Folios cxli - cl

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1902

Pages

276-291

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'Folios cxli - cl', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: D: 1309-1314 (1902), pp. 276-291. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33087 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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Folio cxli.

Acquietancia Joli'is Hoyron cordaru.

A general acquittance granted by John de Padyngtone and Agnes his wife to John, son of Alexander Heyron, corder. Witnesses, Roger de Stowe, Roger de Arderne, Edward de Warewyk, Roger le Mareschal, junior, Hamo atte Welle, Nicholas de Kertlyng, Alan le Pestour, Luke de Haverynge, Stephen de Rokesle, Stephen de Prestone, Roger de Haverynge, Richard de Dorsete, John de Prestone, Nicholas de Rokesle, John Dru, John de Langgele, Walter le Clerk, and others [not named]. Dated 14 Nov., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311]. For enrolment 2s. 6d.

De forisfactura ferramentorum pro Rotis super Walt m Hughlot.

Be it remembered that on Wednesday the morrow of St. Thomas, Ap. [21 Dec.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], came John Dode and other good men of the craft of ironmongers and brought before John de Gysors, the Mayor, Nicholas de Farendone, Richer de Refham, John de Wengrave, Richard de Gloucestre, John de Wyndesore, and Henry de Durham, Aldermen, and Simon Corp, Sheriff, fourteen strakes (strokos) of iron for cartwheels taken from Walter Hughlot de Wodherst, as not being of sufficient length by three inches according to the standard measure ordained for such iron instruments, of which more appears in the Black Book of Memoranda, temp. Elyas Russel, the Mayor, anno 29 Edward I. (fn. 1) And because it was found before the said Mayor and Aldermen that the said strakes (stroka) were not of the right length they were declared forfeited, and the said Walter was warned not to bring the like to the City for sale under penalty of forfeiture.

Folio cxli b.

Scriptum Will'i de Ware stokfisshmongere.

Bond entered into by Gilbert le Mareschal and Hugh, called 'Pikard," to pay to William de Ware, "stokfisshmongere," the sum of 17 marks on the Feast of the Purification next ensuing, under penalty of paying to the collector for the Holy Land for the time being in the City and Diocese of London the sum of 40s. for every week they are in default. Dated Christmas Eve, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311] For enrolment 2s. 6d.

Satisfactum est Will'o de Ware de isto debito sicut ipsemet cognovit.

Afterwards, viz., on Monday before the Purification [2 Feb.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12], the said William received of the said Gilbert 8 marks in part payment of the above debt; and on Monday after the Feast of St. Matthias [24 Feb.] following the said William acknowledged satisfaction for the whole debt.

Scriptum Johannis de Nasyng'.

Bond entered into by William de Nasyng', girdler, in favour of John de Nasyng', girdler, in the sum of £30, whereof £20 to be paid at Easter next. Dated Saturday before the Feast of Epiphany [6 Jan.], A.D. 1311[12]. For enrolment 2s. 6d.

Acknowledged before Henry de Durham, Simon de Paris, and Henry de Gloucestre, Aldermen, and John le Mazeliner, the Chamberlain.

Friday before the Feast of St. Vincent [22 Jan.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12], Margaret de Hontyngdone, "Marion" de Honytone, and Henry le Beste attached in the Ward of Bradestrete by Richard le Kissere, serjeant of the Ward, and committed to the Tun, (fn. 2) as being of bad character Mainpernors for the said Henry, viz., William de Louthe, of the Society (Societas) of the Friscobaldi, and William Sailleben. (fn. 3)

Folio cxlii.

Capcio quorumdam Walensium in Fletestrete.

Wednesday the Feast of St. Thomas the Martyr [29 Dec.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], there were assembled at the Guildhall John de Gisors, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, Richard de Gloucestre, William de Leire, John de Wyndesore, John de Lincoln, William Servat, Henry de Gloucestre, Henry de Durem, Geoffrey de Conduit, Aldermen, and Richard de Welleford, Sheriff, and many other good men of the Commonalty, for the purpose of considering the arrest of Tyder Thoyd, a Welshman, Edmund the Welshman, Merit de Berdeche, Mereduz de Beauveir, and Herlal de Theder on a charge of burglary brought by Dyonisia la Bokebyndere, and the King's demand for their release. (fn. 4)

Breve R' sub privato sigillo de civitate custodienda ad opus suum.

