Folios i - xii

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

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1909

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1-14

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'Folios i - xii', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: I: 1400-1422 (1909), pp. 1-14. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33674 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Letters patent appointing Thomas de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, John Norbury, Thomas Erpyngham, Thomas Rempstone, John Lovell, Walter Cloptone. Thomas Knolles, the Mayor of the City, William Thirnyng, William Rykhyll, and Matthew Suthworth, or any nine, eight, seven, six, five, or four (of whom two are to be of the five first named, and one to be the Mayor, and another to be either Walter Cloptone, William Thirnyng, or William Rykhyll), to be Commissioners to hear and determine all matters of treason and felony that had arisensince the King undertook the government of the realm Witness the King at Westminster, 25 Jan., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399-1400]. Thereupon precept to the Sheriffs that they cause twenty-four good men, Aldermen and others, to attend the above Justices at Neugate on Tuesday before the Feastof the Purification B. M. [2 Feb.] next.

Inquisicio capta.

Inquisition held at Neugate on the Tuesday aforesaid before twelve jurors [not named], who find that Thomas de Holand, late Earl of Kent, John de Holand, late Earl of Huntyngdone, John de Montague, late Earl of Salisbury, Thomas, late Lord le Despenser, (fn. 1) [and] Ralph Lumley, Knt., (fn. 2) had recently been arrested in divers parts of England for treason and beheaded, that Roger Waldene, (fn. 4) clerk, Thomas Merke, (fn. 5) Bishop of Carlisle, Bernard Brokas, (fn. 6) Knt., Thomas Shelley, Knt., Richard Maudeleyne, (fn. 7) clerk, William Feriby, clerk, Gilbert Purveys, esquire, of Scotland, Richard Cliderowe, esquire, Thomas Lollebrok, esquire, and Edward his servant, had conspired against the King in London, viz., at St. Paul's Church, in the Ward of Baynardescastell, and in the parish of All Hallows the Less in the Ward of Douegate and elsewhere, as well within the City as without, from the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.] last past until the following Feast of the Circumcision [1 Jan.], together with Thomas Blount, Knt., Benedict Sely, Knt., and other traitors to the King, recently condemned to death at Oxford, and had raised an armed rebellion at Brampton, co. Oxon, "Wantynge, " "Ciscestre, " and elsewhere in favour of King Richard, forcibly carrying off (among others) the King's liege subject Walter Hungerford, Knt., and robbing him of the King's livery or collar valued at £20.

Whereupon (the said Roger Waldene and the other conspirators having been committed to the Tower by the King's orders) the Constable of the said Tower or his Lieutenant was ordered to produce the prisoners before the said Justices on the following Wednesday to answer for their treason and felony, and precept was also issued to the Sheriffs to cause twenty-four citizens and others of the neighbourhood to appear before the said Justices at the Tower (the said Tower being within the liberty and precinct of the liberty of the City (fn. 8) ) to make delivery of the said prisoners according to the law and custom of England. The said prisoners having been produced, accordingly, by Thomas Rempstone, Knt., Constable of the Tower, there was read the King's writ, dated the 28th Jan., (fn. 9) authorizing the Commissioners to examine the prisoners and proceed according to the law and custom of the realm, notwithstanding the recent statute exempting Archbishops and Bishops from thejurisdiction of the King's Justices in a criminal matter unless otherwise ordered by the King and his Council.

Being put on his defence, the said Roger Waldene said that although he had been indicted as Roger Waldene, "clerk, " he had recently been consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury, and as such claimed exemption from the jurisdiction of the Justice son a criminal question, although he was prepared, if necessary, to make answer under protest. The Justices ruled that the Archbishop's claim of privilege was inadmissible under the circumstances. Thereupon he declared himself not guilty and put himself on the country, and Thomas "Mark, "Bishop of Carlisle, did likewise. Gilbert Purveys acknowledged himself a party to the conspiracy of the aforesaid lords to kill the King either at Kenyngtone (fn. 10) [sic], at Sutton, co. Middlesex, (fn. 11) or between Sunnynge and Wyndesore, and that he was aware of the conspiracy four days before he gave information, having first heard of it from Andrew Hake, and that the reason he delayed giving the information was that he might learn more of the matter; and further, that on giving the said information he had received the King's pardon. Thereupon the said Gilbert was condemned to be drawn from the Tower to Tibourne, there to be hanged, beheaded, and quartered; but execution was respited until the King had been consulted. And the aforesaid Thomas Lollebrok said that on Wednesday before the Feast of Epiphany [6 Jan.] [Here the record ends abruptly.] (fn. 12) .

