House of Lords Journal Volume 18
27 October 1705

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History of Parliament Trust

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1767-1830

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6, 7, 8, 9

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 18: 27 October 1705', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 18: 1705-1709 (1767-1830), pp. 6-9. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=29366 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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DIE Sabbati, 27 Octobris.

REGINA.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Arch. Cantuar.
Arch. Ebor.
Epus. Londin.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Lich. & Cov.
Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Petrib.
Epus. Cicestr.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Carliol.
Gulielmus Cowper, Arm. Ds. Custos Magni Sigilli Angl.
Ds. Godolphin, Thesaurarius Angl.
Dux Newcastle, C. P. S.
Dux Somerset.
Dux Ormonde.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux St. Albans.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Buckingham & Normanby.
Comes Lindsey, Magnus Camerarius.
Comes Kent, Camerarius.
Comes Northampton.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Essex.
Comes Feversham.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Coventrie.
Comes Orford.
Comes Grantham.
Ds. Lawarr.
Ds. Willughby de Br.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Paget.
Ds. Chandos.
Ds. Howard Esc.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Colepeper.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Berkeley Str.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Stawell.
Ds. Guilford.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Halifax.
Ds. Granville.
Ds. Gernsey.
Ds. Conway.

PRAYERS.

Lords take the Oaths.

The Lords following took the Oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy, and the Oath of Abjuration, and made and subscribed the Declaration, pursuant to the Statutes; (videlicet,)

Daniel Earl of Nottingham.
Lawrence Earl of Rochester.
Francis Earl of Bradford.
William Lord Bishop of Carlisle.
Charles Lord Howard of Escrick.
Peregrine Lord Osborne.
Francis Lord Guilford.

Then the House was adjourned during Pleasure, to robe.

The House was resumed.

Queen present.

Her Majesty, being seated on Her Royal Throne, adorned with Her Crown and Regal Ornaments, attended with Her Officers of State (the Peers being in their Robes), commanded the Deputy Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to let the Commons know, "It is Her "Majesty's Pleasure, that they attend Her presently, in the House of Peers."

Smith, Speaker of H. C. presented.

Who being come; they presented the Right Honourable John Smith Esquire, whom they had chosen to be their Speaker, for Her Majesty's Royal Approbation.

And, after a short Speech made by him to Her Majesty, desiring Her Majesty to excuse him from that Service;

The Lord Keeper, by Her Majesty's Command, acquainted the House of Commons, "That Her Majesty was pleased to approve of the Choice they had made; and did allow of and confirm Mr. Smith to be their Speaker."

Then Mr. Speaker returned Her Majesty Thanks, for Her gracious Approbation of the Choice and Acceptance of his Service; and humbly prayed, in the Name of the Commons, "That Her Majesty would be graciously pleased to allow, and confirm, all their ancient Rights and Privileges; particularly,

"That they might have Liberty and Freedom of Speech in all their Debates:

"That their Persons, Estates, and Servants be free from Arrests and Troubles:

"That they may have Access to Her Royal Person, as Occasion shall require:

"That Her Majesty would have a gracious Opinion of all their Actions:

"And that, if himself at any Time should mistake, he might have Her Majesty's favourable Interpretation and gracious Pardon."

Then the Lord Keeper, by Her Majesty's further Command, said,

"Mr. Speaker,

"Her Majesty is pleased to say, That, She being fully assured of the Discretion and Temper, as well as of the good Affections, of Her House of Commons; as to the Suit which you have made in their Name, Her Majesty does most willingly grant to them all their Privileges, in as full a Manner as they were at any Time granted or allowed by any of Her Royal Predecessors: And as to what you have prayed in relation to yourself; Her Majesty will put the best and most favourable Construction upon your Words and Actions, in the Execution of your Duty of Speaker of the House of Commons; being satisfied of your Integrity, of your Zeal for Her Service, of your firm Adherence to the true Interest of your Country, and of your faithful Performance of the Public Trusts which have been committed to your Care."

Then Her Majesty was pleased to say as follows:

Queen's Speech.

"My Lords, and Gentlemen,

I have been very desirous to meet you as early as I thought you might be called together, without Inconvenience to yourselves.

"And it is with much Satisfaction I observe so full an Appearance at the Opening of the Parliament; because it is a Ground for Me to conclude, you are all convinced of the Necessity of prosecuting the just War, in which we are engaged; and therefore are truly sensible, that'tis of the greatest Importance to us to be timely in our Preparations.

"Nothing can be more evident, than that, if the French King continues Master of the Spanish Monarchy, the Balance of Power in Europe is utterly destroyed; and He will be able in a short Time to engross the Trade, and the Wealth, of the World.

