Folios lxxxi - xc
June 1409 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

74-83

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'Folios lxxxi - xc: June 1409 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: I: 1400-1422 (1909), pp. 74-83. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33681 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Folio lxxxi.

Ordinacio mister' de Cordewaners et Cobelers.

15 June, 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], an inquisition held by the Mayor, Recorder, and Aldermen, pursuant to the above, on the oath of certain Cordewaners and Cobelers, who declared the custom that had prevailed from of old as to the proper work executed by the two classes of workmen. (fn. 1)

Folio lxxxi b.

Exon'acio Petri Tanner civis et brasio toris London.

20 Sept., 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], Peter Tanner, brewer, discharged by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio lxxxii.

Exon'acio Gilberti Asshehirst civis et Wodemonger London'.

25 Sept., 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], Gilbert Asshehirst, "wodemonger, " similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Joh'is Audrce de Com' Cantebrugge vaginar' London'.

1 Oct, 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], John Audree (Andree?) of co. Cambr., sheather, similarly discharged for like cause.

Proclamacio facta xiiij die Octobr' anno regis Henrici quarti unde cimo.

Writ to all Mayors, Sheriffs, &c., to make proclamation that any one wishing to visit Rochelle with wine or other merchandise can do so, inasmuch as the King of France had granted his protection. Witness the King at Westminster, 11 Oct, 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409]. (fn. 2)

Exon'acio Joh'is de Bechesworth aurifabr' London'.

16 Oct., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409]; John de Bechesworth, goldsmith, discharged by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio lxxxii b.

Ordinacio mister' de Coupers.

19 July, 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], petition by good men of the Mistery of Coupers to Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, John Prestone, the Recorder, William Staundone, William Walderne, Robert Chichile, William Crowmer, Stephen Speleman, Henry Haltone, Henry Pountfreyt, and William Chichile, Aldermen, and William Nortone and Thomas Duke, the Sheriffs, that an ordinance might be made and enrolled in the Chamber to the effect that no one of the Mistery shall make vessels to contain liquor otherwise than of good, sound wood, without "sappe" (nisi de puro ligno et integro absque aliquo sappe in eisdem existente), (fn. 3) under penalty. Their prayer granted.

Acquietancia m'cator Damyas Corby et Neell.

Acquittance by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, for the sum of 50 marks received from John Beaupeny, merchant of Amyens, being the annual rent due under a "composition" made between the City of London and the merchants of Amyens, Corbie, and Neele. Dated 19 Oct., A.D. 1409.

Folio lxxxiii.

Eleccio vicecomitum.

Saturday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept], 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], in the presence of Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, John Prestone, the Recorder, William Nortone and Thomas Duke, the Sheriffs, Richard Whityngtone, Thomas Knolles, William Askham, Richard Merlawe, Thomas Fauconer, William Crowmer, Stephen Speleman, Henry Pountfreyt, Henry Haltone, Walter Cottone, Thomas Polle, Nicholas Wottone, Henry Bartone, and John Penne, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs—John Lane, Commoner, was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and William Chichile, Alderman, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

Afterwards, viz., on Saturday the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast they were presented and accepted before the Barons of the Exchequer.

The same day (21 Sept.) William Crowmer and Walter Cotton, Aldermen, Philip Bangor, John Reynewelle, William Sevenoke, and John Creek, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens of London Bridge. (fn. 4)

Custodia Margarete Alicie et Johanne filiar' Rog'i Billing gey nup' civis et Chesmong' London'.

26 June, 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], the guardianship of Margaret, Alice, and Johanna, daughters of Roger Billinggey, late "Chesmongere, " with their patrimony and chattels (accruing to them by the death of Thomas their brother), committed by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, to John Coventre, mercer, executor of the said Roger Sureties, viz., Thomas Brown, junior, grocer, and John Cosham, mercer.

Folio lxxxiii b.

Afterwards, viz., on the 12th September following the above, Margaret was apprenticed to Richard Osborne and Johanna his wife, to be taught the art of the said Johanna for a term of eight years.

Custodia Alicie filie Will'i Coventre nup' civis et mercer' London'.

