Folios 109 - 101b; 109b

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1900

Pages

232-248

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'Folios 109 - 101b; 109b', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: B: 1275-1312 (1900), pp. 232-248. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33047 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Folio 109 [facieinversa.] (xxix b).

Tuesday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], 2 Edward II. [A.D. 1309], came Robert de Mordone, "stokfishmongere," William le Spicer, carpenter, Thomas de Dunlee, spicer, and John le Wyte, "stokfishmongere," before Nicholas de Farndone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the Chamberlain, and mainprised John Elys, "stokfishmongere," and Stephen Creye, executor of John Gubbe, to answer for the sum of £56 9s. 1d., quo et quando, &c.

(Cancelled because in paper of memoranda.)

Folio 108 b [facieinversa.] (xxx).

Monday after the Feast of Conversion of St. Paul [25 Jan.], 9 Edward I. [A.D. 1280-1], the following writing was read in Pleas of Land, viz.:—

Edward, &c. Know ye that at the request of our beloved and trusty John de Vescy we have pardoned William de Bosco the suit of our peace, which appertains to us for the death of William le Taverner, whereof he was accused, and any outlawry pronounced against him on that account, and we grant unto him our firm peace. So that, however, he stand to right (stet recto) in our Court if any one wish to prosecute him In witness whereof we have caused these our letters patent to be made. Witness myself at Burgh, 24 Dec., 9 Edward I. [A.D. 1280].

Tuesday the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 10 Edward I. [A.D. 1282], in the Guildhall of London, before the Mayor and other reputable men of the City, Walter Musard, burgess of Douay, brought the King's writ that the whole commonalty of Douay should be quit of murage in terms as follows:—

Edward, &c., to his Mayor and Sheriffs greeting. We command you that if Walter Musard, burgess of Douay, be able reasonably to show to you, on behalf of himself and the whole commonalty of Douay, that they ought, by charter of our father King Henry of famous memory, to be quit of murage throughout our realm, you then permit the said William and others of the said commonalty to be quit of the same, and cause any distress that may have been taken therefor to be restored Dated Worcester, 19 May, 10 Edward I. [A.D. 1282].

The Charter of the Merchants of Douay granted by Henry, late King of England, touching Murage.

Henry, &c. Know ye that we have granted, and by this our charter have confirmed for us and our heirs, to our beloved burgesses and merchants of Douay that they for ever throughout our kingdom and dominion have this liberty, viz., that neither they nor their goods, wherever found in our dominion, be arrested for any debt in the absence of sureties or principal debtors, unless perchance the debtors themselves be of their commune (comuna) and jurisdiction, having the wherewithal to pay their debts in full or in part......And that the said burgesses and merchants be for ever quit of murages (de muragiis) throughout our realm, and shall not through any trespass or forfeiture of their servants lose their goods and chattels on proving them to be their property. And also if the said burgesses and merchants or any of them die within our realm, whether testate or intestate, neither we nor our heirs will cause their goods to be confiscated so that the heirs shall not inherit upon proof of ownership being given. And that they with their merchandise may freely come to our realm and there stay, paying the customs due. But if there should be war at any time between the King of France and us or our own heirs, the said merchants shall be allowed forty days to leave the country with their goods. Wherefore we will and command you that the said burgesses and merchants be allowed to enjoy all the liberties aforesaid, and we forbid that any one should presume to molest them, contrary to this liberty and grant, under penalty of 10 pounds. Witnesses, the Venerable Father H[enry de Sandwich], Bishop of London; Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford; Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex; Hugh le Bigod, Philip le Basset, Hugh le Despenser, our Justices of England; James de Aldithley (Audley), Roger de Mortimer, John Mansell, Treasurer at York, Robert le Waleraund, and others [not named]. Dated Westminster, 24 Nov., 45 Henry III. [A.D. 1260].

(Item in albo novo libro de brevibus et memorandis in folio circa lxxxiij habetur confirmacio Regis E. fil' R. E. super istam cartam de Duaco. (fn. 1) )

Folio 108 [facie inversa.] (xxx b).

