Folios cxi -cxviii

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

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1902

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238-249

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'Folios cxi -cxviii', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: D: 1309-1314 (1902), pp. 238-249. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33084 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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Folios cxi -cxviii.

Amissio liber tatis Joh'is de Coumbe.

John de Coumbe attached to answer Simon Corp and Peter de Blakeneye, Sheriffs, in a plea of trespass done against the liberty of the City, for that the said John, on Friday before the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], had made himself a broker by bringing a certain William le Reed "Estreys," (fn. 1) a foreign merchant, to the house of Peter de Coumbe to buy of John le Mareschal de Bedeford, a foreign merchant, seventeen sacks of wool, and had claimed for his brokerage half a mark for effecting the merchandise aforesaid between the said strangers, to the prejudice of the liberty of the City aforesaid, and this they offer to prove, &c. And the said John came and acknowledged that he could not deny the premises. And because it was found by his own acknowledgment that he made himself a broker between the aforesaid foreigners, to the prejudice of the liberty of the City and damage of freemen of the same, and contrary to the aforesaid proclamation in the City, and the said John was never admitted a broker in that business, it was adjudged that he should lose his freedom, and that the Sheriffs should in future take custom of his merchandise as of a foreigner.

Tenementa capta in manum civitatis que fuerunt Petri Adrian.

Wednesday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], precept to Simon Corp and Peter de Blakeneye, Sheriffs, to take into the City's hand all lands and tenements formerly belonging to Peter Adryan, deceased, and to certify their value. Return made that they seized the said lands, &c., which were of the yearly value of £18 13s. 8d. Thereupon it was considered that Luke de Haverynge, the Chamberlain, should be guardian of the property as well as of Thomas, son and heir of the said Peter. Afterwards precept was issued to the Sheriffs to inquire and report as to the names of the tenants of the property and other particulars. (fn. 2)

Folio cxi b.

Ten' que fuerunt Hug' Baudry et Agn' ux' is eius capt' in manum civitatis.

Precept to the same Sheriffs to take into the City's hand the lands and tenements of Hugh Baudry and Agnes his wife and to certify their value. On Wednesday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], the Sheriffs returned the annual value of the property to be 64s. Further precept as to names of tenants, &c. On Wednesday the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.] the Sheriffs returned that they had made inquiry by oath of good men, viz., Walter le Mouner, William de Finchingfeld, John Smart, William Smith (Faber), John de Stratford, John de Hamme, Nicholas Turgys, Adam Hunteman, Simon Turgys, Gilbert le Hurer, John de St. Saviour, and Hamo Ballard, who say that Peter le Blount, who married the above Agnes after the decease of the aforesaid Hugh, inhabits the house formerly inhabited by the said Hugh and Agnes in the parish of All Hallows de Berkyngcherche; that the executors of Matilda de Caumpes (or Kaumpes) hold a parcel of land in the same parish which the said Matilda and Richard de Kaumpes her husband had by demise of the above Agnes; that the above Hugh had shops at the corner of "Sporieslane," in the said parish; and that Roger de Romeseye holds a wharf and cellars in the neighbourhood......

Capcio tene mentor' que fuerunt Ade fil' Joh' de Storteford in manum civitatis.

Wednesday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], the above Sheriffs took into the City's hand the lands and tenements formerly belonging to Adam, son of John de Storteford, of the yearly value of £6 8s. Afterwards precept issued for inquiry as to tenants, &c.

Bond by Gregory de Moyne in the sum of 8 marks in favour of Matilda de Rothyng. Dated 8 Dec., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310]. The fee (feodum) pardoned by the Mayor at the instance of John de Shaddeworth, clerk.

Wednesday the eve of the Ascension [20 May], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1311], the said Matilda acknowledged satisfaction of the debt, and therefore the recognizance is cancelled.

Folio cxii.

Finis Godefridi de Loveyne pro trans' facta contra consuet' civitatis.