26 June, 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], the guardianship of Alice, daughter of William, son of William Coventre, late mercer, committed by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, and John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, to Richard Harpour, mercer, and Johanna his wife, mother of the said orphan. In the event of the orphan dying before coming of age one half of her money is to go to John Coventre, mercer, her uncle. Sureties, viz., Walter Cottone and John Lane, mercers.

Folio lxxxii b lxxxiv.

Abjudicacio Will'i Kynges cote ab officio custodis porte de Ludgate.

Tuesday, 1 Oct, 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], complaint made to the Mayor and Aldermen by John Lane and William Chichele, the Sheriffs, of obstruction having been offered them by William Kyngescote, the Keeper of the gate and gaol of Ludgate, when taking over the prisoners in the said gaol from William Nortone and Thomas Duke, the late Sheriffs, and proceedings thereon, resulting in the said William Kyngescote being discharged from office and committed to Newgate.

Folio lxxxiv b.

On the 10th Oct, 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], evidence having been given by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, and other trustworthy persons that Isabella, the bastard daughter of John Hardewyk, had died in the month of September last, and that her property in the hands of John Frensshe ought therefore to be delivered to the executors of John Hardewyk, (fn. 6) the same was so delivered.

15 Nov, 14 Henry IV. [A.D. 1412], Alice, daughter of William Coventre, having died, one half of her money was delivered by order of William Waldern, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, to Richard Harpour, and Johanna his wife, mother of the said Alice, and to John Coventre, uncle of the same. (fn. 7)

Royal bond for payment of an indemnity for injuries done to the subjects, Prussians and Livonians, of Ulric de Jungingen, (fn. 8) the Master General of the Order of the Blessed Mary of the Teutonics. Dated at the Palace of Westminster, 19 Oct., 11 Henry IV., A.D. 1409.

[There is no folio numbered lxxxv Fo lxxxvi blank.]

Folio lxxxvi b.

Licence in mortmain to Richard Whityngtone, Henry Londone, and John Chamberleyn, chaplain, to grant a certain parcel of land lying in the street called "le Riole, " in the parish of St. Michael de Paternosterchirche, to John White, parson of the said church, and his successors for the purpose of rebuilding a certain parish church in honour of God and of St. Michael the Archangel, together with a churchyard. Witness the King at Westminster, 20 Dec., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409].

Grant by Richard Whityngtone, mercer, by virtue of the above licence, to the above parson of the church of St. Michael, called "Paternostercherche, " in the street called "le Riole, " of a certain parcel of land in the parish of St. Michael aforesaid, which he, together with Henry London, his servant, and John Chamberlein, a chaplain (both deceased), acquired by gift and feoffment of William Westone, draper, and Johanna his wife, as appears by writing enrolled in the Husting for Pleas of Land on Monday the Feast of St. John ante portam Latinam [6 May], 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], (fn. 9) for the purpose of rebuilding thereon a larger church in place of the small and dilapidated church of St. Michael, with churchyard adjacent. (fn. 10) Dated 13 April, 12 Henry IV. [A.D. 1411].

Folio lxxxvii.

Eleccio Ricardi Merlawe Maioris London'.

Sunday the Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct], 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], in the presence of Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, John Prestone, the Recorder, Richard Whityngtone, Thomas Knolles, John Shadworth, William Askham, Richard Merlawe, Robert Chichile, William Crowmere, William Walderne, Thomas Fauconer, Henry Haltone, Henry Bartone, William Louthe, Thomas Polle, Nicholas Wottone, Stephen Speleman, William Nortone, Walter Cottone, and John Penne, Aldermen, William Chichile and John Lane, the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty, summoned for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing—Richard Merlawe was elected.

On Monday the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct] he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

The same Sunday, viz., the Feast of St. Edward, the whole of the said Commonalty prayed the Mayor and Aldermen by John Westone, the Common Pleader, that, for the unity and honour of the City and nurturing greater love among the misteries of the same, at the next riding of the Mayor and at all future ridings, all the riders who are of the Commonalty of the City shall wear hoods of the City's colours, viz., red and white, &c., and that no minstrels thenceforth ride before any mistery of the City, but only before the Mayor, and then only three bands or companies at the most, &c. Their prayer granted, &c.