Wednesday the eve of the Nativity B. M. [8 Sept.], 23 Edward I. [A.D. 1295], it was ordained, in the presence of Sir John Bretoun, then Warden of the City; John le Blound, Adam de Rokele, Walter de Finchingfeud, Nicholas de Farndone, Richard Aswy, Thomas Romeyn, Thomas Gros (Cros ?), John de Dunstaple, and William de Bettoyne, Aldermen; [and] by the underwritten, viz.:—
that all and singular citizens and others residing in the City who gave the sixth penny of their goods to the lord the King, and also all others newly coming to live and remain in the City, shall give to the collectors assigned for that collection of their goods, viz., 2 pence out of every pound for furnishing a galley for the lord the King, who is going to parts beyond the seas in aid of the war of the lord the King. (fn. 4)

John le Coffrer, of the Ward of Chepe;
William Amis, of the Ward of Cornhull;
William de Rokesl[e], of Douuegate (Dounegate ?);
Benedict [le] Speron[er], of the Ward of N[icholas] de Farndone without;
Geoffrey de Chelheth,
Robert Hardel, of the Ward of Vintry;
Richard Scharp, of the Ward of Billingsgate;
William Jurdan, of the Ward of Candlewystrate;
Robert de Mertone,
John de Steb[e]nhethe, of the Ward of Bridge;
William de la Vine, of the Ward of Tower;
Nicholas Pikot, of the Ward of Lotheberi; (fn. 2)
Walm' de Wallok,
Gregory Lorimer, of the Ward of Crepelgate;
Thomas de Frowick,
Thomas de Waledene, of the Ward of Walebrock;
Richard le Seinturer, of the Ward of H[enry] le Bole; (fn. 3)
Thomas Broning,
Matthew le Paumer, of the Ward of Cornhull;
Richard le Fingere,
William de Storteford, of the Ward of Cordewanerstrate;
John le Loung,
Richard de Morthone, of the Ward of Bredstrate;
Hugh de Bedeford, of the Ward of Aldridesgate;
Robert Gange,
Richard de Caumpes, of (the Ward of) Bassieshawe;
Adam Maniman, of (the Ward of) Colemannestrate;
Alan le Seinturer,
William Bernard, of (the Ward of) Queenhithe;
Robert de Chalfhunte,
Roger de Watham, of the Ward of Alegate,—

Thursday before the Feast of Pentecost [2 June], 25 Edward I. [A.D. 1297], it was ordained—in the presence of Sir John le Bretun, then Warden of London; Thomas de Suffolk, [and] Adam de Foleham, then Sheriffs; Walter de Finchingfeud, William le Mazeliner, John de Dunstaple, Richard Eswy, William de Bettoyne, Salomon le Cotiler, and Henry le Bole, Aldermen—that by reason of murders [and] strifes arising between persons known and unknown, [and] by reason of the congregating in the market of thieves, cut-purses (pro cissoribus loculorum), and other misdoers against the peace of our lord the King, what was called pe nane feyre, (fn. 5) recently instituted after dinner in Soperlane, should thenceforth be altogether abolished and not again be held on pain of losing the wares bought and sold there; which market had been instituted by strangers, foreigners, mendicants, and others living three or four miles (leucas (fn. 6) ) from London. And the ordinance was made by the underwritten in conjunction with the above Aldermen, viz.:—

Of the Ward of Chepe: John le Coffrer, William de Staunford, Adam Bras, Roger le Barber.

Of Ludgate within and without: (fn. 7) Luke de Ware, William Flori, Walter le Chaundeler, Stephen de Hadham.

Of the Ward of Queenhithe: William Bernard, Stephen Bernard, Robert de Chalfhunte [and another, illegible].

Of the Ward of Cornhull: Roger le Ferrur, Robert de Fingere, Ralph de Honilane, Richard de Lamhethe.

Of the Ward of Bridge: John le Benere, Henry le Blound.

Of the Ward of Bredstrate: William Cok, "fruter," Robert de Gloucester.

Of Tower Ward: Peter de Cumbe, Edmund de Cumbe [and another, illegible].

Of the Ward of Crepelgate: Thomas Sely, Gregory Lorimer.

Of the Ward of Walebrock: William de Reed, Thomas de Waledene.

Lotheberi: Nicholas le Coffrer, Saer, le Especer.

Billingesgate: Robert le Treyere, Robert Pikeman.

Vintry: Reginald [le] Barber [and another, illegible].

Alegate: William de Hadham, Henry le Rous.

