Folios cccxi - cccxx
Dec 1373 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1905

Pages

317-327

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'Folios cccxi - cccxx: Dec 1373 -', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: G: 1352-1374 (1905), pp. 317-327. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33522 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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Folio cccxi - cccxx.

Custodia Marg'ie filie Joh'is de Neketone.

6 Dec., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373], the guardianship of Margery, daughter of John de Neketone, aged fourteen years, committed by Adam de Bury, the Mayor, and John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, to John Horn, fishmonger, together with the sum of £40. Sureties, viz., John Lytle and John Rous, fishmongers.

Exon'acio dicte custodie.

Afterwards, viz., on the 27th Jan., 1 Richard II. [A.D. 1377-8], came Alexander Bedyk, who, with the assent of Nicholas Brembre, the Mayor, had married the above Margery, and asked that his wife's property might be delivered up. Thereupon the above John Horn rendered account before the said Mayor and William Eynesham, the Chamberlain, and delivered up the amount due, and he and his sureties were quit.

Custodia Joh'is fil' Joh'is atte Halle.

23 Dec., 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], the guardianship of John, son of John atte Halle, "tannere," aged ten years, committed by Adam de Bury, the Mayor, and John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, to John atte Hale, "whitawyere." Sureties, viz., William atte Brome, "tannere," and John Northawe, "whitawyere".

Folio cccxi b.

Letters patent permitting John Pecche, or his deputies, to buy and sell sweet wines by retail for a term of five years, notwithstanding an ordinance recently made in Parliament to the effect that no merchant, stranger or otherwise, should sell such wines by retail within the realm. Witness the King at Westminster, 30 Nov., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373]. (fn. 1)

Folio cccxii.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation of certain ordinances made in the Parliament summoned to meet at Westminster on the morrow of St. Edmund [20 Nov.], (fn. 2) viz.: (1) an ordinance prescribing the length and breadth of cloth of ray and cloth of colour, and (2) an ordinance fixing the value of the Scottish groat at 3 pence. (fn. 3) Witness the King at Westminster, 26 Nov., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373].

Proclamation made accordingly on Saturday the eve of Christmas.

Folio cccxii b.

Writ of Privy Seal bidding Adam de Bury, the Mayor, to put a reasonable price at which sweet wines should be sold and to make proclamation of the same. Dated at Westminster, 13 Dec., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373].

The price of wine fixed by the Mayor and proclaimed Saturday the eve of Christmas, viz., "Vernage" at 2s. a gallon; "Ryvere," "Mawvesie," and "Romeneye," at 16d.; "Candye," "Trubidiane," "Mountrosse," Greek, "Creet," "Province," and "Clarre," at 12d.

Writ of Privy Seal to the Mayor and Sheriffs bidding them arrest any deserters from the force in Aquitaine under the Duke of Lancaster they may find in the City. Dated at the King's manor of Wodestock, 8 Jan., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373-4].

Folio cccxiii.

William Fisshe, "portour," elected by good men of the mistery of "Stokfisshmongers" to be meter of eels (mensurator ceparum) brought to the City for sale, and he was sworn at the Husting for Pleas of Land held on Monday after the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373-4], to faithfully discharge the office and to measure eels with a certain bushel set aside for the purpose as of old. Thereupon the said bushel was delivered to him with the assent of the Mayor and Aldermen and good men aforesaid.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs and collectors of petty custom (parva custuma (fn. 4) ) in the port of London to render every assistance to Richard Lyons, who had been appointed to collect, by himself or his deputies, the said custom for one year from Christmas last. Witness the King at Westminster, 6 Jan., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373-4].

Folio cccxiii b.

Commissio pro xv a levand'.

Letters patent appointing John Stodeye, Simon de Mordone, John Little, John Metford, William Neuport, and William Wodhous to be collectors of the fifteenth and tenth granted respectively by the Commons and burgesses of the realm in the Parliament which met at Westminster on the morrow of St. Edmund the King [20 Nov.] for the year next ensuing; (fn. 5) one moiety to be ready by the Feast of the Purification B. M. [2 Feb.], and the other by the Feast of Pentecost [21 May] Witness the King at Westminster, 6 Dec., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373].

Delibe acio denar'.

