House of Commons Journal Volume 5
10 August 1647

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 5: 10 August 1647', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 5: 1646-1648 (1802), pp. 270. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=25153 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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Die Martis, 10 Augusti, 1647.

Prayers.

Preacher appointed.

WHEREAS Mr. Tuckney, of Boston, was formerly appointed to preach before the Commons, on the next Day of Publick Humiliation; and hath desired, by reason of his Occasions, to be excused: It is Ordered, That Mr. Woodcock be desired to preach before the Commons on the next Fast Day.

Mr. Wheeler is appointed to acquaint him with this Order, and Desire of this House.

Issue for Irish Service.

Ordered, That the Sum of Five-and-twenty thousand Pounds, appointed by former Orders to be sent over in Specie, by the Treasurer at Wars, into Ireland, and is sithence carried into the Tower of London, be forthwith delivered by those in whose Custody it now remains, unto the Treasurer at Wars, or his Deputy; to be transported into Ireland, and issued and paid according to the former Orders of both Houses, made in that behalf.

The Lords Concurrence to be desired herein.

Invalid Soldiers.

An Ordinance for Relief of maimed Soldiers, by Assessment to be made by the Justices of Peace, in the several Parishes and Chapelries of this Kingdom, in Explanation of a former Ordinance made to that Purpose in May last, was this Day read; and, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords for their Concurrence.

Great Seal.

An Ordinance for continuing and appointing Edward Earl of Manchester Speaker of the House of Peers pro tempore, and William Lenthall Esquire, Speaker of the House of Commons, Commissioners for the Great Seal of England, until the Ending of the last Ordinance whereby they were appointed or continued, and for One Month longer after the Ending of the said former Ordinance, was this Day read; and, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords, for their Concurrence.

Message to Lords.

Sir John Temple carried to the Lords, for their Concurrence, the Ordinance for continuing the Great Seal in the Custody of the Earl of Manchester and William Lenthall Esquire, Speaker of the House of Commons, for a Month longer, after the Determination of the last Ordinance: The Order for Relief of maimed Soldiers in the several Counties: The Order for Payment of the Sum of Five-and-twenty thousand Pounds, formerly ordered for Ireland, to the Treasurer at Wars, or his Deputy, to be transported into Ireland, according to the former Orders in that behalf made.

Message from Lords.

A Message from the Lords, by Mr. Page and Dr. Aylett;

The Lords have received a Letter from Sir Thomas Fairfax; together with a Declaration: It hath been read in their House; and they have agreed to it; and desire your Concurrence.

The Lords desire that both the Sermons that are appointed to be in the Abbey Church on Thursday next, may be in the Forenoon: The First to begin at Nine of the Clock; and the Second to succeed it, without Intermission: To which they desire your Concurrence.

And the Lords did desire, That the Committees of both Houses, appointed to examine the Violence and Force lately offered to the Parliament, might meet Yesterday: But it was so late, that they could not deliver it till now.

Army Declaration.

The Letter from Sir Thomas Fairfax was read: And was from Colebrooke, 3 Augusti 1647; and directed to the Earl of Manchester, Speaker of the House of Peers, and William Lenthall Esquire, Speaker of the House of Commons.

The Declaration was read: And was intituled, A Declaration of his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax, and his Council of War, on the Behalf of themselves, and the whole Army, shewing the Grounds of their present Advance towards the City of London.

Answer from Lords.

Sir John Temple brings Answer, That the Lords do agree to the Three Orders, or Ordinances, carried by him to them.