Bissopesgate: Thomas Broning, William Pointel.

Cordewanerstrate: John le Loung, Roger atte Vine.

Of the Ward of the Castle: (fn. 8) Simon Belimer (?), Thomas Aspelon.

Douuegate (Dounegate ?): Adam le Rey, William Canoun.

Langeburne: William Amis, Richard de Brofeud.

Bassieshawe: Richard de Can......, Henry Hautein.

Candlewystrate: Yvo de Witele, Walter Pain.

Aldridesgate: Henry de Kele, Peter Hungrie.

Folio 107 b [facieinversa.] (xxxj).

Saturday the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], 25 Edward I. [A.D. 1297], it was ordained—in the presence of Sir John Bretun, then Warden of the City; Thomas de Suffolk and Adam de Foleham, then Sheriffs; Sirs Stephen Eswy, Richard Eswy, William le Mazeliner, Walter de Finchingfeud, Thomas Romein, Richard de Gloucester, John de Canterbury, Adam de Rokele, Salomon le Cotiler, William de Bettoyne, John de Dunstaple, Henry le Bole, and John Wade, Aldermen; and by the underwritten, viz.:—

Of Tower Ward: John de Storteford, Elias de Bristoll, Geoffrey Hurel;

Of Bridge Ward: John le Benere, William de Lewes, John de Stebenhethe, Simon le Cotiler, Eustace le Cotiler, Anselm le Furbur;

Of the Ward of Candlewystrate: Matthew le Chaundeler, William Jurdan, Ivo de Wytele, Robert le Surgien;

Of the Ward of [Queen]hithe: William Bernard, Roger Bronig, Stephen Bernard;

Of Ludgate Within: William le Chaundeler, Andrew Mele, Henry de Belhus, John Vigerous, John Dachet, Thomas le Hattere;

The same Ward, without: Nicholas le Loung, Benedict le Speroner, Henry le Speroner, John le Chapeler, Richard Levesone, William Ediman, Roger de Fleg;

Of the Ward of Billingesgate: Stephen Pikeman, Robert le Treyere, William Pikeman, John Scharp, William Fatting';

Of the Ward of Walebrock: Fulk de St. Edmund, William de Reed, Henry de Bondene (Boudene ?), Thomas de Waledene, William de Nettlestede;

Of the Ward of Langeburne: William Amis, Gilbert le Mareschal, Walter de Kent, Clement le Pestur;

Of the Ward of Vintry: Robert Hardel, Reginald le Barber, Robert Hod;

Of the Ward of Bredstrate: Richard le Barber, Adam de la Rose, William de Beverle, Nicholas de Cauntebrege;

Of the Ward of "Wabrock": Fulk de St. Edmund, Thomas de Waledene, William de Reed, William de Nettlested; (fn. 9)

Of Bassieshawe: Philip de Norhampton, Henry Hauteyn;

Of Douuegate (Dounegate ?): William de Paris, Paul le Botiler, Alan de Neuberi, John de Seld, John de Armenters;

Of the Ward of Porsoken ✠ [sic]: Edmund Trentemars, John le Potter, Peter Berneval;

Of the Ward of Lotheberi: Godwyn le Feleper, Robert de Galebrock, Stephen de Uptone;

Of the Ward of Bissopesgate: Geoffrey de Hundesdich, William Pointel, Thomas Bronng [sic];

Of the Ward of Crepelgate: Adam de Hallingeberi, Stephen Hautein, Gregory le Botoner, Guy the Clerk, Vincent de Storteford, William atte Grane;

Of the Ward of Cheap: John le Chaucer, John le Coffrer, Simon de Paris, Walter de Herlefte, R[e]ginald de Frowick;

Folio 107 [facieinversa.] (xxxj b).

Of the Ward of Cordewanerstrate: John de Geldeford, William de Garthone, William de Storteford, Robert le Callere;

Of the Ward of Castle: Richard Poterel, Geoffrey Skot, Baudechoun le Bucher:—

that all and singular citizens and others residing in the City who this year paid to the lord the King the eighth penny of their goods and chattels, and others who have recently come to live and stay in the City, shall give to the collectors of the several Wards sixpence in the pound to discharge the debts of the City, viz.:—

For Martin de Aumbresberi, late Sheriff of London —100 marks.