Be it remembered that on 4 Feb., 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1373- 1374], John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, received from Henry de Padyngtone by the hand of Thomas "Beuchampe," Knt, the sum of £18, the value of certain horses belonging to William de Harewedone, appraised at the suit of the sureties of the said William; the said money to be kept in trust for Johanna, daughter of Walter de Harwedone, touching whose guardianship vide supra, fo. ccxi. Afterwards a further sum of 13 marks was paid to the Chamberlain by Henry Godchepe, so that he has 40 marks in all in trust for the said Johanna.

Afterwards, viz., on the 6th October, 50 Edward III. [A.D. 1376], came Thomas Essex, goldsmith, who had married the above Johanna, and demanded her property, and it was delivered up by William Eynesham, who had succeeded John de Cauntebrigge as Chamberlain.

Folio cccxiv.

Br'e de attorn' recipiend'.

Writ to William Haldene to accept the attorneys to be named by John Wale and Herman Langhe, merchants of Almaine, in a suit against Thomas Gysors for the recovery of a debt, and to make a return of the names of such attorneys when given. Witness the King at Westminster, 8 Feb., 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1373-4].

Return made to the effect that the above John Wale and Herman Langhe had appointed John Pytte and John Brettone to be their attorneys in the suit.

Writ of Privy Seal to the Mayor and Sheriffs bidding them render every assistance to John Pecche in the exercise of his monopoly of sweet wines recently granted to him for five years. (fn. 6) Dated at Westminster, 11 Dec., 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373].

Folio cccxiv b.

Custodia Joh'is fil' Henr' Bretford.

Memorandum of proceedings touching the guardianship of John, son of Henry Bretford, as recorded supra, fo. ccci [b].

Afterwards, viz., on the 10th Feb., 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1373-4], came the Chamberlain, the aforesaid John, John Pountfreyt, his former guardian, and Thomas atte Halle, to whom he had been apprenticed, before Adam de Bury, the Mayor, John Stodeye, James Andrew, John Torngold, William Walworth, Adam Stable, and Nicholas Brembre, Aldermen; and the said John Pountfreyt, having rendered an account of his guardianship, was adjudged to be quit. Thereupon the Chamberlain claimed an allowance for the maintenance (pro tabula) of the orphan for the twenty-seven weeks the said orphan was in his custody, and other sums owed by the said orphan to Thomas Estwyk, John Lever, &c. His claim allowed. Thereupon it was agreed by the Mayor and Aldermen that the said orphan should remain as an apprentice with the said Thomas atte Halle, and that his property should be committed to the said John Pountfreyt until he attained his majority. Sureties for the said John Pountfreyt, viz., Robert de Pountfreyt, "cornmongere," and Godfrey Marchal de Greschirche.

Folio cccxv.

Exon'acio custod' predicte.

Afterwards, viz., on the 2nd Sept., 2 Richard II. [A.D. 1378], the above John, son of Henry Bretford, came before Nicholas Brembre, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and being of full age demanded his property, which was delivered to him after account rendered by John Pountfreyt before John Hoo and William Knightcote, Aldermen, and William Eynesham and William Culham as auditors.

Monday after the Feast of St. Valentine [14 Feb.], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1373-4], a piece of false tapestry condemned to be burnt. (fn. 7)

Folio cccxv b.

Exoner acio custodie Isabelle fil' Ric'i de Poulesholte.

Thursday before the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.], 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373], came William "de" Cotgrave, "taylour," and Isabella his wife, daughter of Richard de Poulesholt, and claimed the property of the said Isabella, amounting to the sum of £61 17s., from her former guardian, Gilbert de Notyngham, "taylour." An account rendered by the said Gilbert before Adam Fraunceys, John Bernes, Adam Carlel, spicer, and John Organ, mercer, in the presence of John Lytle and Adam Stable, Aldermen. The said William Cotgrave committed to prison, quousque, etc., and adjudged to forfeit the sum of £21 17s. for having married the said Isabella without permission of the Mayor and Aldermen, but is forthwith mainprised by Nicholas atte Walle and John Hamertone. Afterwards [date omitted] the property of the said Isabella is delivered to her husband, less the above sum of £21 17s.

Folio cccxvi.

Eleccio Alder'i Warde ae Bradstrete.

12 April, 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], Richard Lyons elected Alderman of the Ward of Bradstrete, loco Walter Forster, deceased, and sworn before the Mayor and Aldermen.

