Folios 265 - 281
Sept 1488 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

260-276

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'Folios 265 - 281: Sept 1488 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: L: Edward IV-Henry VII (1912), pp. 260-276. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33663 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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Folio 265.

Presentacio Will'i Tande Capellani ad secundam Cantar' etc. in eccl'ia Sc'i Pauli.

Letter from William Horne, Knt., Mayor, to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, presenting William Tande, chaplain, for admission to one of the three chantries founded in St. Paul's for the souls of Sir John de Pulteney, William Milford, and John Plesseys, late Archdeacons of Colchester, vacant by the resignation of Laurence Botiller. Dated 6 Sept., A.D. 1488.

Exon'acio Will'i Ussher ciss' ab assisis.

10 Sept., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], William Ussher, tailor, discharged by the Mayor and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his divers infirmities and blindness.

Eleccio Vicecomitum.

Sunday the Feast of St. Matthew, Ap. [21 Sept.], 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], in the presence of William Horne, Knt., Mayor, Thomas Fitzwilliam, Knt., Recorder, John Broun, John Warde, Robert Tate, John Tate, William White, William Martyn, John Swan, Ralph Astry, John Percyvale, Ralph Tilney, William Isaac, John Broke, John Fenkell, and William Remyngton, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs—William Isaac, draper, was elected one of the Sheriffs of the City of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and Ralph Tylney, grocer, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day William Purches, mercer, was elected Chamberlain of the City for the year ensuing; Simon Harrys, grocer, and John Tutsam, draper, were elected Wardens of the City's Bridge; John Mathewe, William White, Aldermen, William Heryot, draper, Thomas Bullesdon, skinner, Walter Povy, tailor, and William Stede, grocer, Commoners, were elected Auditors of accounts of the Chamber and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folios 265b-266b.

Ordinacio de Fullers.

1 Oct., 4 Henry VII., [A.D. 1488], came the Wardens and good men of the Art or Mistery of Fullers of the City before the Mayor and Aldermen, and prayed that certain articles for the better regulation of the Craft might be approved, which articles are to the following effect:—

That no member of the Craft henceforth go to the dinners or feasts of the Mayor or Sheriffs unless bidden by an officer of the Mayor or Sheriffs, or by the Wardens, under penalty of paying the sum of 3s. 4d.; one-half of the same to the use of the Chamber and the other of the Craft.

No member to employ more than 6 workers in the Craft at once.

No member to take as a servant, "allowe," or apprentice, any one born beyond the sea.

No member to put out cloth to "burle" (fn. 1) "pyke," or "rowe" (fn. 2) by any one except a brother admitted and a householder of the same Craft.

Any member having a journeyman or covenant man to "make a clere rekenyng" with him on his departure.

No member to set cloth upon the "tayntours" on Sundays, Our Lady Days, or Principal Feasts.

No member to take any "Chaffer" or ware for his workmanship.

No member to take cloth "to plane (fn. 3) nor sette uppon the Tayntours without it be of his owne rowyng," in order to avoid strife and variance that often arose between the owner of the cloth and the worker that "roweth" the same, "as it may be evidently shewed."

No member to bring cloth to the mill to be "thycked" (fn. 4) until the Wardens have seen the cloth and found it suitable for the "thyckyng."

No journeyman nor servant "allowes" to leave his master's service without reasonable cause of sickness, lack of meat or drink, or non-payment of wages.

The same not to haunt the stews side nor the "kayles" nor any other riotous game or play.

That no member of the Craft make, or cause to be made, any affray upon the Stair appertaining to the Craft nor at their "Tayntours."

Their prayer granted.

Folios 266b-269.

Ordinacio deHurers.

2 Oct., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], came the Wardens and other good men of the Art or Mistery of Hurers of the City before the Mayor and Aldermen, and brought in certain unauthorized ordinances for the government of the Craft, pursuant to an order of the Court, (fn. 5) for approval, to the following effect:—

That every one, within the Livery of the Craft and without, shall attend Mass on summons by the Beadle in the Lady Chapel annexed to the parish church of "oure lady Berkyng," and offer 1d., under penalty of forfeiting a pound or half a pound of new wax according to his being in the Livery or not.

