House of Lords Journal Volume 2
31 May 1614

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History of Parliament Trust

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 2: 31 May 1614', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 2: 1578-1614 (1767-1830), pp. 711-713. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=28672 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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DIE Martis, videlicet, 3I Maii:

p. Archiepus. Cant.
p. Archiepus. Ebor.
p. Epus. London.
p. Epus. Dunelm.
p. Epus. Winton.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Carliol.
p. Epus. Exon.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Bangor.
p. Epus. Peterburgh.
p. Epus. Landaven.
Epus. Hereford.
Epus. Norwicen.
p. Epus. Bristoll.
Epus. Oxon.
p. Epus. Assaphen.
p. Epus. Cestren.
p. Epus. Elien.
p. Epus. Lincoln.
p. Epus. Wigorn.
p. Epus. Glocestren.
p. Epus. Bathon. et Wellen.
p. Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Cicestren.
p. Epus. Coven. et Lichfeild.
p. Ds. Ellesmere, Cancellar. Angliæ.
Comes Northton, Ds. Custos Privati Sigilli.
Marchio Winton.
Comes Oxon, Magnus Camerar.
p. Comes Nottingham, Magnus Admirall. et Senescall.
p. Comes Suffolke, Camer. Hospitii.
Comes Arundell.
p. Comes Salop.
Comes Kancie.
p. Comes Derby.
p. Comes Wigorn.
p. Comes Rutland.
p. Comes Cumbrie.
Comes Sussex.
p. Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Bathon.
p. Comes South'ton.
Comes Bedford.
p. Comes Pembroke.
p. Comes Hertford.
p. Comes Essex.
Comes Lincoln.
p. Comes Dorsett.
p. Comes Sarum.
Comes Exon.
p. Comes Mountgomery.
p. Comes Richmond.
p. Comes Somersett.
Vicecomes Mountagu.
p. Vicecomes Lisle.
Ds. Bergavenny.
Ds. Audeley.
p. Ds. Zouch.
p. Ds. Willughby de Eresby.
p. Ds. Lawarr.
p. Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Berkley.
Ds. Morley.
Ds. Clinton.
p. Ds. Stafford.
p. Ds. Scroope.
p. Ds. Dudley.
Ds. Stourton.
Ds. Herbert.
p. Ds. Darcy et Menell.
p. Ds. Mountegle.
Ds. Sandes.
p. Ds. Windsor.
Dt. Wentworth.
p. Ds. Evre.
p. Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Riche.
p. Ds. Willughby de Parham.
Ds. Sheffeild.
p. Ds. Pagett.
Ds. Darcy de Chich.
p. Ds. Howard de Effingham.
p. Ds. North.
p. Ds. Chandos.
p. Ds. Hunsdon.
p. Ds. St. John.
p. Ds. Compton.
Ds. Norris.
p. Ds. Howard de Walden.
p. Ds. Knolles.
p. Ds. Wotton.
p. Ds. Russell.
Ds. Gray de Groby.
p. Ds. Peter.
p. Ds. Danvers.
Ds. Gerard.
p. Ds. Spencer.
p. Ds. Saie.
p. Ds. Denny.
p. Ds. Stanhope.
Ds. Carew.
Ds. Arundell.
p. Ds. Cavendish.
p. Ds. Knyvett.
Ds. Clifton.

Engrossing Sheep Skins, &c.

HODIE 1a vice lecta est Billa, An Act against forestalling and engrossing of Sheep Skins, Lamb Skins, Deer Skins of all Kinds, Goat and Kids Skins, and for Relief of many Poor Tradesmen.

Establishing an Almshouse, Free School, &c. at Monmouth by Wm. Jones.

The Bill, intituled, An Act to confirm and enable the Erection and Establishment of an Almshouse, a Free Grammar School, and a Preacher, in the Town of Monmoth, intended to be done and performed by the Master and Four Wardens of the Fraternity of the Art or Mystery of Haberdashers in the City of London, at the only Costs and Charges of William Jones, Merchant Adventurer, a Member of the said Fraternity, and now resident at Hamborough, in the Parts beyond the Seas, was this Day delivered into the House, by the Earl of Woorcester, first of the Committees, who signified, That the Committees, having considered of the said Bill, thought the same to be very good, and to deserve all Favour and Furtherance; howbeit they conceived, that somewhat might well be added thereunto: Yet, rather than any Interruption or Stay should be given to so good a Work, they thought good to take their Word that do follow the Business, that they will provide, by their Private Statutes and Ordinances, for such Things as their Lordships the Committees thought meet to be added to the said Bill; to which Opinion the Lords generally agreed, and thereupon