Writ to the Mayor, Recorder, and Aldermen, bidding them stay proceedings taken against Robert de Hales, Prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, and John Almayn, one of his brethren, for preventing the carrying of victuals, &c., through "Templegate" to "Tempelbrygge" by the riverside, and to appear before the King's Council at Westminster one month after Easter [2 April]. Witness the King at Westminster, 10 March, 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1373-4]. (fn. 8)

Folio cccxvi b.

M d de quad' archia sub le Briggehous rep'anda ex a Bisshopesgate.

Presentment on oath of twelve good men [not named] of the Ward of Bisshopesgate in a Wardmote held before John Lytle, Alderman of the Ward, on Sunday after the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.], 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1373], to the effect that after great rains the waters from the fields of the Bishop of London in Berwardeslane and the street outside Bisshopesgate ought by right to have their course through an arch (per archiam) under a certain tenement (fn. 9) belonging to Nicholas de Altone (which tenement was then held by Thomas de Leuesham, "skynnere," opposite Berwardeslane), down to the Moor (fn. 10) of London; that the water-course aforesaid was then obstructed, and that in consequence in winter time every year water overflowed a foot and more in depth, and rose in the church of the Hospital of St. Mary, causing thereby great damage. Thereupon the said Thomas was summoned to show cause why he should not clear the water-course. (fn. 11)

Afterwards an order was made for the said Thomas to remove the obstruction within forty days, which he failed to do. Thereupon he was distrained upon to appear, when he acknowledged that it behoved him and all tenants of the aforesaid tenement called "le Briggehous" to keep the said arch clear and in good repair, and asked for time to execute the work, until Whitsuntide.

Folio cccxvii.

Eleccio Aldr'i de Bassyeshawe.

Wednesday before the Feast of Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr [7 July], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], John Fyfhide elected Alderman of the Ward of Bassyeshawe loco James (Andrew (fn. 12) ), late Alderman.

Eleccio Alder'i de Candelwykstrete.

Thursday the eve of the above Feast, Robert Hatfeld elected Alderman of the Ward of Candelwykstrete loco Simon de Mordone.

Compot' Rob'ti de Brynkeleye.

13 July, 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], account rendered by Robert de Brynkeleye, mercer, before Bartholomew Frestlynge, Alderman, John Bernes and John Hadle, Commoners, as auditors, of divers sums of money entrusted to him on behalt of Thomas, son of Hugh atte Boure, his ward, (fn. 13) as appears supra, fos. xcv and cxxx.

Exon'acio pre dicti Rob'ti et manucaptor' suor'.

Afterwards, viz., on Wednesday the eve of St. Margaret [20 July], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], came the above Thomas, son of Hugh, before Adam de Bury, the Mayor, William Haldene, the Recorder, John Lytle, Bartholomew Frestlynge; William Walworth, John Tornegold, Adam Stable, John Aubrey, and John Fyfhide, Aldermen, and John de Cantebrigge, the Chamberlain, and claimed his property, as being of full age, and the said Robert delivered it up, and he and his sureties are quit.

Folio cccxvii b.

Custodia Alicie filie Nich'i Barbour.

28 July, 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], the guardianship of Alice, daughter of Nicholas Barbour, aged seven years, committed by Adam de Bury, the Mayor, and John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, to Laurence de Westone, "barbour," and Margaret his wife, mother of the said Alice, together with the sum of 40 marks belonging to the said Alice which Gilbert Prynce, "peyntour," formerly had in his keeping, but had given up, as appears supra, fo. ccxliv. Sureties, viz., Adam Stable, Alderman, and John Ferant, mercer.

Exoneracio.

Afterwards, viz., on the 6th Aug., 49 Edward III. [A.D. 1375], the above Alice being dead, came the aforesaid Adam Stable, and delivered the said sum of 40 marks to William Eynesham, the Chamberlain, who on the 8th Aug. paid it over to Gilbert Prynce, executor of the said Nicholas Barbour; and the said Laurence and his sureties are quit.

Folio cccxviii.

Dimissio More et cursus aque de Walebrole.

Indenture of grant by Adam de Bury, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John de Cantebrigge, the Chamberlain, to Thomas atte Ram, "brewere," of the Moor (fn. 14) and the keeping of the water-course of Wallebroke for a term of seven years, quit of any rent, but on condition that he well and honestly safeguard the Moor and keep the said water-course clean. Dated in the Chamber of the Guildhall, Thursday the morrow of St. James [25 July], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374].

