Folios cxci - cc
Dec 1416 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

175-186

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'Folios cxci - cc: Dec 1416 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: I: 1400-1422 (1909), pp. 175-186. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33691 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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Folio cxci.

Consimilis l'ra missa fuit cuil't Aldermanno.

Precept to the several Aldermen to hold their Wardmotes and refer such matters as they found themselves unable to deal with to the General Court to be held before the Mayor at the Guildhall on Monday after the Feast of Epiphany [6 Jan]; and further to elect Alekonners, "rakiers," constables, &c., and take steps for lighting and safeguarding the streets and houses. Dated 12 Dec, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416].

Consimilis l'ra missa fuit cuil't Aldr'o.

Precept to the several Aldermen to take steps to assess and levy in their Wards a sum equal to a fifteenth and a half, and to bring the money to the Guildhall by the 20th January next. Dated 24 Dec, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416].

Proclam' fuit ix° die Februar' anno H' v ti iiii°.

Herry by the grace of god Kyng of Ingelond and of Fraunce and Lord of Irlond hoteth and commaundeth that al maner of Knyghtes whych þat are of the Kynges retenue and bene withinne þe Cite of London drawe hem to the Frere Prechours that they be there redy be thuo aftur none before þe Kynges counseille. (fn. 1)

Folio cxci b.

De resolucione et securitate quinq' m l marcarum.

Letters patent granting to the Mayor and Commonalty a moiety of the subsidy on wools, woolfells, &c., in repayment of a loan of 5,000 marks made by the City to the King to assist him against France. Witness the King at Westminster, 3 March, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416-17].

Exon'acio Henrici Wottone civis et Blaksmyth London'.

5 April, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], Henry Wottone, "blaksmyth," discharged by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio cxcii-cxcii b.

Ordinacio de Cappers et hurers.

16 March, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416-17], complaint made to Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen by Robert Warner, John Bokele, Adam Buk, and Roger Wodecok, the Masters, and good men of the Mistery of Hatters, and by William Sewale, John Chambre, John Corby, and John Langele, the Masters, and good men of the Mistery of Haberdasshers, against the Masters and Wardens of the Mistery of Cappers for having seized 15 "longe cappes" belonging to James Bowyer, haberdasher They pray that the matter may be inquired into, so that if the caps prove to be defective they may be burnt and the said owner punished, and if they prove to be good they may be restored to him.

Thereupon the Masters and Wardens appeared by summons on the 18th March, and being questioned as to the cause of the seizure said that the caps had been fulled under human feet, and that fulling by feet or by mill was forbidden under penalty of forfeiture, as appears by ordinance temp. William Askham, Mayor, recorded supra, fo. xxix, and here recited, and they prayed that the caps they had seized might be declared forfeited, one half of the forfeiture to be to the use of the City's Chamber, and the other to the use of the Mistery of Cappers.

On the other hand, the Masters and good men of the Misteries of Hatters and Haberdashers, who were present, declared that the above ordinance was not for the public good, inasmuch as "cappes, hures and hattes," both in England and abroad, were fulled both by mills and by foot at less cost, and equally as well as those fulled by hand. They further said that this ordinance was bad because the right of search touching false "cappes, hures or hattes" was of old with men of the Mistery of Hatters and Haberdashers as well as of the Mistery of Cappers. They therefore prayed that this new ordinance might be annulled and the old system observed.

After due consideration it was decreed that the ordinance should be annulled, and that in future the examination of caps, &c., should be made by men of both misteries.

Folio cxciii.

Exon'acio Johannis Swe tenham civis et Cissoris London'.

24 April, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], John Swetenham, tailor, discharged from serving on juries, &c., by the Mayor and Aldermen owing to increasing old age.

22 May, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], came Thomas Knolles, junior, and delivered to John Hille, the Chamberlain, the money he had received in trust for William, son of John Drewe. (fn. 2)

23 March, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1416-17], came John Sudbury, grocer, and Richard Osbarn, executors of Robert Odyham, (fn. 3) late grocer, and delivered to John Hille, the Chamberlain, the sum of £30 arising out of the sale of certain lands and tenements in the county of Kent, to the use of Elizabeth, daughter of the said Robert, who was married to John Poley, grocer.

The same day came the above executors and delivered a similar sum to the Chamberlain for John, a son of the above Robert; and on the 29th March the sum of £60 to the use of Robert and Thomas, other sons of the same.

Presentac' d'ni Joh'is Newendene ad unam v. cantar' in Capell' Guihald'.