Writ of Privy Seal addressed to the Mayor, charging him on his allegiance to safeguard the City for the King. Dated at Knaresburgh, 9 Jan., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Ordinacio facta pro custod' civitatis.

Wednesday after the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], the same year, ordinances made for safeguarding the City, viz., each Alderman to cause the best men of his Ward to assemble in the parish church of his Ward or elsewhere; the hostels of the Ward to be searched for suspects, and the owners of such hostels to be made responsible for inmates; each City gate to be guarded by night by twelve strong and well-armed men; and the Aldermen to ascertain the number of men in their Ward capable of bearing arms on horseback or otherwise according to their estate, &c.

Folio cxlii b. [et seq.]

Letters of King Edward II. sent to John de Gisors, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the Commonalty, from York, in the fifth year of his reign, for safeguarding the City of London on his behalf; and ordinances made thereon. (fn. 5)

Folio cxliii b.

Breve R' missum Maiori et Aldermannis.

Writ of Privy Seal to the Mayor and Aldermen repeating former charges to safeguard the City on the King's behalf, and bidding them to permit any Earl or Baron desirous of entering the City to do so, provided he does not bring horse or arms, and is not suspected of mischief. Dated at York, the last day of January, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Breve R' ad proclamand' quod ordinaciones et leges et cons' teneantur.

Writ to the Sheriffs of London for proclamation to be made of the King's wish that the ancient laws and customs of the realm, as well as the ordinances recently made for the benefit of the realm, (fn. 6) which did not redound to the prejudice of the Crown, should be observed. Dated at York, 26 Jan., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12]. (fn. 7)

Breve R' de providencia facienda in Turri.

Writ to the same to assist in provisioning the Tower of London with 60 quarters of corn, 100 quarters of malt, 10 casks of wine, 40 quarters of oats, 20 quarters of salt, 10 carcases of oxen, 40 bacons, 1,000 stockfish (duris piscibus), and 5 "mays" of herring. Dated at York, 28 Jan., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-1312].

Retorn'.

Return made to the effect that the Sheriffs were unable to execute the King's mandate at present, inasmuch as the whole of the City's ferm and other issues in the said City and county of Middlesex were, by a previous order, being expended on satisfying the King's creditors.

Folio cxliv.

Scriptum domini Joh'is de Waltham vicar' de Wyndesore.

Recognizance by Adam de Tyndale, fishmonger, of debt of £47 due to Sir John de Waltham, Vicar of Wyndesore, to be paid at Easter next. Dated Saturday after the Feast of St. Matthias [24 Feb.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Acknowledged the same day before John de Mazelyner, the Chamberlain. Paid 2s. 6d.

Scriptum Joh'is Dachet facta Joh'i de Sellyng.

Recognizance by John, son of John Dachet, butcher, of debt of £40, to be paid to John de Sellyng, viz., one moiety at Christmas next and the other at the Christmas following. Dated Tuesday the Feast of St. Peter in Cathedra [22 Feb.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Acknowledged the same day. For enrolment 2s. 6d.

Breve domini Regis de quietacione muragu pro civibus Ebor'.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London that they allow citizens of York to pass free from payment of murage, pavage, "skewynge" (or "skewenge" (fn. 8) ), and other customs demanded in the City, according to the terms of the King's charter granted to the citizens of York. Dated at York, 16 Feb., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Breve R' pro proclamacione facienda de Societate Friscobaldor'.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London that they make proclamation throughout the City that all persons having in their hands or custody any goods and chattels belonging to merchants of the Society of "Friscombaldi" certify the nature and quantity of such goods between now and Easter next, under penalty in case of default; and further that no one thenceforth deliver up such goods to "Pieres de Friscombaud." Dated at York, 8 March, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

By virtue of which writ command was given to the Sheriffs to make the proclamation 15 March the same year.

Scriptum Hug' de Waltham.

Recognizance by Nicholas Dereman, butcher, of debt of £10, to be paid to Hugh de Waltham, clerk, at the Feast of Pentecost next. Dated Thursday before the Feast of Annunciation B. M. [25 March], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Memoranda temp. John de Gysors, Mayor, anno 5 Edward II.