Folio i.

Eleccio Maioris..

Monday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399], in the presence of Drew Barentyn, Mayor, Matthew Southworth, the Recorder, William Walderne and William Hyde, the Sheriffs, John Hadlee, John Hende, William Staundon, Richard Whytingtone, John Walcote, William Bramptone, John Shadworth, William Askham, William Parker, John Wodecok, John Fraunceis, John Warner, John Wade, William Evote, William Venour, Walter Newton, William Reinwelle, Thomas Wylford, and Thomas Polle, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Thomas Knolles was elected. Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn in the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer, &c.

Exon'acio Walt'i Southwerk.

17 Nov., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399], Walter Southwerk, citizen and tiler, discharged by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., on account of increasing old age.

Br'e de admit tend' Nich'm Symcok in officium sub coron'.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to admit Nicholas Symcok to the office of deputy Coroner, inasmuch as John Payn, the King's Chief Butler, to whom the office of Coroner of the City appertains, is engaged on the King's business. Witness the King at Westminster, 4 Oct., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399].

Admissio Thome Smythe dicti Stanes in mister' Vini tarior'.

1 Dec., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399], came Thomas Smyth called "Stanes, " late apprentice of John Kyng, "tymbermonger, "before Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, having been admitted into the freedom of the City and sworn when Nicholas "Extoun" was Mayor and Richard "Odyam" was Chamberlain, on the 24th Jan., 12 Richard II. [A. D. 1388–9], and declared that he had always used the mistery of Vintners and not the mistery of Tymbermongers, as the Masters of the said mistery of Vintners testified. He therefore prayed the Mayor and Aldermen that he might be admitted to the freedom of the City in the mistery of Vintners. His prayer granted at the instance of many good men of the said mistery who personally attended. He gives for his admission 13s. 4d.

Aamissio Joh'nis Bisshop in mister' Vinitariorum.

5 Dec., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399], came John Bisshop before the said Mayor and Aldermen, having been admitted into the freedom of the City in the mistery of Weavers on the 24th Oct., 47 Edward III. [A. D. 1373], when John Piel was Mayor and John de Cauntebrygge was Chamberlain, and he declared that he had always used the mistery of Vintners and not the mistery of Weavers, as the Masters of the mistery of Vintners testified. He therefore prayed that he might be admitted to the freedom of the City in the mistery of Vintners. His prayer granted.

Condic'oes int' mercatores Anglie et Alemannie.

Exemplification of conditions of commercial agreement between merchants of England and merchants of Almaine enrolled in Chancery. Witness the King at Westminster, 6 Dec., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399].

Folio i b.

Adhuc con dic'oes ut antea etc.

Writ to the Sheriffs that they make public proclamation of the above agreement. Witness the King at Westminster 8 Dec., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399].

Exon'ac' Petri Chirche al' dict' Blake Tabler.

10 Feb., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], Peter, son of Matthew de la Cherche, otherwise called Peter "Blake Tabler, " discharged by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., on account of increasing old age.

Declarac' no'is Drugonis "Barantyn".

10 March, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], came Drew (Drugo) "Barentyn, " goldsmith, before Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and notified that on the 30th April, 38 Edward III. [A. D. 1364], he was enrolled in the red paper of redemptions of freedoms and apprentices of the City by the name of "Andreas" Barentyn, and afterwards, viz., on the 26th Oct., 44 Edward III. [A. D. 1370], in the black paper of redemptions of freedoms and apprentices was admitted a freeman of the City by the name of "Andreas" Barentyn, owing to the negligence of the writer of the indentures of apprenticeship of the said "Andreas, " he believing at the time that "Andreas" was the Latin for Drugo—and prayed that he, "Drugo, " might enjoy the franchise of the City from the date of the said enrolment and admission thenceforth by the name of "Drugo Barentyn, citizen and goldsmith, " and that everything done or to be done by him in that name might stand good. His prayer granted (fn. 13) .

