Folios lxxx - lxxxix

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1901

Pages

129-153

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'Folios lxxx - lxxxix', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: C: 1291-1309 (1901), pp. 129-153. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33061 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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Folio lxxx.

Breve Reg' pro Waltero de Wyke et Matild' de la More uxore sua.

Edward, &c., to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London. Whereas Walter de Wyk and Matilda his wife had impleaded in the Husting John de Laufare, declaring that he had no right of entry into a certain messuage until the expiration of a grant of the same made by John de Pontefract, a former husband of the said Matilda, to Abraham Motun, a Jew; and whereas the said John de Laufare claims the messuage by virtue of a grant made by us after the messuage had become escheated to us on the exile of the said Jew; (fn. 1) and whereas search has been made for the aforesaid conveyance of the messuage to the Jew among the Rolls of our Justices lately assigned for ward of the Jews and cannot be found, we command you to cause the Rolls of the Husting to be searched for enrolments of any documents whereby the said Matilda can be barred of action. Witness ourself at Westminster, the 7th day of March, the thirty-first year of our reign [A.D. 1302-3].

Returnum.

We have caused the Rolls of recognizances, deeds, and writings enrolled in the Husting of London temp. Henry the late King, and likewise of the present King to be searched, and it does not appear that the aforesaid Matilda made any recognizance of the tenement mentioned in the above writ, which writ, thus endorsed, was returned under the common seal on Thursday the eve of All Saints [1 Nov.], 31 Edward I. [A.D. 1303].

Solucio Ricardi de Wollechirch' de £xix.

Friday after the Feast of St. Edward, K. [13 Oct.], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], Richard de Wollechirchehawe came before John le Blound, Mayor, John de Wangrave, Richer de Refham, Richard de Gloucestre, and Nicholas Pycot, Aldermen, and others of the Commonalty, and paid to the Commonalty the sum of £19 (which had been assigned to him by the executors of William de Wollechirchehawe (fn. 2) with the assent of Master William de Bray, the official of the Archdeacon of London, and of Master Philip Martel, clerk) for the repair of the pavement within Bisshopesgate, for the good of the soul of the said William de Wollechirchehawe, &c. An acquittance given for the money.

Folio lxxx b.

Litera W. Ep'i Cestrie pro Rogero de Lincoln'.

Letter from Walter [de Langton], Bishop of Chester, Treasurer of the lord the King, to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London, &c., commanding them, on the King's behalf, to produce before him at the Exchequer at York on the day after St. Michael the body of Roger de "Nichole," (fn. 3) then imprisoned in Neugate for a trespass committed against Hugh Pourte, Sheriff of London, together with record of proceedings, &c. Dated at "la Grave," 5 Sept. And it was sealed with the Bishop's privy seal, and remains in the Chamber.

Responsum.

Reply to the above letter to the effect that such a proceeding would be contrary to the franchise of the City, for the record could only be made at St. Martin le Grand. (fn. 4)

Recognicio Roberti de Cornedale.

Saturday the eve of All Saints [1 Nov.], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], Robert de Cornedale (Corvedale?), clerk, came before Sirs John le Blond, Mayor, John de Wangrave, Walter de Finchingfeld, Richer de Refham, Richard de Gloucestre, Salamon le Cotiller, [and] Nicholas Pycot, Aldermen, and gave pledges to the aforesaid Mayor and Aldermen for having abused Robert de Suttone, a serjeant, in their presence, &c. And the said Mayor and Aldermen condoned the trespass hac vice, &c. And the said Robert bound himself to give 40s. to the fabric of London Bridge if he should be found a delinquent again, &c. (fn. 5) .

Manucapcio Thome de Frowyk pro custodia liberor' Willelmi de Lewes.

The same day Robert de Gloucestre and William le Bret, goldsmiths, came before the aforesaid Mayor and Aldermen and bound themselves jointly and severally on behalf of Thomas de Frowyk, goldsmith, that he would be a faithful guardian of Edmund and John, aged respectively twelve and eight years, children of William de Lewes, deceased, and of their property, and would render true account of the same, &c.

[cedula.]

Transcript of Two Deeds in the Possession of Thomas de Frowyk.

(1) Deed of grant by Edmund Trentemars, Alan le Cirger, and Benedict de Bourck (or de Burgo), executors of the will of William de Lewes, proved and enrolled in the Husting held on Monday before the Feast of St. Andrew, Ap. [30 Nov.], 31 Edward I. [A.D. 1302], (fn. 6) to Alice, relict of the said William, and to Edmund and John their sons, of a certain house in the parish of St. Martin Orgar de Candelwikstrete, to hold to the said Alice for life with remainder to the said sons in tail, with remainders over. Witnesses, John le Blound, Mayor, Simon de Paris and Hugh Pourte, Sheriffs, and Adam de Fulham, Alderman of the Ward, (fn. 7) &c. No date.

(2) Deed of grant by the same to the same of an annual quitrent issuing from a tenement formerly held by William de Lewes in the parish of St. Botolph towards Billingesgate, to be held as above. Witnesses, the Mayor and Sheriffs as above, Elyas Russel, Alderman of the Ward, (fn. 8) William Pykeman, Richard Wolmar, Henry Poteman, Thomas de Wrotham, William de Sandwych, Simon de Grascherche, &c.

Folio lxxxi.

Preceptum super Statutum pro Johanne de Bauquelle.

Precept by John le Blund, the Mayor, to the Sheriffs of London to take the body of Wolmar de Essex for non-payment of a debt of 60 marks due under a letter of statute to Sir John de "Bauquelle," and to make a return to the Mayor on Monday after the Feast of St. Luke [18 Oct.], 31 Edward I. [A.D. 1303]. Return made to the effect that after the receipt of the precept Wolmar de Essex was not found in their bailiwick.

Another precept to the same to take the body of the said Wolmar, if found within their bailiwick, or levy the money on his property lying in their bailiwick, on Sunday the Feast of St. Katherine [25 Nov.], 14 Edward I. [A.D. 1285].

Breve Reg pro eligendo collector' custumarum novar' domino Regi concessar.

Writ to the Mayor and Aldermen of London for the election of two collectors of the custom on wool, woolfels, and skins (fn. 9) in the City, the collectors to appear before the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer at York in the octave of the Purification B. M. [2 Feb.]. Witness, W[alter de Langton], Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, at York, 19 Nov., 31 Edward I. [A.D. 1303].

Returnum.

Return made to the effect that the writ was delivered so late, viz., on the eve of the Purification, by John de Rome, that it. could not be executed. The bearer of the writ had been placed under arrest for his negligence.

[cedula].

Precept by the Mayor and the Sheriffs for the arrest of Wolmar de Essex.

Folio lxxxi b.

De Johanne de Wangrave jur' in recordatorem.