Letter from Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and John Hille, the Chamberlain, to Richard [Clifford], Bishop of London, presenting John Newendene, chaplain, for admission to one of the chantries founded by Adam Fraunceys and Henry Frowyk in the Chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary near the Guildhall, rendered vacant by the death of Sir John Mounfort alias Burbrigge. Dated 28 July, A.D. 1417.

11 July, 6 Henry V. [A.D. 1418], came John Poley, and received from John Hille, the Chamberlain, the sum of £30 belonging to Elizabeth his wife.

Folio cxciii b.

A Common Council held on the 20th April, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], in the presence of Henry Bartone, the Mayor, John Bartone, the Recorder, Richard Merlawe, Robert Chichele, William Crowmer, Thomas Fauconer, Nicholas Wottone, William Louthe, William Nortone, William Chichele, John Penne, William Sevenok, John Michel, Thomas Pyke, Thomas Aleyn, Alan Everard, William Cambrigge, John Reinwell, Ralph Bartone, and John Perneys, Aldermen, John Coventre, one of the Sheriffs, and an immense multitude of Commoners of the City:—

Ordenaunce pur remover les estuies.

An ordinance passed that thenceforth no man nor woman should keep any stews in the City or suburbs for lodging therein any men or women by day or night, under penalty of paying £20 to the Chamber and a fine at the discretion of the Mayor and Aldermen. Provided always that every one in the City for his own cleanliness (pur soun honeste de mesne) may make a stew (fn. 4) for the use of himself and his household.

Ordenaunce derien prendre pur wharfage.

A further ordinance forbidding those who have acquired possession of wharves and stairs on the bank of the Thames to extort money from those who desire to draw water, wash clothes, &c.

Folio cxciv.

Also an ordinance to the effect that no Alderman, Commoner, or other person whatsoever shall thenceforth receive as a tenant any man or woman known to be living a vicious life, under penalty prescribed.

Joh'es Courtnay elect' in comunem venatorem.

The same day John Courteney, of Aynesford, co. Kent, gentleman, was elected and admitted to the office of Common Hunt of the City by the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council in place of Nicholas Brincheslee, Esquire. (fn. 5)

Folio cxciv b.

Feodum decem libr' concess' Joh'i Marchaunt ad terminum vite.

The same day it was granted by the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, at the cordial and diligent instance of John Carpenter, (fn. 6) that John Marchaunt, for the good and laudable service which hitherto and of long time in the office of Common Clerk (fn. 7) of the said City he hath faithfully exercised and occupied, shall have and hold for the term of his life to him and his assigns a mansion which he inhabits, situate above the middle gate at the entrance to the Guildhall of the said City, between the tenement of Thomas Wottone on the east part and the churchyard of the church of St. Lawrence on the west part, without rendering anything for the same. And further, at the instance and by consent of the said John Carpenter, (fn. 8) it was then and there granted by the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, that the said John Marchaunt shall have and receive yearly during his life, at the four principal terms of the year and customary in the City of London, from the Commonalty of the said City, by the hands of the Chamberlain for the time being, £10 sterling appertaining to the office and ancient fee of Common Clerk of the said City. And that John Carpenter, his clerk, who was then and there elected and admitted to the said office, shall have and receive yearly from the aforesaid Commonalty the rewards and robes as well as other fees, commodities, and profits whatsoever to the said office in any way belonging and appertaining, together with the fee of £10 aforesaid after the death, whenever it shall happen, of the said John Marchaunt, &c. And the said John Carpenter then and there, in the full Council aforesaid, granted that during the lifetime of the said John Marchaunt he would not demand or cause to be demanded any of the said fee of £10 to the said office appertaining.

Folio cxciv b-cxcv b.

Record and process taken according to the custom of the City between Thomas Fauconer, Alderman, and late Mayor of the City, and John Russell, "wolpakker," for divers scandals affecting the personal and judicial character of the said Alderman, for that the said John Russell had spread a report in July, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416], that the said Thomas Fauconer had caused Richard Gurinyn, (fn. 9) a baker, to be burnt as a heretic together with letters patent of pardon which the King had granted him, with the result that the said Thomas Fauconer had been committed to the Tower and fined £1,000. Thereupon the said Thomas sought redress The 30th July being appointed for all parties to appear, and the said John Russell having made default, he was found guilty by a jury, viz., William Olyver, William Burtone, William Michell, John Waltham, John Shawe, John Wellys, John Cosham, John "of Water," William Foucher, Bartholomew Deknen, John Esgastone, and William Grantham—and condemned to stand in the pillory.