Folio ii.

Concessio facta Ric'o Osbarn de ij shop' et j vac' plac' in Bassynges hawe.

11 March, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], grant by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty to Richard Osbarn, clerk of the Chamber of the Guildhall, of two shops and land near Bakwelhalle (fn. 14) in the parish of St. Michael de Bassyngeshawe, (fn. 15) upon which land a tenement is to be erected as quickly as possible by Stephen Speleman, the City Chamberlain, at the City's expense, the said Richard contributing the sum of 20 marks. To hold the same for a term of fifty year sat an annual rent of 40s.

Exon'acro Will'i Goryng webbe.

16 March, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], William Goring, "webbe, " discharged by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., on account of increasing old age.

Exon'acio Rog'i atte Hacche Gurdelere.

17 March, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], Roger atte Hacche, girdler, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Ric'i Pecok armurar'.

20 March, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], Richard Pecok, armourer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Petri Cokerelle taillour.

22 March, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], Peter Cokerelle, tailor, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio ii b.

Custod' xl marcar' Lucie fil' Johannis Calthorpe pertin'.

19 March, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399–1400], the sum of 40 marks delivered by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and Stephen Spelman, the Chamberlain, to John Longele, draper, executor of John Calthorpe, barber, with the assent of William Clophulle, brewer, her guardian, in trust for Lucy, daughter of the said John Calthorpe. Sureties, viz., Henry Hert, Thomas Glyvyan, drapers and John Marchaunt, clerk.

Folios ii b -iv b.

Statute of Westminster, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1399]. (fn. 16)

Folio v.

Exon'acio Ric'i Bernes allutar'.

10 May, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], Richard Bernes de Abertoun, cordwainer, discharged by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Joh'nis Wydmer' joynour'.

20 May, the same year, John Wydmere, "joinour, " similarly discharged for like cause.

Br'e contra capellanos sine auct'e p'dicant' in eccl'ii.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation forbidding any chaplain, regular or secular (except parochial chaplains in their parishes), to preach publicly or secretly in any chapel or elsewhere in the City unless he be duly admitted by his diocesan, inasmuch as divers heresies were being preached by unauthorized chaplains. Witness the King at Westminster, 12 May, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400].

The above duly proclaimed 22 May.

Writ to the Sheriffs and Wardens of passage (custodibus passagii) in the Port of the City to make proclamation against any merchant or other of the King's lieges taking any ship, barge, or balinger (balingeram) armed for war out of the said Port against the French (fn. 17) or any other friends of England, but allowing them to do so against the Scots, who had shown many marks of hostility. (fn. 18) Witness the King at Westminster, 18 June, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400].

The above duly proclaimed 25 June.

Exon'acio Ric'i Skete Brewer.

26 June, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], Richard Skete, "brewer, "discharged by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio v b.

Exon'acio Ricardi Lokynton bol bynder.

2 July, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], Richard Lokyntone, "bokebynder, " similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Ade Ratsey civis et corsour.

23 July, Adam Ratteseye, "corsour, " similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Ric'i Manhale talughchaun deler.

5 Aug., Richard Manhale, "taulghchaundeler, " similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acro Marci Ernelee civis et groceri.

22 Sept., Mark Ernelee, "grocer, " similarly discharged for like cause.

Admissio Ric'i Reynold in misteram vinetariorum.

8 Oct., 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], Richard Reygnold, who had been admitted to the freedom of the City on the 7th April, 17 Richard II. [A. D. 1394], in the mistery of Tailors, with which mistery he was wholly unconnected, prayed Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that he might be admitted to the freedom of the City as a Vintner. His prayer granted at the instance of good men of the mistery of Vintners.

Exon'acro Sewalli Hoddesdone piscenar'.

26 Oct., 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], Sewal Hodesdone, fishmonger, discharged by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio vi.

Supervisus de Galoches.