Folio cxliv b.

Abrokarii Vinorum.

Wednesday after Clausum Pasche, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], came William de Portesmuth, Robert de Warham, William Tobbynge, John Child, Peter de Pampeloygne, Peter Drynkwater, Peter Norman, Arnald Barache, John de Kynggestone, brokers [of wines], before John de Gysors, the Mayor, and the rest of the Aldermen, and were bound over to keep and preserve all the articles appertaining to their office, which articles are contained in the 43rd folio next preceding; (fn. 9) and thereon each of them took his corporal oath, &c.

Litera domini Reg' pro libertate concedenda Antonino de Geneetsoc' suis.

Writ of Privy Seal to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty of the City to admit Antonyn "Pessaygne" de Gene, (fn. 10) Manuel and Leonard his brothers, and Gabriel "Pauzan," his cousin, to the franchise. Dated at York, 23 Jan., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Item alia litera pro eisdem.

Afterwards, inasmuch as the above Antonyn and his fellows were not admitted pursuant to the above writ, the said Antonyn brought another letter from the lord the King to similar effect. Dated at Malton, 26 Feb., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Responsio literar' predictar'.

Reply to the above, to the effect that the Commonalty had been summoned and had heard the King's letters. In reply they had set forth how on a former occasion a certain William Lamy, an alien, had received the franchise of the City, and had obtained goods and merchandise without number in places beyond the sea and had failed to pay for the same on the days appointed, to the great loss of many merchants of the City of London, who had never since dared to attend any Fair abroad. They further declared that if the above Antonyn were received into the franchise he would avow (fn. 11) the goods of many other merchants, and thereby the King's sheriffs and officers would lose the custom payable on such goods. They further said that there was a certain John Pysaquile (fn. 12) who at the desire of certain folk had been received into the franchise, and was now under arrest in Paris for large sums owing to divers persons, who would probably suffer great loss.

The above letter was sealed with the common seal, Wednesday before the Feast of St. Mark [25 April], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312].

Folio cxlv.

Ordinacio facta de placers ad le Stolles.

Be it remembered that on Wednesday after the Feast of St. Gregory [12 March], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12], an assembly was made of good men of the Commonalty before John de Gisorz, the Mayor, Nicholas de Farendone, John de Wyndesore, William Trente, Roger de Frowyk, Nicholas Pikot, and Henry de Gloucestre, Aldermen, for the purpose of regulating and considering the status of butchers and fishmongers tenanting places at "le Stokkes"; on which day it was agreed by the whole Commonalty that all those who took their places by demise of John le Benere and the other six good men to whom Henry le Galeys, a former Mayor, and the whole Commonalty had granted the house called "le Stokkes" for the term of the life of the said John le Benere and his fellows for a certain sum of money which they paid yearly to London Bridge, (fn. 13) so that the said John and others could demise those places to butchers and fishmongers, as is more fully contained in a certain writing indented between the aforesaid Henry of the one part, and the said John le Benere and his fellows [of the other part], made and enrolled in the Husting (fn. 14) -should hold and occupy the places they received from the said John or any of his fellows, provided they can prove here in Court before the Mayor that they took the places of the said John or any of his fellows, and this for the term of their life, &c. It was likewise agreed that other butchers who hitherto had taken their places by demise of other Wardens of the Bridge and herein had paid a fine for their lifetime, and could prove this, should have and hold, &c. And that in future places not so held should be taken into the City's hand and demised by the present Wardens, to be held yearly at the best price they can fetch. And it was agreed that no Wardens for the future should have power to demise any places for life without the assent and will of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty for the time being, &c.

Breve domini R' de custod' pacis.

Writ to the Sheriffs of London to inquire as to who had taken upon themselves to appoint guardians of the peace in the City, thereby usurping the King's prerogative. Dated at York, 28 March, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312]. (fn. 15)

Folio cxlv b.

Premunicio facta mercatoribus alienigenis quod non morentur nec teneant bonasua devendita ultra xl. dies.

