House of Commons Journal Volume 10
14 February 1693

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 10: 14 February 1693', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 10: 1688-1693 (1802), pp. 812-814. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=29312 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Martis, 14die Februarii ; 5° Gulielmi et Mariæ.

Prayers.

Salwerp Navigation.

A BILL for making the River of Salwerp, in the County of Worcester, and Brooks adjoining, navigable, was read the Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to Sir John Packington, Mr. Foley, Mr. Waller, Sir Richard Hart, Mr. Dryden, Mr. Bowyer, Mr. Sandford, Mr. Hutchinson, Mr. Goldwell, Mr. Freeman, Mr. Lutterell, Mr. England, Lord Bellamont, Mr. Henly, Mr. Speke, Mr. Cook, Mr. Burridge, Sir Robert Cotton, Colonel Deane, Sir Walt. Young, Mr. Colt, Mr. Slater, Mr. Boscowen, Mr. Palmes, Mr. Hawtry, Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Arnold, Mr. Clarke, Mr. Balsh, Sir S. Bernardiston, Lord Pawlet, Mr. Hungerford, Mr. Travers, Mr. Hedger, Mr. Bromley, Mr. Beare, Mr. Biddulph; and all the Members that serve for the Counties of Glocester, Worcester, Salop, and Stafford: And they are to meet this Afternoon at Four of the Clock, in the Speaker's Chamber: And they are impowered to send for Persons, Papers, and Records.

Leasing the Duchy of Cornwall.

An ingrossed Bill to enable their Majesties to make Grants, Leases, and Copies of Offices, Lands and Hereditaments, Parcel of their Dutchy of Cornwall, or annexed, to the same; and for Confirmation of Leases and Grants already made; was read the Third time.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass: And that the Title be, An Act to enable their Majesties to make Grants, Leases, and Copies of Offices, Lands, and Hereditaments, Parcel of their Duchy of Cornwall, or annexed to the same; and for Confirmation of Leases and Grants already made.

Ordered, That Mr. Travers do carry the Bill to the Lords; and desire their Concurrence thereunto.

Pinmakers Trade.

A Petition of the Master, Wardens, and Company of Pinmakers in the City of Bristoll was read, setting forth, That a Bill being brought into this House to encourage the Art of Pinmaking; which, as the Petitioners conceive, is greatly to their and all other Pinmakers Prejudice, who do not inhabit in the City of London, and tends to a Monopoly; and praying to be heard against the said Bill.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the Bill for encouraging the Trade of Pinmaking, and setting the Poor Pinmakers at Work, is committed.

Militia.

Mr. Goldwell reported from the Committee to whom the Bill for raising the Militia for the Year 1693, although the Month's Pay, formerly advanced, be not repaid, was committed, That they had made some Amendments to the Bill; which they had directed him to report to the House: And which he read, in his Place, with the Coherence; and, afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were once read throughout; and, afterwards a Second time, one by one; and, upon the Question, severally put thereupon, agreed unto by the House.

Ordered, That the Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Supply Bill; Impositions on Merchandize.

A Bill for granting to their Majesties certain additional Impositions upon Merchandize, was read the Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Resolved, That this House will, To-morrow Morning (after the Report from the Committee of the whole House, touching the Supply, is made), resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of the said Bill.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Sir John Cotton have Leave to go into the Country for Three Weeks, on extraordinary Occasions.

Ordered, That Mr. Heming have Leave to go into the Country for a Fortnight, his Lady being very ill.

Ordered, That Sir Edward Hussey have Leave to go into the Country for a Fortnight, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Commissioners of Accompts.

A Bill for examining, taking, and stating the publick Accompts of the Kingdom, was read the Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Resolved, That this House will, upon Friday Morning next, at Ten a Clock, resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of the said Bill.

Ordered, That such Members of this House as have any Exceptions to the Accompts, formerly delivered in, from the Commissioners for examining, taking, and stating the Publick Accompts, and which now lie upon the Table, do present such their Exceptions, in Writing, to this House, by Thursday Morning next.

State of Ireland.

Resolved, That this House will, upon Saturday Morning next, at Eleven a Clock, take into Consideration, the State of the Kingdom of Ireland.

Essex Election.

