House of Commons Journal Volume 6
2 July 1650

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 6: 2 July 1650', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 6: 1648-1651 (1802), pp. 434-436. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=25939 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Die Martis, 2 Julii, 1650.

Prayers.

Sir Charles Kemeys.

THE humble Petition of Sir Charles Kemeys, was this Day read.

The Question being propounded, That it be referred to the Commissioners of Goldsmiths Hall, to consider of this Petition, and examine the Truth of the Particulars therein suggested: And to state the Business; and report it to the House;

The Question being put, That this Question be now put;

It passed with the Affirmative.

And the main Question being put;

It was Resolved, That it be referred to the Commissioners of Goldsmiths Hall, to consider of this Petition; and examine the Truth of the Particulars therein suggested; and to state the Business; and report it to the House.

Messenger from Scotland.

Sir Henry Mildmay reports from the Council of State; "That a Messenger, calling himself Colonel James Gray, a Scott, being brought before the Council, and examined from whom he came, and by what Warrant; and what Letters he brought with him, and to whom: Answered, He came from the Parliament of Scotland, with Letters to the Parliament of England, and the Lord General: And, being twice demanded, whether he had any other Letters; expresly denied, He had any other; yet, upon a Third Demand, consessed he brought other Letters; but said, They were not of Consequence, and were in his Portmanteau: Produced a Pass from the President of the Parliament of Scotland, intimating his Repair to the City of London, about the Affairs of the Publick: And the Letter, by him pretended to the Parliament of England, bearing this Inscription: "For the honourable Wm. Lenthall Esquire, Speaker of the House of Commons in England."

"The Council, taking Consideration thereof, and of the Order of Parliament of the Twenty-sixth of this Instant, referring it to this Council, for preventing and stopping all Correspondency, Intelligence, and Commerce, between England and Scotland, thought fit the said Messenger should be continued in Custody of their Serjeant with all fitting Accommodation of Lodging and Diet, and with Restraint of any Person to converse with him, excepting his Keepers: And have ordered the Seizure and Perusal of his Papers: And the same to be inventoried and secured; And the whole Matter, with the printed Paper annexed, found in the Portmanteau, to be reported to the Parliament, for their further Pleasure and Direction herein.

A Letter from Edinburgh, signed "Burleigh, Præses Parliament'," of the Day of , to the Lord Fairfax, was this Day read.

Ordered, That it be referred to the Council of State, to send Colonel James Grey back to the Lord General, in safe Custody: And that the Manner of this Dispatch be referred to the Council of State, to do therein as they shall think fit.

Resolved, That the Parliament doth approve of the Proceedings of the Council of State against Colonel James Grey.

Army.

Colonel Jones reports from the Council of State; "That the Council finds it necessary, for the better Preserving of these Parts, Three Troops of Dragoons should be received into the Establishment for Three Months: And that Order may be given to the Committee of the Army, for the putting of them into the Establishment, and for the Paying of them."

Resolved, That Three Troops of Dragoons, each consisting of One hundred, be received into the Establishment for the Space of Three Months, for the Safety of these Parts: And that the Committee of the Army be authorized and required to take care for the Payment of them accordingly.

Government of Ireland.

Sir Wm. Armyn reports from the Council of State;

"That the Council, in pursuance of their Order of the Twenty-sixth present, concerning the Government of Ireland, have taken the same into their Consideration; and are thereupon of Opinion, That it is not convenient, as Affairs now stand, that the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland should, at present, lay down his Commission of Lieutenant of Ireland: And that therefore the Parliament will be pleased to approve of that Commission, which the said Lord Lieutenant hath given to the Lord President of Mounster to be his Deputy, in his Absence; and that some fit Persons may be commissionated by the Parliament to be assisting to the Lord Deputy, in Managing, and right Ordering, of the Civil Affairs there, to the best Advantage of the Commonwealth."

"That Colonel Edmund Ludlow, a Member of Parliament, and of this Council, be appointed a Commissioner for the Affairs of Ireland aforesaid, and Lieutenant General of the Horse in Ireland."

"That Colonel John Jones, another Member of Parliament, and of this Council, be one other of the said Commissioners appointed for the Service afore-mentioned: And Sir Wm. Armyne is appointed to make this Report."

Resolved, That the Parliament doth approve of the Commission which the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland hath given to the Lord President of Munster, to be his Deputy in his Absence.

Resolved, That Colonel Edmond Ludlow Esquire, a Member of Parliament, be appointed one of the Commissioners for the Affairs of Ireland, and Lieutenant General of the Horse in Ireland.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel John Jones, a Member of Parliament, be one other of the Commissioners appointed for the Affairs of Ireland.

Resolved, That Commissioners be sent into Ireland, to take Care of the Affairs there; to act according to such Instructions, as shall be given them by the Parliament.

Resolved, That it be referred to the Council of State, to consider of some other fit Persons to be joined with Colonel Ludlow and Colonel John Jones, to be Commissioners into Ireland for the Affairs of Ireland; and to consider of and prepare Instructions for those Commissioners; and report the same to the House.

Col. Fenwick.

Sir Wm. Armyn reports from the Council of State, The Petition of Lieutenant Colonel John Fenwick; and that the House be desired to do something for his Relief; viz.