Afterwards the said John Russell took sanctuary at St. Peter's, Westminster, and remained there until the 26th April, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], when he surrendered himself and made humble confession in the English tongue as set forth. (fn. 10)

Folio cxcvi.

Exon'acio Martim Godard civis et cultellar' London'.

18 June, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], Martin Godard, cutler, discharged by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Judicium de falsis cappis comburendis.

23 March, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1415-16], James Bowyer, haberdasher, charged before the Mayor and Aldermen by Thomas atte Wode and his fellow Masters and Surveyors of the mistery of Cappers with selling 15 false caps. Thereupon precept to John Charleton, one of the Serjeants-at-mace (unum servientum ad clavam) of the Chamber, to summon the said James to appear before the Mayor and Aldermen on the 5th April to answer the charge. Both parties demand a jury, and, after consulting both the old and the new ordinances as to procedure, the Mayor and Aldermen order the aforesaid Serjeant to summon twelve good men as well of the mistery of Cappers as of the Haberdashers, and of other merchants who sell caps, to examine the caps in question. The jurors find two of the caps to be false and the rest good. Thereupon the said false caps were condemned to be burnt in Chepe, and the said James was fined 20s, pursuant to an ordinance enrolled in the Husting for Pleas of Land held on Monday after the Feast of St. Gregory [12 March], 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1361-2]. (fn. 11)

Folio cxcvi b.

Consi'les bille pro tax' [sic] misse fuerunt cuilibet Aldr'o.

Precept to the several Aldermen to keep an armed watch in their Wards during the two nights and eves of St. John Baptist [24 June] and SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], according to ancient custom; and further to take the usual precautions against fire. Dated 17 June, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417].

Exon'acio Ric'i Chapman civis et Upholder Lon don'.

25 July, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], Richard Chapman, "upholder," discharged by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Henrici Ewell civiset Allutar London'.

31 July, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], Henry Ewell, cordwainer, similarly discharged on account of deafness and other infirmities.

Exon'acio Thome Grace civis et Copersmyth London.

16 Oct, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], Thomas Grace, "copersmyth," similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio cxcvii.

De custod' Joh'is fil' Rob'ti Odyham.

22 July [A.D. 1417], the guardianship of John, son of Robert Odyham, together with the sum of £30, committed by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Hille, the Chamberlain—with the assent of John Sudbury and Richard Osbarn, executors, and of Johanna, mother of the said orphan (fn. 12) —pto Henry Purchace, grocer, with whom the said orphan had been placed as an apprentice. Sureties, viz., William Sevenoke and John Maldone, grocers, and Richard Stowell, "wodemonger."

Custodia Joh'is filii Will'i Wirhale nup' civis et Wiredrawer London'.

3 July, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], the guardianship of John, son of William de Wirhale, late "wiredrawer," together with his patrimony and household goods, committed by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Hille, the Chamberlain, to Johanna his mother. Sureties, viz., William Walderne and Thomas Clenhand, mercers.

Folio cxcvii b.

Consimilis l'ra missa fuit cuilibet Aldermanno.

Precept to the several Aldermen to keep an armed watch by night in their Wards until the Feast of All Saints [1 Nov.] next ensuing, ready at all times to oppose the King's enemies and preserve the peace of the City; and further to take the usual precautions against fire. Dated 24 July [A.D. 1417].

Bille misse divers' mister' pro conservacione pacis.

Precept by the Mayor and Aldermen on the King's behalf to the Masters and Wardens of the several Misteries that they take measures to prevent riot and disturbance among their servants and apprentices, and make return of the names of those they may find disobedient. [No date].

L'ra missa d'no Regi.

Letter from the Mayor, &c, to the King desiring to hear news of his welfare, and assuring him of the peaceful state of the City. Dated 4 July [A.D. 1417].

Folio cxcviii.

L'ra missa d'no Regi.

Another letter to the same effect and almost in identical terms. Dated as above.

L're d'ni Regis de faciendo Aldr'os convenire inf a civitatem.

Letter of Privy Seal from the King to the Mayor, charging him to cause absent Aldermen to return to the City and assist the Mayor in the government of the City and preservation of the peace. Dated at Westminster, 12 August [A.D. 1415 ?]. (fn. 13)

L'ra missa Aldr'o ut veniat London'.

Letter from the Mayor to the absent Aldermen, charging them on the King's behalf to return to the City and take their part in its government. Dated 19 August [A.D. 1415 ?].

Folio cxcviii b.

L'ra missa Aldr'o ut sit residens in London'.

