House of Commons Journal Volume 5
25 March 1647

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 5: 25 March 1647', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 5: 1646-1648 (1802), pp. 123-125. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=25053 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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Die Jovis, 25 Martii, 1647.

Prayers.

Delinquents.

UPON Sir Anthony Irby's Report from the Committee at Goldsmiths Hall;

It is Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Three hundred Sixteen Pounds Thirteen Shillings and Four-pence, of Lewis Lewins, of Heslington in the County of Yorke, Gentleman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, Bearing Arms against the Parliament: His Estate in Fee in Possession is One hundred and Ninety Pounds per Annum; out of which issues Sixty-three Pounds Six Shillings Eight-pence for one Life.

An Ordinance for granting a Pardon unto Lewis Lewins, of Heslington in the County of Yorke, Gentleman, for his Delinquency, and for Discharge of the Sequestration of his Estate, was this Day read; and, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords for their Concurrence.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Three hundred and Forty Pounds, of Thomas Edmonds, of Worsbrough in the County of Yorke, Gentleman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, Residing in the Enemy's Garisons: He rendered in November 1645; and is seised of an Estate in Fee, of the Value of One hundred and One-and-twenty Pounds and Ten Shillings per Annum; in separate Debts, One thousand and Fifteen Pounds; and, in desperate Debts, Five hundred Pounds.

An Ordinance for granting a Pardon unto Thomas Edmonds of Worsbrough in the County of Yorke, Gentleman, for his Delinquency, and for Discharge of the Sequestration of his Estate, was this Day read; and, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords for their Concurrence.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Two thousand Pounds, of Thomas Leigh, of Adlington in the County of Chester, Esquire, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, That he was in Arms against the Parliament: His Estate in Fee is Two hundred Thirtyfive Pounds Nine Shillings Eight-pence per Annum; in old Rents, One hundred Twenty-five Pounds Five Shillings Five-pence per Annum; in Reversion, One thousand One hundred Thirty-four Pounds: Out of which Estate in Reversion, there is issuing One hundred and Thirteen Pounds Eleven Shillings and Four-pence Fee-Farm Rent; and out of the other Estate, in Annuities, One hundred and Seventy Pounds.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Forty Pounds, of Peter Liegh Gentleman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, Being in Arms: His Estate is an Annuity of Forty Pounds per Annum, payable out of the Estate of his Brother, Mr. Thomas Liegh; which is not allowed to his Brother upon his Composition: And therefore, this Forty Pounds is Part of his Brother's Fine of Two thousand Pounds.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Fifty Pounds, of Charles Liegh, of Adlington in the County of Chester, Gentleman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, That he was in Arms against the Parliament; and submitted himself upon the Articles of Farringdon: His Estate for Life is Thirty Pounds per Annum in Possession, and Twenty Pounds per Annum in Reversion.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Sixty Pounds, of Henry Liegh, of Adlington in the County of Chester, Gentleman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, Being in Arms against the Parliament; and his Estate, Forty Pounds per Annum for his Life.

An Ordinance for granting Pardons unto Thomas Liegh, of Adlington in the County of Chester, Esquire, and unto Peter Liegh, Charles Liegh, and Henry Liegh, of the Place and County aforesaid, for their respective Delinquencies, and for Discharge of the Sequestrations of their respective Estates, was this Day read; and, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords, for their Concurrence.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Sixty Pounds, of William Knight, of Hennington in the County of Lincolne, Yeoman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, adhering to the Enemies of the Parliament: His Estate in Fee Thirty Pounds per Annum.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Thirty-four Pounds, of William Bishop, of the City of Lincolne, Mercer, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, That he was in Arms against the Parliament: He hath an Estate of Thirty Pounds per Annum in Reversion; and Four Pounds per Annum for Twelve Years to come.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Two-and-thirty Pounds, of Robert Knight, of Wellingore in the County of Lincolne, Yeoman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, Being in Arms against the Parliament; and his Estate Sixteen Pounds per Annum in Fee.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Sixty Pounds, of Robert Beck, of the City of Lincolne, Woolen-Draper, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, Being in Arms against the Parliament: His Estate in Fee, and Fee Tail, Six-and-twenty Pounds Twelve Shillings per Annum; Fifty Shillings per Annum, for Twenty Years to come, and Three Pounds per Annum, for Fourteen Years to come.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Forty Pounds, of Richard Wethereld, of the City of Lincolne, Gentleman, for a Fine for his Delinquency: His Offence is, Being in Arms against the Parliament: His Estate in Fee Twenty Pounds per Annum.