Be it remembered that on Tuesday next before the Feast of St. Mark [25 April], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], all merchant strangers in the City of London came before John de Gisors, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, William de Coumbemartyn, John de Lincoln, Geoffrey de Conduit, Simon Bolet, Aldermen, and Richard de Welleford, Sheriff, by summons, and were warned on behalf of the lord the King not to remain thenceforth in the City with their goods and merchandise longer than forty days from the time they entered the City, and not to retain goods and merchandise unsold beyond that time, under penalty of forfeiture of the articles not sold to the use of the Sheriffs of the City, &c.

Petitiones communitatis facte Maiori et Alder mannis concesse et ordinate.

Donum per communitatem factum Joh'i de Gisorcio Maiori.

Be it remembered that on Wednesday before the Feast of Annunciation B. M. [25 March], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12], a congregation of good men of the City was held in the presence of John de Gisors, the Mayor, William Servat, John de Wengrave, Nigel Drury, Richard de Wyrhale, John de Wyndesore, Henry de Gloucestre, Anketyn de Gisors, [and] John de Lincoln, Aldermen; on which day the good men of the Commonalty desired the articles following, viz., Imprimis, that thenceforth no stranger be admitted to the freedom of the City except with the assent of the Commonalty as (ut (fn. 16) ) in a common assembly or in full Husting in the presence of the Commonalty. Item, that no letters whereby the Commonalty can or ought to be burdened or bound towards any one be made or sealed with the seal of the Commonalty before the Commonalty be assembled for the purpose and have given unanimous consent thereto. Item, it was desired that the Common Seal should thenceforth remain in a certain chest under six keys, whereof three should be kept by three Aldermen, and three good men of the Commonalty should have the other three. Item, the same day it was granted and agreed by common assent of the whole Commonalty then present to give to the said John de Gisors, the Mayor, in aid of his household £40 out of the sum of £43 16s. 3½d., then in the custody of John le Mazelyner, the Chamberlain of the City's Treasury, viz., out of the money which Luke de Haverynge, the late Chamberlain, received to the use of the Commonalty, and had paid to John le Mazelyner by order of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty on rendering his account.

Afterwards, viz., on Saturday after the quinzaine of Easter next following, the good men of the Commonalty came and prayed the Mayor and Aldermen that the aforesaid articles might be granted and confirmed. And all the aforesaid articles were granted the same day in the presence of J[ohn] de Gisors, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, Thomas Romayn, N[icholas] de Farendon, R[ichard] de Gloucestre, J[ohn] de Wyndesore, Anketyn de Gisors, Henry de Durham, Nicholas Pycot, Geoffrey de Conduit, Henry de Gloucestre, Nigel Drury, Roger de Frowyk, R[ichard] de Welleford, Simon de Mereworth.

Writ to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen that they safeguard the City for the King against any peril that may arise from meetings of the Earls and Barons, bearing in mind their letters promising fealty to King Henry III. and his heirs. Dated at York, 8 Feb., 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12]. (fn. 17)

Folio cxlvi.

Ordinacto declericis et servientibus civitatis.

4 June, 3 Edward II. [A.D. 1310], ordinances made by Thomas Romayn, the Mayor, J[ohn] de Wengrave, William de Leire, Richard de Gloucestre, Nicholas de Farndone, Henry de Gloucestre, John de Windesore, Nigel Drury, and William Cosyn, Aldermen, for the removal of Sheriffs and their officers found negligent in the execution of precepts and other duties; (fn. 18) also it was ordained that outstanding debts to the City should be forthwith levied in order that the City's debts might be paid, and citizens and merchants attend markets without fear of having their goods seized in satisfaction, &c.

Dimissio cujusdam dom' facta Agn' Poyntel per J. le Mazelyner.

Monday after the Feast of St. John ante portam Latinam [6 May], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], Agnes Poyntel took of John le Mazelyner a house which Paul le Boteler devised to Walter, son of the said John, situate in Martelane, for 5 marks by the year. Sureties, viz., Matthew le Nailer de Bassieshawe, William de Leycestre, clerk, and John Jylle.

Folio cxlvi b.

Ordinacio super assesstone et colleccione tallagiorum in civitate ne quis alibi taxetur quam in Warda ubimanet.

