House of Commons Journal Volume 8
15 June 1660

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 8: 15 June 1660', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 8: 1660-1667 (1802), pp. 64-65. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=26216 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Friday, June 15th, 1660.

Excise and Customs.

ORDERED, That ColonelBirchdo bring in two Bills To-morrow Morning; the one for continuing the Revenue of the Excise; the other for continuing the Revenue of the Customs, for the Space of Six Months, to commence from the 24th of June next.

Pennington surrenders.

Mr. Speaker acquainted the House, that Alderman Pennington, who sat in Judgment at the Trial of the late King's Majesty, hath rendered himself to him, in pursuance of his Majesty's Proclamation; and that he hath committed him to the Charge and Custody of the Serjeant at Arms, till the Pleasure of this House be declared therein.

Ordered, That this House doth approve of the Commitment of the said Alderman Pennington, as aforesaid.

Pierre's Nat.

A Bill for naturalizing Peter de la Pierre, alias Peters, and John de la Pierre, alias Peters, was read the First time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be read the Second time To-morrow Morning.

Privilege-Words against a Member.

Mr. Pryn reports from the Committee, the Examinations taken in the Case of Colonel Wm. White, a Member of this House, concerning Words reported to be spoken by Colonel White, concerning the late King's Death; viz. The Examinations of Wm. Garrard, Robert Hatton, and John Crey; all which were read, and are in these Words; viz.

June 2d, 1660.

Mr. Wm. Garrard, being examined by this Committee, saith, that he never heard Colonel White use the Words charged against him; viz. "That if there wanted one to cut off the King's Head, he would cut it off himself," nor any Words to the like Effect: That on Sunday last, he meeting with Mr. Clapham, at one Hooke's House in Holbourn, and having several Discourses touching these Times, and speaking of Colonel White, he told Mr. Clapham he heard it was reported abroad, that Colonel White should say, presently after the King's Death, "that if there wanted one to cut off the King's Head, he would cut it off himself," or to that Effect; but he hoped he was now of another Mind: That he heard this Report several Times in several Companies; but remembers not particularly, who it was that reported it; and that one Robert Hatton, a Draper in Paul's Church Yard, was the first who told him he heard such a Report; but from what Person he heard it, he knows it not, nor at what Time, and Place, the said Report was made by Mr. Hatton; and he saith, that he heard Mr. Robert Hatton say, the Words were spoken at Sir Edward Barkham's Table, in Answer upon some Difference between Mr. Deane and Colonel White; and more than this he remembreth not; but only, that there was Company, about three or four, with Mr. Clapham on Sunday last, when he used these Words.

Wm. Garrard.

June 11th, 1660.

Robert Hatton, of London, Draper, being examined before this Committee, saith, that, he being in Company with Mr. Christopher Clapham, a Member of this House, on the 27th of May last, at the Cradle in Holbourn, heard Mr. Wm. Garrard say, that he heard Mr. White say, "That if the King had wanted a Headsman, he would have been the Man;" and that he used the said Words at Sir Edward Barkham's Table; whereupon the said Mr. Clapham demanded of him, whether he would justify the said Words, or no, if he complained of them; for that he had been once baffled in the House, upon a Business of the like Nature? Whereupon the said Wm. Garrard replied, that he would justify the said Words; but this Examinant believeth the said Wm. Garrard was so distempered, when he used these Words, with Passion, through Joy of the King's Coming in, or Drink, that he did not then understand well what he said; and that Mr. Clapham thereupon desired this Examinant to bear Witness of these Words; and that he reproving the said Garrard for accusing his Kindred, he uttered Words to this Effect; that he loved his King so well, that he would not conceal any Truth, out of Respect to any of his Kindred. Rob. Hatton.

John Craye, of Ludgate Hill, London, Factor, saith, that he was at the Cradle in Holbourn, on the 27th of May last, in Mr. Christopher Clapham's Company, and others, where he heard Mr. Wm. Garrard say, that Mr. White (one to whom he was related) said, "That if the King wanted a Headsman (meaning the late King as he supposeth) he would be the Man;" whereupon Mr. Clapham demanded of the said Garrard, whether he would justify these Words? whereunto he replied, he would; but he conceiveth, when he used these Words, he was distempered with Drink, or with Joy. John Craye.

Resolved, That this House doth declare, That Colonel Wm. White is clear from the false Aspersion cast upon him, as aforesaid; and that he is not in the least guilty thereof.

Person discharged.

Ordered, That Wm. Garrard, who stands committed to the Serjeant at Arms attending this House, be forthwith discharged, and set at Liberty.

Penruddock's Petition.

The humble Petition of Arundell Penruddock, Widow, late Wife of John Penruddock Esquire, deceased, was read.

Proceedings against the Regicides.

The Question being propounded, That Wm. Butler, one of the late Major Generals, shall be one of the Twenty Persons to be excepted out of the Act of General Pardon and Oblivion, for and in respect only of such Pains, Penalties, and Forfeitures, (not extending to Life) as shall be thought fit to be inflicted on him, by another Act intended to be hereafter passed for that Purpose;

And the Question being put, That this Question be now put;

The House was divided:

And the Noes went forth.

Mr. Milborne, Tellers for the Noes: 133.
Mr. Palmer, With the Noes,
Sir John Temple, Tellers for the Yeas: 162.
Sir Ralph Knight, With the Yeas,

And so it passed in the Affirmative:

And the main Question being put;

The House was divided:

And the Yeas went forth.

Sir Edward Massey, Tellers for the Yeas: 131.
Sir John Bowyer, With the Yeas,
Sir Henry Yelverton, Tellers for the Noes: 160.
Colonel King, With the Noes,

And so it passed in the Negative.

Resolved, That John Blackwell, of Moreclack, shall be one of the Twenty Persons, to be excepted out of the Act of General Pardon and Oblivion, for and in respect only of such Pains, Penalties, and Forfeitures, (not extending to Life) as shall be thought fit to be inflicted on him by another Act, intended to be hereafter passed for that Purpose.