Godfrey de Loveyne attached at the suit of Robert le Pipere, William Bernard, and other dyers of London, for that whereas it had been ordained in the City of London that no one should send their undyed cloths (pannos crudos) to mills outside the City to be fulled, (fn. 3) the aforesaid Godfrey had sent three cloths outside the City to be fulled at mills, contrary to the said custom, &c. And the said Godfrey came here on Thursday before the Feast of St. Thomas, Ap. [21 Dec.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], and confessed himself guilty. Thereupon it was adjudged that he should incur the penalty provided in the black paper of the Fullers, viz., 20s., because of his first conviction, and the Mayor remitted 10s. And a day was given for payment of the money, viz., Monday next, by surety of Walter de Chesewyk and Walter le Fener.

And the said Godfrey de Loveyne and John de Lesnes, dyers, were sworn to diligently inquire touching all those dyers, fullers, and weavers who send or take undyed cloths outside the City to be fulled at mills, the said cloths being delivered to them to be fulled under foot (sub pedibus), and those whom they shall find guilty of so doing to attach and cause the cloths forthwith to be seized, and present them before the Mayor and Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall. (fn. 4)

Saturday before the Feast of St. Thomas, Ap. [21 Dec.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], the names of Turners sworn not to make false measures, such as "chopynes," "gylles," &c., in future. (fn. 5)

Concordia inter R de Glouc'et Rog'm de Evre.

Terms of settlement of a quarrel between Richard de Gloucestre, Alderman, and Roger de Evre, ironmonger, agreed to before the Mayor and Aldermen in December, 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310]. (fn. 6)

Folio cxii b.

Transcript' br'is d' ni Regis pro facienda proclamacione ne victualia ducant' v' partes Scocie.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London to cause proclamation to be made against the exportation of victuals, horses, and arms in aid of the King's enemies in Scotland Dated at Berwick on Tweed, 22 Nov., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310].

Thereupon proclamation was made throughout the City according to the terms of the above writ on Monday after Christmas Day, 4 Edward II.

Writ to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and whole Commonalty of the City of London for the appointment of four of the more discreet and trusty men of the City to see that the King's orders against sending aid to Scotland are obeyed Dated Berwick on Tweed, 9 Dec., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310]. (fn. 7)

Folio cxiii.

Be it remembered that on Wednesday next after Christmas, 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], the under-written were elected and sworn to keep the gates and ports of the City against the exportation of victuals, &c., to Scotland, except for the use of some English magnate in the King's army.

The Port of Billinggesgate :-John de Romeneye, Thomas Cros, John de Mockyng, John atte Barre.

Queenhithe :-John de Brynkele, Walter le Hethereve, Robert le Hethereve.

Neugate :-Adam Braz, William le Coteler, Geoffry de Jarnemuth, Walter atte Bellehous, Walter de Cicestre, Gerard le Barbier.

Creplegate :-Robert de Gravele, serjeant, Alan Sprot, Robert le Chaundeler, junior, John le Pestour.

Bridge :-John de Wymondham, Ancelyn le Furbour, Robert de Borham.

Ludegate :-John de Paris, corder, Richard le Arblaster, Roger de Bristoll.

Alegate :-Richard the Bedell, William le Clerc, potter, John de Billerica.

Aldresgate :-Peter de Hungrie, Nigel le Avener.

Bisshopesgate :-Walter de Bedefonte, John le Mareschal, John le Little.

Breve Reg' pro proclamacione facienda de stapla de Aunvers.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London for proclamation to be made that merchants of the realm shall hold a staple at Antwerp as formerly accustomed, and not withdraw themselves and cause others to withdraw from the town, as they had recently done (provided they do not transport victuals otherwise than to the King in Scotland, contrary to the proclamation thereon made), inasmuch as the Duke of Brabant had promised to treat such merchants with courtesy and kindness. Dated Berwick on Tweed, 18 Dec., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310].

Thereupon proclamation was made throughout the City on Wednesday the Feast of the Epiphany [6 Jan.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310-11].

Folio cxiii b.

Writs to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London temp Richer de Refham, Mayor, anno 4, for keeping the assize of bread, ale, wines, and other things in the City, and for punishing transgressors.

Proassisa panis et cervisie.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs for the punishment of those who fail in future to keep the assize of bread and ale. Dated Berwick on Tweed, 6 Dec., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310].