Whereas a certain ambiguity has lately occurred in the City of London between certain Aldermen of the said City and divers citizens of divers Wards, and especially between William Trente, Alderman of Bradestrete, and Richard de Gloucestre, whom he claimed to be of the said Ward, and as such to be tallaged, and also between the said Richard de Gloucestre, Alderman of Cornhill Ward, and Richard de Farnberewe, whom he claimed to be of his Ward, and as such to be tallaged,-so that strife has oftentimes arisen between divers Aldermen and men of divers Wards on that account. And in order that this ambiguity may henceforth be removed and a fixed rule be maintained between the Aldermen and men of the Wards in such tallages and assessments, it was ordained and established on Monday next after the Annunciation B. M. [25 March], 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], in the presence of Sir Richer de Refham, the Mayor, Thomas Romayn, Nicholas de Farndone, John de Wengrave, William de Leire, Richard de Gloucestre, William Trente, Nicholas Pikot, Henry de Durham, Simon de Paris, John de Lincoln, and Thomas Sely, Aldermen, and Simon "de" Corp, one of the Sheriffs, and of others of the Council (de consilio) of the said City-that whenever any tallage or any collection ought to be made in the City for the use of the King or any one else for any cause, and it shall happen that a citizen of the said City has his mansion in divers Wards, or has the entrance and exit of his mansion in one Ward, and the hall, chambers, and kitchen in another Ward (in reliqua warda); and further if he have his mansion as aforesaid in one Ward, whilst his merchandise and goods for sale lie in another Ward (in alia warda), the citizens of the said City shall henceforth be taxed, tallaged, and assessed in those Wards wherein their halls, chambers, and the rest of their houses are situate, and where they eat, rise, and sleep, for all their goods and chattels which they possess within the said City, and where of old they were accustomed to be taxed and assessed. But as touching Aldermen, it was agreed and ordained that thenceforth they should always be taxed and assessed in those Wards where they reside with their wives, children, or families, and not in the Wards where they are Aldermen. And the same was to be done respecting making the watches.

Ordinaciones tempore parliamenti a° v to.

Friday after the Feast of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], it was ordained by Richer de Refham, the Mayor, Thomas Romayn, Nicholas de Farndone, John de Wengrave, William de Leire, Richard de Gloucestre, John de Wyndesore, William Trente, William de Leire, [sic] [William] Servad, John de Gysors, William Cosyn, Simon Bolet, Nicholas Pikot, and Simon de Paris, Aldermen, with the assent of twelve good men then summoned from each Ward of the City before the Ordainers appointed by the lord the King for the good of the realm-that every Alderman who refused to consult the men of his Ward, to hold his Wardmotes as he ought, and to do other things appertaining to the office of Alderman, should be removed from his Aldermanry and another appointed in his place. Likewise that those summoned to keep watch on occasion and failing to appear be fined. Likewise that watchmen when watching should be strong and well-armed men, under penalty of a fine to the use of the Chamber of the City. Likewise that whensoever any assault be made in any place of the City, all those in the City who saw and knew of the assault should act like men in bringing about a peaceful issue and arresting the misdoers, under pain of imprisonment.

Folio cxlvii.

Ordinaciones de custodia portarum civitatis a° v to.

Ordinances (fn. 19) made in the Chamber of the Guildhall by the Mayor and Aldermen on Saturday the eve of the Assumption B. M. [15 Aug.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], in the presence of Richer de Refham, the Mayor, Thomas Romayn, Nicholas de Farendone, John de Wengrave, Richard de Gloucestre, William de Leire, William Servad, John de Lincoln, John de Wyndesore, Nicholas Pikot, Simon Bolet, [and] Simon de Paris, Aldermen, the lord the King being at the time at Westminster, and the Earls and Barons of England lying in London and around the City, against (contra) the King's Parliament (fn. 20) [summoned] for the purpose of completing and confirming the ordinances made for the benefit of the whole realm. (fn. 21)

Folio cxlvii b.

Common Memoranda temp. John de Gysors, Mayor, anno 5 Edward II.

Breve R' ad inquirendum de transgres sionibus factis inter mercatores Angl' et Flandr'.