16 Oct., 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], petition to the Mayor and Aldermen by good men of the mistery of Pouchemakers that they may be allowed the rule and supervision of the making of galoches of wood (galoches de feust). (fn. 19) Their prayer granted. (fn. 20)

Feod' et officium Servient' Carn'e concess' Will' Est ad terminum vite.

11 May, 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], in a congregation of Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty assembled as a Common Council (pro commum consilio) in the upper Chamber of the Guildhall, it was agreed that whensoever William Est, one of the serjeants of the Mayor, (fn. 21) should cease to hold office he should receive the same fee for life as other serjeants of the Chamber (ceteri servientes camere) (fn. 22) .

Ordinacro mister' de Goldbeters concess' et affirmat'.

20 Sept., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], petition by good men of the mistery of Goldbeaters (Aurimalliatores) to the Mayor and Aldermen that they may be allowed to elect two Wardens or Masters to govern their mistery, and that those who rebel against such Masters may be punished according to the ordinance made in Letter-Book G, fo. cxxxv [b]. Their prayer granted.

Presentacio ad cantariam in heremitag' de Cripulgate.

Presentation by Friar John, Abbot of the Monastery of Gerondone, co. Linc., of Friar John de Rither to the chantry founded by Dame Mary de St. Paul, Countess of Pembroke, in the Hermitage near Cripulgate (fn. 23) for the soul of Sir Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke. Dated in the Monastery of Gerondone, the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], A. D. 1399. (fn. 24)

Folio vi b.

Eleccio Vice comitum.

Tuesday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept], 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], in the presence of Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, William Walderne and William Hyde, the Sheriffs, Matthew Sutheworth, the Recorder, John Hadlee, John Hende, Richard Whityngtone, Drew Barantyn, Thomas Wilford, William Askeham, William Bramptone, William Venour, John Walcote, and Geoffrey Brook, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of Sheriffs at the Guildhall, John Wakelee was elected Sheriff by the Mayor, and William Evote by the Commonalty. Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept], they were sworn at the Guildhall, &c., and on the following Thursday were presented and sworn (jurati) (fn. 25) before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Eleccio Maroris.

Wednesday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct], 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400], in the presence of Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, Matthew Sutheworth, the Recorder, John Wakele and William Evote, the Sheriffs, John Hadlee, John Hende, Richard Whityngtone, Drew Barantyn, John Wodecok, William Waldern, Thomas Wilford, William Askeham, William Venour, Thomas Polle, William Benwell, John Walcote, John Warner, William Bramptone, and Geoffrey Brook, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, John Fraunceys was elected. Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], in the Guildhall, he was sworn, &c., and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer, &c.

Exon'acio Joh'is Berefaire civis et armurer London.

18 March, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1], John Berfaire, "armurer, " discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Indentura facta int' Maior' Aldr' et Co'itatem Civitatis London' et Ricardum Osbarn.

Indenture of lease by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty to Richard Osbarn of two shops with adjacent land in the parish of St. Michael de "Bassyngeshawe, " situate between the City's tenement called "Bakwelhalle" towards the south, the tenement of Thomas Dystree, mercer, and Johanna his wife, and the City's land and the tenement of the College of the Guildhall Chapel towards the north, the tenement of the aforesaid College towards the west, and the high street towards the east. The said Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty covenant to erect a tenement on the aforesaid land at the City's cost, except for the sum of 20 marks contributed by the lessee, who is to enjoy the premises for a term of fifty years at an annual rent of 40s. Dated in the Chamber of the Guildhall the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept], 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400].

Folio vii.

P'sentacio ex causa permu taco'is facte int' d nos Joh'em Hore wode R ctorem eccl're de Est hanyfeld et Joh'em Dray cote capell in unius cantar' juxta Guihald' civitat' London'.

Letter from John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, to Robert [Braybrook], Bishop of London, notifying that John Horewode, Rector of the church of All Saints, "Esthanyfeld, " (fn. 26) and John de Draycote, alias Baron, chaplain of one of the five chantries in the Guildhall Chapel of St. Mary, had agreed to exchange benefices, and presenting the former to the said chantry Dated 21 April, A. D. 1401.