Writ to the Mayor, Recorder, and Aldermen reciting that the Prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England had represented to Parliament that Hugh le Despenser the younger had obtained possession of the Prior's Manor of the New Temple, which had become forfeited to the King at the fall of the said Hugh; that the said Hugh had occupied cloisters and other places within the said manor, contrary to the liberty and canons of the Church; that the King had restored these premises to the Temple Church and had caused them to be surrendered to the said Prior and his brethren, and had afterwards sold the residue of the said manor to the said Prior, to hold the same, in conjunction with the cloister and other sacred places, at a rent reserved, as in certain letters patent more fully is contained. And whereas the King now understood that Thomas Duke, a tenant of a certain house in the parish of St. Dunstan, near "Templebarre," let to him for a term of years by John Rothynge, "vineter," claimed to enjoy a right of way for transport of victuals, fuel, &c., from Fletestrete to the bridge called "Templebrigge" on the riverside, and had suffered damage by being prevented from enjoying the right by Robert Hales, Prior of the said Hospital, and John Almayn, one of his brethren, and that the Mayor, &c., had thereupon summoned the said Prior to appear to answer the charge and in default had imposed a fine, the said Mayor, &c., are commanded to suspend all further proceedings as likely to be prejudicial to the rights of the Crown. Witness the King at Westminster, 6 June, 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374]. (fn. 15)

Folio cccxviii b.

Compot' de custodia Marione fil' Simon' Courtrey..

Friday after the Feast of St. Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], account rendered by Simon Levelyf, "brewere," before Robert Hattefeld, Alderman, John Bures and John Hadele, as auditors, of the money received with Marion, daughter of Simon Courtrey, of whom he had been appointed guardian by John Wrothe, the Mayor, and John de Cantebregge, the Chamberlain, as appears supra, fo. xcii [b].

Divers sums of money afterwards paid to John Wodegate, "upholder," and the above Margaret (fn. 16) [sic] his wife in satisfaction of her property.

Folio cccxix.

Recital of certain terms of the will of Richard Russell, "paternosterer," proved and enrolled in the Husting on Monday before the Feast of St. Dunstan [19 May], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374]. (fn. 17) The executors of the said will, viz., Thomas de Bermengham and Thomas Noreys, summoned to appear before the Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday the eve of St. Laurence [10 Aug.], the same year, and to give surety for their guardianship of Richard and Lucy, children of the testator, who in the meanwhile were to remain in charge of Adam de Bury, the Mayor.

Folio cccxix b.

On the day appointed the executors appeared and refused the guardianship of the said children, and would not find surety according to the custom, and afterwards they surrendered the property of the said children to the Mayor and were declared quit.

Custodia Ric'i fil' Ric'i Russell Paternos terer.

Afterwards, viz., on Saturday before the Feast of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug.], the same year, the guardianship of Richard, son of the above Richard Russell, aged seventeen years, was committed by Adam de Bury, the Mayor, and John de Cantebrigge, the Chamberlain, to John Leycestre, the King's Changer in the Tower. Sureties, viz., John Walcote, draper, and Blase de Bury, skinner. (fn. 18)

Particulars of the property of the said ward.

Folio cccxx.

Eleccio Vic'.

Thursday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], Richard Lyouns and William Wodhous elected Sheriffs, viz., Richard Lyouns by the Mayor and William Wodhous by the Commonalty.

Afterwards, viz., on Thursday the eve of St. Michael, the said Sheriffs were sworn to stand in the said office (ad stand' in oficio predicto).

Eleccio Cam'ar.

Friday the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], William Eynesham elected Chamberlain of the Guildhall, loco John de Cauntebrigge, by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty, and he was sworn before Adam de Bury, the Mayor, Adam Fraunceys, William Haldene, John Chichestre, John Tornegold, William Walworth, John de Mitford, John Warde, Robert Hatfeld, Richard Lyouns, John Philippot, John Aubrey, John Fyfhyde [Aldermen], and many commoners.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation against molesting Portuguese merchants. Witness the King at Westminster, 14 Sept., 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374]. (fn. 19)

Proclamation made accordingly, Wednesday before the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.].

Folio cccxx b.

The account of John de Stodeye, Simon de Mordone, John Little, John Metford, William Neuport, William Wodehous, collectors of the fifteenth and tenth granted to the King by the laity anno 47 [Edward III.]. (fn. 20)

Eleccio Maioris Will'i Walworthe.