Mr. Serjeant Trenchard reported from the Committee of Elections and Privileges, to whom the Matter touching the Election of a Knight to serve in this present Parliament for the County of Essex was referred, the Matter, as it appeared to the Committee: The which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table, in Writing; Where the same was read; and is as followeth; viz.

That it appeared to the Committee, That Mr. Honywood, upon the casting up the Poll, had a Majority of One hundred and Forty-eight Voices more than Sir Eliab Harvey.

But the Petitioner, Sir Eliab, insisted there had been a great many Abuses committed in taking and closing the Poll; and called

Mr. Wroth, Mr. Moore, and Sir Edward Turner: Who said, That they were present at the Election: That Sir Eliab Harvey had desired of Mr. Felton, the High Sheriff, that the Poll might be taken at the Court-house, as usual; but that the Sheriff refused so to do; but went to a Booth, which he had caused to be built near the said Court-house; and there took the Poll: That the said Booth was not so commodious for taking of the Poll, in regard the Sheriff could not see all that were sworn; and was so filled up with Mr. Honywood's Men, that those that would have voted for Sir Eliab Harvey could not get in; and particularly, that Sir Edward Turner was forced to climb over the Booth, to get in: That Sir Eliab Harvey desired the Poll might be adjourned till the next Day, in regard many of his Friends would not come to Town till then, not expecting the Poll to be over that Night; and that Sir Eliab offered to make Oath of it: That Two Persons unknown, before the last Book was shut up, came and demanded to be polled for Sir Eliab Harvey; but were not admitted: That Sir Edward Turner demanded a Scrutiny; and the Sheriff made Answer, That he would consider of it: That, upon inspecting the Poll, they found a great many, that had polled for Sir Eliab Harvey, set down to Mr. Honywood, and the Cypher altered, and made a Figure of One.

That Mr. Kendall and Mr. Blackstone said, That they heard a Person that polled for Sir Eliab Harvey asked by him that inspected the Poll, if he had received any Money for his Vote, or Horse-hire: And,

That Mr. Gent said, That they gave Two Sorts of Oaths: That they first asked, Who they were for: That, if they answered, they were for Sir Eliab Harvey, they swore them, that they had Forty Shillings a Year, all Charges borne; and if they were for Mr. Honywood, they left out those Words, "all Charges borne:" That he observed it to be done to Two or Three Persons; but does not remember at which Poll it was.

That Mr. Treherne said, That Mr. Sheffeild, who was his Captain, and Under Sheriff, desired him not to vote for Sir Eliab Harvey; and told him, If he did, my Lord of Oxford would demand his Commission, being a Lieutenant.

That Mr. Patch said, he saw Mr. Treherne come to Poll; and that Mr. Sheffield held up his Wand, and bid him have a care what he did; for that he promised to stand neuter: That Three, that polled for Mr. Honywood, had no Estate to qualify them to vote: That he knew of several, that would have come next Day and polled for . . . Eliab Harvey; but said it was put up in the Market-place, that the Poll would be closed in One Day, if possible: That he saw one that polled for Sir Eliab Harvey, entered down for Mr. Honywood.

That Captain Browne said, That he had heard Captain Reevs say, That he had a Letter from his Colonel to vote for him: Who said he would oblige him so far as to vote for neither; and otherwise would have voted for Sir Eliab Harvey.

That Mr. Lee said, That he voted for Sir Eliab Harvey, and had no Application made to him for Mr. Honywood; but several People in the Parish did say, That Captain Hudson had threatened several Persons, if they voted for Sir Eliab.

That Mr. Serle and Mr. Treherne said, They met, the next day after the Election, Thirty or Forty coming to vote for Sir Eliab Harvey.

That Mr. Jonas said, He met several of his Neighbours coming.

Mr. Thory said, That Mr. Sheffield came to Mr. Honywood, before the Poll was over, and said, "Now, Sir, we shall certainly carry the Day:" And that Mr. Toller, an Hour before the Poll was over, folded up his Book, and was absent for an Hour before the Books were sealed up: That, the Day after the Election, he saw Twenty, who told him they were coming to poll for Sir Eliab Harvey.

That John French said, He knew of Thirty.

And Mr. Green said, He knew of Twelve that were coming next Morning to vote for Sir Eliab Harvey.

