Folios ccxxi - ccxxix
Oct 1387 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1907

Pages

315-331

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'Folios ccxxi - ccxxix: Oct 1387 -', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: H: 1375-1399 (1907), pp. 315-331. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33477 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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Folio ccxxi.

L'ra missa d'no Regi per Maiorem Aldr'os et co'itatem.

Letter from Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the Commonalty under the Common Seal to the King, enclosing a copy of the above oath [omitting the clauses placed in parenthesis], which they assure him they had taken and were determined to keep, and commending to him Nicholas Brembre, who would inform him as to the state of the City. Dated 5 Oct. [A.D. 1387].

Carta per donac'ois facta diversis personis.

Letters patent granting pardon, at the request of Nicholas "de" Extone, the Mayor, to Richard Bone, "webbe," (fn. 1) William Harowe, "webbe," Henry Nasse, "webbe," William Pykas, "webbe," John Nook, "webbe," William Pypar, "webbe," and Thomas Wolf, "webbe," for felonies, &c. Witness the King at Westminster, 20 March, 10 Richard II. [A.D. 1386-7].

Presentac' Will'i Lokha capell' ad cantar' in eccl'ia Sancti Pauli pro a'ia Henr' Guld ford fundat'.

Presentation by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and Richard Odyham, the Chamberlain, of William Lokha, chaplain, to the chantry founded in St. Paul's Church by Henry Guldeford, called "le Mareschal," in the place of John Albon, deceased, the right of presentation falling to them pursuant to an agreement made on the morrow of the Purification [2 Feb.], A. D. 1313[-14]. (fn. 2) Dated 28 Sept., A D 1387.

Concessio pro Will'o Courtray de non veniendo in assisis.

23 Oct., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], William Courtray, fishmonger, discharged by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Sheriffs from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio ccxxi b.

Custodia pueror' Will'i Knyghtcote.

27 July, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], the guardianship of Margaret and Margery, daughters of William Knyghtcote, together with a sum of £1,471 7s. 1d. belonging to them and to Idonia their sister, in the custody of Johanna, widow of the said William and mother of the said Idonia, committed by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and Richard Odyham, the Chamberlain, to John Otteley, mercer. (fn. 3) Sureties, viz., Hugh Fastolf and Adam de St. Ive, Aldermen, Thomas Otteleye, grocer, and William Potenham, girdler.

Afterwards, viz., on the 6th Feb., 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388-9], the said John Otteleye paid a certain sum of money to Thomas Sampson, of co. Suffolk, and to Simon his son, who had married the above Margaret; and on the 20th Feb., 13 Richard II. [A.D. 1389-90], he paid another sum of money to Thomas Aleyn, mercer, who had married the above Margery. Other payments follow.

Afterwards, viz., on the 15th June, 17 Richard II. [A.D. 1394], it was granted by William Staundone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that Richard Forster should marry the above Idonia, and the said John Otteley and Thomas Aleyn covenanted to pay them the sum of £500 by two equal instalments.

Letter of Privy Seal to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London bidding them appoint Thomas Usk, (fn. 4) the King's Serjeant-at- arms, to be Under-Sheriff of the county of Middlesex in the place of John Boterwyk, who was getting too old for work. Dated at the King's manor of Clipstone, 2 Sept. [A.D. 1387].

Folio ccxxii.

Letter of Privy Seal from the King to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons, thanking them for their loyalty as expressed in their letter under their Common Seal and by Nicholas Brembre, as also for their efforts to bring about unity and concord in the City. He exhorts them to continue these efforts, so that he might the sooner pay them a visit in person. (fn. 5) It was his intention, with the advice of his lieges in the City, to grant a pardon to all who confessed their misdoings and prayed his favour. He had been informed by Nicholas Brembre that good and honourable men had been elected Sheriffs, and he hoped that at the election of a Mayor they would choose one who could be trusted to well govern the City, (fn. 6) otherwise he (the King) would refuse to receive him on presentation. He charges them to see that no one trouble him with petitions to show greater favour to the traitors John Norhamptone, John More, and Richard Norbury, but to learn particulars as to the property of these men, and safeguard the same until further orders. He is gratified that, in accordance with his request, they have appointed Thomas Usk to the office of Under-Sheriff of Middlesex, and promises that such appointment shall not form a precedent to the prejudice of the City's franchise Dated at the Abbey of Eynesham, 7 Oct. [A.D. 1387].

Proclamacio supra l'ram p'scriptam.