W Benham assaiator Hostrior' et Muscl ar' apud Quenhith.

The same Sunday it was agreed by the said Mayor and Aldermen that William Benham, who for many years past had carried himself honestly and kindly in the office of valet to serjeants of divers Mayors of the City, should have for the term of his life the office of assayer of "hoystrys" (oysters) and "muskles" (mussels) at Queenhithe, to be exercised either by himself or his deputies.

Exon'acio Arnald' Guylham civis et vinetar' London'.

22 Oct., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], Arnald Guylliam of Gascony, vintner, discharged by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Walteri Beaw civis et carnificis London'.

26 Oct., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], Walter Beau, butcher, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Rob ti Edward civis et carni ficis London'.

27 Oct, 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], Robert Edward, butcher, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Joh'is Silvyrton civis et pelliparn London'.

28 Oct, 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], John Sylvyrton, skinner, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio lxxxvii b.

Br'e d nun cians certos Cardinales he reticos et elec cionem summi Pontificis de non (novo?) sacrati.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation of the condemnation passed at a Synod held at Pisa upon Peter de Luna and Angelo Carario, styling themselves respectively Pope Benedict XIII. and Pope Gregory XII., and of the call of Peter de Candia to the Papal chair by the title of Alexander V. Witness the King at Westminster, 22 Oct., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409]. (fn. 11)

Ordinacio q'd Maior Recordat' sedebunt in principali Canra tenent' Cur'.

Monday, 4 Nov., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], it was ordained by Richard Merlawe, the Mayor, John Prestone, the Recorder, Drew Barantyn, Thomas Knolles, William Askham, William Walderne, John Warner, William Louthe, Thomas Polle, Henry Haltone, Henry Bartone, Walter Cottone, John Penne, Aldermen, William Chichile and John Lane, Sheriffs, assembled in the inner Chamber of the Guildhall, that the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Recorder should thenceforth sit on the usual days in the principal Chamber of the Guildhall, and there hold openly the Mayoralty Court between parties desirous of bringing plaints as of old accustomed, and not in the inner Chamber (fn. 12) as has been done some few years past. And if any matter pending before the said Mayor and Aldermen requires examination, the Mayor and Aldermen, if it pleases them, or two, three, or four Aldermen chosen by the Mayor, shall cause the said matter to be re-examined by the parties without calling in Counsel in the inner Chamber aforesaid, and shall report what they find to the Court, that the said Court upon their findings may be able to proceed and determine the matter according to the custom of the City. (fn. 13)

Folio lxxxviii.

Exon'acio Henrici Milward et Ric'i Mordone de bonis Nich'o fil' Joh'is Seves terre legat'.

£cxxvij ijs xd p'tin' pu'is Will'i Wight delib'at' Joh'i.

Proffyt Cam'ar' per Will'm Askham Aldermannum.

5 Nov., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], Henry Milward and Richard Mordone, "irmongere, " executors of John Sevesterre, (fn. 14) late brewer, delivered in Court to Nicholas, son of the said John, now of full age, the sum of £20 and divers household goods.

The same day William Askham, Alderman, delivered to John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, sums of money due to John, Richard, and Alice, children of William Wight, (fn. 15) by bequest of their said father, and by reversion on the deaths of Nicholas and William, other children of the same. Mention made of Agnes, wife of Thomas Wottone, draper, and Beatrix, wife of John Elys, mercer.

Exon'acio Thome Myntone civiset cis soris London'.

6 Nov., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], Thomas Myntone, tailor, discharged by Richard Merlawe, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'ac' exec Will'i Reyn well de £lx. p'tin' pu'is Thome Cha combe.

30 Oct., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], came John, son of William Reynewell, and John Westone, executors of the said William, before John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, and rendered account of the patrimony of John, William, Thomas, and Cristina, children of the said William, as well as of legacies bequeathed by the said William to John, Thomas, and William, sons of Thomas Chacombe, grocer, of whom the said William Chacombe is dead.

Folio lxxxviii b.

