House of Lords Journal Volume 10
5 July 1648

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 10: 5 July 1648', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 10: 1648-1649 (1767-1830), pp. 362-364. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=32850 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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Die Mercurii, 5 die Julii.

PRAYERS, by Mr. Hickes.

Domini præsentes fuerunt:

Comes Manchester, Speaker.

Comes Northumb.
Comes Lyncolne.
Comes Rutland.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Midd.
Comes Kent.
Comes Mulgrave.
L. Admiral.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Grey.
Ds. Dacres.
Ds. Hunsdon.
Ds. North.
Ds. Maynard.

Vote of the H. C. for the King to sign Three Propositions.

The Vote sent from the House of Commons, "That the King do assent unto and sign the Three Propositions before the Treaty for Peace," was read.

And this House adhered to their former Vote, upon the Question.

Roper and Wiseman.

Ordered, That the Cause between Roper and Wiseman shall be heard on Wednesday next, in the Morning.

Petitions from the Common Council, &c.

This Day a Petition was presented, by the Sheriffs and some of the Aldermen and Common Council-men of the City of London, with a Petition annexed; and being received, they were publicly read, as followeth.

(Here enter them.)

London to be the Place for Treaty with the King.

The Persons that presented the Petition withdrew; and the House took the same into Consideration.

And the Debate was, "Whether London shall be the Place where the Treaty with the King shall be?"

And for the better Consideration of it, the House was adjourned into a Committee of the whole House.

The House was resumed.

And it was Resolved, upon the Question, That this House thinks it fit that London be the Place where the Personal Treaty shall be had with the King.

Militia of London, Westm, &c. to be associated.

Then the Clause in the Petition was read, "That the Militia of London and Westm. Southwarke, and the Hamlets, shall be joined together."

And the Question being put, "Whether that the Militia of London, Westm. Southwarke, and the Hamlets, shall be joined together, as they desire in their Petition?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

London Militia to raise Horse.

Next, the Desire of the City, for to have Power to raise Horse, was read.

And it being put to the Question, "Whether to agree to give Power to the Militia of London to raise Horse, as they do desire?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Order for Gen. Skippon to raise Horse.

The Order brought from the House of Commons, for giving Power to the Committee at Derby House to grant Commission to Major General Skippon, to command, raise, and list a Regiment of Horse, was read the Second Time.

And it was Resolved, upon the Question, To have this Order respited.

Message to the H. C. with the foregoing Votes.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Hakewill and Mr. Page:

To deliver the Three Votes made upon the Petitions this Day received from the City, and desire their Concurrence therein.

E. of Steamford, Leave to be absent.

Ordered, That the Earl of Stamford hath Leave to be absent.

Answer to the Petitions from the Common Council, &c.

The Sheriffs and others, that presented the Petitions this Day from the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, of the City of London, were called in again.

And this Answer following was delivered to them, by the Speaker, by the Direction of the House:

"The Lords have commanded me to let you know, That they have considered of the Particulars this Day tendered by you unto them. They had of themselves made some Progress in those Things mentioned therein; and they do now declare unto you, that they have thought fit to grant your Desires in all the Particulars contained in the Petitions, in Confidence that the City of London will be careful to make good their great Engagement now made, for the preserving and securing of His Majesty's Person and the Parliament from Tumults, Mutinies, Insurrections, or other Disorders, that may interrupt the Honour, Freedom, and Safety of the King or Parliament. And they cannot doubt but that they will still adhere to live and die in Defence of the King and Parliament, according to their Covenant."

Ordered, That these Two Petitions, with this Answer, shall be printed and published.

Members of The Trinity House, Petition.

A Petition of divers cordial and well-affected Mariners, being Commanders of Ships, and Members of The Trynity House, was presented, and read. (Here enter it.)

And this Answer was returned by the Speaker; (videlicet,)

Answer to them.

The Lords have commanded me to give you Thanks, for your great Expressions of your Fidelity and good Affections to the Parliament. And they desire you still to continue your Care and Endeavours for the reducing of the revolted Mariners to their Obedience to the Parliament. And they desire you to be confident, that their Lordships will improve their utmost Endeavours, for the procuring a safe and well-grounded Peace."

L. Stourton, a Pass.

That the Lord Stourton, his Lady and his Children, shall have a Pass, to go into Wiltshire.