16 Oct. [A.D. 1387], proclamation made, pursuant to the above letter, to the effect that no one urge the King for greater favour to be shown to Northamptone, More, and Norbury.

Compotus int' Thomam Austyn et Joh em Banham ser vientem ejus.

8 Oct., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], report made by William Sheringham, John Loveye, John Ottele, and Robert Guphey, mercers, as auditors of a commercial account between Thomas Austyn, mercer, and John Banham, his servant.

Folio ccxxii b.

Masters of Misteries sworn.

Cordwainers: Walter Buk, John Lewes, Richard Pyrye, and Richard Shote sworn, 2 Oct., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], to rule the mistery, sparing none for love nor molesting any for hate, and to present such defects as they may find to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Chamberlain, &c.

Tapicers: William Tannere, Richard atte Welle, Thomas Besouthe, and Hugh Riculf sworn, 7 Oct., the same year.

Fiecchers: William Aystone and Nicholas Minot sworn, 22 Oct., the same year.

Foreign Weavers: Peter Egelyn of Brabant and Reginald Van de Lare of Flanders sworn, 20 Oct., the same year.

Butchers at the Stokkes: Richard Hoke and Richard Morkoc sworn, 3 Dec., the same year.

Native Weavers: William Gorynge and John Willes sworn, 21 Nov., the same year.

Fulleres: William Wormestre, John Holbeche, Thomas Mytone, and Geoffrey Brystowe sworn, 11 Dec., the same year.

Skinners: Edward Cambre, William Brichford, William Bowyere, and Richard Waltham sworn surveyors of the mistery, 16 Jan., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387-8].

Cardemakers: Nicholas Loffenham and Richard atte Celer sworn, 23 Jan., the same year.

Barbers: John Shepey and Richard Canpolle (Caupolle?) sworn, 16 April.

Acquietancia unius marce redditus ponti London' debit' de quod' gardino quod prior beate Marie de Suthwerk tenet extra barram Sc'i Georgii de Suthwerk per Maiorem Alder'os et co'itatem eidem Priorifact' etc.

Acquittance by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the rest of the citizens, to Friar Henry Colyngbourne, Prior of the House of St. Mary de Suthwerk, and convent of the same, for one year's quitrent due to the same and to London Bridge for a garden belonging to the said religious house situate near Kentstrete, in the parish of St. George without the Bar of Suthwerk, and once the property of William de Exmuthe. Dated the morrow of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387]. (fn. 7) 0

Folio ccxxiii.

Custodia Joh'e filie Will'i Brykles.

31 Oct., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], the guardianship of Johanna, daughter of William "Bricles," together with a sum of £20 and a mazer bequeathed to her by Sabine, late wife of Henry Yerdele, committed by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and Richard Odyham, the Chamberlain, to William Tonge, vintner. Surety, viz., Thomas Wyght, pepperer.

Afterwards, viz., on Monday the 13th March, 13 Richard II. [A.D. 1389-90], the said William Tonge having died, the above guardianship was committed by William Venour, the Mayor, and the above Chamberlain to William Wasshebourne, "sherman" Sureties, viz., Thomas Wyght and William Wyght.

Afterwards, viz., on the 2nd June, 16 Richard II. [A.D. 1393], the said Johanna having died, came Katherine, widow and executrix of the above William Wasshebourne, and John Wyryng, her co-executor, and delivered the deceased's property to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, and also certain articles of silver bequeathed to John, son of William Brykles, to keep quousque etc.

Custodia Isabelle fil' Will'i Brykles.

31 Oct., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], the guardianship of Isabella, daughter of the above William Brikles, together with a sum of £20 and a mazer bequeathed to her by the above Sabine, late wife of Henry Yerdele, committed by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and Richard Odyham, the Chamberlain, to Thomas Wight, pepperer. Surety, viz., William Wyght, pepperer.

Afterwards, viz., on the 1st Feb., 21 Richard II. [A.D. 1397-8], came John Canynges, who had married [Cecilia], the widow of the above Thomas Wight, (fn. 8) and delivered to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, the property of the said Isabella for safe custody.

Afterwards, viz., on the 29th March, 21 Richard II. [A.D. 1398], the above Johanna, daughter of William Brykles, being dead, and Isabella being of full age, the property of the latter was delivered to her together with a moiety of the property of her deceased sister.