That every two years, after celebration of the Mass in the said chapel on the day of the Nativity of Our Lady [25 March], the whole Fellowship shall meet in some convenient place and elect two new Wardens, and those who refuse office, without reasonable cause, shall pay 40s.

That every 3 or 4 years, if thought necessary, a new clothing of livery be provided, and the names of those who refuse to receive it be presented by the Wardens and "the twelve" (fn. 6) of the Fellowship, for the time being, to the Mayor and Aldermen for correction after their discretion.

That four times a year, viz., within 14 days after Christmas, Easter, Midsummer, and Michaelmas, the Fellowship shall meet, and every brother pay his quarterage of 4 pence, under penalty of forfeiting a pound or half a pound of new wax according as he be in the Livery or not.

That apprentices be presented to the Wardens and be English born.

" That no man of the saide Crafte egge entice ne purloyne in to his service any other mannes servaunt of the same Craft tyll his maister and he be aggreed," under penalty of 40s.

"That no persone or persones of the same Crafte go into Foreyns houses for to wirke nor in to no straunge places for to teche the science of the saide Crafte," under similar penalty.

That if any member take any work to a stranger to be worked "he make therof a good ende hymself or elles do it to be made among the Freemen Brethern and true wirkers of the saide Crafte," under penalty of 20s.

That no "thycker" of the Craft "thicke" any ware to a strange man or woman "which can make no good ende thereof," or "put it to dresse" to any but brethren of the Craft, or true workers of the same, under penalty of 6s. 8d.

Any one discovering "the Counceill lefull" of the Craft to forfeit 10s.

That no member implead another without licence of the Wardens, so long as he can get justice within the Craft.

That no apprentice out of his term take a house to work in until he be "assaied" by the Wardens as to his "connyng to work sufficiently."

That no freeman of the Fellowship set an alien to work or to buy or sell in his shop, under penalty of 6s. 8d.

That disputes between masters and servants touching work or wages be referred to the Wardens.

That upon every default done contrary to the ordinances distress shall be taken by the Wardens and kept 40 days. If it be not then redeemed, the said Wardens and "the twelve" shall cause the same to be valued and sold, and return the surplus (if any), after recovering the amount of fine, to the owner.

That Wardens proved to be remiss in their duties forfeit 6s. 8d. for every neglect.

The above articles (inter alia) approved and ordered to be recorded.

Folio 269 b.

Eleccio Maioris.

Monday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], in the presence of William Horne, Knt., Mayor, Thomas Fitzwilliam, Knt., Recorder, Richard Gardyner, John Broun, Knt., Robert Billesdone, Knt., John Warde, Henry Colet, Knt., Robert Tate, Richard Chawry, William White, John Mathewe, William Martyn, John Tate, John Fenkell, Knt., William Remyngton, John Percyvale, Knt., John Swan, William Capell, Knt., John Broke, William Isaac, and Ralph Tilney, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor—Robert Tate was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Ordinacio de Corsours.

1 Oct., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], came the Wardens and other good men of the Art of "Corsours" of London before the Mayor and Aldermen, complaining of the lack of ordinances to govern their Craft, and praying that they would approve of ordinances to the following effect:—

That yearly on Saint "Loes" (fn. 7) day the Wardens be chosen as rulers and governors of the Craft.

That members pay a quarterage of 4d.

That members not attending on summons forfeit 4d.

The articles approved.

Folios 270-271 b.

Ordinacio de Lorymers.

2 Oct., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], came the Wardens of the Art of "Lorymers" before the Mayor and Aldermen, and brought in their book of ordinances pursuant to an order of the Court, (fn. 8) and prayed that the same might be approved, to the following effect:—

That no member of the Craft work on any "Saturday vigill even" or "any other Festivall even" after "none" rung in his parish church, under penalty, except "vernysshyng," "burnysshyng," and "bosyng," (fn. 9) and work no longer than from 5 A M until 7 P. M. between Michaelmas and Lady Day.

That when any brother or sister happens to die, freemen of the Craft shall come in their "most honest clothyng" to the parish church of the deceased to dirige, and on the morrow to a Mass of Requiem, under penalty in case of default without reasonable excuse; and that every such brother or sister—"if they in their lyfe paied well and truly their quarterages and other charges" of the Craft—shall within 8 days of their decease have 30 masses sung for them by one of the four Orders of Friars, at the cost of the Fraternity.

