Folios 84-100
1430-32

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

116-134

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'Folios 84-100: 1430-32', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 116-134. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33715 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Folio 84.

Letter from the King to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commune of the City asking for a loan of 10,000 marks, that sum being more helpful to him in his present necessity than peradventure double or more would be at another time when his need were less. Dated at Rouen, 10 Nov. [A.D. 1430]. (fn. 1)

Custodia Joh'is filii David Galganet.

15 June, 6 Henry VI. [A.D. 1428], the guardianship of John, son of David Galganet, together with his patrimony, committed by John Gedney, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, to John de Marcanovo, merchant. Sureties, viz., Thomas Catworth, grocer, and William Rus, goldsmith.

Afterwards, viz., on the 14th Oct., 11 Henry VI. [A.D. 1432], came the above John de Marcanovo, and delivered to John Galganet his patrimony.

Folio 84 b.

Ordinacio contra fallaces probaciones ab antiquo usitat' unica manu nunc per Will'm Estfeld Maiorem et Aldr'os civitatis London' det'minat' est q'd quil't petens in aliqua bill' probacionis de cetero juret viitem manib.'

12 Feb., 8 Henry VI. [A.D. 1429-30], ordinance by the Common Council that thenceforth no one wishing to claim any property as his own by deed or gift of a defaulting debtor should do so by his own hand alone, (fn. 2) as hitherto accustomed, but should call at least six other trustworthy persons to support his claim; and further, that any one wishing to convey his goods to another for reasonable and just cause shall come into the Court of the lord the King or other public place before the Mayor and Recorder, or one of them, and at least one Alderman, and there make oath that the conveyance is not for the purpose of defeating his creditors, and the deed shall be placed on record. The grantee, in case the property should be afterwards attached as belonging to another, may then prove his ownership on oath by one hand only, as formerly accustomed, provided the property be not in the hands of the donor's wife (donatoris uxoris) or servant, when seven hands shall be necessary; or the ownership may be tried by a jury, if a plaintiff wishes to prove that the ownership was with the aforesaid donor (in prefato donante) at the time of attachment. No one shall be allowed to impugn the record enrolled of fraud or collusion, but the Mayor, Recorder, and Aldermen shall exercise caution before admitting a document for enrolment.

Folio 85.

Consil'is Billa missa fuit cuilibet Aldr'o.

Precept to the Aldermen to hold Wardmotes in their respective Wards, and refer such matters as they could not themselves redress to the General Court to be held by the Mayor at the Guildhall on Monday next after the Epiphany [6 Jan.] ; also to take steps for the preservation of the peace, for cleansing and lighting the streets, &c., and further to cause an election to be made of a certain number of freemen of their Wards to serve on the Common Council. Dated 12 Dec., 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1430].

Presentacio d'ni Tho'e Hore ad Cantariam Guyhalde.

Letter from Nicholas Wotton, the Mayor, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, to William [Grey], Bishop of London, presenting Thomas Hore, chaplain, for admission to one of the five chantries founded in the Chapel of the Blessed Mary near the Guildhall by Adam Fraunceys and Henry Frowyk, vacant by the resignation of Sir John Newenden. Dated 13 Jan., A.D. 1430[-1].

Exon'acio Ade Aleyn ab assisis.

26 Jan., 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1430-1], Adam Aleyn, "lynenwebbe," discharged by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Consi'le mandatum missum fuit cuil't Aldermanno.

Precept to the Aldermen to cause an armed watch to be kept in their several Wards on the nights and eves of St. John the Baptist [24 June] and the Apostles SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], and to take precautions against fire. Dated 12 June, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431].

Proclamacio jc'a erga Festu m Nat' Sc'i Joh'is Baptiste etc.

Precept for proclamation to be made forbidding vintners, taverners, cooks, &c., to keep their house open after 10 o'clock on the nights and eves of the above Festivals, or to open them before 6 o'clock in the morning, under penalty of fine and imprisonment.

Folio 85 b.

Custodia pueror' Rad'i Skynnard una cum ccc marcis eisdem legatis.