"No good Englishman could at any Time be content to sit still, and acquiesce in such a Prospect; and at this Time we have great Grounds to hope, that, by the Blessing of God upon our Arms, and those of our Allies, a good Foundation is laid for restoring the Monarchy of Spain to the House of Austria; the Consequences of which will not only be safe and advantageous, but glorious, for England.

"I may add, we have learnt by our own Experience, that no Peace with France will last longer, than the First Opportunity of their dividing the Allies, and of attacking some of them with Advantage.

"All our Allies must needs be so sensible this is the true State of the Case, that I make no doubt but Measures will soon be so concerted, as that, if we be not wanting to ourselves, we shall see the next Campaign begin offensively on all Sides against our Enemies, in a most vigorous Manner.

"I must therefore desire you, Gentlemen of the House of Commons, to grant Me the Supplies, which will be requisite for carrying on the next Year's Service both by Sea and Land; and at the same Time to consider, that the giving all possible Dispatch will make the Supply itself much more effectual.

"The Firmness and Conduct which the Duke of Savoy has shewn, amidst extreme Difficulties, is beyond Example.

"I have not been wanting, to do all that was possible for Me, in order to his being supported.

"I ought to take Notice to you, that the King of Prussia's Troops have been very useful to this End. Your Approbation of that Treaty last Sessions, and the Encouragement you gave upon it, leave Me no Doubt of being able to renew it for another Year.

"I take this Occasion to assure you, that not only whatever shall be granted by Parliament, for bearing the Charge of the War, shall be laid out for that Purpose, with the greatest Faithfulness and Management; but that I will continue to add, out of My own Revenue, all I can reasonably spare beyond the necessary Expences for the Honour of the Government.

"My Lords, and Gentlemen,

"By an Act of Parliament, passed the last Winter, I was enabled to appoint Commissioners for this Kingdom, to treat with Commissioners, to be empowered by Authority of Parliament in Scotland, concerning a nearer and more complete Union between the Two Kingdoms, as soon as an Act shall be made there for that Purpose: I think it proper for Me to acquaint you, that such an Act is lately passed there; and I intend, in a short Time, to cause Commissions to be made out, in order to put the Treaty on Foot; which I heartily desire may prove successful; because I am persuaded that an Union of the Two Kingdoms will not only prevent many Inconveniencies, which may otherwise happen, but must conduce to the Peace and Happiness of both Nations; and therefore, I hope, I shall have your Assistance in bringing this great Work to a good Conclusion.

"There is another Union I think Myself obliged to recommend to you in the most earnest and affectionate Manner; I mean, an Union of Minds and Affections amongst ourselves: It is that, which would, above all Things, disappoint and defeat the Hopes and Designs of our Enemies.

"I cannot but with Grief observe, there are some amongst us, who endeavour to foment Animosities; but, I persuade Myself, they will be found to be very few, when you appear to assist Me in discountenancing and defeating such Practices.

"I mention this with a little more Warmth, because there have not been wanting some, so very malicious, as even in Print to suggest, the Church of England, as by Law established, to be in Danger at this Time.

"I am willing to hope, not One of My Subjects can really entertain a Doubt of My Affection to the Church, or so much as suspect, that it will not be My chief Care to support it, and leave it secure after Me; and therefore we may be certain, that they, who go about to insinuate Things of this Nature, must be Mine and the Kingdom's Enemies, and can only mean to cover Designs, which they dare not publicly own, by endeavouring to distract us with unreasonable and groundless Distrusts and Jealousies.

"I must be so plain, as to tell you, the best Proofs we can all give, at present, of our Zeal for the Preservation of the Church, will be, to join heartily in prosecuting the War against an Enemy, who is certainly engaged to extirpate our Religion, as well as to reduce this Kingdom to Slavery.

"I am fully resolved, by God's Assistance, to do My Part.

"I will always affectionately support and countenance the Church of England, as by Law established.

"I will inviolably maintain the Toleration.

"I will do all I can, to prevail with My Subjects to lay aside their Divisions; and will study to make them all safe, and easy.

"I will endeavour to promote Religion and Virtue amongst them, and to encourage Trade, and every Thing else, that may make them a flourishing and happy People.

"And they who shall concur zealously with Me, in carrying on these good Designs, shall be sure to find My Kindness and Favour."

Then Her Majesty was pleased to withdraw; and the Commons went to their House.

Receivers and Triers of Petitions.

Ordered, That the Names of the Receivers and Triers of Petitions be entered, according to ancient Custom.

Les Receivors des Petic'ons d'Angleterre, d'Escoce, et d'Ireland.

Messire Jean Holt, Chivalier et Chief Justicer.
Messire Jean Powell, Chivalier et Justicer.
Messire Jean Edisbury, Docteur au Droit Civil.

Et ceux qui veulent deliver leur Petic'ons, eux baillent dedeins Six Jours procheinement ensuent.