Writs to the Sheriffs of London that they take measures for the safety of Flemings coming to London to obtain redress of grievances, Commissioners having been appointed on the part of England and Flanders to adjudicate upon differences which had arisen between merchants of those countries. Names of the Commissioners, viz., Robert de Kendale, Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, Henry de Cobeham, junior, John de Northwode, senior, and John de Frisyngfeld, appointed by the King of England, and William de Nyvelle, William Pesson, Baldewyn de Arsebrek, and John de Menyn, Knts., by the Count of Flanders. Dated at York, 21 March, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Recognicio Ric'i de Wymbisshe pottarn facta Priori Sancte Trinitatis.

Friday after the Feast of St. Mark [25 April], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], a deed of covenant by Richard de Wymbisshe, potter, to make a bell for the church [of the Priory] of Holy Trinity, London, according to specifications. (fn. 22)

Folio cxlviii.

Recognicio £c facta Nich'o Pikot per Cristianam que funt ux' Egidn le "Qwylt'".

27 April, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], came Cristiana de Evre, formerly wife of Giles le Quylter, before John de Gisors, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, Richard de Gloucestre, William de Coumbemartyn, John de Lincoln, Henry de Durham, and John de Wyndesore, Aldermen, and John le Mazelyner, the Chamberlain, and acknowledged herself bound to Nicholas Pikot in the sum of £100, to be paid at Midsummer next.

Scriptum indentatum int' Nich'm Picot et Cristianam q' fuit uxor Egidii le Quylt'.

Indenture between the above Cristiana and Nicholas, whereby the latter covenants that the above recognizance shall be void provided he enjoy peaceable possession of certain shops, garden, &c., in the parishes of Little St. Bartholomew and St. Christopher demised to him for a term of years. Dated Monday the Feast of SS. Philip and James [1 May], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312]. Witnesses, Sir John de Gisors, the Mayor, Simon de Mereworth and Richard de Welleford, Sheriffs, John de Wengrave, Richard de Gloucestre, Henry de Durham, Robert de Keleseye, Henry de Merlawe, Richard Doche, Hugh de Waltham, Roger le Clerk, and others [not named].

Folio cxlviii b.

Common Memoranda temp. John de Gysors, Mayor, anno 5 Edward II.

Scriptum Nich'i Pikot factum per Cristianam de Evre.

Indenture of lease by the above Cristiana to the above Nicholas of the said property. Dated 12 April, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312].

Folio cxlix.

Friday the morrow of the Ascension [4 May], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312]. Proceedings as to the disposal of certain hides purchased by the Mayor and Sheriffs on the King's behalf, but never taken or paid for. (fn. 23)

Folio cxlix b.

Deliberacio scriptorum facta Joh'i de Selby clerico.

Be it remembered that John de Selby, clerk, came before John de Wengrave and Anketyn de Gisors, Aldermen, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, 3 June, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], and demanded the delivery to him of two written contracts made between him and Richard de Normantone, skinner, touching a house in Holebournestrate, the said documents having been entrusted to John le Mazeliner under certain conditions. The said Richard being summoned to show cause why the documents should not be given up, and failing to appear, it was adjudged that they should be given to the said John de Selby upon his finding sureties of indemnity. The names of the sureties, viz., Walter de Walpol, goldsmith, and William de Lynton, saddler.

Tuesday before the Feast of Nativity of St. John Bapt. [24 June], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], came John de Wengrave, William Trente, Master Adam le Peyntour, and William de Fingrie, "braceour," before the Mayor, and became sureties for Master Alexander le Imagour, that he would complete his contract made with William de Estone, parson of the church of Stanewell, before the Feast of All Saints, &c.

Breve R' ad venire faciend' duos cives ad parliamentum Lincoln'.

Writ to the Sheriffs of London for the election of two citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Lincoln on Sunday after the Feast of St. Mary Magdalen next [22 July]. Dated at York, 3 June, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312]. (fn. 24)

Afterwards, on Saturday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June] the same year, there were assembled at the Guildhall T[homas] Romayn, N[icholas] de Farendone, and John de Wengrave, deputies of the Mayor, because he was infirm, William de Coumbemartyn, William Trente, John de Nicole, Roger de Frowyk, Simon de Paris, William Cosyn, Nigel Druri, John de Wyndesore, Anketin de Gysors, and Simon Bolet, Aldermen, Richard de Welleford, Sheriff, and twelve of the better men of each Ward, &c., for the election of two or four good men for the business contained in the writ, &c. And thereto were elected Nicholas de Farendone, John de Wengrave, Robert de Keleseye, John de Sellyng, (fn. 25) or David de Cotesbrok, to go to Lincoln to the Parliament, &c.