Item, for expenses of John de Banquell going to the lord the King in parts of Scotland to conduct the Cardinal "Albin' (fn. 10) —40 marks.

Item, for a fine made to Sir Walter de Beauchamp, the Steward of the lord the King, for a certain trespass against him by young men of the City—50 marks.

Item, for an old debt due from the City to Adam de Foleham, Alderman, for fish bought of him—50 marks.

Item, for an old debt due from the City to "Duratus" the merchant and his fellows of the Society of the Pulci for promise (promissione) made to the lady the Queen on the coming of the lord the King from parts of France—£24.

Item, for a debt due from the City to Bonejoye the merchant for the City's affairs—£15.

Item, for a fee of Hugh de Notingham, clerk in the King's Exchequer, for allowance of 20,000 marks—£20.

Item, for a debt to five citizens by letter under the seal of the Commonalty—£35.

Item, for Walter de Finchingfeud—40s.

Item, for allowance of account—£1,048.

Folio 106 b [facieinversa.] (xxxij).

At a meeting of Aldermen, Friday the morrow of St. James, Ap. [25 July], 25 Edward I. [A.D. 1297]—John Bretun, Warden; Stephen Eswy, Richard Eswy, Nicholas de Farndone, Sir Robert de Basinge, John le Blound, William le Mazeliner, Adam de Foleham, Richard de Gloucester, Thomas Romein, William de Bettoyne, John de Dunstaple, John Wade—it was provided and ordained that the gates of the City should be kept by the underwritten Wards, viz.:—

Alegate by The Ward of Alegate.
Tower Ward.
Langeburne.
[Porsoken]. (fn. 11)
Limstrate.
Bissopesgate by The Ward of Bissopesgate.
Colemannestrate.
Lotheberi.
Walebrock.
Crepelgate by The Ward of Crepelgate.
The Ward of Chepe.
Bassieshawe.
Aldridesgate by The Ward of Aldridesgate.
The Ward of Bredstrate.
The Ward of Cordewanerstrate.
The gate of Neugate by Half the Ward of Neugate.
The Ward of Castle.
The Ward of Queenhithe.
The Ward of Cornhulle.
The gate of Ludgate by Half the Ward of Ludgate.
The Ward of Vintry.
The Ward of Douuegate.
The gate of London Bridge by The Ward of Bridge.
The Ward of Billinggesgate.
The Ward of Candlewystrate.

Folio 106 [facieinversa.] (xxxij b).

Thursday before Christmas [25 Dec.], 23 Edward I. [A.D. 1294], it was ordained by the Warden, Sheriffs, and Aldermen of the City that each night watch should be kept throughout the City as follows:—

The first night by the Warden and Sheriffs and their clerks and sergeants, &c., with horses and arms, &c.

The second night by John de Canterbury, the Prior of H. Trinity, Adam de Rokele, Adam de Foleham, Thomas Cros, and Martin Box.

The third night by Adam de Hallingberi, Elias Russel, Henry le Bole, Walter de Rokele, John Wade, John de Dunstaple.

The fourth night by Geoffrey de Northone, John le Blound, William le Mazeliner, Thomas Romein, Salomon le Cotiler, and William de Bethoyne.

The fifth night by John de Banquell, Stephen Eswy, Walter de Finchingfeud, Nicholas de Farndone, Richard Eswy, and Richard de Gloucester.

Nevertheless the watch shall be kept by wards as accustomed, and any Alderman being remiss in the premises as to watch shall be punished, &c.

[Here follows an ordinance as to mooring vessels at Billingsgate and Queenhithe, a translation of which is printed in the 'Memorials,' pp. 33-4.—Editor.]

Whereas a great number of misdoers and disturbers of the King's peace lie hid among the good men of the City, it is ordained that the better and more discreet engaged in the several trades of the City shall cause a register to be made of all the names of masters, their apprentices and servants, and diligently inquire among themselves as to the conduct and behaviour of all and singular so engaged. And if any be found of bad repute and behaviour, and unfit to remain in the City, they shall present such in rolls to the Warden and Aldermen at the Guildhall as often as need be, that the said Warden and Aldermen may do therein as may seem best for the welfare of the City, &c.

Folio 105 b [facieinversa.] (xxxiij).