Br'e pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Bristol (fn. 16) in the quinzaine of St. Hillary [13 Jan.] next. Proclamation to this effect to be made in the next Husting, the election to take place in the Husting and a return to be made into Chancery, under the seals of the Sheriffs and of those attending the election, of the names of those elected, whether they themselves be present at the time of election or not. (fn. 17) Witness the King at Westminster, 26 Oct., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409].

Pursuant to the above writ, the following were elected, viz. :—Drew Barantyn and Henry Haltone, Aldermen, John Reynewell and Walter Gawtron, Commoners.

Custodia Joh'is et Tho'e filior' Tho'e Chacombecivis et Groceri London'.

8 Nov., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], the guardianship of John and Thomas, children of Thomas Chacombe, grocer, together with the money left to them by William Reynewell, their grandfather, committed by Richard Merlawe, the Mayor, and John Proffit, the Chamberlain, to the said Thomas their father Sureties, viz., Thomas Colshulle, "wollepakker,' and WilliamRandolf, goldsmith.

Folio lxxxix.

Custodia Will'i filii Will'i Coven tre senior' et Alicie ux'is ejus.

3 Dec., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], the guardianship of William, son of William Coventre, (fn. 18) senior, and of Alice his wife, together with the sum of £20 bequeathed to him by his said father, committed by the same to John Colman, Esquire, and the aforesaid Alice his wife. Sureties, viz., Walter Cottone and John Lane, mercers.

Proclamacio fact' nono die Decembris annor'r' Henr' quarti undecimo.

9 Dec., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], proclamation made forbidding the sale of fish by retail elsewhere than in places ordained, viz., Bryggestrete, Oldefisshstrete, "lestokkes, " "le Bocherye" in Estchepe and "le Bocherye" in St. Nicholas "Flesshammes, " except Thames and sweet-water fish and fowl (volatille).

Proclamacio fact' pro fimis abducend' die et anno p'dictis.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation forbidding any one to cast filth, entrails, &c., into the streets, complaint having been recently made of a nuisance caused thereby in the street leading from Aldrichegate to Nomanslond (fn. 19) near the Carthusian Priory, contrary to the Statute recently made at Cambridge. (fn. 20) Witness the King at Westminster, 12 Nov., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409].

Folio lxxxix b.

L're misse d'no Regi per Maiorem Aldr'os et co'i tatem London'.

Letter from the Mayor, &c., to the King assuring him that the sum of 7, 000 marks, required for his expedition into Wales, had been paid to divers of the King's officers, in manner as specified, although the writers had been informed by the Prince [of Wales] that the money had not come into the King's hands. Dated 12 Dec. [11 Henry IV.].

Folio xc.

Consimiles billemissefuer' cuilibet Alder manno.

Precept to the several Aldermen to hold their respective Wardmotes and make their presentments before the Mayor at the Guildhall at his General Court held on Monday after the Feast of Epiphany [6 Jan.]; also to see that no one walked abroad at night without a light, or with masks, and that proper watch be kept at Christmas, &c. Dated 13 Dec., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409].

Br'e pre parliament' ordinat' apud Bristoll' ad jornat' usq' Westm'.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster in the quinzaine of St. Hillary instead of at Bristol, if not already elected pursuant to a former writ. The election to be made by the whole county (in pleno com' vestro), and the result to be returned into the Chancery under the seals of the Sheriff and of all those present at the election. (fn. 21) Witness the King at Westminster, 18 Dec., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409].

Folio xc b.

Exon'acio Johannis Bul strode civis et aurifabri civi tatis London'.

24 Jan., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409–10], John Bulstrode, goldsmith, discharged by Richard Merlawe, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Thome Kale civis London'.

10 Feb., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409–10], Thomas, son of Robert Kake, otherwise Thomas Mallyng, similarly discharged for like cause.

Fos xcb–xc.

De treugis et pace.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to proclaim the prolongation of the truce between England and Flanders. (fn. 22) Witness the King at Westminster, 12 Dec., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409].