Afterwards, viz., on the 19th Sept., 5 Henry IV [A.D. 1404], came the aforesaid John, son of the said William Brikles, being of full age, and received his property from the said Chamberlain.

Folio ccxxiii b.

Eleccio Nich'i Extone Maioris.

Sunday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], in the presence of Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, Nicholas Brembre, Knt., John Hadle, William Cheyne, the Recorder, Nicholas Twyford, Knt., John Chircheman, William Venour, Hugh Fastolf, William More, William Staundone, Henry Vanner, John Shadworth, John Rote, John Hende, Adam de St. Ive, Adam Bamme, John Fraunceys, Roger Elys, Thomas Wylford, and William Olyver, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, as well of the Common Council as of other good men of the Wards, summoned for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Nicholas Extone was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn in the Guildhall, and on the morrow was admitted and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Consimiles bille misse fuerunt cuil't Alder manno pro lio'ib' armor' con vocandis.

Precept to the several Aldermen to cause the men of their Ward to be arrayed, each according to his estate, by Friday next, and to return their names. Dated the Feast of St. Martin [11 Nov.].

Proclamacio de suscepc'oe d'nor' in pro teccionem d'ni Regis.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs for proclamation (fn. 9) to be made in the City and suburbs to the effect that the King had taken under his special protection his uncle Thomas, Duke of Gloucester, Richard [Fitz Alan], Earl of Arundel, Thomas [de Beauchamp], Earl of Warwick, and all their folk, as well as Alexander [Neville], Archbishop of York, Robert [de Vere], Duke of Ireland, Michael [de la Pole], Earl of Suffolk, Robert Tresilian and Nicholas Brembre, Knights, who stood impeached of certain charges, and all their folk, until the next meeting of Parliament at Westminster on the morrow of Candlemas [2 Feb.]. (fn. 10) [No date. (fn. 11) ]

L'ra Regia q'd Maior et Aldr'i veniant ad Regem apud Wyndesore.

Writ of Privy Seal to Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, bidding him attend the King at Wyndesore Castle, together with all the Aldermen, on Sunday next [1 Dec.], in order to consult on matters of great importance. Dated at Wyndesore Castle [Thursday], 28 Nov. (fn. 12) [A.D. 1387].

Proclamacione quis male loquat' de Rege Regina nec aliis d'nis.

A royal proclamation forbidding any one to speak ill of the King and Queen or of the lords who dwelt about the King's person, for that the King himself would act as he thought best. [No date]. (fn. 13)

L'ra Regia q'd quil't Aldr's salvo custodiat Wardam suam.

Writ of Privy Seal to Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, bidding him to charge the Aldermen to take steps for safeguarding the City on the King's behalf, and to make a return of the names of all disloyal persons they may find. Dated at Wyndesore Castle, 3 Dec. [A.D. 1387].

Folio ccxxiv.

Consimiles bille misse fuerunt cuilibet Aldr'o.

Precept to the Aldermen to take steps for keeping watch and ward at Christmas for the preservation of the peace and prevention of disturbance.

Proclamacio ne quis portat arma infra civitatem.

Proclamation against any one carrying a sword or other arms unless he be an esquire or valet of a Knight, bearing a single sword only after his master; also against any one going as a "mummer" or playing any game with a mask or other strange guise, whereby his identity may be concealed.

Breve regium ad eligend' iiij or cives pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the morrow of the Purification [2 Feb.]. No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Wyndesore, 17 Dec., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387].

Carta per donacionis civitat' London' etc.

Letters patent granting pardon to the citizens in respect of recent disturbances caused by members of certain arts and misteries, except those already convicted, and those who had taken flight and had not yet returned to the City. (fn. 14) Witness the King at Westminster, 22 June, 9 Richard II. [A.D. 1385].

Br'e ad delib' and' Thomam Austyn et ux'em ejus ac alios.

Letters patent appointing Robert Bealknape, John Holt, and Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, or any two of them (the said Mayor being one), to be Justices for the delivery of Thomas Austin, mercer, Alice his wife, Hugh Lytherpolle, and other prisoners in Neugate. Witness the King at Westminster, 29 Jan., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387-8].

Folio ccxxiv b.

Consimiles bille misse fuerunt cuil't Aldr'o pro Aldermannis et co'i consilio eligendis.

Precept for election of Aldermen, whether they have already been Aldermen or not, and also of a certain number (fn. 15) of sufficient persons of each Ward to serve as a Common Council, the names of those so elected being returned to the Guildhall by Monday before the Feast of St. Gregory [12 March] next.