[Here follow an ordinance as to watch and ward at the City gates, a translation of which appears in the 'Memorials' (p. 35), and a Royal proclamation as to the abolition of Prisage on certain commodities. The latter is dated Monday after the Feast of St. Bartholomew (24 Aug.), 25 Edward I. (A.D. 1297), and is printed in the 'Liber Custumarum' (Rolls Series), i. 71, 72.—Editor.]

Folio 105 [facieinversa.] (xxxiij b).

[Regulations for the safe keeping and cleaning of the streets, made on Thursday after the Feast of Exaltation of H. Cross (14 Sept.), 25 Edward I. (A.D. 1297). A translation printed in the 'Memorials,' p. 34.—Editor.]

Folio 104 b [facieinversa.] (xxxiiij).

[Ordinances for the safe keeping of the City, made at the Bishop of London's house at St. Paul's on the following Monday. A translation printed in the 'Memorials,' p. 35.—Editor.]

Friday after Michaelmas [29 Sept.], 25 Edward I. [A.D. 1297], it was ordained by John Bretun, Warden of the City, and the following Aldermen, viz., Stephen Eswy, Richard Eswy, John le Blound, Walter de Finchingfeud, John de Canterbury, Thomas Romein, Thomas Sely, William de Bettoyne, Thomas Cros, Salomon le Cotiler, and John de Dunstaple, that the gates of the City should be kept by the wards, and that the water of the Thames should be similarly guarded by the nearest wards as given below:—

Folio 104 [facieinversa.] (xxxiiij b).

The water of the Thames to the east of London Bridge to be kept by The Ward of Tower.
The Ward of Billinggesgate.
The water of the Thames to the west of London Bridge by The Ward of Vintry
The Ward of Queenhithe.
The Ward of Castle Beynard.
The gate of Lodgate by The Ward of Cordewanerstrate.
The Ward of Bredstrate.
The gate of Neugate by The whole Ward of Nicholas de Farndone within the gate.
The Ward of Colemannestrete.
The gate of Aldridesgate by The Ward of Aldridesgate.
The Ward of Walebrock Bassieshawe.
The gate of Crepelgate by The Ward of Crepelgate.
The Ward of Chepe.
The gate of Bissopesgate by The Ward of Bissopesgate.
The Ward of Lotheberi.
The merchants of Almaine upon the gate (super portam). (fn. 12)
The gate of Alegate by The Ward of Alegate.
The Ward of Langgeburne.
The Ward of Limstrate.
The Ward of Cornhulle.
The gate of London Bridge by The Ward of Bridge.
The Ward of Candlewystrate.

Folio 103 b [facieinversa.] (xxxv).

Nota bene et lege.

Saturday the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 26 Edward I. [A.D. 1297], John Bretun, Warden of the City, caused an assembly of all the Aldermen there present in the City and the Sheriffs, viz., Sir Robert de Basinges, citizen and knight, Sirs Stephen Eswy, Richard Eswy, William de Bettoyne, Adam de Rokele, John de Canterbury, John le Blound, Walter de Finchingfeud, Nicholas de Farndone, Richard de Gloucester, Geoffrey de Northone, Thomas Seli, Salomon le Cotiler, Thomas Romeyn, and Henry le Bole, Aldermen; John de Storteford and William de Storteford, Sheriffs, and six of the better and more discreet men of each ward [not named], and proclaimed as follows:—Whereas by the lord Edward, son of the illustrious King Edward [sic] (fn. 13) and his Council, the Barons of the Exchequer, the Bishops, the Earl of Hereford and the Earl Marshal, and other magnates of England then and there being present, injunction was laid upon him [the said John Bretun] by oath that he would keep the City of London and all the liberties and ancient customs of the same City unharmed as of old they used to have and had them, and that he would bear himself in all things as if he were Mayor in all the liberties and customs of the City aforesaid, save, however, that he should have the name of Warden (custos) in place of Mayor until he received other orders from the lord the King, who was staying in parts of Flanders engaged in his war.—And in the same assembly he restored to the Commonalty the common wharf in a ruinous condition, known as St. Botolph's Wharf, with all rents, ruins, and appurtenances.—It was adjudged and ordained by the same that three weighing-beams (statere) with their weights, recently ordained for weighing corn at the mills, be thenceforth altogether abolished.—And that the hurdles whereon they recently drew bakers through the City who had been convicted of false bread, that is to say, bread weighing less than it ought, should likewise be abolished, and that the said bakers should thenceforth have the punishment of the pillory; (fn. 14) likewise, the Tun (Thonellus (fn. 15) ) recently established should be abolished and not thenceforth used.