Message to the H. C. for the Committee for a Treaty to meet.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Eltonhead and

To desire them, that the Committee for Peace may meet this Afternoon, at Four a Clock; and to have Power to adjourn from Time to Time.

Heads for a Conference about the Vote for the King to sign Three Propositions.

Ordered, That these Lords following are appointed Committees, to draw up Reasons, to be given at a Conference with the House of Commons, why this House adheres to their Vote, that the Three Propositions shall not be insisted upon:

Comes Northumb.
Comes Lyncolne.
Comes Manchester.
Ds. North.
Ds. Hunsdon.

Any Three; to meet To-morrow Morning.

Pepys to be instituted to Arksdon.

Ordered, That Doctor Aylett give Institution and Induction unto Robert Pepys Clerk, Master of Arts, to the Vicarage of Arkesdon, in the County of Essex, void by the Death of George Berdsale, the last Incumbent there; Salvo Jure cujuscunque: Richard Cutts Esquire, Patron.

Cox. E. of Dover's Steward, to be released.

Ordered, That Charles Cox, Steward to the Earl of Dover, who was on Wednesday last taken from Kingston, being there upon the Employment of his Lordship, by a Party of Horse under the Command of the Parliament, and is still detained in Custody, contrary to the Privilege of Parliament, shall, upon Sight hereof, be released and set at Liberty; and that his Horse, Money, Ring, and other Things, shall be restored and delivered unto him likewise, upon Sight of this Order, &c.

To the Governor of Windsor Castle, &c.

Members of The Trinity House Petition, declaring that they will faithfully assist, to reduce the Revolted Mariners, &c. to Obedience.

To the Right Honourable House of Lords in Parliament assembled.

The humble Declaration, Tender, and Petition, of divers cordial and well-affected Mariners, whose Names are subscribed, being Commanders of Ships, and Members of The Trinity House;

Sheweth,

That the present sad and fresh bleeding Condition of this distressed Kingdom, the many Ways of Force and Treachery which are continually attempted, to bring to utter Ruin and Destruction this Parliament and their Forces by Land and Sea, the late Defection of some Mariners trusted and employed by the Parliament in divers Ships set forth for Safety of the Kingdom, and the Proceedings thereupon, will not suffer the Petitioners to be longer silent: And therefore, in Discharge of their Duty to Almighty God, to the King, Parliament, and Kingdom, they do humbly declare, That the Petitioners are most unfeignedly thankful for this Parliament's effectual endeavouring the Public Settlement; and for giving Direction that, in order to Safety of the Kingdom, the Encouragement and Preservation of Trade, and the Reduction of the said Ships revolted, a convenient Fleet be provided and set to Sea, and manned with cordial and well-affected Mariners (all intimated by the Votes of the Honourable House of Commons made the 17th; and by the Lord High Admiral's Letter to the Masters, Wardens, and Assistants of The Trinity House, dated the 19th of June last: That, although the Petitioners do most heartily desire a right Understanding and happy Reconcilement betwixt the King and Parliament, yet it is far from the Intention of the Petitioners (and they hope of any others that have lately petitioned for a Personal Treaty), to make Use of the said Revolt, or of any other Streights the Parliament are or may be in, to precipitate their Counsels, or to destroy their Forces, being (as they humbly conceive) contrary to the Protestation taken in or about May, 1641, the Vow taken in or about June, and the Covenant taken in or about February, 1643; as it is also to necessitate the Parliament to that Treaty, before such a Foundation of Security be laid as the Wisdom of Parliament shall conceive (by the Blessing of Almighty God thereupon) to be fully sufficient for the Preservation of themselves, and of all that have adhered to them, from Destruction in and after that Treaty; and for the Reformation of Religion; and for the Maintenance and Defence of Laws and Liberties, for all which so much Blood and Treasure hath been spilt and spent: That the constant Valour and Fidelity of English Mariners (Commanders and others) have encouraged this and all other Nations with whom we have any Commerce, as well Jewes, Turkes, Heathens, as Christians, to put their Persons and Estates into their Power and Possession, having found them always valiant to defend both the one and the other, and faithful in Discharge of their Trust to those that employ them, whether Friends or Foes; which hath much advanced the Wealth, Strength, and Safety of this Kingdom: That the Valour and Fidelity of English Mariners is of late much blemished, by those that are revolted in the said Ships, and that have encouraged them thereunto, and have neither publicly expressed their utter Detestation thereof, nor their Resolution with their Lives and Estates (according to their Covenant) to endeavour the reducing those Revolters by such Ways and Means as the Parliament and Lord High Admiral of England shall in their Wisdom direct: That the Petitioners (to take off those Blemishes, and preserve the Honour of the English Nation) do disavow the having any Hand in that Revolt; they do abhor and detest that unparalleled Breach of Trust, as most destructive to the Trade and Navigation of this Kingdom, and to all the faithful Mariners and others who have their Dependency thereupon: And the Petitioners do promise to use their utmost Endeavours, with their Lives and Estates (according to their Covenant if they shall be called thereunto), for the reducing of the said Revolters to their Duty, in such a Way as the Wisdom of Parliament and Lord High Admiral shall direct; and doubt not (whatsoever have been suggested to the contrary) but there are many other Mariners in this Kingdom will be most ready and willing to do the like.