Exon'acio Simonis Gode rich civis et allutar' London.

16 April, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1401], Simon Godrich, cordwainer, discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Ordinacio mistere de Fullers.

20 April, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1401], petition to John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, by good men of the mistery of Fullers, for an ordinance to be made forbidding any fuller or other person sending cloth to the mills near the City (fn. 27) that had not first been cleaned and washed, under penalty of paying 13s. 4d., one-half to go to the Chamber of the Guildhall and the other half to the mistery. The petition granted.

Custodia pueror' Gilb'ti Prynce.

18 May, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1401], came John Higyn and John Wolfey, executors of Gilbert Prynce, late painter, and delivered to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, the sum of £100 belonging to John, son of the said Gilbert, and another sum of £100 belonging to Johanna, daughter of the said Gilbert, in trust for the same.

Folio vii b.

Exon'acio custod' p'dict' Joh'e.

Afterwards, viz., on the 12th Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], the aforesaid Stephen Speleman, late Chamberlain, delivered to John Proffyt, the then Chamberlain, the sum of £100 belonging to the aforesaid Johanna.

Afterwards, viz., on the 12th Nov., 13 Henry IV. [A. D. 1411], it was adjudged by Robert Chichele, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that the aforesaid money should be delivered to Thomas, son of Thomas Coggeshall, of co Essex, who had married the said Johanna.

18 May, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1401], the above executors of Gilbert Prynce delivered to William Erntone, mercer, with whom the aforesaid John Prynce had been bound apprentice, the sum of 10 marks left for the purpose by Gilbert Prynce.

Afterwards, viz., on the 31st Aug., 7 Henry IV. [A. D. 1406], came the said John, being of full age, and acknowledged satisfaction for the sum of £100 due to him.

Exoneracio Ricardi Wode ham qui fuit apprenticius Rad'i Martyn.

8 June, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1401], Richard Wodeham, who was apprentice of Ralph Martyn, "sherman, " discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Ordinaunce des Brocours.

Ordinance made anno 2 Henry IV. forbidding any one to meddle with brokerage, "chevaunce, " or exchange except English brokers chosen by the misteries of the City and accepted and sworn by the Mayor and Aldermen, under penalty of paying £100 to the Chamber. (fn. 28)

Folio viii.

Names of Brokers (Correctiers) elected by divers misteries of the City and presented to John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and accepted and sworn, viz.: —

By the Grocers: Guy Laurence, Richard Nevyle, Simon Berde, Roger Harlestone, Thomas Pateswyk.

By the Mercers: Robert Speke, Roger Guy, John Bynde.

By the Fishmongers: John Gerard, Robert Rose.

By the Ironmongers: Thomas Launde.

By the "Drapers": John Traylle, Thomas Overay.

By the "Vintners": Richard Ryner.

By the Skinners: William Multone.

Exon acio Ric'i Punchard aur'.

17 Feb, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1], Richard Punchard, goldsmith, discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Admissio Joh'is fil' Rob'ti Pynnere et de London' in mister' de Salters.

9 March, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1], came John, son of Robert Pynner, who had been apprentice to William Rodland, "Netmaker, " and been admitted to the freedom of the City when John Warde was Mayor and William Eynesham was Chamberlain (viz., on the 14th Jan., 49 Edward III.), and prayed John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that he might be admitted to the freedom of the City in the mistery of Salters, he having for a long time past used that mistery, and not the mistery of Netmaker. His prayer granted, and he pays for his admission 10s., &c.

Exon acio Ric'i Milden hale allutar'.

15 March, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1], Richard Mildenhale cordwainer, discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Thome Brys towe Fustour.

18 March, Thomas Bristowe, "fustour, " similarly discharged for like cause.

Billa de Jorgnours.

18 March, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1], petition to the Mayor and Aldermen by good men of the mistery of "Joynours" that they may be allowed to elect two Wardens to rule the mistery, and that certain ordinances may be approved. Their petition granted.

Folio viii b.

Br'e fact' de Theolonio non solvend' et sup' al' lib't London.