Monday after the Feast of Conversion of St. Paul [25 Jan.], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1303-4], before Sirs John le Blund, the Mayor, John de Burreforth, Sheriff, William de Betoyne, Walter de Finchingfeld, William de Leyre, Thomas Romeyn, Adam de Foleham, John de Canterbury, Nicholas de Farndone, Simon de Paris, John de Dunstaple, Richard de Gloucestre, Henry de Gloucestre, Adam de Rokesle, Hugh Pourte, Thomas Sely, Richer de Refham, Nicholas Pycot, [and] John de Vintry, Aldermen, came John de Wangrave, Alderman, and was sworn to well and truly render all judgments in the Husting after the Mayor and Aldermen have come from consultation and have arrived at an agreement, and also all other judgments touching the Commonalty of London, &c. And that he will do justice as well to poor as the rich. And that all pleas in the Husting immediately after the Husting is closed he will survey, set in order, and cause to be enrolled according as they have been pleaded, &c. And that he will come prepared to expedite the business of the City, where and when he shall have been lawfully forewarned by the Mayor and bailiffs, (fn. 10) &c. For which trouble the aforesaid Mayor and Aldermen have agreed to give the said John £10 sterling per annum out of their Chamber, and 20 pence for every deed, writing, and testament enrolled in the aforesaid Husting, &c.

De Gilber to Cros jur' in custodem Pontis London'.

The same day came Gilbert Cros, fishmonger, in the full Husting for Pleas of Land, and was sworn to well and faithfully receive all issues of rents of London Bridge, and also all other money accruing to the said bridge from whatever cause from that day forward, and to expend the same well and faithfully for the use and benefit of the aforesaid bridge, and well and faithfully to render account thereof, where and when forewarned by the Mayor and Aldermen, &c.

Composicio inter cives Wynton' et London'.

Monday before the Feast of Annunciation B. M. [25 March], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1303-4], John le Blound, Mayor of London, William de Leyre, John de Wangrave, Thomas Romeyn, Walter de Finchingfeld, Richard de Gloucestre, Nicholas de Farndone, John de Dunstaple, Nicholas Pycot, Thomas Sely, [and] Hugh Pourte, Aldermen, John de Burreforth, Sheriff, and other citizens, on behalf of themselves and the Commonalty of the City of London, and Roger de Enkepenne, Mayor of the City of Winchester, and John de Kirkeby his fellow-citizen, on behalf of themselves and the Commonalty of the said City, having met together to treat of certain disputes that had arisen between them on account of divers customs taken from citizens of Winchester in London by bailiffs of London, and having put forward reasons on either side, the aforesaid dispute was arranged in the following manner, viz., that all citizens of Winchester of their guild merchant should be quit in the said City of London of pontage, murage, and pannage, and of other customs whatsoever to be taken of their merchandise, except tronage of wool of old given, viz., 6d. on the first sack and 5d. on every subsequent sack, and except the custom on skins and woolfels, and likewise customs taken at the Queenhithe, of which they cannot be quit although they make their challenge, &c. And that all citizens of London should be quit of all customs in the City of Winchester, as of pontage, pannage, murage, and other customs and tolls whatsoever. And for the perpetual memorial of this fact this agreement has been enrolled on the paper at the Guildhall of London in the presence of the Mayors, Aldermen, and citizens aforesaid. (fn. 11)

Folio lxxxii.

Statutes of Poultry and Fish made during the Mayoralty of Henry le Waleys. (fn. 12)

Folio lxxxii b.

Manucapcio Rogeri de Lincolnia.

Monday the octave of St. Martin [11 Nov.], 31 Edward I. [A.D. 1303], came John de Rokesle, corder, Gregory le Bokeler, draper (draparius), Walter de Walepol, goldsmith, Henry de Faveresham, "cordwaner," Thomas Beauflour, vintner; and Walter de Creye, "toundour," (fn. 13) before Walter de Finchingfeld, the locum tenens of Sir John le Blund, the Mayor, William de "Combemartin," John de "Borrreforch," Sheriff, John de Canterbury, Ralph de Honilane, Henry de Gloucestre, Nicholas de Farndone, and Nicholas Pycot, Aldermen, and received from them the body of Roger de Lincoln, draper, convicted of a trespass against Hugh Pourte, Sheriff of London, to produce him before the Mayor and Aldermen on the morrow of St. Thomas the Apostle next to receive judgment; in default, the same bound themselves jointly and severally in the sum of £30 to the Mayor and Commonalty. They further undertook that no harm should come to Hugh Pourte, Adam de Foleham, Richer de Refham, and Katherine de Lincoln from the said Roger or his following (secta sua), under fitting penalty. And the said Roger came and pledged the King's peace in form aforesaid, &c.

(Afterwards came Peter le Rey, "draper," before the Chamberlain on Monday after the Feast of St. Andrew, Ap. [30 Nov.], and undertook to pay on behalf of the said Roger to the Commonalty the sum of 20s. due for the tallage of £1,000 unless, &c. Afterwards, viz., on the aforesaid Monday, the said Roger came before the Mayor and Aldermen and made his fine for £10, to be paid on the morrow of Clausum Pasche.)

Secundum breve Reg' pro eligendo collector' novarum custumar' domino Regi concessarum.

Another writ to the Mayor and Aldermen for the election of two collectors of the custom on wool, woolfels, and skins in the City, the names of those elected to be sent to the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer at York by the morrow of Clausum Pasche, unless W[alter de Langton], Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, and Roger de Hegham, or either of them, previously come into the City, in which case the said collectors shall take the oath of office before them Dated York, 16 Feb., 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1303-4].

Returnum.

Return made to the effect that the collectors of the custom of the lord the King in the City had hitherto been appointed by the King and his Council, and the citizens had never appointed such officers. Accordingly nothing was done by the writ.

Folio lxxxiii.

De mensurarus Wysde et abrocar' jur'.

Saturday after the Feast of St. Edmund, K. [20 Nov.], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1303]-before Sir John le Blund, Mayor, Thomas Romeyn, Richard de Gloucestre, John de Canterbury, Nicholas de Farndone, and Nicholas Pycot-Richard le Clerk and William de Canterbury were sworn to faithfully measure woad, as well for buyers as for sellers, &c. And before the woad merchants of Candelwykstrete, (fn. 14) and before Gilbert de Veer, John Fowace, and James Dek, merchants of woad from parts beyond the sea, &c., and before the above mentioned, and on the day aforesaid, Wybert de Abbevile was sworn a broker of woad to testify justice and truth and nothing else, as well for buyer as seller, &c.

Cognicio Johannis de Sellingge pro pixide recepta de Johanne le Benere.

Tuesday the morrow of St. Katherine, V. [25 Nov.], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1303], came John de Sellingge, apothecary, before the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, and acknowledged the receipt of a certain box which had been deposited with John le Benere as security for the payment of a sum of 60 marks to Master Peter de Paris, apothecary to the Queen of England, by the Commonalty of "Gernemue" (Yarmouth). (fn. 15)

Custodia Stepham et Sarre liberor' Thome Ferbraz defuncti.