Also the same day it was agreed by the Aldermen and Commonalty that debts owing on account of Sheriffs, for which the City has satisfied the lord the King, be levied by the Sheriffs to acquit the City toward the lord the King. And it was agreed that Simon Bolet should now pay to the Commonalty £30, part of £50 wherein he made fine with the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty temp. Richer de Refham, late Mayor, for all and singular debts demanded of him on account of tenements held by him which belonged to Luke de Batencourt, late Sheriff, viz., for a moiety of the sum of £276 which was demanded of the said Luke, and that an acquittance should be given him for his share, &c.

Folio cl.

The King by William de Wengrave, his prosecutor, demands from William de Toppesfeld and Johanna his wife a certain messuage in the suburb of London which John, son of Benedict le Sporiere, held of King Edward I., and which the present King now claims as escheat, owing to the said John having become an outlaw for felony. The said William and Johanna defend the force, &c. Thereupon the Mayor and Commonalty claim their liberty, declaring that Edward I. had by charter granted that no citizen should plead outside the City's walls in any plea, except pleas of outside tenure, save moneyers and the King's officers, and they produced the charter (fn. 26) to that effect, &c. They further say that it was granted to the same citizens by the Great Charter of Liberties of England, that they should have all their ancient liberties and customs unimpaired, and that the custom of the City is that such pleas of escheats of tenements within the liberty of the City should be pleaded before the Justices Itinerant at the Tower, and not elsewhere. A further day given. In the meantime parley is to be held with the lord the King, &c.

Breve Regis missum Marori London' ad cap' civitatem in manum Regis.

Writ to the Mayor to take the City forthwith into the King's hand and to seize all war-horses (equos ad arma) and armour for the King's use, and not allow them to leave the City. Dated at York, 26 June, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312].

The King to the Mayor and Aldermen, notifying his intention of coming to the City, and enjoining them to keep the City for him and not allow armed men to enter therein. Dated at Schelford, (fn. 27) 11 July, 6 Edward II. [A.D. 1312].

Folio cl b.

Scriptum Theobaldi de "Merk.".

Recognizance by Vincent de Storteford, woolmonger, of a debt of £100 due to Theobald de "Mierk" at Michaelmas next. Witnesses, John le Mazerer, John Vincent and Roger his brother, Hugh de Blithe, Alan de Caustone, and others [not named]. Dated Tuesday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312].

For enrolment 2s. 6d.

Afterwards, viz., on Thursday before the Feast of Pentecost [3 June], 6 Edward II. [A.D. 1313], came the aforesaid Theobald and acknowledged satisfaction.

Breve R' adinquirend' sidri's Rex dare possit quandam placeamvacuam juxta Sc' m Paulum.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to hold an inquisition ad quod damnum, touching a proposed grant by the King to Master William de Maldone of a piece of waste land in the City situate near the tenement of John of Brittany, Earl of Richemund, and houses belonging to Henry le Waleis in the vicinity of Ivylane and Eldedeneslane (fn. 28) and the north wall of the Bishop of London's palace. Dated at York, 10 March, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311-12].

Inquisition held before John de Gisors, the Mayor, Richard de Welleford and Simon de Mereworth, the Sheriffs, on Thursday after the Feast of Nativity of St. John Bapt. [24 June], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1312]. The jurors find that the proposed grant would be prejudicial both to the King and the Queen; to the King, because any building on the spot would render the King's passage through Chepe to Westminster too narrow; and to the Queen because in the event of her wishing to take the same route in her chariot she would find difficulty in turning it or passing another vehicle. It would also be prejudicial to the Bishop of London, inasmuch as the Bishop has a wall hard by, and if he desired to build thereon, or to make a passage through it to the highway, as he might well do, any building on the ground aforesaid would prevent him. Moreover, there would arise a risk of fire to the church of St. Paul if the new buildings were to take fire. The jurors further find that the proposed buildings would be prejudicial to the free entry and exit of the tenement of Sir John of Brittany, would hinder carts carrying woad from Castle Baynard Wharf, and would prevent the proper defence of Ludegate and Neugate in time of war, &c.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of two citizens to attend Parliament in London instead of at Lincoln on Sunday after the Feast of Assumption B. M. [15 Aug.] next. Dated at Spaldyng, 8 July, 6 Edward II. [A.D. 1312].