19 July, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], the guardianship of Henry, William, and Elizabeth, children of Ralph Skynnard, late skinner, together with their patrimony, committed by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, to Elizabeth, the orphans' mother, for a term of five years. Sureties, viz., Ralph Holand, John Olney, mercer, John Ray, and Hugh Somervyle, skinner.

Afterwards, viz., on the 18th March, 16 Henry VI. [A.D. 1437-8], came the above Henry, being then of full age, and acknowledged satisfaction for his patrimony.

Afterwards, viz., on the 18th July, 21 Henry VI. [A.D. 1443], came the above William, being then of full age, and similarly acknowledged satisfaction.

Afterwards, viz., on the 22nd March, 23 Henry VI. [A.D. 1444-5], came the above Henry and William before Henry Frowik, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for the patrimony of their sister Elizabeth, who when under age had entered religion and become professed in the monastery of the Virgin Mary and St. Bridget at Syon. (fn. 3)

Acquietacio Cam'ar' de omnib' terr' et ten' p'tin' Elizabet Turk.

17 July, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], came Edward Fitz Symond, esquire, who, with the consent of the Court, had married Elizabeth, one of the daughters of [blank] Turk, an orphan, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's property.

Custodia decem marcar' p'tinent' Joh'i filio Jacobi Bramptone.

15 June, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], the custody of the sum of 10 marks bequeathed to John, son of James Bramptone, by William Bramptone, father of the said James, committed by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, to Stephen Salman, draper. Sureties, viz., Elias Twier and William Rerysby, drapers, Nicholas Draytone, mercer, and Nicholas Gwillo, " upholder."

Folio 86.

Licencia Regis concessa Maiori et Cam'ar' ad distringend' pro quodam redditu quatuor marc' ad op' p'son' de Neugate.

Letters patent reciting that whereas it had been shown by John Carpenter, executor of Richard Whityngtone, that John Pulteney, knight, by will enrolled in the Husting on Monday before the Feast of St. Luke [18 Oct.], 23 Edward III. [A.D. 1349], (fn. 4) had granted certain lands and tenements to the Master and Chaplains of the Chapel of Corpus Christi, near the Church of St. Laurence de Candelwykstrete, on condition that they paid 4 marks annually, in manner prescribed, to the prisoners in Neugate; that this sum had continued to be paid until the prison was rebuilt in accordance with the will of the said Richard, but had now ceased owing to the testament of the said Richard giving no power of distress-the King, therefore, with the assent of Parliament, (fn. 5) hereby authorizes the Mayor and Chamberlain for the time being to distrain the above 4 marks whenever necessary. Witness Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Warden of England, at Westminster, 12 Jan., 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1430-1].

Folio 86 b.

Concessio fact' Joh'i Carpenter de domo etc.

Lease granted by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the whole Commonalty of the City, to John Carpenter junior, Clerk of the Commonalty of the City, and Katherine his wife, of a parcel of land and ancient shops in the parish of St. Peter de Cornhill, in the Ward of Lime Street, situate between the garden of the lord de la Zouche (fn. 6) and a tenement belonging to the said church of St. Peter on the east side, and nine shops which Thomas Moisaunt, " carpenter," lately built, and a close called "le Tymberhawe" (fn. 7) on the west; to hold the same for a term of 80 years, at an annual rent for the first 30 years of a red rose at Midsummer, if demanded, and of 20s. yearly for the rest of the term. Dated 23 Feb., 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1430-1].

De x marc' concess' ad Ricardum Bridlyngtone.

Grant by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty to Ralph Holand, John Bederenden, John Carpenter, Thomas Knolles junior, William Holgrave, Richard Osbarn, John Birker, Thomas Osbarn, Robert Fenescalles, Thomas Suttone, and John Olney of an annual rent of 10 marks charged on the lands and tenements of the Commonalty, in trust to pay the same to Richard, son of Thomas Brydlyngtone, late tailor, for life. Dated 15 April, 7 Henry VI. [A.D. 1429].

Folio 87.

Una toga de lib'ata Maioris concessa Thome Bridlyngtone ad t'minum vite.

The same day the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty agreed that the above Richard Bridlyngton should receive during his lifetime, yearly at Christmas, from the Chamberlain for the time being, a gown of the suit and livery of the Serjeants of the Mayor and of the Chamber.