Folio 103 [facieinversa.] (xxxv b).

Littere domini Johannis de Brabaunt pro peticione cujus dam debiti tres cent' ma sterl'.

John, lord of Locher', Brabant, and Lembourck, (fn. 16) to the bailiffs and Commonalty of the City of London, greeting and all that is good. We send to put you in remembrance, as to our friends, of a debt that you have long owed to Symon de le Rye, our special friend and host, and other burgesses of Gaunt, (fn. 17) as appears by your letters in his possession. We pray and require satisfaction of the same, &c. [No date].

Litere civium Lond' responsales.

Recital and verification under seal, by Seiger de Brelo, Prior of the Order of Preaching Friars of Ghent, and Friar John called "de Hest," Warden of the Friars Minors of the same place, dated at Ghent, the fourth day after the octave of the Epiphany [6 Jan.], A.D. 1296[-7], of a deed whereby John Adrian and Luke de Batecor, Bailiffs of London, (fn. 18) and the whole com mune (communa) of the said City covenanted to pay to William de York and Baldwin Bec, merchants of Ghent, the sum of 730 marks, part of a sum of 1,030 marks advanced by the said merchants, jointly with John, son of Alexander, and Peter called "de Curia," to King Henry III., the money to be paid out of the fine due to the King for recovering his favour, (fn. 19) by such instalments and at such times as set out, under penalty of distress. Dated in the Husting of London, (fn. 20) xiv. Kal. October [16 Sept.], A.D. 1267.

Folio 101 b [facieinversa.] (xxxvij).

Tuesday before the Sunday on which Letare Jerusalem is sung, (fn. 21) anno 26 Edward I. [A.D. 1297-8], it was ordained, in the presence of Sir John Bretun, then Warden of the City of London; John de Storteford and William de Storteford, then Sheriffs; John de Banquell, Richard Eswy, Nicholas de Farndone, John de Dunstaple, William de Bettoyne, Walter de Finchingfeud, Thomas Romein, Adam de Rokele, Adam de Foleham, John le Blound, John de Canterbury, Geoffrey de Northone, and Henry le Bole, Aldermen; [and] by four or six of each ward as follows:—

The Ward of Tower: William de Gillingham, William de Kent, John de Stratford, Peter Boyhz;

Langgeburne: Gilbert le Mareschal, William Amis, Walter de Kidemenstre, Hugh de Stebenhethe;

Cornhulle: William le Lou, Roger le Ferrun, Richard le Convers, Ralph de Honilane;

Walebrock: Fulk de St. Edmund, Thomas de Suffolk, William de Reed, Thomas de Waledene;

Ward of Castle Beynard: Richard Poterel, Thomas le Blound, John Baudchoun, Peter de Edelmetone;

Ludgate Within and Without: John Vigerous, Richard de Hokele, Roger de Lintone, Richard Mel, William Passemer, John Bogeys;

Billingesgate: Robert le Treyer', John de Mockinge, Richard Wolmer, William Sorweles;

Alegate: Roger le Rede, Robert Lorchoun, Robert de Caumpede, William de Suffolk;

Bassieshawe: Henry Hautein, Richard le Pentur, Thomas le Fundour, William Smart;

Douuegate (Dounegate ?): [blank];

Aldridesgate: Nicholas Brun, Henry de Keles, Robert Gange, Peter de Hungrie;

Ward of Chepe: William Delisle, Roger le Barber, John de Pesemers, Robert de Thorney, Peter de Norwis, John de Ripelowe;

Ward of Bissopesgate: William Pointel, Thomas Broning, Nicholas atte Lofte, Hubert de Bissopesgate;

Ward of Porsoken ✠ [ sic]: [blank];

Colemannestrate: [blank];

Bradestrate: Stephen le Chaucer, John le Botoner, senior, Adam de Horsham, Nicholas le Coffrer;

Ward of Bridge: John Benere, Richard Horn, John de Stebenhethe, Walter Gubbe;

Candlewystrate: [blank];

Vintry: Robert Hardel, Adam Wade, Thomas le Barb', Reginald Barber;