Judicium col listrigii pro imposicione unius pecie ferri in uno pane.

Wednesday after the Feast of St. Matthias [24 Feb.], 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387-8], Robert Porter, servant of John Gibbe, a baker of Stratford, charged at the Guildhall before Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, John Hadle, John Chircheman, William Venour, Adam Bamme, Adam de St. Ive, Thomas Wilford, William Wottone, and John Fraunceys, Aldermen, with inserting a piece of iron into a loaf to add to its weight and to deceive the said Mayor when making the assize of bread Condemned to stand on the pillory with the loaf and piece of iron hung about his neck. (fn. 16)

Proclamacio de vendicione viniet servisie.

21 March, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387-8], proclamation made for regulating the price of new wine and ale.

Judicium imprisonamenti Roberts Staf fertone propter rebellionem contra Aldr'm suum.

Friday before Palm Sunday [22 March], 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387-8], John Walcote, Alderman of the Ward of Walbroke, complained to Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, of an insult having been offered to him by Robert Staffertone, whom he had summoned by Robert Parker, the Beadle of the Ward, to attend on a certain day at the church of St. Swithin in Candelwykstret, and for his disobedience had committed to prison until the matter should be determined by the Aldermen.

On the following day the Mayor and Aldermen committed the said Robert Staffertone to Neugate for forty days, but this punishment was soon afterwards commuted for one of penance and the presentation of a wax candle to Guildhall Chapel. (fn. 17)

Folio ccxxv.

Lra Regia prosecuritate quinque mille libr' d'no Regi per civitatem London' mutuat'.

Letters patent acknowledging a loan of £5,000 made by the City to the King, to be repaid by the Feast of Holy Trinity [24 May] next, out of the half tenth and half fifteenth (fn. 18) to be raised in the City of London and county of Middlesex, the county of Wiltshire, the parts of Lyndesey in the county of "Nicol," (fn. 19) and the counties of Suffolk, Essex, Kent, Oxford, and Southampton. Dated at Westminster, 25 March, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388].

14 Sept., 17 Richard II. [A.D. 1393], came John Otteleye before William Staundone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and paid to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, certain sums of money in trust for Idonia, daughter of William Knightcote; and on the 1st Oct. the said Chamberlain delivered the said Idonia's property to Richard Forster, who had married her. (fn. 20)

Folio ccxxv b.

L'ra d'ni Regis patens ad levand' unam medietatem unius xvme in civitate London'.

Letters patent appointing Thomas Austyn, William Wottone, William Tonge, and John Furneux to levy in the City the money granted by Parliament for safeguarding the sea and defence of the realm. Witness the King at Westminster, 10 March, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387-8].

Consimiles bille misse fuerunt cuil't Aldr'o ad taxand' et levand' medietatem unius xve.

Precept to the several Aldermen to levy a sum of money equal to half a fifteenth in their Wards, and to bring it to the Guildhall by Monday after the Feast of St. Mark [25 April].

Forisfact' Furrur'.

21 April, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], Edward Cambr[ege?], William Brichford, William Bowiere, and Richard Waltham, Surveyors of the mistery of Skinners, brought five [sic] furs, which they declared to be false and deceitful and ought to be confiscated, viz., one fur of "meniver" seized in the house of Nicholas Waldegrave, containing 3 timbers, (fn. 21) appraised by oath of William Wiltshire, John Titesbury, John Huwet, and Richard Arderne, skinners, at 4s. a timber; one fur of meniver, cleaned (pured), containing 18 timbers, seized in the house of Robert Rybot, appraised at 3s. a timber; another fur of the same, containing 9 timbers, seized in the house of John Reynold, appraised at 2s. 6d. a timber; another of 6 timbers seized in the house of Matilda Penne, appraised at 3s. a timber. Total value, £4 19s. and no more, because one fur was sold for less than its appraised value. One-third of the aforesaid sum, viz., 33s., was given to the Surveyors for their trouble, and the rest, viz., £3 6s., remained to the use of the Commonalty.

13 June, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], William Asshford discharged by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the Sheriffs from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio ccxxvi.

Election of Aldermen.

Billinggesgate: Nicholas Extone, Mayor.

Lymstret: John Hadle.

Aldrichesgate: Nicholas Twyford, Knt.

Bisshopesgate: John Chircheman.

Bridge: Hugh Fastolf.

Tower: William Venour.

Cordewanerestret: John Fresshe.