Richard Palmer said, Three polled for Mr. Honywood, that had no Right; viz. John Palmer, Simon Ansty, and Sam. Burrell: That he saw the Oath pronounced to several; but they did not kiss the Book.

That Daniel Portman said, Richard Oliver and George Staines had no Freehold.

That John Bridge said, That Six Persons, who had polled for Mr. Honywood, declared that they would poll again; and that they thrust up to the Bar of another Poll: And that one Stokes said, there were several Quakers: And Captain Masely said, "Bring the Names, and I will enter them:" That Wm. Perkins said, He had Five Shillings of Mr. Honywood.

That John Pounset said, He polled for Mr. Honywood; and had Eight Shillings given him by Mr. Wheeler, to bear his Charges, and for Horse-hire.

That John Baite said, That, after the Election, he saw a great many little People about Mr. Honywood: And that Mr. Honywood asked them, If they were all paid; and they answering, No, Mr. Honywood replied, They should be all satisfied.

That * Chandler said, He voted for Sir Eliab Harvey; and had Eight Shillings for Horse-hire and Charges: That Robert Harris had Eight Shillings, John Phillipps Eight Shillings, Nich. Harris and his Son Five Shillings apiece, John English his Horse-hire; who all lived at Colchester, and voted for Mr. Honywood.

That David Sidley said, Thom. Bruce had Eight Shillings, John King Eight Shillings, John Garret Eight Shillings: Hump. Pooly had no Right, and had Five Shillings: Wm. Sayer had no Right, and had Six Shillings, as they told him, and voted for Mr. Honywood: That himself voted for Sir Eliab Harvey, and had Five Shillings for Horse-hire, and Three Shillings for Charges.

That, for the Sitting Member, were called,

Mr. Sheffield, the Under Sheriff: Who said, That the High Sheriff had commanded him to take Care to give timely Notice of the Election; and accordingly gave Notice in the most considerable Market Towns, in Writing: He began to give Notice the latter End of December, that the Election would be on Tuesday the Tenth of January; and, if possible, that it would be concluded the same Day: That he had Order from the High Sheriff to acquaint Sir Eliab Harvey, that the Election would be in the same Manner as the last Election was: And accordingly he left Word with his Son: That he understood, that Sir Eliab Harvey had been acquainted by his Son with it, from a Letter he received from Sir Eliab: That the Quarter Sessions happened the same Day as the Election; and therefore the Sheriff thought fit to adjourn to the Booth: That the Booth was made in such Manner as that there were Six Clerks placed on one Side, and Six on the other: That the Partition was made but Breast-high; and the Sheriff, turning himself round, might see to any Part of the Booth: That there were Twelve Clerks appointed and sworn by the Sheriff: That there were Twelve Inspectors of each Side; and every Freeholder sworn, to the best of his Knowledge: That, at Sir Eliab's Request, the Court was adjourned for an Hour, and then they repaired to the Court-house, and gave Notice to the People, by Proclamation, that they should repair to the Booth: That the Poll began about One of the Clock; and, about Four a Clock, the Poll slackening, they sent to the Market Place, and made Proclamation for the People to come and poll; and did afterwards the same several times, at the Booth: That, for Two Hours together, there were not above Thirty People polled: Knew no Man denied his Poll, but One, that came to poll for Mr. Honywood; and the Reason was, because he came too late: That they made the Clerks sign and seal the Books respectively: And Mr. Wroth, and several of Sir Eliab's Friends, were at the Casting up of the Books; and saw the Seals broke open.

That Major Lloyd said, He was a Supervisor for Mr. Honywood; and there was one Mr. Bradbury at the same Book, for Sir Eliab Harvey, who took care, that those that came to be polled should lay their Hands close to the Book, and be set down fair: That several Proclamations were made to come to the Poll; and, after Proclamation, Two or Three would drop in to Poll; and so for an Hour together: That, at last, when no more appeared, the Sheriff called for Candles; and was a long time in sealing up the Books: And that the Oath was, That they had Forty Shillings per Annum Freehold, and had not been before sworn; and the same was administred to all Persons indifferently.