Footnotes

1 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 571-4 In 1417 the King issued his writ to the Mayor and Aldermen to see that this ordinance or agreement (compositio) was duly observed, but return was made to the writ to the effect that the ordinance had proved prejudicial to public interest, and therefore they declined to enforce it Infra, fo. ccii. The ordinance was formally annulled by Common Council in Jan., 1418 Infra, fo. ccix b.
2 Set out in Jules Delpit's 'Collection Genérale des Documents Fran¸ais qui se trouvent en Angleterre,' pp. 212-13.
3 The ordinance also for bids themaking of any vessel of false sappe or partly so (de faux sappe ne parcelle de faux sappe). The word appears as a designation of a certain kind of wood (sapling?) in a schedule of murage dues in 1315 thus :De qua libet centena borde et sape duos denarios. Letter-Book E, fo. 1 b.
4 The custom of recording the election of the Chamberlain and the Wardens of London Bridge, after that of the Sheriffs, appears to have dropped out at the previous election (supra, pp. 68-9).
5 Set out in 'Memorials, pp. 574-6 Kyngescote was reinstated in 1411. Infra, fo. cvi b.
6 Cf. supra, p. 40.
7 Cf. supra, p. 76.
8 He had succeeded his brother Conrad as High Master of Teutonic Knights in 1407. For some year spast a system of reprisals on the high seas had been carried on between English and Hanseatic traders, which was eventually settled by the payment of indemnities by both sides. See Wylie, op. cit.,, ii. 66-72, iv. 1-13.
9 Hust. Roll 136 (71).
10 For particulars as to the site and extent of the land here conveyed, see 'Memorials,' pp. 578-9 According to Stow (Thoms's ed., p. 91), Whitmgton acquired the land whereon to build "his college in the Royall" from the Mayor and Commonalty the same year (viz., 12 Henry IV) that he made the above grant to the parson of the Church of St. Michael, but on what authority Stow makes this statement is not clear.
11 Henry had himself made efforts to put an end to the schism that had long prevailed in the Church Walsingham, ii. 280-1. A similar writ had been sent to the Archbishop of Canterbury on the 17th Oct. Wilkins, 'Concilia,' iii. 321. The difficulty that presented itself to the Council at Pisa was thus summed up by a Cardinal who was present: "The Italians do not wish a Frenchman to be Pop; the French are unwilling to elect a Roman or Italian — let us therefore choose somebody who is neither one nor the other." He thereupon proposed Peter de Candia, at one time Bishop of Pisa and Archbishop of Milan, and the proposal was at once accepted. 'Contin. Eulogii' (Rolls Series, No. 9), vol. iii. pp. 414-15.
12 The Mayor's Court has always been known as the Court of the Mayor and Aldermen sitting in the outer Chamber, in contradistinction to the Court of Aldermen proper, which sat in the inner Chamber.
13 This appears to mean that when ever a question arose on the custom of the City, an investigation as to what was the custom in the case in point was made by the Mayor and Aldermen sitting as a Court of Aldermen without the assistance of Counsel, and that the Court of Aldermen reported the result of their inquiry to the Mayor and Aldermen sitting as the Mayor's Court.
14 His will proved and enrolled in the Husting in March, 1401 See 'Cal. of Wills, ' ii. 350. (where the Editor has misread and misprinted the name as "Senesterre').
15 Probably brother of Thomas Wight, grocer, whose will was proved and enrolled in the Husting in Feb, 1406. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 365.
16 The Parliament actually sat at Westminster on the 27th Jan., 1410 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 622.
17 The election was to be made juxta formam statuti inde editi et provisi, referring to the statute of 1406 Vide supra, p. 57. note. The clause touching the non-election of Sheriffs does no appear in the writ.
18 His will proved and enrolled in the Husting in 1407. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 374.
19 Stow records (Thoms's ed., p. 161) that in 1349—the year of the Black Death—Sir Walter Manny purchased a plot of land adjoining No Man's Land, "lying in a place called Spittle cross because it belonged to St. Bartilmewe's hospital, " for burial purposes. It was in the vicinity of the Charterhouse.
20 Stat. 12 Ric. II cap. xiii. A.D. 1388.
21 Pursuant to the statute of 1406 The clause touching Sheriffs not to be returned does not appear in the writ.
22 It recites the terms of the truce, which had been prolonged for three years from the 15th June, 1408, whereby security was guaranteed for French shipping between the ports of Winchelsea and St. Valery on the opposite coast of France.