House of Commons Journal Volume 7
21 June 1659

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 7: 21 June 1659', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 7: 1651-1660 (1802), pp. 690. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=24793 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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Tuesday, the 21st of June, 1659.

Tythes.

ACCORDING to former Order, the House was this Day resolved into a Grand Committee, touching how a more equal and comfortable Maintenance may be settled for the Ministry, and Satisfaction of the People, than by Tythes.

Mr. Speaker did forbear to take the Chair.
Mr. Solicitor Reynolds was called to the Chair.
Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair.

Mr. Solicitor Reynolds reports from the said Grand Committee, That the said Committee desire the Leave of this House, That they may sit again, upon this Business, on this Day Sevennight.

Ordered, That the House be resolved into a Grand Committee, on this Day Sevennight, upon this Business: And that Mr. Speaker do then forbear to take the Chair.

Impressing Seamen.

Ordered, That the Bill for impressing Mariners be read To-morrow Morning, the first Business: And that Mr. Speaker do put the House in mind thereof.

Hertford Petition.

The House being informed, That many Gentlemen of the County of Hertford were at the Door;

They were called in: And Sir Henry Blunt, one of the Petitioners, being come to the Bar, acquainted Mr. Speaker, That he was come to present the House, with the humble Petition of many Gentlemen of the County of Hertford, and their cordial Affection to your Government; and that none other had signed the same: And delivered a Petition: Which, after the Petitioners were withdrawn, was read; and was intituled, "The humble Petition of divers Freeholders, and other Inhabitants, within the County of Hertford."

The Petitioners were again called in: And Mr. Speaker gave them this Answer:

"Gentlemen,"

"The House have read your Petition, and every Part of it; wherein they find many good Expressions; and, they believe, many good Intentions: And therefore they have commanded me to give you the Thanks of this House: And I do give you the Thanks of this House, accordingly."

Hull Petition.

The House being informed, That divers Gentlemen of Hull were at the Door;

They were called in: and one of the Petitioners, being come to the Bar, said, "I am required to present this humble Representation and Petition, from many, who, through Grace, have been kept sensible of, and mourned for and under, the late Apostasy from the good Old Cause; and who are bound in all Faithfulness, and good Affections, to this Nation; with their humble Desire, That it may be read: And therewith delivered a Writing: Which, after they were withdrawn, was read; and was intituled, "The humble Representation and Petition of many, who, through Grace, have been kept sensible of, and mourned for and under, the late Apostasy from the good Old Cause."

The Question being propounded, That these Gentlemen have Thanks for their good Affections;

The House was divided.
The Yeas went forth.

Sir Henry Vane, Tellers for the Yeas: 28.
Colonel Rich, With the Yeas,
Mr. Weaver, Tellers for the Noes: 23.
Colonel Morley, With the Noes,

So it was Resolved, That these Gentlemen have Thanks for their good Affection.

The Petitioners were again called in: And Mr. Speaker gave them this Answer:

"Gentlemen,"

"The House have read your Petition; and find many Things in it of several Natures; and find many Expressions of your good Affections: and they have commanded me to give you Thanks for your good Affections: And I do give you the Thanks of this House for your good Affections, accordingly."