An Ordinance for granting a Pardon unto William Knight of Hennington in the County of Lincolne, Yeoman; William Bishop, of the City of Lincolne, Mercer; Robert Knight, of Wellingore in the County of Lincolne, Yeoman; Robert Beck, of the City of Lincolne, Woolen Draper; and Rich. Wethereld, of the same, Gentleman; for their respective Delinquencies, and for Discharge of the Sequestrations of their respective Estates; was this Day read; and, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords for their Concurrence.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Sir John Seymour, a Member, of this House, shall have Leave to go into the Country.

Scandalous Pamphlet.

Resolved, &c. That the Serjeant at Arms attending on this House shall have Warrant for Apprehending of all such as are, have been, or shall be, Publishers of a libellous Pamphlet, intituled, "A Warning for all the Counties of England to awake speedily out of their Dreams, and apply themselves to all just Means for the Recovery and Preservation of their Liberties; because of a present Design to expel the most Faithful out of the House of Commons, and to frustrate all the Countries good Elections; that so the Malignant Party may bring the free Commons of England, now, after all their bloody Sufferings, to cruel Thraldom, and make themselves Lords over them."

Ordered, That Colonel Barton, Mr. John Hyde, Mr. John Jekell, Dr. Audlyn, and Mr. Fyge, be desired to give the best Information and Assistance they can to the Serjeant's Deputy, and likewise to the Committee, for the Discovery and Finding-out the Authors, Printers, and Publishers, of a scandalous Pamphlet, intituled, "A Warning for all the Counties of England," &c.

Resolved, &c. That it be referred to the Committee where Colonel Liegh has the Chair, this Afternoon, to examine and inquire, Who were the Authors, Contrivers, Designers, Printers, Publishers, and Venders of a scandalous seditious Pamphlet, intituled, "A Warning Piece for all the Counties of England to awake speedily out of their Dreams, and apply themselves to all just Means for the Recovery and Preservation of their Liberties; because of a present Design to expel the most Faithful out of their House of Commons, and to frustrate all the Countries good Elections; that so the Malignant Party may bring the free Commons of England, now, after all their bloody Sufferings, into cruel Thraldom, and make themselves Lords over them:" And have Power to send for Parties, Witnesses, Papers, Records: And to commit such Persons as they shall find to have a Hand in the said Pamphlet, as Authors, Contrivers, Designers, Publishers, or Venders thereof, if they shall find it fitting: And they are to report their Opinions concerning this Business, with all Speed.

Reports deferred.

Ordered, That on Tuesday next, the Reports from Goldsmiths Hall be made.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Sir John Evelyn of Wiltes, a Member of this House, shall have Leave to go into the Country.

Ordered, That Colonel Morley, a Member of this House, shall have Leave to go into the Country.

Scandalous Pamphlets.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth expect, that the Company of Stationers, London, according to the Powers to them formerly given, do forthwith seize a scandalous Pamphlet, intituled, "A Warning for all the Counties of England, &c. and all other scandalous Pamphlets of like Nature, and suppress the same.

Ordered, That the Serjeant at Arms attending on this House do forthwith seize upon and suppress a scandalous Pamphlet, intituled, "A Warning for all the Counties of England," &c. in all Places where the said Pamphlets are sold in, and Westminster Hall.

Army Affairs.

Mr. Holles reports from the Conference had with the Lords Yesterday, concerning the Army, That the Earl of Manchester read the Matter of this Conference, and delivered it in Writing: The which was first read by the Reporter, and then by the Clerk; and was in hæc veba, viz.