Writ to Sheriffs, Mayors, Bailiffs, &c., not to molest the citizens of London in the enjoyment of their chartered rights Witness the King at Westminster, 5 Sept., 1 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400].

Br'e pro leprosis Sancti Egidii.

Writ to the Mayor bidding him to levy forthwith the sum of 100s. on the tenants of property in the City belonging to the Hospital of St. Giles, (fn. 29) for the benefit of the lepers therein, who were in want of maintenance owing to pending litigation in the King's Court. Witness the King at Westminster, 16 March, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1].

Folio ix.

Suscepc' denar' juxta form' p'dict' b'ris et combotus inde.

Pursuant to the above writ Richard Jargevyle received the sum of 100s. 5d. of rents of the said Hospital, the same being collected from John Fraunceys, the Mayor, Laurence Durem, William Vannere, grocer, John atte Corner, Thomas Say, vintner, Richard Stile, fishmonger, Richard Brangweyn, and the Prior and Convent of St. Bartholomew near Westesmethefelde, and on the 4th April, the same year, 100s. thereof were distributed among certain lepers, viz., Thomas Burgeys, John Pastone, John Hilling, Richard Pecok, and Brian Middeltone.

Ordinacio mister' dez Steynours.

18 March, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1], petition presented to the Mayor and Aldermen by good men of the mistery of Steynours that they may be allowed (inter alia) to choose yearly two good men to govern the mistery and punish those who unlawfully stain cloth for sale, &c. Their petition granted.

Folios ix b - xii b.

Statute of Westminster, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1400–1], (fn. 30) [De heretico comburendo].

Folio xii b.

Br'e de cs levand' de ten' leprosor' et eisdem leprosis procor' susten tac' lib'and'.

Another writ to the Mayor to levy 100s on the tenants of property in the City belonging to the Hospital of St. Giles, for the benefit of the lepers therein. Witness the King at Westminster, 17 May, 2 Henry IV. [A. D. 1401].

Execucio br'is predicti.

Pursuant to the above writ Richard Jargevile, Serjeant to the Mayor, raised 101s. iiijd. by various sums from William Kenet, saddler, William Poule, "boteimaker, " Richard Leycestre, "barbour, " William Ermyn, clerk, Walter Donemowe, William Godes, butcher, William Lylye, "pewtrer, " John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and from the Master of the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, and on the 9th July he distributed 100s. of the amount so raised among the said lepers.

[Folios xiii-xiii b blank.]