Tuesday the eve of the Annunciation B. M. [25 March], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1303-4], came Richard de Welleforth, "chaucer," Thomas de Winchester, bureller, and Robert Inn, fishmonger, before John le Blound, Mayor, William de Leyre, John de Wangrave, Walter de Finchingfeld, Adam de Foleham, Hugh Pourte, Nicholas de Farndone, [and] Nicholas Pycot, Aldermen, and mainprised Nicholas de Northwode called "de Garderoba," who had been appointed guardian of Stephen and Sarah, the children of Thomas Ferbraz, for the due performance of his duties.

Folio lxxxiiib.

Commissio dominorum Rogeri de Hegham, W. de Glouc' et J. Sandale.

Royal Commission appointing Roger de Hegham, Walter de Gloucestre, and John de Sandale (fn. 16) assessors of a tallage about to be levied (fn. 17) in the cities, boroughs, and royal demesnes within the counties of Kent, Middlesex, London, Surrey, and Sussex Dated Dunfermelyn, 6 Feb., 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1303-4].

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London notifying the appointment of the above assessors. Dated Dunfermelin, 6 Feb.

Writ from the above assessors to the same to cause all the Aldermen and twelve men from each Ward to appear before them at the Guildhall on Saturday [no date].

Breve de Scaccario.

Writ to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen of the City for the speedy getting in of the tallage outstanding, and delivery of the money to John de Sandale. Witness, W[alter de Langton], Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, the King's Treasurer at York, the 15th day of May, 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304].

Folio lxxxiv.

Breve R' de literasubnomi nibus Giraldi de Sanguinetto et Johannis de S Petro mercator' de Barona aa Cancellariam mittenda.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London for the delivery to Arnald de St. Martin of two letters under the names of Giraldus de Sanguinetto and John de St. Peter, merchants of Bayonne, sealed with the seal of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, late the King's deputy in the Duchy of Aquitaine, and containing the sum of £148, which letters had been seized in the custody of John de Listowe; of which sum the said Giraldus and John had received £24 15s. out of the issues of the new custom on wool, and the residue, viz., £123 5s., they had sold to John Blank' and William de Laur', citizens of Bayonne, who were indebted to the King for the goods of William de Sant' (Saut' ?), late citizen of Bayonne, deceased. Dated Sandford, 8 April, 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304].

Return made to the effect that they had delivered to Arnald de St. Martin the two letters in a box, sealed with their seals, for transmission into the Chancellery as prescribed in the writ.

Breve pro Johanne le Leutour de acquietacione tallagii R'.

Roger de Hegham, Walter de Gloucestre, and John de Sandale to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen, notifying the receipt of the King's writ, dated at "Inverkethyn," 13 April, 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], to the effect that John le Leutour should be exempted from tallage, such exemption having been granted at the instance of Edmund the King's brother and of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, with the assent of the citizens of London, and bidding them see that the King's orders were executed. Dated at York, 27 April, the year aforesaid.

Consideracio quod Johannes le Leutour non assideatur ad tall' quia habet cartam Reg'.

Friday before the Feast of St. Laurence [10 Aug.], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], came John le Leutour before Sirs John le Blound, Mayor, John de Wangrave, Walter de Finchingfeld, Simon de Paris, Salamon le Cotiller, [and] Nicholas Pycot, Aldermen, and complained that the Serjeant of the Chamber of the Guildhall and other bailiffs of the City had unlawfully distrained him for the fifteenth granted to the King in the Parliament at Lincoln, in the twenty-ninth year of his reign, contrary to the terms of the charter of exemption from such burdens granted to him by King Edward I., and now produced. It was thereupon ordered that his name should be removed from the Roll, and that he should not in future be assessed.

Carta Johannis le Leutour.

Charter of exemption from assessments (mentioned supra) granted to the above John le Leutour at the instance of Edmund the King's brother and of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln. Dated Westminster, 26 Aug., 23 Edward I. [A.D. 1295].

Folio lxxxiv b.

Proclamacio pro vad' vendena'.

Sunday the morrow of St. James [25 July], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], public proclamation made by Thomas Juvenal, the Common Serjeant, throughout the City that all those of whom pledges had been taken for debts due to the King or to the City should redeem them within the next eight days, &c., otherwise they would be sold.

Cognicio Johannis le Mirourer merceris London'.

A settlement of differences between Roger de Paris and the Commonalty of the Mercery of London, plaintiffs, and John le Mirourer, defendant, made on Wednesday after the Feast of St. James, Ap. [25 July], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], in the presence of Henry de Suttone, Warden of the Friars Minors of London, John de Wangrave, William de Leyre, Simon de Paris, Richer de Refham, mercer, and Nicholas Pycot, Chamberlain, and many others [not named], viz., that the defendant pledged to the aforesaid mercers the sum of £20; whereof £10 are remitted altogether; 100s. are respited, and only to be paid in the event of another delinquency; and 100s. the defendant undertakes to pay to the work of the Chapel of the Blessed Mary of the Pui (de Podeo (fn. 18) ) on the Feast of St. Bartholomew next, unless he find some further favour. He, moreover, swore on the Holy Gospels not to draw off any merchant from the aforesaid trade, nor avow the goods of any foreigner, nor do any injury to any one of the trade, &c. And Walter, his brother and apprentice, came and took a similar oath.

Afterwards, viz., on Thursday after the Feast of St. Giles [1 Sept.], the year aforesaid, the said John le Mirourer paid to Andrew de Staunforth, skinner, Peter de Sparham, William Hasard, and John de Etone, mercers, 100s. of the aforesaid recognizance, and they bound themselves severally and jointly to acquit him against the Commonalty of the Mercery of London.

Inquisicio pro nocte vagantibus.

Saturday the eve of All Saints [1 Nov], 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], an inquisition taken by John le Blound, Mayor, John de Lincoln, Sheriff, John de Wangrave, and the rest of the Aldermen [not named], as to disturbers of the King's peace, &c. The jurors-viz., Stephen le Naylere, John le Disshere, Osebert de Braye, John le Barber de Melkestrete, Ralph de la Barre, goldsmith, Nicholas Wastel, cook, Robert "Hewe," (fn. 19) John de Fincham, William de Bodele, Roger le Bourser, Richard le Barber de Bredstrete, Roger de Arcubus, William Lefchild, "seler," William de Gloucestre, John Brice, "seler," William Sone, cook, [and] William le Salter, barber (fn. 20) -find John, son of Roger de Redingge, Robert and Hugh de la Marche, tailors, William, servant of the aforesaid Roger, John le Bole, tailor, William de Pasham, tailor, Philip the Tailor, servant of William de Kent, John le Bole, "cordwaner," and Roger, the brother of William de Siningham, "cordwaner," guilty of assault and disturbers of the peace. Precept for their arrest and imprisonment.

In like manner, John Blome, clerk of the church of St. Peter de Wodestrete, was indicted on the oath of Ranulph Balle and others, as appears on the panel, (fn. 21) for having joined some of the persons aforesaid in an assault with swords and other arms and disturbing the peace on the previous Friday. Precept for his arrest, &c. (fn. 22)

Litera Episcopi Cestrie.