Ditto. Expedit.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, An Act to confirm and enable the Erection and Establishment of an Almshouse, a Free Grammar School, and a Preacher, in the Town of Monmoth, intended to be done and performed by the Master and four Wardens of the Fraternity of the Art or Mystery of Haberdashers, in the City of London, at the only Costs and Charges of William Jones, Merchant Adventurer, a Member of that Fraternity, and now resident at Hamborough, in the Parts beyond the Seas.

Manor of Paineswick. Expedit.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, An Act for the Confirmation of a Decree in Chancery, made by the Consent of the Lord of the Manor of Paineswick, in the County of Glocester, and the Customary Tenants of the same Manor.

Yew's Lands for Payment of his Debts.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, An Act for the enabling of John Yewe, Clothier, to make Sale of certain Lands, for the Payment of his Debts.

Assuring Somerscal's Portion.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, An Act for the assuring of Eight Hundred and Fourscore Pounds, being the Portion and Marriage Money of Judith Somerscalls, Wife of Daniell Somerscalls, and Daughter of Adam Sutcliffe, Gentleman, deceased, out of such Lands as were heretofore sold and assigned for Payment of the same.

E. of Richmond's Privilege.

Sir David Wood's Arrest.

Memorandum, That this Day Sir David Wood, Servant to the Earl of Richmond, was brought unto the Bar in this House, by the Bailiff of the Liberty of the Dean and Chapter of the Collegiate Church of St. Peter of Westm. with a Return of the said Bailiff on the Writ of Habeas corpus, for the bringing thither of the said Prisoner; which Writ and Return were presently read in the House by the Clerk of the Parliament; whereupon, because it appeared that the said Sir David Wood was taken and imprisoned, contrary to the Honour and Privilege of this House, he was therefore, by Order of the Court, set at Liberty, and discharged of the said Arrest; and forasmuch as the said Bailiff of the Dean and Chapter aforesaid alledged, that he was ignorant, and knew not Sir David Wood to be privileged, or to serve any Peer of this Realm, he was therefore discharged of any further Attendance.

Ld. Compton's Privilege.

Taylor's Arrest.

This Day Richard Taylor, Servant to the Lord Compton, was from Ludgate brought into this Court, by the Sheriffs of London and Mid. according to a Writ of Habeas corpus to the said Sheriffs, by a Warrant of this House in that Behalf directed; whereupon, because it appeared that the said Taylor was arrested, and taken in Execution, contrary to the Honour and Privilege of this House, he was set at Liberty, and discharged of the said Arrest; and for that Peirson, at whose Suit the said Taylor was arrested, protested that he, at the Time of the said Arrest, did not know that Taylor did serve any Lord of this House; and Tailor confessing that himself, neither at that Time nor in Three Days after, did alledge his Attendance of the said Lord, therefore Peirson and others offending in the Cause were discharged of further Attendance in that Behalf.

Message from the Commons, concerning the Answer they received from the Lords, touching their Complaint against the Bp. of Lincoln.

Message from the Lower House, by Sir Roger Owen and others, etc.

That the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the Commons House of Parliament, having, in Answer of their Complaint against the Lord Bishop of Lincolne, received from the Lords of this House a Message to this Effect: videlicet, That their Lordships would take it very tenderly, that any unworthy Aspersion should be laid on them of that House, whom their Lordships so much respect, and with whom they desire to hold all good Correspondence and Agreement; and having perfectly remembered the full Effect of the Message sent Yesterday from the Lords unto that House, wherein he omitted few or no material Words, he proceeded to deliver the Message committed to him in this Manner: videlicet, That, though the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the Commons House of Parliament, do not take common and public Fame to be a sufficient Ground, or Proof, by a legal and ordinary Course of Justice to proceed against any Man, yet they hold it enough to induce the Lords of this House to take the Matter into Consideration; and, albeit they did not set down the Words in particular, yet was the Matter, as they conceive, sufficiently laid down, when in Effect they said, that the Lord Bishop of Lincolne, in this House, to dissuade the Lords from Conference with them touching Impositions, termed the Prerogative, etc. a Noli me tangere, insmuating that the Taking of the Oath of Supremacy and Oath of Allegiance do restrain a Man from Treaty of that Business; also that he doubted, in the Conference, would be used, or spoken some undutiful and seditious Words, not fit for their Lordships to hear; or Words to the like or worse Effect: That now the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the Commons House, do desire the Lords, if those Words were not spoken, so to signify to that House; otherwise, if they were used, then they hope their Lordships will do as they promised: Lastly, from that House, he further said, That they know not what other Course they could have taken to bring the Matter to Examination, nor otherwise, how any undutiful Speech, which may be uttered in this House, or in theirs, can be called in Question.