Another letter from the same to absent Aldermen, bidding them to return to the City and there reside. Dated as above.

De custodia terrar' et ten' Joh'is fil' et her' Joh'is Clophille.

20 Feb, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416-17], came Johanna, widow of William Triggelowe, of Cornwall, and John, son of the said William, to whom had been committed the custody of lands and tenements belonging to John, son of John Clophille, in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldersgate, and rendered account before John Penne and Ralph Bartone, Aldermen, John Middeltone and William Turnell, Commoners, auditors appointed by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen.

Folio cxcix.

L'ra d'ni Regis Maiori et Aldr'is missa.

Letter from the King to the Mayor, Sheriffs, Aldermen, &c., of the City announcing the surrender of the castle of Touque, (fn. 14) and desiring them to send him news from time to time by "komerys bethwene." (fn. 15) Dated at the said castle, 9 August [A.D. 1417].

Responsio eiusdem.

Reply to the above under the Mayoralty Seal, testifying to the joy with which the news conveyed therein had been received in the City, and assuring the King that it had remained in a state of tranquillity. Dated 28 August [A.D. 1417].

Exon'acio David Litle civis et Cis soris London'.

6 Sept, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], David Litle, tailor, discharged by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, owing to increasing old age.

Folio cxcix b.

Exon'acio Will'i Godes ball civis et Pynnere London'.

The same day William Godesball, "pynnere," similarly discharged for like cause.

Qe les surveyours des lazars soyent dischargez des enquestes et somonces.

A writing under the seal of the Mayoralty discharging Robert Mildenhale, "pelter," and John Wassborn, mercer, Guardians and Surveyors of the lepers at St. Giles's, "les Lokes," and Hakeney, from serving on inquests so long as they remain in office. Dated 1 Sept., 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417].

Presentacio Will'i Spaldyng in unam Cantar' Guyhald'.

Letter from Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and John Hille, the Chamberlain, to Richard [Clifford], Bishop of London, presenting William Spaldyng, chaplain, for admission to one of the chantries founded by Adam Fraunceys and Henry Frowyk in the chapel of B. V. Mary near the Guildhall, vacant by the death of John Depham. Dated 8 Sept., A.D. 1417.

Folio cc.

De zonis restauratis quiabone sunt.

8 Sept., 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], certain girdles belonging to William Stikeneye, of London Bridge, which had been presented by John Nasyng, Walter Colred, William Penne, and Richard Michell, Wardens of the Mistery of Girdlers, to the Mayor and Aldermen as being harnessed with tin and other false and worthless metal, declared to be lawful as being harnessed with good and serviceable metal, viz., latten "tynglasse," (fn. 16) and with but little tin intermixed.

Exon'acio Thome Radclyf civis et Pastler London'.

10 Sept., 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], Thomas Radclyf, "pastler," discharged by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Inquisicio capta sup' litus Thomisie apud Lymhosteys pro morte Thome Frank.

17 Aug, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417], inquest held before "les Lymehostes" within the liberty and franchise of the City, before Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the King's Escheator, as to the cause of the death of Thomas Franke, of Herewich, late steersman (conductor) or "lodysman" of a ship called "la Mary Knyght" of Danzsk in Prussia A jury sworn, viz., John Baille, Matthew Holme, Robert Marle, Henry Mark, Alexander Bryan, John Goby, Richard Hervy, Walter Steel, Peter West, Richard Stowell, John Dyse, and Walter Broun. They find that the said Thomas Franke was killed by falling on the sharp end of an anchor. (fn. 17)

Folio cc b.

L'ra d'ni Regis Maiori et Aldr'is miss'.

Letter from the King to the Mayor, &c., announcing the capture of the town of Caen and of the conditional surrender of its castle on the Feast of the Translation of St. Cuthbert [4 Sept.], "with right litell deth of oure peple." Dated at Caen, 5 Sept. [A.D. 1417]. (fn. 18)

L'ra ducis Clarencie miss' eisdem.