Letter from Walter [de Langton], Bishop of Chester, to the Mayor of London to make inquiry as to the imprisonment of the Lady of Leukenore, concerning which the said Mayor would learn more from William Waldeschef the bearer. Dated York, the eve of All Saints [1 Nov]. (fn. 23)

(The letter arrived on Sunday the octave of All Saints, anno 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304]).

Folio lxxxv.

Saturday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304], Reginald de Thunderlee rendered account before Sirs John le Blound, Mayor, John de Wangrave, Nicholas Pycot, the late Chamberlain, and Richard Poterel, the present Chamberlain.

Manucapcio pro bonis Johannis le Benere.

Friday after the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5], came Adam, son of John le Benere, Robert de Mockingge, John Fros, and James le Reve, before Sirs John le Blound, Mayor, John de Wangrave, Thomas Romeyn, William de Leyre, Walter de Finchingfeld, Nicholas de Farndone, John de Armenters, John de Vintry, Richard de Gloucestre, Salamon le Cotiller, Simon de Paris, Nicholas Pycot, Ralph de Honilane, Aldermen, John de Lincoln and Roger de Paris, Sheriffs, and Richard Poterel, Chamberlain, and mainprised the goods of John le Benere, deceased, late warden of London Bridge, then attached, and bound themselves to satisfy the Commonalty and London Bridge of the sum of £30, if it be found that the said John was to that extent indebted.

Breve Reg' pro Henr' Naes.

Writs to all bailiffs, &c., not to molest Henry Naes, who, although a Fleming, was not an enemy of the King of France, and therefore did not come under the recent proclamation that all Flemings should quit the realm of England before Midsummer last (fn. 24) Dated at Tyd, (fn. 25) 24 Jan, 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5]. And Remund de la Brue, at whose suit the goods of the aforesaid Henry had been attached as being those of a Fleming, being summoned to show cause why they should not be delivered up, appeared on Friday after the Purification before the Mayor and Aldermen and said nothing against the delivery of the goods. It was therefore adjudged that they should be given up, &c.

Cognicio Rogeri de Lincolnia.

Friday after the octave of the Purification [2 Feb.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5], came Roger de Lincoln, draper, before John de Wangrave and Richard Poterel, the Chamberlain, and acknowledged himself indebted to William de Trente, Walter de Waldeshef, Andrew de Staunford, skinner, and Richard de Bluntesham, in the sum of 100s., payable in the event of his being convicted of a trespass at any time against any one of them, and unless, &c.

A dispute which had arisen between Sir John le Blound, Mayor of London, on the one part, and Nicholas Pycot, formerly Chamberlain of the Guildhall of London, on the other part, touching payments made to divers persons contained in an indenture made between the Keeper of the Wardrobe of the lord the King and the Mayor and citizens of London, in the office of the Sausery (Salsarie (fn. 26) ), amounting to the sum of £6 19s. 4d., was set at rest on the following terms on Monday the morrow of St. Valentine the Martyr in the month of February, anno 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5]., viz. : that the aforesaid John will pay 70s. and Nicholas Pycot 70s. to the Bishop of Chester, assignee of John le Sauser de London, &c. And the aforesaid John, the Mayor, wills and grants that the said Nicholas shall retain and receive twopence out of all the money raised thereon, and the Mayor himself one penny, until the said Nicholas shall have recovered and received the said 70s., &c.

Folio lxxxv b.

Breve R' pro ij civibus mittend' ad parliamentum.

Writ to the Sheriffs of London for the election of two citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on Tuesday in the quinzaine of the Purification B. M. [2 Feb.] next ensuing. Dated at "Brustwyk," (fn. 27) 12 Nov., 32 Edward I. [A.D. 1304]. (fn. 28) Pursuant to the above, Walter de Finchingfeld and William de Combemartin were sent, &c., by the following letter.

Comissio ij civium ad parliamentum R'.

Letter from John le Blound, Mayor, the Aldermen, Sheriffs, and the whole Commonalty of the City to the King, announcing the election of the above Walter de Finchingfeld and William de Combemartin to represent them in the coming Parliament. Dated Thursday after Ash Wednesday [3 March], (fn. 29) 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5].

Obligacio communi sigillo sigillata de cc mar'.

A bond sealed with the common seal of the City, whereby the Mayor and Commonalty acknowledge themselves indebted to Bettin "de Friscabaldis" and "Coppo cotenno," merchants of Florence, of the Society of the Friscabaldi, and others of the same company in the sum of 200 marks, of good and lawful sterlings crowned, out of the King's Mint, 13s. 4d. sterling to the mark, money borrowed for the use of the City, to be paid at Easter next. Dated at the Guildhall, Saturday after the Feast of St. Matthias [24 Feb.], A.D. 1304, anno 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5].

The above bond was ordered to be executed on Saturday after the Feast of St. Peter in Cathedra [22 Feb.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5], by John le Blound, Mayor, William de Leyre, Walter de Finchingfeld, Hugh Pourte, Simon de Paris, Ralph de Honilane, Richer de Refham, John de Dunstaple, Salamon le Cotiller, and the rest of the Aldermen, Richard Poterel, the Chamberlain, Reginald de Thonderle, William Cosin, Adam Wade, William de Heningtone, Andrew de Staunford, John Beauflour, William de Laufare, Geoffrey Hurel, Reginald le Barber, vintner, Gilbert Cros, William de Reed, Robert Hod, Roger atte Vine, Richard de Dorkingge, Stephen de Prestone, Peter de Blakeneye, Adam Absolon, Paul le Botiller, William Trente, [and] Walter Gubbe, the money to be devoted to expediting the City's affairs in the aforesaid Parliament.

Folio lxxxvi.

Concessio facta Nicholao de Cokfeld de Turello juxta Bisshopesgate.

In the Husting of London for Common Pleas held on Monday after the Feast of St. John ante portam Latinam [6 May], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], the Mayor and Aldermen of the City granted and demised to Nicholas de Cokfeld, the King's Serjeant, a certain turret (turellum) on the east side of Bisshopesgate, formerly held by William Querdelion, chaplain, to hold the same for life on condition that he repair the said turret within a year, and keep the same secure against wind and rain. (fn. 30)

Manucapcio pro executoribus testamenti Willelmi de Beton', etc.

Wednesday after the Feast of Pentecost [6 June], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], came John le Botoner, of St. Laurence Lane, Ralph Godchep, Richard Doge, mercer, Alan le Potter, Richard son of William de Beton', and David le Foundour, before Sirs John le Blound, Mayor, Walter de Finchingfeld, Thomas Romeyn, Richer de Refham, and Nicholas Pycot, Aldermen, and John de Lincoln, Sheriff, and Richard Poterel, the Chamberlain, and bound themselves jointly and severally on behalf of William de Hedersete, William de Chingeforth, Henry de Rokingham, and Ralph Pecok, clerk, executors of William de Beton, deceased, to save the City harmless touching all dues to the King and the Chamber of the Guildhall.