Nicholas de Farendone, John de Wengrave, and Robert de Kelleseye returned.

Footnotes

1 Referring to Letter-Book C, folio liv b.
2 A "round house" or prison situate in Cornhill, and so called from its being "somewhat in the fashion of a tun standing on the one end." It originally served as a prison for night-walkers, but was afterwards converted into a cistern for water conducted from Tyburn, and became known as the Conduit on Cornhill.
3 'Memorials,' p. 89.
4 Particulars set out in 'Memorials,' p. 89 (the editor, however, gives the date incorrectly, and appears to have misprinted several of the proper names).
5 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 93-8.
6 The ordinances to which the royal assent had reluctantly been given on 5 Oct., 1311. They had been prepared by the so called "Ordainers." The reservation here made, viz., que in dampnum seu prejudicium nostri aut corone nostre non redundant, is characteristic of the King's attitude in the matter of the observance of ordinances to which he had been forced to subscribe.
7 See similar writ addressed to the Sheriff of York, printed in Rymer's 'Fœdera,' vol. ii. pt. i. p. 154.
8 The custom known as "Scavage," from A.-S. scēawian, to show. See 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' p. 151n.
9 Referring to the articles set out on folio ci (supra, p. 219).
10 Genoa.
11 Fictitiously claim as his own.
12 Probably identical with John de Pinza Aquila of Genoa, mentioned in Letter-Book B ('Cal.,' pp. 248, 250).
13 About the year 1282 Henry le Galeys, the Mayor, established a market near Woolchurch, which market came to be known as the Stocks Market, from its standing on the site where formerly a pair of stocks for punishment of offenders stood. The rents of the market were to be devoted to the maintenance of London Bridge. 'Liber Cust.,' i. 276-8; cf. Letter-Book E, folio cxlvi b.
14 The enrolment not to be found.
15 A similar writ addressed to the Sheriffs of Lincoln is printed in Rymer's 'Fœdera,' vol. ii. pt. i. p. 161.
16 Probably an error for vel, as suggested by the editor of the 'Liber Albus,' where the same restriction as to the admission of foreigners to the freedom of the City is recorded verbatim ('Liber Albus,' i. 366). Among the articles for governing the City confirmed by Edward II. in 1319 was the following, viz., "Quod nullus alienigena in libertatem civitatis prædictæ admittatur, nisi in Hustengo" ('Liber Albus,' i. 142).
17 Rymer's 'Fœdera,' vol. ii. pt. i. p. 156.
18 Cf. order made in 1299 for the imprisonment of Sheriffs who were in arrear with their accounts of money due to the King. 'Cal. Letter-Book B,' p. 85.
19 The ordinances relate to the watch and ward of the City, and are set out in Riley's 'Memorials,' pp. 91-3.
20 Parliament had been summoned to meet on 8 August ('Parl. Writs,' vol. ii. pt. i. pp. 63-5). The King "left Berwick at the end of July and ......presented himself about the end of August to the assembly which had been some time waiting for him." The Parliament sat at the Blackfriars. Stubbs's 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 328.
21 These were the ordinances forced upon the King by the Ordainers. The original ordinances had been few in number and of a more or less liberal character. The result of their consideration by Parliament was greatly to increase their number and stringency. They were published in St. Paul's Churchyard on 27 September, and received the royal assent on the following 5 October. Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 328n., 331.
22 See 'Memorials,' p. 100.
23 Set out in 'Memorials,' p. 101.
24 Palgrave, 'Parl. Writs,' vol. ii. pt. ii. p. 74.
25 Misprinted "Selby" in Palgrave's 'Parl. Writs,' vol. ii. pt. ii. p. 74.
26 Inspeximus charter,dated at Westminster, 17 April, 27 Edward I. [A.D. 1299]. See 'Liber Cust.,' i. 255-266. Original charter preserved at the Guildhall.
27 Co. Cambs.
28 Old Dean's Lane.


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