House of Commons Journal Volume 9
5 June 1675

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 9: 5 June 1675', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 9: 1667-1687 (1802), pp. 354-355. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=27470 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Sabbati, 5 die Junii, 1675.

Prayers.

Message from the King about Adjournment.

MR. Secretary Coventry acquaints the House, That he had Command from His Majesty, to let the House know, that it was His Majesty's Desire, that the House would adjourn till Four of the Clock in the Afternoon; and had sent a Message to the Lords, to adjourn to that Time: And that His Majesty had commanded both Houses to attend Him then at the Banqueting House in Whitehall.

Serjeant at Arms.

A Debate arising, touching the Removing John Topham Esquire, Serjeant at Arms in Ordinary, who attended the House Yesterday;

Resolved, &c. That the further Debate of the Matter, touching Mr. Topham Serjeant at Arms, who attended the House Yesterday, be adjourned till Five of the Clock this Afternoon.

And then the House adjourned till Four of the Clock in the Afternoon.

Post Meridiem.

The King attended.

THE House being met, Mr. Speaker and the House went to attend His Majesty at Whitehall.

Mr. Speaker, with the House, returned from Whitehall.

Mr. Speaker reports, That in Obedience to his Majesty's Commands, he had attended his Majesty; and that His Majesty, to prevent Mistakes, had delivered in Writing what he did declare to both Houses: Which Mr. Speaker read twice: And the same is as followeth, viz.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

The King's Speech.

YOU may remember, that at the Meeting of this Sessions I told you, no Endeavours would be wanting to make the Continuance of this Parliament unpracticable: I am sorry that Experience hath so quickly shewed you the Truth of what I then said: But I hope you are all convinced, that the Intent of all this, in the Contrivers, is to procure a Dissolution. I confess, I look upon it as a most malicious Design of those who are Enemies to Me and the Church of England; and, were the Contrivers known, I should not doubt but the Dislike of their Practices would alone be a Means of bringing the Houses to a good Understanding: But since I cannot prescribe any Way how to arrive at the Discovery of it, I must tell you plainly My Opinion, That the Means of coming to any Composure betwixt yourselves, cannot be without admitting of such full Conferences as either convince one another by the Reasons then offered; or enable Me to judge rightly of the Differences, when all hath been said upon both Sides, which the Matter will afford: For I am not to suffer these Differences to grow to Disorders in the whole Kingdom, if I can prevent it; and I am sure, My Judgment shall always be impartial between My Two Houses of Parliament.

But I must let you know, that whilst you are in Debate about your Privileges, I will not suffer My own to be invaded.

I have nothing more to say at this Time, but to desire, as I did, when we met first, that you would yet consider, and not suffer ill Mens Designs to hinder this Sessions from a happy Conclusion.

Thanks for Speech.

Resolved, Nemine contradicente, That the humble Thanks of this House be returned to his Majesty, for the gracious Expressions in his Speech, this Day made to both the Houses of Parliament: And such Members of this House as are of His Majesty's Privy Council, are desired to present the humble Thanks of this House to His Majesty.

Resolution that no Member has contrived the Disputes between the two Houses.

The Question being propounded, That it doth not appear to this House, that any Member thereof hath either contrived or promoted the Difference between the Two Houses of Parliament; or, in asserting the Rights of the Commons of England, and the Privilege of this House, to have done any thing inconsistent with his Duty, or the Trust reposed in him.

The Question being put, That the Word "appear" do stand in the Question;

The House divided.

The Yeas go out.

Tellers, Sir John Cotton, For the Yeas, 171.
Mr. Collingwood,
Tellers, Lord O'Brian, For the Noes, 104.
Sir Richard Temple,

And so it was resolved in the Affirmative.

Resolved, &c. That it doth not appear to this House, that any Member thereof hath either contrived or promoted the Difference between the Two Houses of Parliament; or, in asserting the Rights of the Commons of England, and the Privilege of this House, to have done any thing inconsistent with his Duty, or the Trust reposed in him.

Serjeant at Arms.

Resolved, That the adjourned Debate, touching Mr. Topham Serjeant at Arms, who attended the House Yesterday, be taken up on Monday Morning next, at Ten of the Clock.

And then the House adjourned till Monday Morning, Eight of the Clock.