(Cancelled because the aforesaid executors received an acquittance under the common seal on Saturday before the Feast of St. Gregory next following, the terms of which appear in the Roll of Letters sealed with the common seal, &c.)

Concessio facta Thome de Kancia de Alegate.

Tuesday the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], by John le Blound, Mayor, John de Wengrave, Walter de Finchingfeld, Richer de Refham, Salamon le Cotiller, Nicholas Pycot, Hugh Pourte, Henry de Gloucestre, Simon de Paris, John de Dunstaple, Thomas Sely, Aldermen, John de Lincoln and Roger de Paris, Sheriffs, Reginald de Thunderle, Sheriff-elect, and Richard Poterel, the Chamberlain, the gate of Alegate was granted and delivered to Thomas de Kent, the Mayor's Serjeant, to keep and inhabit the said gate during good behaviour and as long as he should keep it roofed and secure against wind and rain. (fn. 31)

De retiis cremat'.

Monday after the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], ten nets were burnt in Chepe opposite Fridaystrete (fn. 32) which had been captured by...... [blank].

Folio lxxxvi b.

A letter of attorney granted by the executors of Richard son of John de Donewych to Sir Peter de Donewych. Dated at Donewych, Wednesday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305].

Transcriptunr litere de attornato pro Petro de Donewyco sigillo Maioratus signato.

A transcript of the above letter sealed with the seal of the Mayoralty, and the letter enrolled in the Chamber of the Guildhall at the request of the said attorney made to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen on Friday after the Feast of St. Mary Magdalen [22 July], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305].

Breve Reg'.

[Blank.]

Proclamacio.

Saturday after the Feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist [29 Aug.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], proclamation made for the protection of strangers coming to the Parliament and against enhancing provisions. (fn. 33)

Folio lxxxvii.

Prison' G de Tauntone Sellarii.

Monday the eve of St. Laurence [10 Aug.] came Gilbert de Tauntone, saddler, before Sirs John le Blound, Mayor, John de Wengrave, Walter de Finchingfeld, Richard de Gloucestre, Henry de Gloucestre, Nicholas Pycot, [and] Nicholas de Farndone, Aldermen, and acknowledged that he had broken a sequestration made upon him by the serjeant of the Sheriffs for 2s., at which he had been assessed by Thomas le Palmere, Andrew Mel, William Florie, and the rest of the assessors and collectors for the Ward of Nicholas de Farndone Within. (fn. 34) Being asked why he had broken the sequestration, he said that he had business to do in the house that had been sequestrated, and that therefore he broke the sequestration in contempt of the lord the King and his bailiffs. It was therefore adjudged that he go to prison until, &c.

Breve R' pro Martino de Aumbresbiry quantum solvit.

Writ of certiorari to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Chamberlain of the City as to what payments had been made by Martin de Aumbresbury of arrears due in respect of his Shrievalty. Witness, W[illiam] de Carletone at Westminster, 15 March, 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5].

Returnum.

Return made to the effect that during the time when John le Bretoun was Warden of the City and William de Betoyne was Chamberlain, the said John and William received of the aforesaid Martin 100 marks; and when John de Dunstaple and Simon de Parys were Chamberlains of the City, they received of the said Martin £67 and half a mark and £28 and half a mark, which two particular sums are allowed the said Martin on the account of John de Armenters and Henry de Fyngrie, Sheriffs, anno 28 Edward I.

Breve R' pro Thoma Squier et Sarra uxore ejus.

Writ of certiorari to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London that whereas they had oftentimes been enjoined to proceed with an Assize of Novel Disseisin (fn. 35) brought by Thomas Sqwyer and Sarah his wife against the Mayor and Commonalty of the City and Nicholas Pycot and William [clerk] of the Chamber without the King's writ, according to the custom of the City, and although the Assize had been arraigned within forty weeks of the decision, according to the custom of the City, (fn. 36) they had not proceeded with it nor shown cause why they should not or could not; they are peremptorily ordered to proceed with it or appear before the King a fortnight after Easter to show cause why they would not or could not obey the King's command. Dated Westminster, 18 March, 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1304-5].

Returnum.

Return to the effect that the Sheriffs and the Coroner, before whom Assizes of Novel Disseisin are pleaded in the City of London, are and will be prepared to proceed with the taking of the assize aforesaid according to the custom of the City when the parties complainant are willing to prosecute.

Breve R' pro executor' Agnet' atte Brugge.

Writ of certiorari as to the detention by the Mayor and Sheriffs of the goods and chattels of Agnes atte Brugge, deceased, so that her testament could not be executed. Dated at St. Alban, 2 May, 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305].

Returnum.

Return to the effect that they had not taken into their hand any goods except a cistern and two hand-mills, which had been taken for 2½ marks, at which the said Agnes had been assessed as her portion of the sum of £1,000 paid to the King by the citizens as a fine for the acquittance of 20,000 marks in which they were bound to the King.

Folio xxxvii b.

Proclamacio publica.

Saturday after the Feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist [29 Aug.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], proclamation made against molesting strangers coming to the Parliament and enhancing the price of victuals. (fn. 37)

B eve R' pro Johanne de Uggele replegiand'.

Writ for the replevin of John de Uggele, dated 20 Oct, 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305]; and return thereon. (fn. 38)

Ordinacio de arieragiis tallagiorum.

Wednesday the morrow of [All] Souls [2 Nov.], 33 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], the Rolls of extracts of arrears, as well of the tallage of 2,000 marks, the fifteenth, the £1,000, as of the tallage made in the thirty-third year of the King's reign for acquitting the debts of the City, were delivered by Sirs John le Blound, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, Walter de Finchingfeld, Thomas Romeyn, Adam de Rokesle, Richard de Gloucestre, Nicholas Pycot, Salamon le Cotiller, John de Dunstaple, Richard de Wilhale, Henry de Gloucestre, and Richer de Refham, Aldermen, to Reginald de Thunderle and William Cosin, the Sheriffs, William de Londoneston, Hugh de Wautham, David de Gloucestre, Richard de Croftone, John de Frydaystrete, and William de Wengrave, clerks, and all the other clerks and bailiffs of the Sheriffs; so that they have the money or pledges of value in the Chamber of the Guildhall, in the quinzaine of St. Martin next ensuing, under penalty of losing their offices for ever, and of the said money being levied on the goods of the Sheriffs, &c.

De Narratoribus Attornat' et Essoniatoribus.

It was also ordained by the aforesaid Mayor and Aldermen on the aforesaid Wednesday that all Countors, (fn. 39) Attorneys, and Essoiners (fn. 40) wishing to plead at, and attend, the Courts at the Guildhall should be sworn according to the form contained in the old paper in the time of the Mayoralty of Gregory de Rokesle ordained and approved. (fn. 41) Robert de Kelleseye, Robert de Suttone, Reginald de Oundle, William de Graftone, Richard de Honewyk, were sworn Countors according to the ordinance aforesaid.