"That the Petition of Lieutenant Colonel John Fenwick be reported to the House by Sir Wm. Armyn; and they desired to do something for his Relief and Subsistence; and particularly, if the House shall so think fit, by giving unto the Son of the said Lieutenant Colonel the Government of the Hospital of Sherborne in the County of Duresme, for his Life, and after the Life of his Father."

Resolved, That the Mastership and Government of the Hospital of Sherborne in the County of Duresme be settled upon Lieutenant Colonel John Fenwick, for his Life; and that the Reversion, after his Decease, be settled upon John Fenwick, Son of the said Colonel John Fenwick, during his natural Life: And that Mr. Attorney General do prepare a Patent for passing the said Office to them, accordingly: And the Lords Commissioners for the Great Seal of England be authorized and required to pass the said Patent, under the Great Seal of England, accordingly.

Letter read.

A Letter from the Lord General, from Ware, of the Twenty-ninth of June, was this Day read.

Resolved, * * * *

Ly. Fairefax.

Ordered, That the Lady Fairefax her Petition be read To-morrow Morning, the first Business, after Mr. Speaker takes the Chair.

Hill's Claims.

Sir Wm. Armyn reports from the Council of State;

THAT the Council, having taken into Consideration the Petition of Colonel Arthur Hill, with all Proofs; Papers, and Certificates, that concern the same, according to an Order of the House, dated the Ninth of July 1649, find,

1. That by Certificate, bearing Date the One-and-twentieth of March 1642, and otherwise, that there was then bought by Colonel Hill, and delivered in to the Stores at Carickfergus, Arms, Ammunition, and Ordnance, to the Value of One thousand Three hundred and Twenty Pounds Thirteen Shillings and Nine-pence; for Payment of which Sum, and the Interest, ever since it was due, he stands engaged.

Also they find, by the Certificates, dated the Three-and-twentieth of May 1642, the Eighth of June, and Eleventh of October 1644, that the said Colonel disbursed, for the Provision of his own Regiment when the Stores were empty, the Sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Eighty Pounds Four Shillings.

In regard whereof the Council are of Opinion, That, in Satisfaction of the said Two Sums of One thousand Three hundred and Twenty Pounds Thirteen Shillings and Nine-pence, and One thousand Nine hundred and Eighty Pounds and Four Shillings, due unto him long since, as aforesaid, it be reported to the House, that he be paid the said Two Sums of One thousand Three hundred and Twenty Pounds Thirteen Shillings and Ninepence, and One thousand Nine hundred and Eighty Pounds and Four Shillings, out of the Revenues, or other the Profits, of forfeited Lands in Ireland; with the Interest already due, and growing due, until the same be satisfied: And that the Thousand Pounds, paid to the said Colonel, upon Account, by Two Orders of the House; the one, dated Two-and-twentieth July 1648; and the other, dated the Ninth of July 1649; be accounted as paid in part of Satisfaction of the said Two Sums, and the Interest already due, as aforesaid.

2. It appears, that the Earl of Antrim owes Colonel Hill, by Statute Staple, dated the Fourth of January 1638, the Sum of Five thousand Five hundred and Sixty-six Pounds, payable in December 1639; That the Interest thereof is ever since due, as appears by Account under the said Earl's Hand, dated February 1640, the Rebellion breaking out shortly after; and that the Profits of the said Earl's Estate ever since the War, being now upwards of Seven Years, was received by the Earl of Arguile's Regiment, towards their Maintenance; by reason whereof the said Colonel Hill could not, to his very great Prejudice, reap the Benefit that the Laws afford in such Cases, for the Recovery of the said Debts.

In regard whereof, and also that the said Colonel Hill hath made Affidavit before Mr. Page, one of the Masters of Chancery, that the said Debt and Interest is due unto him as aforesaid the Council are of Opinion, That the said Colonel, his Executors and Assigns, be satisfied the said Five thousand Five hundred and Sixty-six Pounds, due by Statute Staple, as aforesaid, out of the Sequestrations of such Estates in Ireland as are liable to the said Statute; together with the Interest already due, and which shall grow due, until the same be paid: And that the House be moved, to give Order to the Lord Lieutenant to the Purposes aforesaid.

That it be reported to the House, That the Arrears of Colonel Hill may be stated: And that some Course may be taken for the Satisfaction thereof."

Resolved, That the several Sums of One thousand Three hundred and Twenty Pounds Nineteen Shillings and Nine-pence, and One thousand Nine hundred and Eighty Pounds Four Shillings, be paid to Colonel Arthur Hill, out of the Profits of forfeited Lands in Ireland; the Sum of One thousand Pounds, by him already received, being abated and deducted.

Ordered, That the said Colonel Arthur Hill be, and is hereby, impowered and authorized to extend the Lands now under Sequestration, which are liable to his Statute Staple, dated 4 Januarii 1638, entered into by the Earl of Antrim, for the Payment of Five thousand Five hundred Sixty-six Pounds in December 1639, until his just Debt and Damages be satisfied: And that the Sequestrators, and all others whom it doth or may concern, do permit and suffer him to extend the said Lands, and take the Profits thereof, accordingly.

Resolved, That Five thousand Pounds be paid to Colonel Arthur Hill, in Recompence of his eminent Service, in reference to Ireland, and Satisfaction of all Arrears and Pretensions of other Demands whatsoever, out of the Arrears of the Assessment for Ireland.