That if a member of the Craft of "good guydyng and conversacion falls to povertie by goddes sonde (fn. 10) and hath no thynge to helpe hym self with all that than he shall have wokely a Reward of the co'en boxe of the same Crafte that is to say he that hathe been Wardeyn of the said Crafte shall have wokely xd and he that hathe not been Wardeyn shall have wokely vijd And if any suche persone so havyng suche Almes of the said Crafte dye that than his burying to be paid for of his owne goodes if he be of power and elles to be paied and borne at the charge of the said Crafte."

That apprentices be not enticed out of the service of their masters, and that no apprentice out of his term set up shop until he be made a freeman of the Craft, and that every apprentice at the first opening of his shop pay 12d. towards the maintenance of the Craft.

That no member take any journeyman or "allowes" except by the year.

That all disputes be referred to the Wardens before any other steps be taken.

That no member disclose any lawful matter or communication touching the Fellowship, under penalty.

That any one using high and "owterageous" language at meetings and not keeping silence at the bidding of the Wardens shall forfeit a pound of wax.

That no member of the Craft renew or cause to be renewed any old ware belonging to himself to sell the same again as new ware, under penalty; but he may varnish and amend anything pertaining to the Craft for another person.

That the Wardens shall have the right of search and seize badly wrought works and bring them to the Guildhall.

"Also that no persone of the said Crafte hereafter tynne any olde werke belongyng to the said Crafte for to selle that is to say Bittes Steroppes or any other thynge except the thinges that been hable to bere the fylyng as Frensshe Bittes the which bene hable to bere the tynnyng uppon payne to lose at every tyme that any suche persone so dothe a pounde of wexe."

One-half of all fines and forfeitures to be to the use of the Chamber of the Guildhall, and the other to the use of the Commonalty of the Craft.

The above articles approved.

Folio 272.

Custodia Elizabeth filie Steph'i Traps.

18 Nov., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], came William Grene, John Lee, tailors, William Brikles, grocer, and Edward Grene, mercer, before the Mayor and Aldermen, and entered into bond in the sum of £200 for payment into the Chamber by the said William Grene of a like sum to the use of Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen Traps, late tailor, when she comes of age or marries.

Folios 272-272 b.

Custodia David Waren' filii Will'i Waren' Cissoris.

3 Dec., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488], came John Grey de Noryell, co. Beds, yeoman, John Rock, haberdasher, Robert Setcole, "Foundour," William Kyrfote, grocer, and John Robynson, stockfishmonger, and entered into bond in the sum of £40 for the payment by the said John Grey to David, son of William Waren, late tailor, when he comes of age, of the sum of £36 in respect of the issues of a certain tenement in the parish of All Hallows in Bredestrete, which tenement had been devised by Roger Waren, late tailor, to William, the father of David, in tail male; and in the event of the decease of the said David under age for the payment of the said money to Elizabeth Waren, sister of the said David.

Folio 273.

Custodia pueror' Thome Breteyn Aldr'i.

29 Jan., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488-9], came John Broke, Alderman, (fn. 11) John Storke, William Curle, grocers, and Thomas Bullesdone, skinner, and entered into bond in the sum of £1,373 2s. 11¼d. for payment into the Chamber by the said Alderman of a like sum to the use of William, Johanna, Juliana, Matilda, and Elizabeth, children of Thomas Breteyn, late Alderman, (fn. 12) when they come of age. (fn. 13)

Folio 273 b.

Custodia Thome Edward filii Will'i Edward groceri.

29 Jan., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488-9], came Margery Edward, widow, Philip Edward, grocer, Richard Hille, tailor, and Alexander Hedlam, upholder, and entered into bond in the sum of £110 for payment into the Chamber by the said Margery of a like sum when Thomas, son of William Edward, late grocer, comes of age or marries.

Custodia pueror' Johannis Gardyner Cissoris.

17 Feb., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488-9], came John Hardy, John Barnarde, Alexander Bassyngthwayte, tailors, and John Sympson, dyer, and entered into bond in the sum of £66 for payment into the Chamber by the said John Hardy of a like sum to the use of John and Margaret, children of John Gardyner, late tailor, when they come of age or marry.

Folio 274.

Custodia pueror' Thome Hewetson Cissoris.