Concessio wharvi Sc'i Pauli fact' Decano et Capit lo pro xs. per ann.

Grant by William Estfeld, the Mayor, and the Commonalty, to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, of the City's deserted wharf situate in the parish of St. Benedict near to the wharf belonging to the said Dean and Chapter; (fn. 8) to hold the same on a renewable lease for a term of 99 years, with the view to the said wharves being rebuilt with a free course for water descending to the river, at an annual rent of 10s. Dated 28 Sept., 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1430].

Folio 87 b.

P' sentacio d'ni Rothelandi Archebaude ad unam cantariam in eccl'ia S'ci Swithini.

Letter under the Mayoralty seal from Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and John Simond the Recorder, to William [Gray], Bishop of London, presenting Rotheland Archebaude of the Diocese of Worcester, chaplain, for admission to the chantry at the altar of SS. Katherine and Margaret in the Church of St. Swithin, founded by Roger Depham, late Alderman, and vacant by the death of Walter Pacy, the last chaplain. (fn. 9) Dated 15 July, A.D. 1431.

Exoneracio Ferronum ab assisis Juratis etc.

1 June, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], precept issued by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, for certain reasons [not specified], to the Sheriffs and their officers, to abstain in future from summoning any ironmongers (ferrones), called horse-farriers (marescallos equorum), to serve on juries, &c., except in cases of urgent necessity.

Acquitaunce fait as m'chauntz Damieux.

Acquittance by the above Mayor for the sum of 50 marks received from Jaquot Clabout, merchant of Amiens, pursuant to the "composition" made between the City and merchants of Amiens, Corby, and Neel. Dated 20 July, A.D. 1431.

Exon'acio Thome "Beaumount."

27 Oct., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], Thomas "Bemond," salter, discharged by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio 88.

Custodia Matild' filie Joh'is Walter.

14 July, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], the guardianship of Matilda, daughter of John Walter, late "pouchemaker," together with her patrimony, committed by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, for a term of five years to William Newham, who married Alice, the orphan's mother. Sureties, viz., Richard Panter, William Elfem, and John Champeney.

Custodia Joh'is filii Joh'is Hauk etc.

22 Feb., 7 Henry VI. [A.D. 1428-9], the guardianship of John, son of John Hauk, late "irmonger" (William, Johanna, and Clemence, other children of the said John, being dead), together with his patrimony, committed by Henry Bartone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, until the said orphan shall come to full age, to Richard Lyndesay, scrivener, who married Agnes, the orphan's mother. Sureties, viz., Thomas Bataille, mercer, Richard Grove, "armurer," and Martin Aleyn, " letherseller."

Transmutacio Ric'i Davy ab arte de Peyntours in artem de Steynours.

15 Sept., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], came Richard Davy, of co. Gloucester, painter, before Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that, whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the art of Painters (Pictorum) temp. Thomas Fawconer, Mayor, and John Proffyt, Chamberlain, viz., on the 15th May, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], he had long used, and was now using, the mistery or art of "Steynours," as the Masters and others of the art of Painters testified. (fn. 10) He prayed, therefore, to be admitted into the freedom of the City in the art of "Steynours." His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the said art, viz., William Hygyne, Edmund Hermer, William Gynore, Thomas Fynyngham, William Edward, Simon Taillour, and others [not named].

Folio 88 b.

Collectorib' quint'.

Letters patent directed to Robert Otteley, grocer, John Paddesley, goldsmith, Robert Marschall, grocer, and William Cantelowe, mercer, bidding them summon four men from each Ward to levy the subsidy granted in the last Parliament. (fn. 11) Witness Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Warden of England, at Westminster, 22 Sept., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431].

Precept under the Mayoralty seal to the Aldermen to cause good men in their several Wards to be elected for the purpose of levying the above subsidy. Dated 24 Oct., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431].

Permutacio cum uno capellanor' Gihalde.

Letter from Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, to Robert [Fitz Hugh], Bishop of London, presenting John Love, Rector of the parish church of "Aspylegyse," (fn. 12) in the diocese of Lincoln, for admission to one of the five chantries founded by Adam Fraunceys and Henry Frowik in the chapel of the Blessed Mary, near the Guildhall, in place of John Leget, who exchanges benefice. Dated 4 Oct., A.D. 1431.