Castle Baynard: William More.

Cornhulle: John Rote.

Algate: William Staundone.

Vyntre: Henry Vanner.

Bassieshawe: John Shadworth.

Farndone: John Fraunceys.

Queen Hithe: Thomas Wylford.

Bredestret: William Sheryngham.

Crepulgate: John Loveye.

Langbourne: Thomas Austyn.

Douegate: William Wottone.

Bradstret: Adam de St. Yve.

Walbroke: John Walcote.

Colmanstret: Thomas Carltone.

Chepe: Adam Bamme.

Candelwykstret: John Heende.

Br'e ad proclamand' quoddam statutum factum apud Ebor' de victualib' vendend' etc.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation of a statute passed in the last Parliament (fn. 22) confirming statutes passed in the ninth and twenty-fifth years of King Edward III., whereby freedom of trade in all manner of victuals, &c., was granted to foreigner and denizen alike in the City of London and elsewhere, any charter, &c., to the contrary notwithstanding, and to see the said statute observed. Witness the King at Westminster, 14 June, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388].

Folio ccxxvi b.

Judicium Ric'i Bole carnific' pro obprobri orib' verbissuis Will'o Wottone Aldr'o dictis.

Proclamation accordingly, 26 June, 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388] Saturday the eve of Pentecost [17 May], 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], Richard Bole, butcher, committed to prison for asking too high a price for his meat and for insulting William Wottone, the Alderman of the Ward of Douegate.

The matter being referred to the judgment of the Mayor and Aldermen, they condemned him to six months' imprisonment, and to do penance by humbly presenting a wax candle to the Guildhall Chapel. The term of imprisonment was afterwards remitted. (fn. 23)

Concessio ereccionis pinna culi conductus in Fletestrete.

12 June, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], licence granted by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Richard Odiham, the Chamberlain, to those living in the neighbourhood to build a pinnacle (fn. 24) over the Conduit in Fletestrete, opposite the house and tavern of John Walworth, "vynter," and near the hostel of the Bishop of Salisbury, (fn. 25) in order to prevent inundations owing to fractured pipes. The work to be done at their own cost, and to be abated on notice being given them by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Chamberlain, or by the Common Council. Sureties, viz., John Rote, John Walworth, Robert Bryan, Thomas Duke, George (fn. 26) Cressy, Reymond Standulf, John Chamberleyn, Robert Ikford, Nicholas Simond, Adam Jurdan, Robert Wauter, John Attehille, Walter Hoggeslade, Walter Dunmowe, William Balle, Roger Kempestone, Richard Middelton, Alan Ulryk, Roger Rabat, John Derneford, Robert Mauncel, and John Enmede.

Folio ccxxvii.

Br'e ad de lib'and' Aliciam que first uxor Joh'is Coterelle a prisona.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to release from prison Alice, widow and executrix of John Coterelle (committed to Neugate for failing to satisfy the just demands of John Body and Johanna his wife), she having been mainprised by Robert Wyclif, clerk, John Appeltone, Walter Knolles, Thomas Sibsay, William Clophille, Philip atte Vyne, and John Meire, in the King's Chancery. Witness the King at Westminster, 12 June, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388].

Returnum ejusdem.

Return made to the above by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, William Venour and Hugh Fastolf, the Sheriffs, setting out the custom of the City in respect of orphans, and the jurisdiction of the Mayor, Aldermen, and the Chamberlain over them and their property, to the exclusion of other authorities. Nevertheless, they had, pursuant to writs sent to them on the matter, released the said Alice from prison so that she might appear before the King (inasmuch as they could not themselves appear owing to pressing business touching the City), subject to the preservation of the City's liberties and customs and to her being remitted to prison in due course.

Folio ccxxvii b.

Custodia Mar garete filie Will'i Herkestede.

2 July, 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], the guardianship of Margaret and certain goods belonging to Thomas (apprentice to Mark Ernele, pepperer), children of William Herkstede, (fn. 27) late pepperer, committed by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and Richard Odiham, the Chamberlain, to John Vyne, mercer. Sureties, viz., Stephen Spilleman and William Lyncoln, mercers.

Afterwards, viz., on the 14th Dec., 14 Richard II. [A.D. 1390], the above Margaret having died under age and unmarried, her property was delivered to the above John Vyne and Thomas, executors of the said William Herkestede. (fn. 28)

Folio ccxxviii.