Crepelgate: Robert de Worchestede, John le Loung, Reginald de Meldeburne, John le Normaund;

Cordewanerstrate: John de Hakeburne, John de Staundone, William Heyroun, Roger de Springgewelle;

Ward of Queenhithe: Robert de Chalfhunte, Roger Broning, William de Medelane, Robert Leman;

Bredstrate: William de Beverle, William de Wouburne, Robert de Gloucester, William Cok, "fruter," Richard Matefrey;

Limstrate: Gilbert le March[al], Clement le Seur,—

that all and singular citizens and others residing in the City, and who gave to the lord the King the ninth penny of their goods, and all others recently come to live and stay in the City shall give to the collectors appointed for that collection of their goods, viz., of every pound six pence, up to a hundred pounds, to be given to the lord the King as of right (de debito) at his coming from the parts of Flanders for his war. (fn. 22)

Recognizances of Debts, anno 3 Edward II., temp. Richard Poterel, Chamberlain, continued.

Folio 109 b (xxix). [facieinversa.]

cognicio.

vjd.

Monday after the Feast of St. Ambrose [4 April], 3 Edward II. [A.D. 1310], came John de Hanyfeld, taverner, before the Mayor and Chamberlain and acknowledged himself bound to Thomas "des Arches" in the sum of 5 marks; to be paid, viz., one moiety at Pentecost and the other in the quinzaine of the Nativity of St. John Bapt., and unless, &c.

cognicio.

xd.

The same day the aforesaid John came before the Chamberlain and acknowledged himself indebted to Bernard Johan, "de vico majori," and Peter de Bourdeaux, his merchant, of Gascony, in the sum of 100s.; to be paid, viz., one moiety at the Feast of the Ascension and the other at Midsummer, &c.

cognicio.

nil quia aldr'.

Wednesday after the above Feast came Laurence le Fevere and acknowledged himself indebted to William de Leyre, Alderman, in the sum of 40s.; to be paid within three weeks after Easter, &c.

cognicio.

iiijs.

Thursday before Palm Sunday [12 April] came William Servat before the Mayor, Aldermen, and Chamberlain and acknowledged himself indebted to "Fresotto" de Monte Claro and "Totto" his brother and John de Monte Claro in the sum of £24; to be paid in the quinzaine of the Nativity of St. John Bapt., &c.

cognicio.

nil quia aldr'.

The following Saturday came John Jakke, tiler, before the Chamberlain and acknowledged himself indebted to William de Leyre, Alderman, in the sum of 9s.; to be paid within the quinzaine of Easter, &c.

cognicio.

vd.

The following Monday came William de Hereford, armourer, and acknowledged himself indebted to Jacobin "Coudirario" (fn. 23) (?), of Milan, in the sum of 52s.; to be paid in the quinzaine of the Nativity of St. John Bapt., &c.

cognicio.

vjd.

The same day came Michael le Bret and acknowledged himself bound to Robert de Actone in the sum of 5 marks; to be paid at Michaelmas, &c.

cognicio.

iijs viijd.

The vigil of Easter [17 April] came Anabilla, relict of Geoffrey de Bek, before the Mayor and Chamberlain and acknowledged herself bound to John [de] Pinza Aquila de "Jenes," (fn. 24) citizen of London, and Francis Bachemo de "Jenes" in the sum of £22; to be paid within the octave of Pentecost, &c.

cognicio.

vijs. vjd.

The same day the above Anabilla, in the name of her late husband, acknowledged herself indebted to the above John and Francis in the sum of £45 5s. 10d., which she promised to pay as soon as she recovered the debts due to her late husband, &c. And for so doing she bound herself fide media, &c.

cognicio.

viijd.

The same day came John le "Tapicer" de Fletestrete before the Chamberlain and acknowledged himself bound to John de Boreford in the sum of £4 7s.; to be paid within eight days of the Nativity of St. John Bapt., &c.; and unless, &c.

(Thereupon the said J. de Boreford came on 28 April, anno 4 Edward II., and acknowledged he had received of the above John le "Tapiser" the sum of 53s. 4d. of the debt; and there were delivered to the same John le "Tapicer" four new bankers, (fn. 25) which had been taken upon [super] the said debtor for the aforesaid debt, and this with the assent of the creditor.)

cognicio.

ijd.