De Tabernar' vinorum.

Writ to the same, that they visit all the taverns in the City, test the wines sold, and destroy all wines found to be bad. Same date.

Detrans gressor'.

Writ to the same for a diligent search to be made for all vagrants in the City and for their due punishment. Same date.

Folio cxiv.

Writ to the same for the punishment of dilapidators of the City wall, gates, and posterns. Same date. (fn. 8)

[Here follows a portion of a writ to the same for the suppression of houses of ill fame in the City, &c., entered in full infra, fo. cxvi.]

Deliberacio Rog'ile graunt baibier impri sonati per statitum.

Record of attachment of Roger le Graunt "barbier," at the suit of Thomas Beauflour, for a debt of £22, and of its discharge by the hand of Nicholas Crane, butcher, with costs, &c.

Judicium collistrigii.

William de Croton de co Suffolk condemned to the pillory for pretending to be a serjeant of the Sheriffs of London and arresting the carts of Richolda de Stratford and Mabel de Stratford, bakeresses, on their way to the City with bread for sale. (fn. 9)

Folio cxiv b.

Petitio pistorum pro novo assayo faciendo.

Tuesday the eve of the Epiphany [6 Jan.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310-11], on the petition of the white-bakers of London, forasmuch as the assay of bread made after the Feast of St. Michael last past, temp. T[homas] Romayn, Mayor, was too severe upon them to keep and maintain, because the bread of the said assay was badly baked, as the said bakers say, so that if they were to keep and maintain that assay they would be unable to exercise and follow their trade: it was agreed and ordained by Richer de Refham, the Mayor, Nicholas de Farendone, Thomas Romayn, John de Wengrave, William de Leyre, William de Coumbemartyn, John de "Gysorce," Henry de Durham, William Trente, John de Lincoln, Richard de Wyrhale, and Nicholas Picot, Aldermen, and Simon Corp, Sheriff, that the said bakers should deliver to the Chamberlain a sum of money wherewith to buy corn and for other expenses attaching to the making of a new assay. And the said bakers agreed, &c.

Invaaracio Joh de Wynton'.

The same day John de Wynchestre, cordwainer, gave pledge of a cask of wine to Richer de Refham, the Mayor, not to use abusive language in court. (fn. 10)

The same day the following Aldermen were assigned to audit the account of divers collectors in the several wards for the tallage made for presents and expenses at the coronation of the lord the King and to admit men to the freedom of the City, &c., viz., Nicholas de Farndone, Henry de Durham, William de Leire, and Simon de Paris.

Electi ad au diend' comp Ric'i Potrel, Camerar'.

Tuesday before the Feast of St. Edmund, King and Martyr [20 Nov.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], six good men of the City were elected in the presence of the whole Commonalty to audit the account of Richard Potrel, the Chamberlain, for the time when he served as Chamberlain, viz., Nicholas Picot, William de Leire, Aldermen, Roger le Palmere, John de Cantebrige, William Bidik, and John de Paris, commoners. And it was agreed by the Mayor, Aldermen, and the whole Commonalty that all arrears of tallages in the City should be levied to pay the City's debts, &c.

Folio cxv.

Elecciocus todum muragii tocius civitatis a° iiij to.

Tuesday before the Feast of St. Edmund, King and Martyr [20 Nov.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310], Roger Hosebonde and John Dode, ironmongers, were elected by the Mayor and Aldermen and good men of the whole Commonalty to receive all the money issuing from the murage of the whole City, and made oath that they would expend the same well and faithfully on the repair and mending of the City's walls, and render good and lawful account of the same where and when requested by the Mayor and Aldermen, &c.

Goscelin, the Serjeant (serviens) of London, received the murage of St. Laurence Lane, Sopereslane, Ismongerelane, and the Tanners' Seld, (fn. 11) and of Alegate, Bisshopesgate, Creplegate, and Aldresgate, from the 1st day of June, anno 4 Edward II, up to the end of the year following, for £30, paying each month 50s. more or less, &c. Afterwards, at the end of the year, he surrendered the murage, and it was given to Henry de St. Osyth, as appears infra.