2 July, 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], the guardianship of Johanna, daughter of the above William Herkstede, together with divers rents and other property, committed by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and Richard Odiham, the Chamberlain, to John Hanefeld, pepperer. Sureties, viz., Walter Neutone and Thomas Knolles, pepperers.

Br'e pro sacr'o faciend' per civitatem London' de observando leges et statuta Anglie etc.

Afterwards, viz., on the 16th July, 17 Richard II. [A.D. 1393], came Roger Culney, draper, who had married the above Johanna, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's property. Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs bidding them to take the same oath as that recently taken by those who attended the Parliament then sitting, and to administer the same to the Aldermen and chief men of the City and suburbs according to the form enclosed. (fn. 29) Witness the King at Westminster, 4 June, 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1388].

Exon'acio Rob'ti Kyng candellar' ab assisis etc.

17 July, 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], Robert Kyng, chandler, discharged by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Sheriffs, from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio ccxxviii b.

Judicium col listrigii pro "Michale" Tropist.

Wednesday after the Feast of Translation of St. Thomas [7 July], 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], a plaint made by John Helstone, brewer, before Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, to the effect that whereas Michael Tropist had covenanted with Laurence, an appealer (appellour (fn. 30) ) in Neugate, to appeal him (the said John) for receiving thieves, for which the said Michael was to give the said appealer half a mark, and whereas the said appealer had written a Bill and sent it to the said John, threatening to appeal him unless the said John sent him a noble, whereupon the said John had gone to Neugate, and in the presence of the Coroner had asked an explanation from the appealer, who said he had acted at the instance of the said Michael, to the great hurt of the plaintiff, who now prayed that the said Michael might be punished for his offence.

Thereupon the said Michael was attached to answer the charge laid against him. He confessed himself not guilty, and claimed a jury. The jurors of the venue of the parish of St. Sepulchre without Neugate, viz., William Grene, John Reynham, William Grandone, William Spicerer, William Proude, John Trentmars, John Austyn, John Watvile, Hugh Troght, William Bisshop, William Trymnel, and Michael Wight, found him guilty of procuring and abetting the said approver (fn. 31) (probatorem), and of causing him to appeal the said John Helstone, whereby the said John might easily have lost his life and property. Cur. ad. vult.

Afterwards, viz., on Wednesday the Feast of Translation of St. Swythun [15 July], the Mayor and Aldermen, sitting in the Hall of the Guildhall, condemned him to stand on the pillory for one hour on three consecutive days, and afterwards to be committed to Neugate for one year unless, &c.

Afterwards, viz., on the 23rd Dec., 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], the said Michael was released.

Exon'acio Joh'is Blake in assisis.

4 Aug., 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], John Blake, "cornmonger," discharged by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Sheriffs from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Breve pro civib' eligend' ad parliatum.

Writ for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Cantebrigge on the morrow of the Nativity of St. Mary [8 Sept.]. (fn. 32) No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Oxford, 28 July, 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388].

Return of election of Adam Bamme and Henry Vanner, Aldermen; William Tonge and John Clenehand, Commoners.

Folio ccxxix.

Amocio Simonis Terry ab officio suo Janitor' compularii.

Monday the 3rd Aug., 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], Simon Terry, gate-keeper of the Compter of William Venour, one of the Sheriffs, removed from office and committed to prison for insulting Adam Bamme, an Alderman. The imprisonment subsequently remitted. (fn. 33)

Amocio Will'i Asshwell ab officio Bedell'.

The same day, William Asshewell, Beadle of the Ward of Cornhulle, was charged before the Mayor and Aldermen with having spread false reports to the effect that John Chircheman and Hugh Fastolf, Aldermen (the latter being also Sheriff), had been arrested and carried to the Tower by order of the King's Council, and that the said John Chircheman had had his head broken by the Duke of Gloucester. Thereupon the said William Asshewell was removed from office. (fn. 34)

Judicium Rob'ti Feltone.

Friday the 31st July, 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], a plaint made by Robert Buk, goldsmith, before Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, against Robert Feltone, a prisoner in Neugate, to the effect that he had bribed Laurence the appealer (lappellour) in Neugate to bring false charges against him, to wit, that he should have been (dust avoir este (fn. 35) ) with the said appealer at the death of John de Clifford at Donnysmore, co. Warwick, and at certain other felonies below "le Park de Etone," to the great hurt of the plaintiff; that thereupon John Charneye, the Coroner, had questioned the said Laurence on the matter, who had confessed that he had acted at the instance of Robert Feltone. The plaintiff prayed a remedy.