19 Feb., 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488-9], came William Worthyngton, draper, James Fitte, tailor, Thomas Pays, draper, and John Haddesley, girdler, and entered into bond in the sum of £64 13s. 4d. for payment into the Chamber by the said William of a like sum to the use of John, Peter, Henry, William, Thomas, and Margaret, children of Thomas Hewetson, late tailor, when they come of age or marry. (fn. 14)

Folio 274 b.

Custod' Joh'is filii Thome Riche merceri.

23 March, 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1488-9], came Thomas Croke, skinner, Richard Croke and John Croke, drapers, and Richard Thornell, mercer, and entered into bond in the sum of £100 for payment into the Chamber by the said Thomas Croke of a like sum to the use of John, son of Thomas Riche, late mercer, when he comes of age or marries.

Folio 275.

Custod pueror' Ric'i Alpe Tallugh.

16 July, 4 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489], came Richard Stewarde, Richard Cock', William Hamlyn, Thomas Piers, "tallughchaundelers," and Philip Leycok, "hurer," and entered into bond in the sum of £36 11s. 8d. for payment into the Chamber by the said Richard Stewarde of a like sum to the use of Walter and Thomas, sons of Richard Alpe, late "tallughchaundler," when they come of age or marry.

Folio 275 b.

Judicium Pillorie pro quo dam pronuba.

John Spicer condemned to stand on a pillory for being a "common bawde." [No date.]

Judicium cujusdam Co' is pronube.

Elizabeth Judela (Indela ?), convicted of being a "common bawde," to be led from prison to the Pillory in Cornhill with "mynstralcye," with a "rayhode" on her head and a white rod in her hand, (fn. 15) and there the cause to be proclaimed, and then to be conveyed through Chepe to Newgate, and to avoid the City, "but if (fn. 16) she laufully behold in prison by sum laufull accion." [No date.]

Folio 276.

Judicium pillorie pro fabricacione unius fict' obligacionis.

Thomas Elys, "dawber," condemned by "my lord the Maire" and the Aldermen to stand on the pillory for forging a bond purporting to bind John Walshe to him in the sum of £10. [No date.]

Eleccio Vicecomit'.

Monday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489], in the presence of Robert Tate, Mayor, Thomas Fitz William the Recorder, Robert Billesdone, John Warde, Henry Colet, William Horne, Richard Chawry, William White, William Martyn, John Tate, John Swanne, John Percivall, William Remyngton, William Capell, William Isaac, and Ralph Tilney, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs—William Capell, Knt., draper, was elected one of the Sheriffs of the City of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and John Broke, grocer, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

[The election of a Chamberlain not recorded.]

Simon Harrys, grocer, and John Tutsham, draper, elected Wardens of London Bridge; William White, William Martyn, Aldermen, Walter Povy, tailor, William Stede, grocer, Richard Swan, skinner, and Thomas Boterell, draper, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamber and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folios 276-276 b.

Custodia pueror' Johannis Pasy tallugh'.

23 Sept., 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489], came Stephen Hunt, grocer, John Frensshe, baker, Thomas Barry, "brwer," and Gilbert Wilson, "brwer" and entered into bond in the sum of £14 13s. 4d. for payment into the Chamber by the said Stephen of a like sum to the use of Peter, Katherine, and Margaret, children of John Pasy, late "tallughchaundler," when they come of age or marry.

Folio 277.

Eleccio Maioris.

Tuesday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489], in the presence of Robert Tate, the Mayor, Thomas Fitz William the Recorder, the Prior of Christchurch, John Broun, Knt., Robert Billesdone, Knt., John Warde, Hugh Brice, Knt., Henry Colet, Knt., William Horne, Knt., Richard Chawry, John Mathewe, William White, William Martyn, Ralph Astry, John Tate, John Percyvale, Knt., William Remyngtone, John Fenkell, Knt., William Isaac, Ralph Tilney, William Capell, Knt., and John Broke, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing—William White was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Presentacio Will'i Stodarde Capell'i ad cantariam in Capella sup' ossament' mortuor' in Cimiterio Eccl'ie Cathe dralis Sc'i Pauli London'.