[Vacant space left for the names of the Attorneys and Essoiners, which are not filled in. In the margin there are five small caricatures of heads, apparently designed to represent Countors and Attorneys having their mouths open, and a distinctive headgear, which the editor of the 'Memorials' conjectures may be intended to represent the coif.]

Folio lxxxviii.

Custodia liberorum Aunselmi Knotte piscenar'.

ijs. vjd.

Thursday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 34 Edward I. [A.D. 1305], the guardianship of John, aged seventeen years, Richard, aged fourteen, and Henry, aged twelve, children of Anselm Knot', late fishmonger, (fn. 42) and of their rents, was granted to John Connale in the presence of Sirs John le Blound, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, Thomas Romeyn, Richer de Refham, Adam de Fulham, and the rest of the Aldermen [not named], and Richard Poterel, the Chamberlain, by mainprise of Peter de Edelmetone, draper, John Sharp, tailor, Stephen de Herford, skinner, John de Somerset, tent-maker (pavilonarius), Gilbert de Tauntone, saddler, William de Arondel, "coszoun," Walter de Bellehous, cornmonger (bladarius), William le Botiller, spicer, Peter de Bolingtone, fishmonger, and Ralph the Tailor, draper (draparius) of Cordwanerstrete.

(Afterwards, viz., at a Court held on Wednesday after the Feast of St. Matthias next ensuing, appeared John, son and heir of Anselm Knotte; before John de Wengrave, the locum tenens of John le Blound, the Mayor, Richer de Refham, Richard de Chigwelle, Hugh Pourte, William de Leyre, and the rest of the Aldermen, and demanded the delivery of his rents and tenements, &c., and he appears to be of the age of twenty-one years, &c., and they are delivered to him, &c., and the aforesaid John Connale and his mainpernors are absolved, &c.)

Amissio libertatis carnificum eo quod fuerunt nativi ep'i London'.

Thomas le Bedel, Robert le Bedel, Alan Underwode, and Edmund May, butchers, came before John le Blound, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, William de Leyre, Richer de Refham, Adam de Fulham, Richard de Gloucestre, Nicholas de Farndone, Nicholas Pycot, Simon de Paris, John de Dunstaple, Salamon le Cotiller, Richard de Chigwelle, Henry de Gloucestre, and Richard de Wilehale, Aldermen; and it was found, upon their own acknowledgment, that they held land by villainage of the Bishop of London in Stebenhethe, (fn. 43) and resided without the liberties of the City of London. It was therefore adjudged that they lose the freedom of the City, &c.

Preceptum factum piscenar' de vico pontis, etc, pro stantibus ad stall', etc.

Thursday after the Feast of Conversion of St. Paul [25 Jan ], 34 Edward I. [A.D. 1305-6], precept issued by Sirs John le Blound, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, Thomas Romeyn, Walter de Finchingfeld, Richer de Refham, Adam de Fulham, Richard de Gloucestre, Richard de Wylehale, and Thomas Sely, Aldermen, to the fishmongers of Bridge Street and the old fish market, then being present, that they allow, under heavy penalty, freemen of the City who are fishmongers to stand at stalls and to trade with them, and to freely obtain their share of merchandise bought, as is befitting and just, and as the freedom of the City demands, &c. (fn. 44)

Breve R' sub privato sigillo pro custod' eligendis loco J Maioris, etc.

Writ of Privy Seal addressed to the Aldermen and other good folk of the City of London enjoining them to elect four of the best men of the City to attend to the duties of the Mayoralty, &c., in the absence of John le Blound, the Mayor, who was to be created a Knight at the Feast of Pentecost in company with Edward the King's son. (fn. 45) Dated at Wolveseye, (fn. 46) 4 May, 34 Edward I. [A.D. 1306].

Pursuant to the above writ a congregation was held on Wednesday the eve of the Ascension [12 May], the year aforesaid, in which, with the assent of the aforesaid Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty, there were elected Richer de Refham, John de Wengrave, Walter de Finchingfeld, William de Combemartin, Thomas Romeyn, Nicholas de Farnd[one], Aldermen, to be wardens according to the form of the writ aforesaid, &c.

Folio lxxxviii b.

Transcriptum carte latitudinis de Medelane.

Deed of limitation of metes and bounds of "Medelane," (fn. 47) wherein was situate certain property conveyed by Adam, son of Peter, son of "Neuelon," (fn. 48) to John de Stratford and Belisenta his wife. Witnesses, Peter the Cutler, Roger de Bixle, Robert Curteys, Adrian the Draper, Hervey Blund, and others [not named]. No date.

The above deed remains in the possession of Henry Monquoy, tenant of a tenement which belonged to the above John and Belisenta.

Pro Willelmo Servat.

A statute merchant whereby William Servat binds himself to Sir Hervey de Stantone and Richard de Halstede in the sum of £216 13s. 4d.; to be paid, viz., £116 13s. 4d. at the Feast of the Nativity B. M. [8 Sept.], 34 Edward I. [A.D. 1306], and £100 at Michaelmas following; and unless, &c. Dated Sunday after the Feast of St. Giles [1 Sept.], the year aforesaid. (Satisfied.)

[cedula].

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London for proclamation to be made against the exportation of victuals, money, arms, &c., and for sending victuals and other necessaries to the King and his army in the North. Dated at Lanercost, 6 Nov., 34 Edward I. [A.D. 1306]. (fn. 49)

Proclamation thereon.

Order for all persons who had pledges at the houses of William Cosyn and "Renaud" de Thonderle, the Sheriffs, for the green wax (fn. 50) or for amercements of the Sheriff's court, to redeem them within fifteen days, otherwise they would be sold, &c.

Folio lxxxix.

Deliberationes Reddituum Roberti de Rokesle et denar' inde receptorum.

John de Paris, "corder," came into the Chamber of the Guildhall on Monday after the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 35 Edward I. [A.D. 1306-7], and paid to Robert de Hauvile, the husband of Margery, relict of Robert de Rokesle, late Sheriff of London, the sum of 16s. 8d. received of the rents of the said Robert as attorney of the Commonalty for the debts which the said Robert and Martin de Ambresbiri his fellow - sheriff owed the King for the time of their Shrievalty, (fn. 51) as well of the ferm as of other debts, &c.; and this was done by precept of Sir John le Blund, the Mayor, and the Aldermen assembled as a Court of Scavagers, (fn. 52) and of many citizens then present, &c. For that the said Robert de Hauvile deraigned (disracionavit) the aforesaid rents against the said Mayor and Commonalty before the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer, &c., and the aforesaid John is absolved in the future as well of the said money as of the receipt of the rents aforesaid.

Porta de Crepelgate concesa Thome de Kancia.