The said Sir Roger Owen, being by the Lord Chancellor demanded, whether he had in Writing the Message so as aforesaid by him delivered, answered negatively.

Answer.

Answer:

That the Lords, having heard the Message which hath been delivered to them from the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the Commons House, will presently enter into Consideration thereof, as the Shortness of Time will permit, and will return them Answer, if they can, before they rise, or otherwise will send them Word, they cannot. And afterwards returned unto the Lower House, by Mr. Doctor Amie and Mr. Doctor Ridley, this further Answer: videlicet,

That the Lords, having received from the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the Commons House of Parliament, a Second Message, touching the Complaint against the Lord Bishop of Lincoln, and thereupon entering into Consideration of the Business, the said Lord Bishop did humbly entreat that he might be heard to expound himself; which being granted unto him, he did make solemn Protestation, upon his Salvation, that he did not speak any Thing with any evil Intention to that House, which he doth with all his Heart duly respect and highly esteem; expressing, with many Tears, his Sorrow that his Words were so misconceived and strained further than he ever meant. Which submissive and ingenuous Behaving of himself gave Satisfaction to their Lordships, that, howsoever the Words might found, his Intention was not as it hath been taken; and their Lordships do assure the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the Commons House, that, if they had conceived the Lord Bishop's Words to have been spoken or meant to cast any Aspersion of Sedition or Undutifulness upon that House (as it seemeth Report hath been carried to them), their Lordships would forthwith have proceeded to the Censuring and Punishing thereof with all Severity. Nevertheless, their Lordships think fit to signify, That, although they have been careful at this Time to give them Contentment, for the better expediting of His Majesty's Business, and to retain all good Correspondence with them, yet their Lordships are of Opinion, That hereafter no Member of their House ought to be called in Question, when there is no other Ground thereof but public and common Fame only.

Conference requested on the Bill for punishing the Abuse of the Sabbath.

Further, the Messengers last named did, as Part of their Message, say unto the Lower House, That the Lords do desire a Conference to be, between Committees of this House and the like of that House, touching the Bill of the Sabbath Day; that the Number for the Lords should be Twenty-five; the Place the Painted Chamber, the Time Saturday Morning at Eight of the Clock, if it may stand with the Occasions of that House. Which Motion of Conference was by the Lower House accepted; who appointed to send Fifty Committees accordingly, at the Time nominated for that Service; whereupon the Lords appointed the Committee which before have met on this Case, being in Number Twenty-four, to meet now also with them of the Lower House, and unto them added the Lord Archbishop of Canterb.

Bp. of Lincoln explains himself in regard to the Speech complained of by the Commons.

Memorandum, After the former of the Two Answers abovementioned was delivered, the Lord Bishop of Lincolne, being by the Lords admitted to speak for himself, did express, in Terms of great Passion, much Grief that his Words had been misconstrued and strained further than he ever meant; and that, by Occasion of his Speech, their Lordships had been troubled, and the Lower House taken Offence, whom he solemnly protested he did duly respect, and highly esteem; and vowed that he did not speak any Thing with any evil Intention to that House, which gave to their Lordships good Satisfaction; whereupon, by common Consent, the Lords, as a general Committee (without special Words to adjourn the Court), did immedately enter into Consideration what further Answer were fit to be sent to the Lower House; and, after some small Time spent therein, did refer the same to the Lord Archbishop of Cant. the Lord Chancellor, the Earl of South'ton, and the Lord Chandois, who conceived the Answer, last above set down; which being allowed by the general Committee, was forthwith presented, and read to their Lordships sitting in full Court, and by them, so agreed and resolved on, was sent to the Lower House as aforesaid.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius continuavit præfens Parliamentum usque in diem Sabbati, 4m Junii, hora 9a.