Letter from Robert Tate, the Mayor, and William Purches, the Chamberlain, to Master Richard Lychefeld, (fn. 17) Doctor of Laws, Canon Residentiary in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, and Warden of the spiritualities of the City and diocese of London, the Bishopric being vacant, (fn. 18) presenting Sir William Stodard, chaplain, for admission to a chantry in the Chapel over the bones of the dead in St. Paul's Churchyard, vacant by the death of Sir John West, the last chaplain. Dated 27 Oct., A.D. 1489.

Evon acio Thome Hawes ab assisis.

9 Nov., 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489], Thomas Hawes, haberdasher, discharged by William White, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Folio 277 b.

Custod' pueror' Thome Wolston Carnifu'.

20 Nov., 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489], came John Wolston, Thomas Laman, Thomas Wode, and John Dudley, "bochers," and entered into bond in the sum of £10 for payment into the Chamber by the said John Wolston of a like sum to the use of Thomas and Agnes, children of Thomas Wolston, late butcher, when they come of age or marry. (fn. 19)

Folio 278.

Custodia Margerie filie Thome Graunt vinitar'.

11 Dec., 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489], came Edward Grene, mercer, Oliver Warner, William Grene, tailors, and Robert Palmer, barber, and entered into bond in the sum of £136 19s. 9¾d. for payment into the Chamber by the above Edward of a like sum to the use of Margery, daughter of Thomas Graunt, late vintner, when she comes of age or marries.

Folio 278 b.

L're patentes d'ni Regis fact' Johanni "Percyvale' militi ad essend' Aldr'm Theutonicor' apud le Styleyerde etc.

Letters patent appointing John Percevale, Knight and Alderman, to be justice to the merchants of the Guildhall of the Teutonics for the speedy recovery of debts and hearing of pleas in cases where the Sheriffs and Mayors may be unable to determine such matters from day to day. Witness the King at Westminster, 25 Jan., 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1489-90].

Folios 278b-279b

Ordinacio des Foundours.

2 April, 5 Henry VII. [A.D. 1490], came the Wardens and other good men of the Art or occupation of "Foundours" praying that certain articles (fn. 20) for the rule of the Craft might be approved, to the following effect:—

That every member obey the summons of the Beadle, under penalty, unless "he be letted by meltyng or other lefull causes."

That every brother of the Clothing pay a quarterage of 3 pence, every householder keeping a shop and not of the Clothing 2 pence, and every journeyman a penny for the "fyndyng of light, kepyng of masses, buryng of poore brethern," and other deeds of alms.

That members attend Mass for all the Brotherhood on the Feast of the Assumption [15 Aug.], in the church of St Laurence, Jewry, or other place appointed, and there make offering, under penalty.

That no brother out of the Clothing take more than one apprentice at a time except by special permission, and no brother who is of the Clothing take more than two apprentices at a time; that a Warden or ex-Warden have three apprentices and no more, and one who has been Upper Warden no more than four.

That apprentices be "right lymmed."

That every brother going to a fair shall show his ware before it be packed to the Wardens for approval.

Petition granted.

Folio 279 b.

Eleccio Vice comitum.

Tuesday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 6 Henry VII. [A.D. 1490], in the presence of William White, the Mayor, Thomas Fitz William the Recorder, John Broun, Robert Billesdon, John Warde, Henry Colet, William Horn, Robert Tate, Richard Chawry, John Mathewe, William Martyn, Ralph Astry, John Swanne, John Tate, Hugh Cloptone, John Percyvale, William Remyngton, John Broke, William Capell, Henry Cote, (fn. 21) and Robert Revell, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs—Henry Cote, goldsmith, was elected one of the Sheriffs of the City of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and Robert Revell, grocer, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

[The election of Chamberlain not recorded.]

Simon Harrys, grocer, and Christopher Elyot, goldsmith, were elected Wardens of London Bridge, William Martyn and John Swanne, Aldermen, Richard Swanne, skinner, Thomas Boterell, draper, Richard Hawkyns, draper, and John Pasmer, skinner, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Eleccio Maioris.

Wednesday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 6 Henry VII. [A.D. 1490], in the presence of William White, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, Thomas Fitz William the Recorder, John Broun, Knt., Robert Billesdone, Knt., John Warde Henry Colet, Knt., William Horne, Knt., Robert Tate, Richard Chawry, John Mathewe, William Martyn, John Swan, John Tate, William Remyngton, William Isaac, John Percyvale, Knt., Robert Revell, and Henry Cote, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing—John Mathewe was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn and admitted, and on the morrow was presented, accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folios 280-281 b.