The gate of Crepelgate was granted to Thomas de Kent, Serjeant to the Mayor, at the request of Sir Edward, Prince of Wales, the King's son, who sent his letter on behalf of the said Thomas, by Sir John le Blund, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, William de Leyre, Walter de Finchingfeld, Richer de Refham, Thomas Romeyn, Hugh Pourte, Richard de Wylehale, Adam de Rokesle, Nicholas de Farndone, Richard de Gloucestre, John de Dunstaple, [and] Adam de Fulham, Aldermen, Simon Bolet and Geoffrey de Conduit, Sheriffs, assembled for a Husting for Common Pleas on Monday after the Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul [25 Jan.], 35 Edward I. [A.D. 1306-7], and previously by William de Coumbemartin, Salamon le Cotiller, Nicholas Pycot, William Cosyn, John de Vintry, Coroner, [and] John de Gysors, Aldermen;-to keep and inhabit the said gate so long as he shall well and honestly behave himself, and shall keep the same roofed at his own cost and protected from wind and rain, &c.

Littera missa Ep'o Cestrie sigillo majoratus sigillata.

Letter under the seal of the Mayoralty to Walter de Langton, Bishop of Chester, in reply to his expressed desire to make a park and warren in his manor of Greneford. Sealed on Thursday after the Feast of St. Ambrose [4 April], 35 Edward I. [A.D. 1307], with the consent of the Mayor, eleven Aldermen [named], the Chamberlain, and a large number of citizens [not named]. (fn. 53)

Folio lxxxix b.

Breve R' super Statutum Wynton.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London as to the observance of the Statute of Winchester. Dated Beverley, 22 July, 34 Edward I. [A.D. 1306].

Return signifying obedience to the writ.

Aliud Breve super statutum Wynton'.

Another writ on the same matter. Dated Lanercost, 7 Dec., 35 Edward I. [A.D. 1306].

Return to similar effect.