Folio 89.

Presentacio d'ni Joh'is Melford capell'i ad cantar' in eccl' ia Sc'i Pauli London.'

Letter from Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, presenting John Melford, chaplain of the diocese of Ely, for admission to the chantry of Sir Henry de Guldeford, called "le Marescall," clerk, at the altar of the Apostles in the church of St. Paul, vacant by the resignation of Sir William Bovetone, the last chaplain there. Dated 16 March, A.D. 1430[-1].

Eleccio Joh'is Atherle et Steph'i Broun vic'.

Friday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], in the presence of Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, John Symond, the Recorder, Thomas Knolles, William Crowmere, Thomas Fauconer, John Gedney, Ralph Bartone, John Welles, Robert Whityngham, John Perneys, Simon Seman, Henry Frowik, John Paddesle, Stephen Broun, Robert Large, and William Melreth, Aldermen, Walter Chertesey, one of the Sheriffs, and very many Commoners, summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs, John Atherle was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and Stephen Broun was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day John Bederenden, draper, was elected Chamberlain; Robert Colbrook, "irmonger," and William Trymnell, mercer, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; and Robert Ottele and Robert Large, Aldermen, Robert Bamburgh, Richard Nordon, Philip Malpas, and Thomas Bernwell, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the said Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented and admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Eleccio Joh'is Welles Maioris London'.

Saturday the Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], in the presence of Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, John Symond, the Recorder, the Prior of Christchurch, Thomas Knolles, William Crowmere, Henry Bartone, Thomas Fauconer, John Gedney, William Estfeld, Ralph Bartone, John Perneys, Robert Whityngham, John Welles, Nicholas James, Simon Seman, Henry Frowik, John Brokle, Thomas Wandesford, Robert Ottele, John Paddesle, Stephen Broun, Robert Large, and William Melreth, Aldermen, John Atherle, one of the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor, John Welles was elected Mayor for the year ensuing.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Transmutacio Joh'is Beket ab arte de Tymbermonger in Misteram de Stokfisshmonger.

1 Oct., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], came John Wodman, alias Beket, " tymbermonger," before Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that, whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the art of "Tymbermonger" temp. William Crowmere, Mayor, and John Bederendene, Chamberlain, viz., on the 3rd Nov., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], he had long used, and was now using, the art of "Stokfisshmonger," and not that of "Tymbermonger." He prayed, therefore, that he might be admitted into the freedom of the City in the art of "Stokfisshmonger." His prayer granted.

Folio 89 b.

"Browderers."

On the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 10 Henry VI. A.D. 1431], came good men of the Mistery of "Brouderers" before Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, in the great Chamber (la graund Chambre) of the Guildhall, and prayed that certain articles for the regulation of their Mistery might be approved. (fn. 13) Their prayer granted.

26 Nov., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], John Caundisshe and John Mounselle sworn Masters of the above Mistery.

Folio 90.

Ordenaunces pur Neugate et les prisonners eyns.

23 Feb., 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1430-1], ordinances made by the Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs, and Commonalty in Common Council assembled for guarding and governing the gate of Neugate, lately rebuilt out of the goods of the late noble merchant Richard Whityngtone, to the following effect:-

First, that in order to diminish the number of officers in the Compters and in Ludgate and Neugate who waste the alms of the poor prisoners, and also to curtail the charges made by porters of the Compters, it is decreed that thenceforth all prisoners who wished and ought to live by the common alms of the people should not remain in a Compter for more than a day and a night, but should be removed by the Sheriffs and their clerks to the said gate, (fn. 14) there to remain as prisoners until lawfully delivered, viz., freemen of the City and other honest persons in the chambers which have chimneys and privies near the Hall and fountain on the north part of the prison, and the free and other honest women in the like chambers on the south; that strangers (foreins) and others of inferior condition shall occupy less convenient chambers, whilst felons and others suspected of great crimes be safeguarded in the basement cells and strongholds on the south part of the prison, and not allowed any intercourse with other prisoners.