The same Goscelin le Sergeaunt received the murage issuing from corn on the Pavement (fn. 12) and from Holebourne Bridge and the Bar of Smethefeud and Wolcherchawe for a like term for 22 marks by monthly payments, &c. At the end of the year he surrendered the murage, and it was given to Henry de St. Osyth, as appears infra.

The same Goscelin received the murage issuing from the Frippery (de Pheliperia (fn. 13) ), London, from 11 April, 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1311], to the end of a year, for one mark.

Muragium de Smethefeud.

John le Little took the murage issuing out of Smethefeud for a like term for £10, paying quarterly 50s.

At Christmas following Nicholas le Maderman took the murage for £10

Muragium de Stratfora.

Roger Priour and Roger le Long took the murage of the City of London issuing in the vill of Stratford atte Bowe, viz., for bread, poultry, cheese, and timber, from Saturday after the Feast of St. John ante portam Latinam [6 May], 4 Ed ward II. [A. D. 1311], to the end of a year, for £12, paying monthly 20s.

Murag' dimis sum Henr' de Sancto Osytha.

The murage of St. Laurence Lane, Sopereslane, Ismongerelane, and the Tanners' Seld, and of Alegate, Bisshopesgate, Creplegate, and Aldresgate, of the Pavement of London, of Holebourne Bridge, the Bar of Smethfeud, and Wolcherchehawe, was granted to Henry de St. Osyth by Roger le Paumer and Roger Hosebonde, the wardens of the murage appointed by the Commonalty; to hold the same from the 1st June, 5 Edward II. [A. D. 1312], for one year for £50, by monthly payments to the said wardens or to the Mayor and citizens And the said Henry bound himself on oath to demand no more from any one for his goods and merchandise than is allowed by the King's commission granting murage to the City. His sureties, viz., William de Sutton, dyer, and Gilbert de Yhistelworth, dyer.

Tuesday before the Feast of St. Thomas, Ap. [21 Dec.], 6 Edward II. [A. D. 1312], came Richard Scot before the Chamberlain and acknowledged himself bound to Roger Husebonde and Roger le Palmer, wardens of the murage, in the sum of 16 marks for the murage of Smethefeud.

Folio cxv b.

Be it remembered that whereas a certain contention has lately arisen between Goscelyn le Sergeant, collector of the murage of Sopereslane and St. Laurence Lane, on the one part, and Thomas Vernoun, collector of the murage of Billinggesgate, on the other part, for that the said Thomas claims the right to receive murage issuing from all merchandise bought by foreign merchants, who are bound to pay murage, (fn. 14) within the limits of his bailiwick, although the said merchants have carried the same outside his bailiwick to their own hostels in Soperelane [or] St. Laurence Lane to be tied up and trussed, &c. And the aforesaid Goscelyn claims the said murage as belonging to him, for that the said merchants carry and transport the said merchandise purchased in parcels to their own hostels within his bailiwick to be tied up and trussed, and there they ought to pay custom, because he says that if they were to pay custom in the place where they bought their merchandise they would have to obtain the collector's mark for each parcel of merchandise, and that would be inconvenient, &c. He asks the consideration of the Mayor and Aldermen thereon, &c. And the said Thomas likewise, &c. Thereupon, by consideration of the Mayor and Aldermen, it was adjudged that every merchant stranger should in future pay his murage for his merchandise to the collector of the place where he may be housed and shall have trussed his merchandise, &c., and not elsewhere, &c. And precept was issued both to the said Thomas and Goscelyn that in future they take murage in no other manner of merchandise leaving the City, &c.

Folio cxvi.

Breve pro malefactoribus castigandis.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs for the suppression of houses of ill fame, &c., in the City. Dated Berwick on Tweed, 30 Dec., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310]. (fn. 15)

Denar' soluti Luce de Haveryng Camer' pro Henr' de Glouc.