Les Receivours des Petic'ons de Gascoigne, et des autres Terres et Pais de par le Mer et des Isles.

Messire Thomas Trevor, Chivalier et Cheife Justic. de Banc Com.
Messire Edward Ward, Chivalier et Chiefe Baron de I'Exchequer de la Reine.
Messire Jean Francklin, Chivalier.
Messire Lacon William Child, Chivalier.

Et ceux qui veulent deliver leur Petic'ons, eux baillent dedeins Six Jours procheinement ensuent.

Les Triours des Petic'ons d'Angleterre, d'Escoce, et d'Ireland.

Le Duc de Somerset.
Le Duc de Ormonde.
Le Duc de Bolton.
Le Duc de Buckingham & Normanby.
Le Count de Lindsey, Grand Chamberlein.
Le Count de Northampton.
Le Count Rivers.
Le Count de Stamford.
Le Count d'Essex.
Le Count de Feversham.
Le Baron Wharton.
Le Baron Paget.

Touts ceux ensemble, ou Quatre des Seignieurs avanditz; appellants au eux les Serjeants de la Reine, quant serra besoigne; tendront leur Place en le Chambre de Tresorier.

Les Triours des Petic'ons de Gascoigne, et des autres Terres et Pais de per le Mer et des Isles.

Le Duc de Beaufort.
Le Duc de Northumberland.
Le Duc de Leeds.

Le Count de Kent, Chamberlein d' I'Hostel de la Reine.

Le Count de Denbigh.
Le Count de Winchilsea.
Le Count de Thanet.
Le Count de Nottingham.
Le Count de Rochester.
Le Count de Bradford.
Le Baron Mohun.
Le Baron Sommers.
Le Baron d' Halifax.

Touts ceux ensemble, ou Quatr' des Seignieurs avanditz; appellants au eux les Serjeants de la Reine, quant serra Besoigne; tendront leur Place en Chambre de Chamberlain.

Poor's Bill.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for preventing the Poor's being defrauded, and redressing several other Abuses."

Committee for Privileges.

Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Customs and Orders of the House, and the Privileges of Parliament, and of the Peers of this Kingdom and Lords of Parliament; (videlicet,)

Ds. Godolphin, Thesaurarius Angl.
Dux Newcastle, C. P. S.
Dux Somerset.
Dux Ormonde.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux St. Albans.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Buckingham & Nor.
Comes Lindsey, Magnus Camerarius.
Comes Kent, Camerarius.
Comes Northampton.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Essex.
Comes Feversham.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Coventrie.
Comes Orford.
Comes Grantham.
Arch. Cant.
Arch. Ebor.
Epus. Londin.
Epus. Wigorn.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Lich. & Cov.
Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Petrib.
Epus. Cicestr.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Willughby de Br.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Paget.
Ds. Chandos.
Ds. Howard Esc.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Colepeper.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Berkeley Str.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Stawell.
Ds. Guilford.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Halifax.
Ds. Granville.
Ds. Gernsey.

Their Lordships, or any Seven of them; to meet on Monday next, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Committee for the Journal.

Lords Sub-committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of the House, and Privileges of the Peers of this Kingdom and Lords of Parliament; and to peruse and perfect the Journals of the last Parliament, and also the Journal of this Parliament.

Dux Somerset.
Dux Bolton.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Essex.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Orford.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Lich. & Cov.
Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Petrib.
Epus. Cicestr.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Paget.
Ds. Howard.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Colepeper.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Guilford.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Halifax.

Their Lordships, or any Three of them; to meet when, where, and as often as, they please.

Queen's Speech:

Then Her Majesty's Speech was read by the Lord Keeper, and afterwards by the Clerk.

Committee to draw an Address upon it.

Whereupon it is Ordered, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the humble Thanks of this House be given to Her Majesty, for Her most Gracious Speech to both Houses of Parliament.

Lords Committees appointed to draw an Address of humble Thanks to be presented to Her Majesty, for Her most Gracious Speech to both Houses of Parliament; and to report to the House.

Ds. Godolphin, Thesaurarius.
Dux Newcastle, C. P. S.
Dux Ormonde.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Bolton.
Comes Lindsey, Magnus Camerarius.
Comes Kent, Camerarius.
Comes Northampton.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Essex.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Coventrie.
Comes Orford.
Comes Grantham.
Epus. London.
Epus. Sarum.
2. Epus. Petrib.
1. Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Cicestr.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Paget.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Colepeper.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Berkeley Str.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Stawell.
Ds. Guilford.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Halifax.
Ds. Granville.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them; to meet on Monday next, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Adjourn.

Dominus Custos Magni Sigilli declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, vicesimum nonum diem instantis Octobris, hora duodecima, Dominis sic decernentibus.