Footnotes

1 He had been created Earl of Gloucester in 1397, but was deprived of the earldom in 1399.
2 Otherwise Lord Lumley. Summoned to Parliament as a Baron 1384–1399.
3 The Earls of Kent and Huntingdon, who had recently been reduced from the Dukedoms of Surrey and Exeter, had conspired with the Earl of Salisbury and Le Despenser to seize the King at Windsor, where he was spending Christmas, and replace Richard on the throne. The conspiracy had been discovered, and the Earls of Kent and Salisbury seized and put to death at Cirencester. Lumley had been beheaded at Oxford; Le Despenser had been taken and killed by the citizens of Bristol; and the Earl of Huntingdon had been taken in Essex and beheadedat Plesshy. 'Annales Hen. IV.' (Rolls Series, No 28, vol. iii.), pp. 323 9; Walsingham, 'Hist. Anglicana, ' ii. 243 5; Kingsford's 'Chron. of London, ' p. 62.
4 He had been raised to the Arch bishopric of Canterbury in 1397 in place of the deposed Arundel, but on the accession of Henry IV. was forced to surrender the see to its previous occupier.
5 Or Merk. He had been one of Richard II.'s confidential advisers, and was the only Bishop present with Richard when taken at Flint.
6 Master of the King's buckhounds. Cal. Pat. Rolls (1399 1401), p. 193.
7 He had been one of the late King's Chaplains, and bore such a striking resemblance to the King that he had been employed more than once by Richard s supporters to impersonate him in public. One contemporary writer went so far as to declare that in his opinion it was Maudelain's corpse and not that of Richard that was exposed in St. Paul's in March (1400) for the purpose of identification; but this could not be, inasmuch as Maudelain himself had already been publicly executed and beheaded. See Webb's translation of Creton's 'Metrical Hist. of the Deposition of King Richard the Second' (Archæol, vol. xx. pp. 134, 213, 221, 424).
8 Eo quod idem Turris infra libertatem et precinctum libertatis civitatis predicte existit. According to Coke ('Institutes, ' iii. 135*) the ancient City wall extended through the Tower, and all that part of the Tower precinct which lay to the west of the wall was in Tower Ward, whilst that to the east of the wall was situate in the county of Middlesex. In 1321 we find the City Coroner holding an inquest within the second gate of the Tower towards the West in the parish of All Hallows Barking in Tower Ward. Coroner's Roll, B 1.
9 Printed in Rymer's 'Fœdera' (ed 1727), viii. 123.
10 Probably the manor of Kenton near Kingston, one of the rendezvous agreed upon by the conspirators.
11 The manor of Sutton, also near Kingston.
12 Eventually the Archbishop was set at liberty and the Bishop received the King's pardon. Of the others, Sir Thomas Shelley, "Maudeleyne' (or Magdalene), and "Feriby" (or Ferby), clerks, as well as Bernard Brokas, Knt., were either hanged or beheaded at Tyburn. 'Annales Henrici IV., 'p. 330; Walsingham, 'Hist. Angl., 'ii. 245; Kingsford's 'Chronicles of London, ' p. 63; Archæol., vol. xx. pp. 87, 215; Rymer, 'Fœ dera, ' viii. 150, 105-6.
13 'Memorials, ' pp. 553-4.
14 See 'Cal. Letter - Book H, 'p. 449n.
15 This tends to show that "Bassishaw" and "Basinghall" are etymologically the same, as already suggested ('Cal. Letter Book F, ' p. 273n.), and were both named after the family of Basing. The Ward is frequently spelt "Bassyngeshawe." See 'Cal. Letter-Book G, ' pp. 60, 285.
16 See 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), i. 436-444. The statute, as recorded in the Letter Book, omits caps. iv. and xvii., the former confirming the proceedings of the Parliament held anno 11 Richard II., and the latter confirming Stat. 6 Richard II. cap. x., which allowed strangers to buy and sell, within the realm, fish and other victuals, in gross or by retail, notwithstanding the letters patent recently granted by the late King to the Fishmongers of London. See 'Cal. Letter-Book H, ' p. 447.
17 "A truce had been patched up with France, but peace was not to be looked for." Stubbs, 'Const. Hist., 'iii. 27.
18 In the course of this summer the King marched north to insist on the homage of Scotland, but returned home without achieving his object. Walsingham, ii. 246.
19 Such as were at one time depicted on the arms of the Pouchmakers' Company.
20 'Memorials, ' pp 554-5.
21 In August, 1399, he had been appointed Bailiff of Southwark. 'Cal. Letter-Book H, ' p. 447.
22 There were usually three Serjeants of the Chamber. 'Lib. Alb., ' i. 49.
23 The hermitage was situate in Mugwell (now Monkwell) Street. Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book F, ' p. 180.
24 'Memorials, ' p. 553. Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book F, ' p. 180.
25 This was unusual, al though itoccurs again infra, fo. xxx b. See 'Cal. Letter-Book C, ' pp. 178-9; 'Cal. Letter-Book D, ' p. 20.
26 East Hanningfield, co. Essex.
27 These mills were situated at Wandsworth, Old Ford, Stratford, and Enfield. See 'Cal. Letter-Book H, ' p. 37.
28 According to a note appended by the scribe, the proclamation of this ordinance is recorded on the sixth folio preceding it a certain mark, but the reference is not correct.
29 In October, 1380, the Aldermen were ordered to make a return of the property of St. Giles' Hospital lying in their respective Wards 'Cal. Letter-Book H, ' p. 155.
30 Printed in 'Statutes at Large, 'i. 445-453. The Parliament which sat from 20 Jan. to 10 March, 1401, was chiefly remarkable for its drastic treatment of the Lollards, as testified by cap. xv. of this statute. By its terms the impenitent heretic, convicted by the spiritual court, was to be delivered over to the officers of the secular law to be burnt.