Letter from the Duke of Clarence to the same, notifying the capture of the town of Caen and that the castle of Caen was to be surrendered by the 19th Sept. unless succoured by the King of France or his eldest son or the Count "Darmaignak," (fn. 19) the Constable of France. John Risby, the bearer, would further inform them of the names of other towns, castles, and fortresses which had surrendered. From so favourable a beginning it appeared to the writer that the King would soon gain his end and victory over his enemies and rebels. Nothing was wanting but people to inhabit and safeguard the towns and fortresses that had been taken. Dated at Caen, 11 Sept. [A.D. 1417]. French. (fn. 20)

Proclamacio pro br'e de custum' etc.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation to the effect that whereas in the last Parliament held at Westminster (fn. 21) it was ordained that all merchant strangers should pay for subsidy 60s. on every sack of wool, 60s. on every 240 woolfells, and 106s. 8d. on every last of skins during the King's life, the King, perceiving that such a measure would prove detrimental to his subjects, now declared that all merchants in England might, for the next four years, pay such subsidy and custom on wool and other merchandise as they had been accustomed to pay before the passing of the above statute. Witness the King at Southampton, 17 July, 5 Henry V. [A.D. 1417].

Footnotes

1 'Memorials,' p. 645, where the editor has misread thus for thuo (i.e., two, denoting the hour). Cf. supra, p. 152, "be tweyne aftir none."
2 Supra, p. 126.
3 His will proved and enrolled in the Husting in 1415. 'Calendar of Wills,' ii. 407-8.
4 A hot bath room. The stews or bagnios in ancient Rome being used for vicious purposes, the name came to be applied to houses of ill fame.
5 All the above proceedings of the Common Council of the 20th April, 1417, are set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 647-51.
6 Thus far, the entry has been rewritten over an erasure, probably by direction of John Carpenter himself.
7 John Marchant was admitted and sworn "Clerk of the Chamber" in 1380 ('Cal. Letter-Book H.,' p. 163). He indirectly aided the rebels under Wat Tyler, by furnishing John Horne, the traitor Alderman, with a Royal Standard, under cover of which he rode out, as one having authority, to Blackheath to assure the rebels of a welcome in the City. The date of his appointment as Common Clerk (or Town Clerk) of the City is not recorded.
8 This again appears to be an interpolation by John Carpenter.
9 There was a baker named "Gur myn" burnt for heresy in 1415, and probably in the same fire as John Claydon, a skinner, but his Christian name is given in the Pipe Rolls as George (see Tyler's 'Memoirs of Henry V.,' ii. 394). On the other hand, it is recorded elsewhere (Cotton MS., 1 Julius, B. II., fo. 65 b) that the fellow sufferer with Claydon was Richard Baker, of Lombard Street (Kingsford's 'Chronicles,' pp. 69-70). Gregory ('Chron.,' p. 108) records the baker's name as Richard "Tur myn," and so does Foxe ('Acts and Monuments,' iii. 351, 375, 531).
10 The whole of the proceedings (with the exception of the names of the jurors, here supplied) are set out in Riley's 'Memorials,' pp. 630-33; but the editor, strangely enough, misreads the name of the heretic as "Surmyn."
11 Hust. Roll No. lxxxiv.
12 In the abstract of the will of Robert Odyham given in 'Calendar of Wills, Court of Husting, London' (ii. 407-8), the editor has inadvertently mentioned Johanna as the mother, instead of wife of the testator.
13 The letter is printed in Rymer's 'Fœdera' (ix. 306 7) under this date It is also set out (in English) in Riley's 'Memorials' (pp. 654-5), but the editor ascribes both this letter and the two letters to the Aldermen which immediately follow to the year 1417. It is to be noted that in 1415 the King had set sail for France on the 11th Aug., and in 1417 he landed for the second time in Normandy on the 1st Aug. See Kingsford's 'Henry V.,' pp. 127, 213.
14 Touques, a small fortified place not far from the modern Trouville, surrendered, after a brief siege, on the 9th Aug., 1417.
15 The first word puzzled the editor of the 'Memorials,' who prints the letter in full (p. 654). He suggests "komerys" to mean "comrades," whereas it plainly means no more than "comers." In the letters ad dressed by the City to the King on the 4th July (supra) the civic authorities ask for news "par les enter venauntz," i.e., by means of comers between The word has been cor rectly interpreted in the copy of the letter printed by the Rev. J. Endell Tyler in his 'Memoirs of Henry the Fifth' (ii. 215). This letter as well as the reply are set out by Jules Delpit, op. cit., pp. 219-20.
16 De auricalco tynglasse This appears to be the correct reading, and not "tyngbasse," as read by the editor of the 'Memorials' (p. 656).
17 'Memorials,' pp. 655-6.
18 'Memorials,' p. 657. Set out by Jules Delpit, op. cit., p. 220.
19 Bernard, Count of Armagnac, whose daughter was married to Charles of Orleans.
20 Set out by Jules Delpit, op. cit, pp. 220-21.
21 Sat from 19 Oct. to 20 Nov., 1416.