Saturday the morrow of SS. Philip and James [1 May] came John le Borgiloun, saddler, and acknowledged himself bound to William le Taillur in the sum of 20s.; to be paid at the Feast of Pentecost, &c.

Footnotes

1 Referring to the Inspeximus Charter, dated 8 Nov., 11 Edward II., entered in Letter-Book E, fo. 83 b. The writ and charter of Henry III. are entered in 'Liber Horn' (fos. 287 b et seq.), where a reference is given to this entry in Letter-Book B. They are also set out in the 'Liber Memorandorum' (fos. 13-14), but the date of the charter is there given as 41 Henry III.
2 Afterwards Broad Street Ward.
3 Ward of Bishopsgate.
4 In the previous year the King had renounced his fealty to France, and a French force had recently landed at Dover and been beaten off with loss.
5 Probably the None or Noon Fair. In the abstract of this passage given in the 'Memorials' (p. 33) Riley appears to have misread these words as The Neue Feyre, being apparently misled by the statement that the Fair had been recently established or renewed (de novo factum). A Fair known as la Novele Feyre (or the New Fair) existed at the time, but this appears to have been held in the parish of St. Nicholas Acons, far away from Soper Lane. See will of Gilbert de Chippestede, 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Husting, London,' i. 133.
6 Literally, "leagues."
7 See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 11n.
8 Castle Baynard.
9 It will be seen that the representatives of Walbrook Ward are entered twice, with the exception of Henry de Bondene.
10 Cardinal Albano, who had recently arrived in England, and had proceeded to Berwick to negotiate with the King touching a truce between England and France. Rishanger, 'Chron.' (Rolls Series, No. 28), vol. ii. p. 166.
11 Struck out.
12 The portion of the gate assigned to the Hanse merchants (in a "Composition" made between the City and them in 1282) for repair and defence was the upper portion, although in 1287 we find a new position assigned to them (under the title of "Danes") for purpose of defence, viz., the centre of the gate, with men of the ward stationed above and beneath them See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 228; Introd., p. xii.
13 Mistake for Henry.
14 It was in the tenth year of Edward I. [A.D. 1281-2], during the mayoralty of Henry le Galeys or Waleys, that corn was ordered to be weighed on going to the mill and the flour on its return, and that the punish ment of the hurdle was instituted for fraudulent bakers. It was at the same time ordained that the Mayor for the time being should provide weights and balances (balancias), hire places where the corn might be so weighed, and appoint officers to superintend the Pesage. 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' pp. 120-1, 208; 'Liber Albus' (Rolls Series), i. 354-355; 'Liber Cust.' (Rolls Series), i. 292, 328, 329; Aungier's 'French Chron.' (Riley's translation), p. 240.
15 It was also in 1282, according to Stow, that Galeys erected a prison for night-walkers and other suspicious persons, "called the Tun upon Corne hill, because the same was built some what in fashion of a tun standing on the one end." It was not until the fifteenth century that it was converted into a cistern, known as the Conduit upon Cornhill; whilst a pair of stocks for night- walkers and a pillory for offending bakers and others were set up hard by.—'Survey,' Thoms's ed., pp. 71, 72.
16 John "the Victorious," Count of Louvain, Duke of Brabant and Lim burg, whose son married Margaret, daughter of Edward I. of England.
17 Gand or Ghent.
18 In November., 1266, William Fitz Richard, whom the King had ap pointed Warden of the City, was removed, and John Adrian and Luke de Batencurt had been elected by the citizens as Bailiffs of the City and of Middlesex ('Chron. of Mayors and Sheriffs,' p. 93).
19 Probably refers to a fine for the letters patent dated 16 June, A.D. 1267 ('Chron. of Mayors and Sheriffs,' pp. 98-100).
20 No Husting Roll for the year mentioned is extant.
21 Mid-Lent Sunday, so called from the first words of the introit for the day.
22 The King had embarked for Flanders on 22 Aug., 1297, and returned on 14 March, 1298, after making a truce with France.
23 This word possibly means a tailor See Migne's 'Lexicon,' s.v. 'Coudrerius'.
24 Infra, p. 250, "Jenue," i.e., Genoa.
25 Banquer'; a covering of cloth or tapestry, or cushion, for a bank or bench.


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Folios 100b - 96b