That Colonel Desborough said, He was present, and did not see any Man polled, but who took the Oaths; and that there was no Interruption at all: That at the same Book, there was an Inspector for Sir Eliab Harvey.

That Mr. Hudson said, He came into Court when they began to poll, and kept moving, and went to the several Books; and all he saw was fair: That, as to Ten Books, he found Inspectors; and at the Eleventh Book; none answered; but one had been fixed to the Book; but that was the best Book on Sir Eliab's Side: That there were Inspectors for Sir Eliab Harvey at every Book: That Proclamation was made in the most considerable Inns of the Town; and, for the last Half-hour, not above Twenty polled: That the Sheriff could see all over the Booth; and, when the Poll was closed he could go round on the Outside of the Booth, and not touch a Man: That he spake to some to be for Mr. Honywood; but told them, He would not court them: That the Alteration of Cyphers into Figures was done in Court, by the direction of the Inspectors, to rectify Mistakes, occasioned by the Clerks fast writing.

That Mr. Fowler said, His Book was the last open: And said, That for at least Two Hours, not above Ten Men came: That at last came a young Man to poll; but he was a Minor, and went back: And one English, who would have polled for Mr. Honywood; but he came too late.

That Mr. Butler said, He was a Swearer at one Book; and every Man by him was sworn duly; and he gave the same Oath to all: That, after Four a Clock, none was polled at his Book.

And that, upon the whole Matter, the Committee came to several Resolutions: Which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read; and are as followeth; viz.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That John Lemot Honywood, Esquire, is not duly elected a Knight to serve in this present Parliament for the County of Essex.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That Sir Eliab Harvey, Knight, is not duly elected a Knight to serve in this present Parliament for the County of Essex.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Election of a Knight to serve in this present Parliament for the County of Essex, in the Place of Henry Mildmay, Esquire, deceased, is a void Election.

The First of the said Resolutions being read a Second time;

And the Question being put, That the House do agree with the Committee in the said Resolution;

The House divided.

The Noes go forth.

Tellers for the Yeas, Sir Robert Davers, 149.
Mr. Gwynn:
Tellers for the Noes, Sir Walt. Young, 152.
Mr. Clarke:

So it passed in the Negative.

Salwerp Navigation.

A Petition of Samuel Baldwyn, Esquire, was read; setting forth, That there is now a Bill in this House, for making navigable the River Salwerp: That an Act was made in King Charles the Second time, for making navigable the Rivers Stower and Salwerp: Wherein the late Earl of Plymouth, and the Petitioner's Father, had the greatest Interest; and they, and others claiming under them, have expended above Six thousand Pounds for that Purpose: And that the said Bill tends to make void the said Act, and to take away all the Works and Materials done in pursuance thereof: And praying to be heard against the said Bill, before it pass this House.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the Bill for making navigable the River Salwerp in the County of Worcester, or Brooks thereunto adjoining, is committed.

Importing Saltpetre.

Ordered, That Sir Hen. Goff, Sir Chr. Musgrave, Sir John Knight, Sir Walt. Young, Mr. Palmes, Mr. Schackerley, Mr. Chase, Sir Tho. Haslerigg, Mr. Lewis, be added to the Committee to whom the Bill for the Importation of Saltpetre, notwithstanding the Act of Navigation, is committed.

Price's Estate.

Ordered, That Sir Tho. Bellot, Colonel Kirby, Sir Tho. Travell, Mr. Wharton, be added to the Committee to whom the Bill to enable Roger Price, Esquire, to sell some Part of his Estate, for Payment of Portions to the Daughters of John Price, Esquire, deceased, is committed.

Importing Saltpetre.

A Petition of several Merchants dealing in Saltpetre was read, setting forth, That * * * *.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the Bill for the Importation of Saltpetre, notwithstanding the Act of Navigation, is committed.

Woolen Manufactures.

Ordered, That the ingrossed Bill, continuing Part of the Act made in the First Year of their Majesties Reign, for the better preventing the Exportation of Wool, and encouraging the Woolen Manufactures of this Kingdom, be read the Third time upon Thursday Morning, after the Committee of the whole House hath sat to consider of the Petition of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty of the City of London, touching the Relief of the Orphans of the said City.

Committees.

Ordered, That all Committees be revived.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Eight a Clock.