Ordinacio Sellarior'.

6 Oct., 6 Henry VII. [A.D. 1490], came the Wardens and other good men of the Art or occupation of Saddlers of London before the Mayor and Aldermen, and showed that, whereas in times past ordinances had been made for the rule of the Craft that had not been authorized within the City, they had brought in their book of ordinances before the Mayor and Aldermen, as commanded, and those that were not authorized had been cancelled; (fn. 22) and thus they had been left without ordinances wherewith to govern the Craft. They prayed, therefore, that certain ordinances might be approved, to the following effect:—

That the Wardens and Fellowship shall yearly attend Mass on the Feast of the Assumption [15 Aug.], in the church of St "Faystres," (fn. 23) in their last livery, and in the afternoon of the same day be at a Dirige, and on the morrow at a Requiem for the souls of deceased members of the Craft.

That on the same Feast four new Wardens be elected, and brought within a month, by the old Wardens and 4 or 6 of the most honest persons of the Craft, to the Guildhall to be sworn.

That any member admitted, by the Wardens and 8 persons of the Fellowship "to theym assistent," to the Clothing (or Livery) and refusing it, without reasonable excuse, shall pay for his disobedience 13s. 4d.

That any member of the Clothing wishing to take a "patron" of the cloth to buy his gown cloth as he will shall pay for the same "patron," towards the priest's and beadle's gowns, 16d., and shall bring the cloth before the Wardens, in order that they may see whether the colours be "like," under penalty; and he that is admitted into the Clothing shall pay, according to custom, an ounce of silver or a spoon of silver, (fn. 24) to the value of 4d.

That any one admitted by the Wardens and by the 8 persons "to theym assistent" to be a brother or sister of the Craft, the brother shall pay 13s. 4d. and the sister 6s. 8d. for the benefit of the poor of the Craft; "and if it hapne any suche brother or sister or any other housholder of the saide Craft the whiche before hath kept the gode Rules of the same Craft and also have payed their duetes of xiijd. yerly falle herafter in povertie by the visitacion of God than the said brother sister or housholder shalbe refresshed of the comon boxe by the discrecion of the Wardeyns and of the forsaid viij persones to theym assistent."

That an aggrieved member submit his complaint to the Wardens before taking action, and that no member maintain any quarrel between members of the Craft until the Wardens have given licence to the parties to go to law, under penalty of 5s. to the augmentation of the alms of the Craft.

That no member entice away a "Custumer beyng in dette afore tyme to any other persone of the same Crafte," under penalty of 20s.

That no one disclose any matter touching the welfare of the Fellowship which might cause strife or debate.

That no member attend feasts of the Mayor or Sheriffs, or any other Feast "where any greate assemble of people shalbe,' unless invited or ordered.

That servants or "allowes" working by the year or quarter shall receive their wages within a month of the expiration of the quarter.

That such workers shall give their masters a month's warning before leaving.

That no journeyman work in chambers or privy places to avoid examination of his work, under penalty of 3s. 4d.

That the taking of apprentices be regulated as directed.

That the Wardens have full power of search, and that all works wrought to deceive the buyer "as stuff belongyng to the same Crafte the whiche is daily sette uppon upholsters stalles to selle and brought by Foreyns unto the Citie that the said stuffe so unlafully wrought may some of it be fynable and some may utterly be forfeit"; and that any one opposing such search pay 10s.

That four Auditors be appointed yearly, and any one refusing the office pay 3s. 4d.

That on election day the whole of the Clothing shall choose 8 persons, of which the Wardens shall elect 4, to be Wardens for the year ensuing.

That the Wardens and Renters hereafter render their account by Michaemas Day next after their leaving office.

That one half of all fines, forfeitures, and penalties remain to the use of the City's Chamber, and the other to the use of the Fellowship.

Their petition granted.

Folio 281 b.

Custodia pueror' Rob'ti Godewyne pannar'.