Tuesday the eve of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310-11], came Henry de Gloucestre before Richer de Refham, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, William de Leire, John de Lincoln, John de "Gysorce," Richard de Wirhale, Simon de Paris, Henry de Durham, and Simon Bolet, Aldermen, to answer for divers arrears of tallages and other debts due to the Chamber of the City, viz., 20s. arrears of 2,000 marks; 40s. arrears of the fifteenth assessed anno 29 [Edward I.] (fn. 16) ; 8s. of the Queen's Gold (aurum Regine (fn. 17) ) issuing from the same fifteenth; 32s. 4d. arrears of £1,000; and for his gown of scarlet which he had of the livery of the Chamberlain for the King's coronation, 41s. 8d.; and for a cloak and tunic which he had for the use of his servant at the same time, 16s. 8d.; and for his own cloak of cloth of Luka at the same time, 7s. 6d.; and for his gown of red cloth of Luka delivered to him at the same time, 25s. 4d. And the said Henry says that he paid to divers collectors of the aforesaid tallages all the arrears aforesaid, and also that he paid other debts for gowns, tunics, and cloaks aforesaid to the merchants from whom they were purchased, and this he was prepared to prove per quantum, &c. Thereupon it was agreed by the Mayor and Aldermen aforesaid that inasmuch as the said Henry had not produced acquittances for the said arrears and debts, he should pay here in the Chamber the sum of £4 and be quit, which sum he paid.

Acquietanc' domini H. ie Despens' facta per Baudet le Engleys de £.

Monday the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter [18 Jan. (fn. 18) ], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310-11], came Baudet le Engleis, valet of John Hanekyn, merchant of St. Quintin, and acknowledged before Richer de Refham, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, William de Leire, Simon de Paris, and John de Lincoln, Aldermen, that he had received on behalf of his said master from Sir Hugh le Despenser, by the hand of Nicholas de Sodyngtone, the sum of £100 in part payment of £180 due from the said Sir Hugh to the said John for horses purchased of him; for which sum of £100 the said Baudet acknowledged the said Sir Hugh to be quit.

Folio. cxvi b.

Scriptum convencionis int' Rog'm de Rokeste juniorem et Joh'em de Prestone cordar'.

Demise by Roger de Rokesle, junior, to John de Prestone, corder, of an annual quitrent of 16s., which he (the grantor) used to receive of Roger de Wyndesore, corder, for a shop situate in the parish of All Hallows at the Hay in the Ropery (in corderia); to enjoy the same for a term of seven years from Michaelmas, anno 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310]. Dated Saturday the Feast of St. Peter ad Vincula [1 August], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310].

The said John pays for enrolment 2s. 6d. The above deed was acknowledged by the said Roger de Rokesle before Luke de Haveryng, the Chamberlain, on Monday after the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310-11].

Afterwards, viz., on Monday before the Feast of St. Gregory [12 March], 9 Edward II. [A. D. 1315-16], came John de Prestone and demised his estate in the above rent to Walter Bullok.

Scriptum Rob'i Newcomen.

Demise by Henry, son of Hugh de Rokyngham, late goldsmith, to Robert Newcomen, seal-maker (sigillai'), of a shop in Westchep, in the parish of St. Mary de Colcherche, opposite the Conduit, and situate between the tenements of Richard de Rokyngham and Richard de Beton'; to hold for a term of five years. For enrolment 2s. 6d.

The above deed acknowledged by the said lessor before the Chamberlain the same day as the foregoing.

Folio cxvii.

Brevedirec um vic' pro Regede templarus.

Writ to the Sheriffs of London that they receive such Templars as shall, by the King's orders, be delivered to them by the Constable of the Tower, and safeguard them in the King's prisons, viz., in the four gates of London, in the houses formerly belonging to John de Banquell and the Friars of the Penance (fn. 19) (de penitentia), and other convenient places in the City or neighbourhood, so that the Prelates and Inquisitors appointed to inquire into their Order may deal with them according to the ecclesiastical law. Dated at "Byger," (fn. 20) 6 Oct., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310]. (fn. 21)

Carta R' con cessa Rog'o de Lynton'.

Writ of Privy Seal notifying that at the instance of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, the King had granted to Roger de Lyntone, citizen of London, exemption from juries and recognizances and from keeping any watches in the City . Dated at Berwick on Tweed, 26 Feb., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310-11].

Nevertheless the said Roger agrees to keep watch when, &c., and this of his own free will.