"Gentlemen,

"The Lords have received a Petition from the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons, of the City of London; wherein, as they do seasonably and fully declare their good Affections to the Parliament; together with their fixed Resolutions, carefully to intend the Honour, Security, and Advantage thereof; so they do likewise express a great Sense of their present Pressures, by reason of the Quartering of the Forces commanded by Sir Thomas Fairfax, in those Parts adjoining near to the City: Neither is this resented by them alone; but the County of Essex did, some few Days since, by Petition, make known unto their Lordships the Burdens, and other Mischiefs that was likely to fall upon that County, by the Quartering of great Numbers of the Army upon them, and the rest of the Associated Counties."

"The Lords, having seriously considered these Petitions do find it to be of very ill Consequence to have the Army quartered, either in the Associated Counties, or any Parts adjacent to the City of London."

"First, Because the City of London, being the Place where the Parliament, and all the Courts of Justice, are kept, must of Necessity have a very great Concourse of People, as an Addition to that numerous Body of their own settled Inhabitants."

"If, therefore, this City shall, by the near Quartering of the Army, be deprived of their usual Provisions, and necessary Accommodations, it may give an Occasion to some to break that good Order, and interrupt that Government, which, in all these Times of great Distractions, hath been kept in a settled Quietness; which hath not only been a Security, but an Advantage, to the Parliament."

"And, in this Conjuncture of Time, it may probably increase such Jealousies and Suspicions, as may not suddenly be removed, most. Men looking upon such Actions as these, which prove inconvenient to them, as Designs, rather than Matters of Necessity. And their Lordships express their Fears in this particular, the rather, because they have received divers Informations, That some Persons of the Army, in all Places where they come, do endeavour to disaffect the People to the present established Resolutions of the Parliament."

"They do likewise consider the great Assistance and Advantage that the Parliament hath had from the Eastern Association; they having been faithful unto the Parliament from the first to the last; when divers other, either in Whole or in Part, have deserted and opposed the Parliament in this Cause: These Counties, having been, during these Troubles, the Magazine of Provisions to the City, and other Parts of the Kingdom, do now expect to be furnished from them with these Necessaries, which are not to be had in that Plenty in other Counties, they being much wasted in their Stores of Corn and Cattle: It will therefore prove mischievous in general to the whole Kingdom, if these Counties shall have their Stores exhausted by the Quartering of an Army, which, by a provident and orderly Management and Use, might support themselves, and furnish others."

"Upon the whole Matter thus before them, their Lordships do think it necessary, that the Forces commanded by Sir Thomas Fairfax, shall not quarter within the Associated Counties, or any Parts near adjoining to the City of London: And, seeing likewise, that, by the great Blessing of God upon the Endeavours of the Parliament, and the Successes of their Armies, they now enjoy a Freedom from any Force maintained against them; they do hold it their Duty to do what in them lies, towards the freeing the Kingdom from these Burdens that lie upon them: And therefore they press this, as the most necessary Means, tending to the Ease and Satisfaction of the Kingdom, that a Provision of Money be made for the speedy Paying and Disbanding of our Armies: The way of raising this they leave to you to consider; that so we may give a real and speedy Relief to the distressed Kingdom of Ireland; and keep such a competent Force within ourselves, as may secure our Garisons, and prevent the Designs of such, as, out of their ill Affections, should, at any time, attempt to disturb the Peace and Happiness of the Parliament and Kingdom."

He further reported, That the Earl of Manchester said, That the Lords had commanded him to communicate unto us another Thing, which did much obstruct the Proceedings of their House; That their Messengers, whom they sent upon Messages to the House of Commons, were made to attend so long, sometimes Days, before they could be admitted; which did very much hinder Business; and seemed to be some kind of Reflection upon the House of Peers: That their Lordships had always been careful to maintain all good Correspondency with the House of Commons; and not to do any Thing which might look like a Disrespect towards them: And they did desire and hope to find the like Care and Readiness in the House of Commons, in what concerned their Lordships.

Warwick Castle.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel John Bridges be continued Governor of Warwick Castle.

Red Castle.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Hugh Price be continued Governor of Red Castle.

Prince Elector.

A Message from the Lords, by Serjeant Finch and Sir Edw. * * ;

The Lords have this Morning received a Letter from the Prince his Highness the Prince Elector: And, according to the Contents of the said Letter, the Lords have appointed a Committee of Seven Lords, to go To-morrow to Whitehall, to attend the Prince Elector: And desire this House to appoint a Committee of a proportionable Number, to go To-morrow at Four of Clock: And have appointed Three to be of the Quorum.