Footnotes

1 Towards the close of the year 1290 all Jews were expelled from England by the King's order, and among them were some 2,000 London Jews. Abraham Motun must have been a Jew of some distinction, for we find a grant made to him in 1282 of property situate in the parish of St. Michael, Wood Street, in trust for the Jewish community in England. Hust. Roll 13 (37). There was quite a large family of Motuns in the City, one of whom named Hugh combined the business of an oil and colour man with the more distin guished duties of City Chamberlain -See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' pp. 83-4.
2 The will of William of Wollechirchehawe was proved and enrolled in the Husting in March, 1301, the whole of his estate (with the exceptions of small bequests to London Bridge and Stratford monastery) being left to Olive his wife for life, with remainder to pious uses for the good of his soul, &c. 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust., London,' i. 153.
3 The old French term for Lincoln.
4 The bishops letter and reply are printed in 'Memorials,' pp. 50-51.
5 'Memorials,' p. 53.
6 See 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust., London,' i. 156.
7 Bridge.
8 Billingsgate.
9 The nova custuma to be exacted from foreign merchants in return for the concessions made to them by the famous Carta Mercatoria in the previous month of February.
10 This appears to be the earliest form of oath of the Recorder. Other, and fuller, forms will be found in Letter-Book D, fly-leaf E b, and fos. 1 and 7. See also 'Liber Albus' (Rolls Series), i. 308.
11 Notwithstanding this composition, the citizens of Winchester had to complain in 1403 of a custom of 2s. being exacted on every cart-load of goods purchased in London. The matter was inquired into, and it was agreed that the composition of 1304 should be adhered to, and that the citizens of Winchester of the Guild Merchant should not again be distrained (Letter-Book I, folio 75). The effective part of the composition has been printed by Dr. Gross in his work on 'The Gild Merchant' (ii. 258), from the 'Black Book of Winchester' (Brit. Mus., Add. MS. 6036), which gives the reference to the later confirmation in the City's archives as Letter-Book H instead of Letter-Book I.
12 Printed in 'Liber Cust.,' i. 82, 83, 117-20.
13 A shearman, one who shears the nap of cloth.
14 The restrictions originally imposed upon the woad merchants (as upon all foreign trades) would not allow them a settlement in the City, nor per mit them to store their woad, which they had to sell, as best they could, on the wharf where it was landed. In 1237, however, the merchants of Amiens, Corby, and Nesle were allowed, by special arrangement, greater freedom in the disposal of their woad and other wares (See 'Liber Cust.,' Introd., pp. xl, xlii- xliv) Here we find them settled in Candlewick Street, the centre of the cloth trade in the City :- Then went I forth by London stone Throughout all Canwyke street: Drapers mutch cloth me offred anone Lydgate, 'London Lyckpenny'.
15 Printed in Riley's 'Memorials,' p. 55.
16 Or "Sendal"; described as Clerk of the Bishop of London (clericus venerabilis Londoniensis) in 'Chron Edward I. and II.,' i. 132.
17 The tallage on this occasion consisted of the fifteenth penny of moveable goods and the tenth penny of rents. Id. ibid. Here we have an early illustration of the City of London being a county in itself.
18 The "Pui" was the name of a fraternity recently imported into the City of London from Le Puy, the ancient capital of Velay, in Auvergne Unlike other fraternities, it possessed the unique characteristic of being devoted to the cultivation of poetry ('Liber Cust., i. 216-28) The chapel here alluded to stood in the church or precinct of St. Martin le Grand There was also a chapel of St. Mary "de la Pewe" at Westminster, but this appears to be of later date, and its name may be derived from a different source (Smith, 'Hist. of Westm.,' pp. 123-7).
19 Mistake for "le Kew."
20 On the panel (which is inserted) the following names also occur, viz., Walter le Disschere, John de Sellyngge, Michael de Wymbourne, John de Aymaylor, Geoffrey de Conduit, Robert de Gloucestre, Adam de Benetle, Matthew de Wodeham, William de Wygemere, barber, Ralph de Resham (Refham ?), taverner, Hosebert de Arcubus, Walter de Herlestede, William le Barber, "especer," John de Writele, John de Redigg', tailor, Robert and Hugh de la Marche, William, servant of Roger de Redigg', and John Bole, tailors, John Bole, "cordwaner," Roger, brother of William de Siningham, William de Pasham, tailor, and Philip the Tailor, servant of William de Kent.
21 The panel is headed Nomina juratorum pro sagittariis. It contains the following names (twentytwo of which are marked as having been sworn of the jury), viz., Ranulph Balle, Ralph Godchep, Alan Ballard, Walter de Harlestede, William le Gras, Matthew le Payntour, Robert de Russendene, Thomas ate Bowe, Roger de Arcubus, Adam de Arcubus, Osebert le Espicer, Ralph de Refham, Stephen de Uptone, Robert de Uptone, Richard de Welleford, Daniel de Chiltre, Godwyn le Hodere, Robert Tournay, John le Coffrer, Walter Bardeny (?), David le Foundour, William de Beverle, Richard le Barber, Stephen de Harewe, Richard Golde, Robert de Assindone, William Lefchild, Robert Lyhtfot, Gilbert de Tauntone, William de Herlawe [struck out], Walter de Gloucestre, Henry de Bristoll, Maurice de Herlawe, John le Botoner, Roger Brunne, William de Kauntebrege, Robert de "Wrthstede," Adam Trug, John Scarlet, Geoffrey de Conduit, William de Bodelee, Robert le Keu, John de Essex, Matthew de Essex, Richard le Gras, John le Disshere. The panel is endorsed with the finding of the jury.
22 'Memorials,' p. 54, where the editor appears to have misread the heading of the panel, for he states that "a list is given of the wounded" !
23 Printed in 'Memorials,' p. 53.
24 On the eve of Pentecost, A.D. 1304, the Flemings were banished from England at the urgent request of the King of France, and proclamation to that effect was made in the Husting of London on the Monday after Trinity 'Chron Edward I. and II.,' i. 133; Rymer's 'Fœdera,' vol. i. part ii. p. 962.
25 Tydd St. Mary (?), co. Linc.
26 An office in the royal household.
27 Burstwick, co. York.
28 This writ is omitted in Falgrave's 'Parl. Writs'.
29 As the Parliament was to commence on 16 February, this letter appears to have been dated some days after the opening of the session.
30 Printed in ' Memorials,' p. 56.
31 Seventy years later the same gate was demised to the poet Chaucer 'Memorials,' p. 377.
32 The editor of the 'Memorials' remarks that this passage deserves notice "as a very early mention of this street." The name, however, occurs nearly half a century earlier than this in the records of the Court of Husting. Hust. Roll 2 (22), (48).
33 Printed in 'Memorials,' p. 56 Cf. infra, p. 147.
34 Within Ludgate and Newgate. See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 11n.
35 The Assize of Novel Disseisin, or Fresh-force, was originally instituted as a procedure before the Justices in Eyre for the speedy recovery of lands or tenements of which a party had been disseised. In the City of London the procedure took place before the Sheriffs and Coroner, as set out in the 'Liber Albus' (i. 195-197). The technicalities incident to writs of assize eventually led to the adoption of a simpler remedy, the writ of trespass in ejectment, and they were formally abolished by statute 3 & 4 Will. IV., c 27, sec. 36.
36 "Les assises de Novelle Disseisine appellez 'Fressheforce' des terres et tenementz et rentz deinz la Citee de Loundres, de disseisins faitz deinz les quarant semaignes, sount tenuz et terminables devaunt les deux Viscountz et le Coroner du dite Citee en comune" ('Liber Albus,' i. 195).
37 Cf. supra, p. 145.
38 Printed in 'Memorials,' p. 57.
39 Or pleaders, Lat. narratores.
40 Counsel of inferior rank who made excuses for non-attendance. See Glossary, 'Liber Cust.,' s. v. Essoyne.
41 No doubt meaning the ordinances De Countours et Attournes drawn up in the eighth year of Edward I., when Rokesle was Mayor. See 'Liber Cust.,' 1 280; 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' pp. 204, 205.
42 The will of a certain Anselm Quentin, called Knotte, was proved in the Court of Husting early in 1306. The will mentions five sons, viz., Richard, Henry, Robert, William, and Peter ('Calendar of Wills,' i. 176). John, son of Anselm "Quintin," formerly called "Knot," occurs in a deed of 1309. Hust. Roll, 37 (55).
43 See note supra, p. 4.
44 The editor of the 'Liber Albus' (Introd, p. lxxviii) remarks that "freemen of the City, too, were permitted to stand with the fishmongers at their stalls, and to be partners with them in the sale of their wares." Nothing appears in the 'Liber Albus' to bear out this statement, except a reference to this passage, which runs as follows, viz., permittant liberos homines de civitate piscenarios ad stallas stantes cum ipsis mercandizare et partes suas de mercandizis emptis libere optinere The Fishmongers, nevertheless, continued to form a very close guild, and constantly endeavoured to exclude freemen from their trade.
45 Not only were Prince Edward and Johan le Blount, the Mayor, knighted on Whitsunday, but nearly three hundred others. The total number of Knights in the City of London at this period, we are told, was estimated by the heralds at a thousand. 'Chron Edward I and II.,' i. 146.
46 Wolvesley, co. Hants.
47 Occurs several times in the Husting Rolls, where it is described as being in the parish of St. James, Garlickhithe. Perhaps identical with Maiden Lane.
48 There was a Peter (Fitz ?) "Nevelon," "Nevelun," or "Newlay," Sheriff of London in 1191. 'Chron. of Mayors and Sheriffs,' p. 1. Cf. 'List of Sheriffs for England and Wales,' p. 200 (Record Office Lists and Indexes, No. ix. ).
49 The writ is in the same terms as that addressed to Great Yarmouth from Lanercost, 5 Jan., and printed in Rymer's 'Fodera,' vol. i. part ii. p. 1007.
50 Pour la verte cire Estreats delivered to the Sheriff out of the Exchequer for the purpose of being levied bore the seal of that Court in green wax. Prior to the year 1859 (when the Act for Regulating the Office of Queen's Remembrancer was passed) an Estreat Roll under the Great Seal of the Exchequer, containing a schedule of fines, forfeited recognizances, &c., to which the City of London was entitled, was annually delivered by an officer of the Court of Exchequer to the City Chamberlain, who in turn delivered it to the City Solicitor as the acting City's Bailiff. A large number of these Rolls are still preserved, dating back to the seventeenth century. Since 1859 there has been no such formal record of what belongs to the City, and it has rested each year with the bailiffs to claim on behalf of the Corporation before the auditors of the Sheriffs' accounts such fines and forfeitures as they believe the City to be entitled to.
51 A.D. 1293-4.
52 Pro curia de scawageriis. The "Scavager" is commonly supposed to have originally been an officer who took the toll or custom charged upon the "scavage" or "scawage" (i. e., showage from A. -S. sceawian, to show) or opening out of imported goods. At a later period he appears to have executed such miscellaneous duties as seeing that chimneys, ovens, &c., were properly protected against fire, that pavements were kept in repair. and the streets kept clear of refuse (See the oath of the "scawageours," temp. xv. cent., Letter-Book D, fos. 3 b and lxxxv.) This officer, the late Mr. Riley remarks ('Liber Albus,' Introd., p. xli), no doubt gave name to the "scavenger" of the present day, although, in the opinion of Prof. Skeat, "the etymology of scavenger from the A. -S. sceawian is impossible, because the A. -S. sc becomes sh. in English." (Athenæum, Nov. 25, 1899). All this, however, scarcely helps us to the meaning of a "Court of Scavagers," any more than does the latest discovery made by Mr. J. H. Round from a MS in the British Museum (Add. MS. 14,252, folio 106), viz., that escauingores were at one time elected for the purpose of regulating the watch and ward of the City. See 'The Commune of London,' by J. H. Round, pp. 255-7. Perhaps the words curia de scawageriis would best be interpreted here as a Court of Inspectors.
53 Printed in 'Memorials,' p. 61.


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