Precept to David Berteville, the Keeper of the gaol of Neugate, to bring up Robert Feltone before the Mayor and Aldermen on Monday the 3rd August, when the said Robert denied his guilt and claimed a jury. The jurors, viz., John atte Shoppe, Thomas Martin, Richard Molle, John Huwet, William Stanes, John Dewes, Simon Dustone, William Trymnelle, John Coteswold, Nicholas Wyght, Richard Sulby, and John Pynchoun, summoned by John Wykes, Serjeant of the Chamber, from the venue of Neugate, declared the said Robert to be guilty, notwithstanding his having produced the King's letters of protection. Cur. ad. vult, the said Robert being recommitted to prison in the meantime. (fn. 36)

Folio ccxxix b.

L'ra d'ni Reg' patens pro Nicholas Extone Marore etc.

Letters patent to the effect that whereas it had been commonly reported in the City that Nicholas "de" Extone, the Mayor, had in the last Parliament held at Westminster used his endeavours with the prelates and magnates to prejudice the City's liberties and to get Robert Knolles appointed Captain over the said City, and whereas, at the request of the said Mayor, the King had caused inquiries to be made among the prelates and magnates attending the present Parliament (fn. 37) as to the truth of such a charge and had found it to be wholly false —the King hereby signifies to his lieges of the City the innocence of the Mayor, and forbids any further defamation of him. Witness the King at Cantebrege, 4 Oct., 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388].

Exon acio Will'i Uptone in assisis etc.

6 Oct., 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], William Uptone, "peautrer," discharged by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Sheriffs, from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Simonis Walshman in assisis etc.

14 Oct., 12 Richard II. [A.D. 1388], Simon Walshman, "taillour," similarly discharged for like cause.

Custodia pueror' Joh'is Thomlyn nuper civis et Grocer' London'.

30 Nov., 11 Richard II. [A.D. 1387], the guardianship of Agnes, Henry, and Alice, children of John Thomlyn, late grocer, committed by Nicholas Extone, the Mayor, and Richard "Odyam," the Chamberlain, to John Cowlynge, grocer, who had married their mother. Sureties, viz., John Halle, grocer, and Thomas Sybsuy (Sybsay?).

Afterwards, viz., on the 21st Nov., 19 Richard II. [A.D. 1395], came the above John Cowlynge before the Mayor and Aldermen, praying that the above Henry might be allowed to enter the Priory of Lewes as a monk, and that his money might be handed over to the Priory. His prayer granted.