The Letter from the Prince Elector, of 24 Martii, 1647, stilo novo, and signed Charles Lodovic, directed to the Earl of Manchester, Speaker of the House of Peers, was read; and was to desire, That, upon some Account he has received from some Agent he sent to the general Treaty at Munster and Osnabrugge, touching some Matters that do very much concern the Protestant Religion through Christendom, and that great Cause maintained by the Parliament, he desires to communicate his Intelligence to such Committee as shall be appointed to receive the same.

A Letter to the same Purpose, from the Prince Elector, was delivered by Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Holles, Sir Henry Vane, Mr. Solicitor, Sir Henry Mildmay, Sir Gregory Norton, Mr. Pierrepoint, Sir Wm. Lewes, Mr. Nath. Fienes, Mr. Holland, Mr. Gerard, Sir Wm. Waller, Sir Rich. Lucy, Colonel Boothe, Sir Benjamin Rudyard;

This Committee, or any Six of them, are appointed to meet, with a proportionable Number of the Lords, to go to the Prince Elector to Whitehall, To-morrow at Four of Clock, according to the Desire of the Prince Elector, in a Letter from his Highness.

Answer returned by the same Messengers; That this House has considered their Lordships Message; and have appointed a Committee of a proportionable Number, to join with a Committee of the Lords, to go to the Prince Elector To-morrow, as is desired.

Garisons.

Mr. Speaker delivered in a Paper, containing the Answer which the Lord Herbert of Cherbury desires to be presented to the House of Commons, touching the Castle of Mountgomery: In which Paper is expressed as followeth; videiicet;

"The Promise I humbly offer to the honourable House of Commons, upon the free Re-delivery of my Castle, according to the Capitulation of 5 Septembris, 1644:"

"1. That I shall put no Man in Authority in my Castle, or so much as admit a Servant into it, whom I either know, or can discover to be ill-affected to the Parliament."

"2. That, if Danger appear of any Attempt against the Castle, I shall give Order to such Persons as I shall principally intrust with my Castle, to advertise the next Parliament Garison, as also the Parliament itself, thereof, as conveniently may be."

It is hereupon Resolved, &c. That the Lord Herbert of Cherbery shall have the Custody of his own Castle, called Montgomery Castle.

Ordered, That it be referred to the Members of both Houses, that are of the Committee of both Kingdoms, to consider of the Services of Colonel Samuell Moore, Governor of Montgomery Castle, What Allowance is fit to be made unto him, in Consideration thereof; and likewise, of my Lord of Cherberie's Desires in his Paper this Day read; and to report their Opinions thereupon to the House, what is fit to be done for my Lord of Cherberie's Satisfaction.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Thomas Glyn be continued Governor of Carmarthen.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Carter be continued Governor of Conway Castle.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Mitton be continued Governor of Anglesey and Beaumaris.

Resolved, &c. That Captain John Poyer, be continued Governor of Pembroke.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Rice Powell be continued Governor of Tenby.

Resolved, &c. That the Garison of Haverford West be disgarisoned and the Outworks slighted, and made untenable.

Resolved, &c. That Carmarthen Castle be disgarisoned, slighted, and made untenable.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Edward Prichard be continued Governor of the Town and Castle of Cardiff.

Resolved, &c. That the Town of Warrington in Lancashire be disgarisoned.

Resolved, &c. That To-morrow Morning, the first Business, the House do proceed in the remaining Part of Garisons: And that, when they come to the Consideration of the Garison of Hereford, that the Report from the Committee of both Kingdoms, concerning the Dispatch of the Forces of that Garison, be made: And that, after the Business of the Garisons shall be dispatched, That the House do proceed in the Consideration of the Horse that are to be kept up in the Kingdom.

Ordered, That the Committee of the Army be ready To-morrow, with the Report of the State of the Army, and of the State of their Arrears, and what Money has been paid them, and what Places are in Arrear unto them, if the House should have Occasion to use it.

Colonel Ven is appointed to take care of this Business.