The Petitioners therefore do humbly pray, That the Vote of the Honourable House of Commons, made the 17th of June last, for the providing as great a Fleet, manned with cordial and well-affected Men, as the Parliament shall think fit, with all possible Expedition, for the Safety of the Kingdom, and reducing the said Revolters, may be vigorously prosecuted.

And your Petitioners, as in Duty bound, shall pray, &c.

Memorandum, That Fifty-two of the Subscribers are Commanders of Ships, Members of The Trinity House."

Petition from the Common Council, with the following one.

To the Right Honourable the Lords in the High Court of Parliament assembled.

The humble Petition of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons, of the City of London, in Common Council assembled;

Sheweth,

That your Petitioners, sitting in Common Council upon the weighty Affairs of the City, had presented unto them, by divers Field Officers, Captains, and their Commission Officers, of the Trained Bands of the City of London and Liberties thereof, the Petition hereunto annexed; which being openly read, and seriously considered of, they apprehend that the same is of great Concernment, worthy due Consideration, tending to the Honour and Safety of the King, and Preservation of the Parliament, and the Settlement of the Peace and Welfare of the City and Kingdom: And they, concurring with the Petitioners therein, have thought fit to present the same to this Honourable House.

And they humbly pray your Honours, to take the same into your serious Consideration; and do therein as in your grave Wisdoms you shall see fit.

And they shall pray, &c.

"Michell."

Officers of the London Militia Petition, for the King to come to London; -to be associated with the Militia of Westm. &c.;-and to have Power to raise Horse.

To the Right Honourable the Lords assembled in Parliament.

The humble Petition of the Field Officers, Captains, and their Commission Officers, of the Trained Bands of the City of London and Liberties thereof;

Sheweth,

That, out of the deep Sense of the sad Miseries that lie upon these Kingdoms, the only visible Remedy whereof (under God) we conceive to be a Personal Treaty with His Majesty, which happy Work, we hear, is like to be retarded, if not frustrated, by Fears and Jealousies suggested, if it should be here in London (which is so much desired), that, instead of settling Peace, it might involve us all in Blood, by Tumults that might be raised by Persons driving on their own Designs and Interests: We think ourselves bound in Duty, for promoting so desirable a Work so much as in us lieth, to offer our Service, with our Lives and Fortunes, to the utmost, (fn. *) to defend His Majesty's Royal Person and this Parliament from all Violence whatsoever, that they may meet and treat with Freedom, Honour, and Safety, according to the ancient fundamental Constitution of this Kingdom; and that whosoever shall, by Tumults, Mutinies, Insurrections, or otherwise, interrupt or force the Honour, Freedom, and Safety of King or Parliament, we and all under our Commands shall be ready, as One Man, to live and die in Defence of the King and Parliament, according to our Covenant.

1. Wherefore we humbly pray, That, for our Enablement thereunto, the Militia for the City of London and adjacent Parts may be settled in One Committee. And if in your Wisdoms you shall think fit to join some Persons of the Parts adjacent to the Grand Committee, they may be such as have no Places of Profit which depend upon the Continuance of the War and our Troubles, or have shewed themselves disaffected to the Ends of the Covenant.

2. That the King may be brought to London, with Freedom, Honour, and Safety, to treat with His Parliament, for the settling of a safe and well-grounded Peace.

3. That the Militia may have Power to raise Horse, if Need be, for the Defence of the King, Parliament, and City.

"And we shall pray, &c."

Adjourn.

House adjourned till 10a cras.

Footnotes

* Deest in Originali.