Friday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward the King [13 Oct.], 48 Edward III. [A.D. 1374], William Walworthe elected Mayor for the year ensuing, in the presence of Adam de Bury, the Mayor, William Haldene, the Recorder, John Stodeye, John Wrothe, John Chichestre, John Bernes, John Pyel, John Lytle, Richard de Croydone, Bartholomew Frestlynge, John Mitford, John Warde, John Tornegold, Adam Stable, John Philipot, Nicholas Brembre, John Aubrey, John Fyfyde, Robert Hatfeld, and Richard Lyons, Aldermen, and the said Richard Lyons and William Wodehous, the Sheriffs.

Afterwards, viz., on Saturday the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], the said William Walworthe was sworn at the Guildhall into the office of the Mayoralty, &c., and on the following Monday was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Mag'ri Tapec'.

21 Oct., the same year, Thomas Clerk, William atte Lathe, William Gledesey, and Robert Hebbe, tapicers, elected and sworn to survey their mistery, &c.

Footnotes

1 A marginal note states that the above monopoly was annulled by Parliament.
2 Sat from 21st Nov. to 10th Dec.
3 These ordinances printed in Rymer's 'Fœdera,' vol. iii. pt. ii. p. 994. Cf. 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), i. 344.
4 The additional custom granted to the King in 1303 was known as the nova or parva custuma as distinguished from the magna et antiqua custuma of 1275. It had been declared illegal by the Ordainers, and ceased to be collected in 1311, but was restored by Edward II. in 1322 and confirmed by his successor in 1328 Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 524-5; 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' p. 117n.
5 A fifteenth was granted for two years if the war should last so long. Cf. infra, p. 330.
6 Vide supra, p. 318.
7 'Memorials,' p. 375.
8 'Memorials,' pp. 376-7. In 1360 a jury found that there had always existed a right of way through the Great Gate of the Templars, and that the possessors of the Temple were bound to maintain a bridge or jetty at the waterside. Vide supra, p. 126, 'Memorials,' pp. 305-6.
9 Afterwards spoken of as "le Briggehous" (not to be confounded with the tenement mentioned supra, p. 132, nor with the tenement known as the Bridge House, belonging to the City, and situate at the south end of London Bridge). In 1324 it belonged to John de Thunderle, and was con veyed by him and Johanna his wife to John Soke. Hust. Roll 52 (118). In 1353 a messuage near "le Briggehous" is recorded as having been conveyed to Nicholas de "Aultone" by Henry Dovedale, cook, and Matilda his wife, having previously belonged to Henry atte Barre, Matilda's father. Hust. Roll 81(126).
10 Finsbury Moor.
11 'Memorials,' pp. 374-5.
12 The scribe has incorrectly written "Aldr'i" (Alder manni).
13 Particulars of the account are set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 378-9. From these it appears that the youth started with a capital of £300; that his guardian paid the City interest on this sum at the rate of 20 per cent. per annum, one half of which was remitted to him at the end of his guardianship for his trouble by the custom of the City; that his ward spent some years of study in the schools at Oxford, his board there as well as elsewhere costing him no more than 2s. a week, whilst the cost of his education never exceeded 2 marks a year; and that at the end of thirteen years his capital was nearly doubled. It is elsewhere recorded that in the previous month of April the guardian had been committed to prison for failing to render his account, and also for having taken his ward as an apprentice without permission of the Mayor and Alder men. 'Pleas and Memoranda,' Roll A 19, membr. 8 dors.
14 Finsbury Moor, whence ran the Wallbrook, entering the City between Moorgate and Bishopsgate, and discharging itself into the Thames near the port of Dowgate.
15 Notwithstanding this injunction, fresh proceedings are elsewhere recorded as having been taken in November, 1376, against the Prior at the suit of the above Thomas Duke for an alleged infringement of the latter's rights of free access to the river through the Temple. 'Pleas and Memoranda,' Roll A 22, membr. 5.
16 Simon Courtrey had two daughters, named Marion and Margaret (vide supra, p. 129). It is not clear which of the two became wife of John Wodegate.
17 See 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 160.
18 The discharge of John Leycestre and his sureties is recorded in Letter-Book H, fo. xix.
19 Rymer, 'Fœdera' vol. iii. pt. ii. p. 1014.
20 Vide supra, p. 319.