23 Nov., 6 Henry VII. [A.D. 1490], came Johanna Godewyne, widow, Robert Fitzherbert, draper, Laurence Ailmer, draper, and William Hampton, "powchemaker," and entered into bond in the sum of £400 for payment into the Chamber by the said Johanna of a like sum to the use of Richard, Robert, William, and Margery, children of Robert Godewyne, late draper, when they come of age or marry. (fn. 25)

Footnotes

1 To pick the buris or burls from the surface of woollen cloths. Dyer, 'The Fleece,' Book III., has:— "Soon the clothier's shears And burler's thistle, skim the sur face sheen."
2 To rough cloth with card or teasel, a process which took place over a "perch." Cf. "Sheringe with broade sheres or rowinge at the perche' —Will of Richard Hilles enrolled in the Court of Husting, 1588. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 713.
3 Cf. "panno equando," supra, p. 198.
4 That is to say, filled Fr. fouler, to tread, full or thicken cloth. The old method of fulling cloth was to tiead it with the feet, "hence come our surnames of Fuller, Walker, and Tucker, fullers being known as walkers or tuckers from walking on or kneading the cloth when under treatment" ('Drapers' Dict.'). Among the deceits mentioned in a statute of Edward VI. (Stat. 5 & 6 Edw. VI. c. 6) as practised by clothworkers was taking cloth out of the mill before it was "full thicked." Cf. "No thycker of the same Crafte (Hurers) thicke no ware to no straunge man or woman." Infra, p. 264. Cf. Stat. 22 Edw. IV. c. 5.
5 Supra, p. 246.
6 Not previously mentioned. Here we are reminded of a "Court of Assistants."
7 St. Louis. A church in Paris is dedicated to St. Giles and St. Loe.
8 Supra, p. 246.
9 Embossing.
10 God's visitation. Cf. 'Piers Plowman' (ed. Skeat), i. 239:— "Blynde men and bedreden and broken in here membres And ale poure pacientes a payed oj godes sonde" (resigned to God's visitation).
11 A Grocer; he had recently been elected Alderman of Farringdon Ward Within; he was Sheriff 1489-90.
12 Ironmonger; elected Alderman of Aldersgate Ward in Nov., 1483; ob. 1485. (Beaven.)
13 Margin. 4 Oct., 12 Henry VII. [A.D. 1496], came William Esyngton, gentleman, who married the above Johanna, and acknowledged satisfac tion for his wife's patrimony.
14 Margin. 10 July, 20 Henry VII. [A.D. 1505], came the above Henry, orphan, and acknowledged satisfaction for his patrimony, as well as for money iccruing to him by the death of the above John, Peter, Thomas, and Margaret; and on 5 Feb., 21 Henry VII. [A.D. 1505-6], came the above William and did likewise.
15 See ordinance of 1382. 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 189; 'Liber Albus,' i. 459.
16 Unless. Cf. 'Piers Plowman' (ed. Skeat), i. 316, 368.
17 Archdeacon of Middlesex; ob. 27 Feb., 1496-7; buried in St. Paul's (Newcourt, 'Rep.,' i. 81).
18 Thomas Kemp, Bishop of London, had died on the 28th March, 1489, and his successor, Richard Hill, was not consecrated until the following November, although elected to the See in August.
19 Margin. 7 April, 10 Henry VII. [A.D. 1495], John Long, "bocher," becomes a surety loco Thomas Wode, deceased.
20 The articles are much to the same effect as those recorded in 1456. See 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' pp. 375-6. They will be found printed from the Letter-Book in Williams's 'Annals of the Founders' Company' (pp. 10-12), but the date is wrongly given as 4 Henry VII., 1489, and "right lymmed" (in connexion with appren tices) has been misread "right bounde."
21 Mentioned for the first time Spelt. "Coot," infra, p. 279.
22 Supra, p. 246.
23 St. Vedast, Foster Lane.
24 The gift of spoons on such occasions was very general in livery companies, and specimens of them may be seen at the present day in the Guildhall Museum. Apprentices to the Basket makers, on obtaining their freedom, were called upon to present their company with a silver spoon, the spoon in many cases being stamped with the initials of the donors See 'Records of the Basket makers' Company,' recently edited by H. H. Bobart, the clerk of the Company, pp. 106-7. Many of the spoons so presented appear to have been destroyed in the Great Fire, whilst those of a later date have been sold The Pewterers' Company also sold many of their spoons (Welch, 'History of the Pewterers' Company,' ii. 6).
25 Margin. 22 Dec., 12 Henry VII. [A.D. 1496], came Robert Moum ford, draper, who married the above Margery, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's patrimony.