Folio cxvii b.

Writ to the Mavor and Sheriffs for regulating the sale of wines within the City. Witness, John de Sendale, the Treasurer. Dated at Westminster, 15 Jan., 4 Edward II. [A. D. 1310-11]. (fn. 22)

Folio cxviii.

Scriptum Rog'i de Rameseye.

Defeasance of a grant by Roger de Rameseye to Alan de Suttone, saddler, of an annual quitrent of £10 issuing from a tenement in Langebournestrete situate near the tenements of Walter de Rokesle and of Simon Fitz Robert, fishmonger, and Agnes his wife (which grant was deposited for safe keeping in the hands of William de Speresholte), provided that the said Roger pay or cause to be paid to the said Alan the sum of £110 before Midsummer, A. D. 1313. Dated 12 May, 5 Edward II. [A. D. 1312].

[Fos cxviii b-cxxi blank.]

Footnotes

1 See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 46, note 2.
2 The Sheriffs appear to have made their report, but the record is imperfect, several lines having been erased.
3 In 1298 it was ordained that no fuller, dyer, or weaver should thenceforth send any cloth outside the City to be fulled at mills except those who owned the cloth and were willing to avow the same as their own. 'Liber Custumarum,' i. 128-9. Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' pp. 52-53.
4 Printed from the City's 'Liber Memorandorum' (fo. 49) in the 'Liber Albus' (Rolls Senes), Appendix II.
5 'Memorials,' p 78, where "chopynss" are described as probably holding about a pint and "gylles" half a pint.
6 Id. ibid.
7 A similar writ, addressed to the town of Sandwich, is printed in Rymer's 'Fædera,' vol. II. part i. p. 120.
8 Set out in 'Memorials,' p. 79.
9 'Memorials,' p. 81.
10 'Memorials,' p. 81.
11 See 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' p. 162, note 2.
12 See ibid., p. 58, note 3.
13 Probably meaning the place where old clothes and furniture were sold. See 'Cal Letter-Book C,' p. 163, note 3.
14 Per mercatores forinsecos qui muragium solvere tenentur. By the charter of the foreign merchants, 01 Statutum de Nova Custuma (as it is called in the City's 'Liber Custu marum,' i. 205), passed in 1303, foreign merchants were expressly ex empted from payment (inter alia) of murage Many of the provisions of this statute, however, were suspended in 1309 through the determined atti tude of the Ordainers, and in 1311 the statute was declared illegal Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 157n., 323, 524-5; 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' Introd., pp. xiv-xvi.
15 Printed in Rymer's 'Fodera,' vol. ii. pt. i. p. 124.
16 Granted by the Parliament which met at Lincoln in January, 1301, in lieu of a twentieth previously granted. Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 151; cf. supra, p. 236.
17 "A royal revenue raised in favour of the Queens Consort of England from tenants in capite...... in con sideration of a grant made to them by the King, and due in the proportion of one tenth of the entire sum due to the King.' -' Lib. Cust.,' Glossary, p. 784.
18 Festum Cathedre Sancti Petri. This Feast, known also as "St. Peter at Rome," fell on 18 January. It must not be confounded with another festival known as "St. Peter in Cathedrâ," or "St. Peter in Cathedrâ at Antioch," which was kept on 22 February.
19 As to their place of settlement see 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' p. 61, note 3.
20 Biggar, Lanaik, N. B.
21 Proceedings commenced to be taken against the Templars in 1307, and five years later the Order was suppressed. 'Chron. Edw. I. and II.' (Rolls Series), i. 152, 265, 271. A writ addressed to the Sheriffs of London, to similar effect and almost in the same terms, from Beverley, 26 August, the same year, is printed in Rymer's 'Fodera' (vol. ii. pt. i. p. 115), as well as a writ to John de Crumbewell, Constable of the Tower, dated from "Byger," 6 Oct. (Ibid., p. 117.)
22 Printed by Delpit ('Collection Generale des Documents Français qui se trouvent en Angleterre,' pp. 44-45). Translation in Riley's 'Memorials' (p. 83), but the date is inadvertently there given as 5 January.


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