Footnotes

1 Weaver.
2 See 'Cal. Letter-Book E,' pp. 30-31.
3 John Otteley had been appointed guardian of the children by the will of William Knyghtcote, dated 23 Aug., 1382, and proved and enrolled in the Husting in July, 1383. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 237.
4 This appointment formed the subject of another charge brought by the lords appellant in the Parliament of 1388 against Brembre and other supporters of the King as having been made for the express purpose of furthering malicious proceedings against the lords. ('Rot. Parl.,' iii. 234.) Usk was a scrivener by profession, and had been one of the chief supporters of Northampton. Never theless he had shown himself bitterly hostile to Northampton when on his trial at Reading. (Higden, ix. 45-6.) He was also a collector of customs during part of the time that Chaucer was the Comptroller, and was the author of 'The Testament of Love,' at one time ascribed to Chaucer himself. In that literary effort Usk displayed no little contrition for his treachery to Northampton, although, when condemned to death, as condemned he was, by the "Merciless" Parliament, with Brembre and others, he still maintained the truth of the accusations he had formerly brought against his friend and patron. (Higden, ix. 169.)
5 According to Higden (ix. 104), the King paid a visit to the City on the following 10th November, when he received every token of welcome.
6 Extone was re-elected.
7 'Memorials,' pp. 498-9.
8 The will of Thomas Wight, a grocer, who had a wife named Cecilia (daughter of William Yvory) and a brother named William, dated 1396, was proved and enrolled in the Husting in 1406. See 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 282, 365.
9 This proclamation was the result of an interview between the King and the Duke of Gloucester and the Earls of Arundel and Warwick in Westminster Hall on Sunday, the 17th Nov., when it was decided to sum mon the King's unfortunate advisers to appear at the next Parliament to give account of themselves. Before that day arrived four of the accused had taken flight, and only Brembre was captured. ('Rot. Parl.,' iii. 229; Higden, ix. 107-8.) This is the last we hear of Brembre in the Letter-Book. Soon after Parliament met he was brought to trial and hanged at Tyburn. ('Rot. Parl.,' iii. 238; Walsingham, ii. 173-4.) He had taken the precaution in October of making over all his property to William Venour, a brother grocer, and others. ('Pleas and Memoranda,' Roll A 28, membr. 7).
10 This Parliament, known as the "Merciless" Parliament, sat for 122 days, viz., from 3 Feb. to 20 March, and from 11 April to 4 June, 1388. It was also known as the "Parliament that wrought wonders" (Stow, 'Annales,' ed. 1592, p. 475).
11 According to Knighton (ii. 249) the date was probably Tuesday, 19 Nov.
12 'Memorials,' p. 499. On the last day of November, according to Higden (ix. 108-9), the Mayor and Aldermen were sent for by the King, who desired to know how many armed men the City could furnish at a crisis. To this question a cautious reply was given, to the effect that the inhabitants of the City were traders by profession, and only took up arms for the defence of the City. This, we are told, was followed by a request made by Extone to the King that he might be discharged from the Mayoralty, but the King declined.
13 'Memorials,' p. 500 The publishing this proclamation was charged against Brembre and his associates in Parliament as an encroachment by them on the King's prerogative ('Rot. Parl.,' iii. 235), although, according to Higden (ix. 108), it was made by the King's orders.
14 It is noteworthy that this act of favour towards the citizens was followed a few days later by a City loan of £5,000 to the King. Vide supra, p. 267.
15 Six, four, or two, according to the size of the Ward. Supra, p. 228. This particular precept specifies four, but the name of the Ward is not recorded.
16 'Memorials,' p. 498.
17 Ib., pp. 500-2.
18 On the 10th March Parliament had granted half a tenth and half a fifteenth on condition that it should be expended on a naval expedition, and not otherwise. 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 244.
19 Lincoln.
20 Cf. supra, p. 316.
21 A "timber" of fur usually consisted of 40 skins.
22 Stat. ii. Ric. II. cap. vii. 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 247 Higden remarks (ix. 179) that the passing of this Act on the 14th May meant a loss of the City's privileges, a loss which, in the opinion of the chronicler, the citizens richly deserved on account of an attack made at the opening of Parliament against victuallers holding office in the City by certain mercers, goldsmiths, and drapers of London. However that may be, it is certain that the Cordwainers and other craft guilds of the City petitioned the King in the Parliament of 1386 that these statutes of Edward III. might be enforced. 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 226-7.
23 See 'Memorials,' pp. 502-3.
24 Lat. aventum (Fr. auvent) in the text. Translated "penthouse" by Riley ('Memorials,' pp. 503-4).
25 Commemorated at the present day by "Salisbury Court," on the south side of Fleet Street.
26 An early instance of the name?
27 His will proved and enrolled in the Husting in May, 1386. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 258.
28 It is difficult to see how Thomas, son of William Herkstede, who was a minor at the time of his father's death, could have been one of his executors. Moreover, the executors named in Herkstede's will are John Vyne and John "Henefeld," the latter being no doubt identical with John "Hanefeld," appointed (infra) guardian of Johanna, another daughter of William Herkstede.
29 The oath which follows was administered to those attending Parliament on Wednesday the 3rd June, 1388, and pledged them not to suffer the Acts recently passed to be repealed. Vide 'Rot. Parl.,' iii 251-2. The return to the writ is enrolled among 'Pleas and Memoranda' (Roll A 28, membr. 12 et seq.) together with the names of those in the City who took the oath as prescribed. The list comprises 490 Aldermen and citizens (under their respective Wards) and 93 ecclesiastics.
30 On another occasion he is called the appealer (lappellour), infra, p. 330. It looks as if Laurence was a professional "appealer," that is to say, that he brought "appeals" or charges against felons for what he could get out of them.
31 The name "approver" was commonly applied to a convicted felon who obtained his own pardon by prosecuting appeals against his accomplices This may account for Laurence being in Newgate at the time. Pollock and Maitland, 'Hist. of English Law,' ii. 631.
32 Sat from 9 Sept. to 17 Oct., 1388.
33 'Memorials,' pp. 506-7.
34 'Memorials,' p. 507.
35 "That he had been with," &c (Riley).
36 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 504-6. Nothing more of the matter appears to be recorded.
37 Then sitting at Cambridge. Its proceedings are not recorded in the Rolls of Parliament.