Also, whereas the common people suffer from the importunity of a number of persons daily soliciting alms for the prisoners, who profit little thereby owing to the large payment demanded by those so soliciting, it is decreed that in future only two couples of prisoners should solicit alms, one by the river side and the other on land, each couple having a box and saucer so marked that they may be recognized as belonging to the prison.

Also, whereas the Keepers of the prisoners and their servants often appropriate the alms given to the prisoners, it is ordained that the said boxes be sealed by one of the Sheriffs or the Chamberlain for the time being, and that their contents be used for paying the collectors and buying food and other necessaries for the prisoners every month or quarter of a year under the supervision of one of the Sheriffs, the Chamberlain, or some other trustworthy person appointed by the said Sheriff and Chamberlain.

Also, it is forbidden that any officer or servant of the prison sell any manner of victual, charcoal, candles, &c. (except beer, in manner as prescribed), but the prisoners may buy their victuals where they please; (fn. 15) and that no officer, under colour of his rent, take more for "le Tappehous" than in the old gaol, as that would be contrary to the expressed intention of the founders of the new gaol.

Folio 90 b.

Also, it is decreed that no Keeper or servant of the prison shall prevent any free man or woman from having and using their own bed, if they have one, without any charge, nor shall they take more than a penny a night for a bed with blankets and sheets, as is done at hostelries, nor more than a penny a week for a couch, or more than fourpence towards the maintenance of the prison lamps for the whole time the prisoner may be there, and if it happen that such things be provided by some charitable person, the Keeper or his servant shall charge nothing.

Also, inasmuch as the said prison is sufficiently strong, it is ordered that the Keeper and his officers shall not put any free man or woman in irons, if imprisoned for a debt of less than 100s., on their finding surety (seurte) (fn. 16) for good behaviour; but in graver cases the Keeper may take a reasonable fee (suette) for removing irons, as accustomed in other prisons of the King.

Also, it is ordained that the Keeper or any of his officers shall not take for the delivery of any prisoner, unless committed for felony, more than eightpence, and in case of felony more than 2s., provided always that no one committed by the Mayor, Aldermen, or Sheriffs for punishment shall pay anything for lamps, couches, fees, or suettes at his coming in or going out.

Also, inasmuch as the basements and dark places often cause infection, it is ordained that the Keeper and his officers shall allow all freemen of the City and other honest persons, on their finding sufficient surety (seurte) for good behaviour, to go every day, at convenient times, for devotion and recreation to the Chapel and the two spacious and well-lighted chambers on each side of the Chapel, and the women to the large chamber near the Hall on the south side, without demanding any payment, but desiring them to pray devoutly for the souls of the said Richard Whityngtone and Alice his wife. Provided always that, inasmuch as the repairs of the said gate belong to the Keeper for the time being, no one shall occupy a tower or chamber in a tower, nor be allowed to walk on the leads or in the passages (en les aleins) of the said gate, unless he come to some reasonable agreement with the Keeper to contribute towards such repairs.

Also, whereas by charter the custody of the said gate, as of all other gates and posterns of the City, appertains to the Mayor [Aldermen] and Commons, it is ordained that the Keeper be yearly elected, and that he find surety (seurte) for the Sheriffs for safeguarding the prisoners, and also find surety for the Chamberlain for carrying into execution the above articles.

Folio 91.

12 March, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1430-1], the custody of the sum of £30 13s. 4d. bequeathed to Elias, son of Margaret Cliderowe, "silkwoman," deceased, by his said mother, committed by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, to Matthew Fouchere, mercer, to hold in trust until the said orphan shall come of age. Sureties, viz., John Olney, William Cavendisshe, Robert Damyon, and Thomas Tikhyll, mercers.

Translacio Joh'is Bartholomewe "haburdascher."

2 Jan., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431-2], came John Bartholomewe, haberdasher, before John Welles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of Haberdashers temp. Robert Chichele, Mayor, and John Bederendene, Chamberlain, viz., on the 12th Nov., 9 Henry V. [A.D. 1421], he had for long time past used, and was still using, the mistery or art of Powchemakers and not that of Haberdashers. He prayed, therefore, that he might be admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art or Mistery of Powchemakers. His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the latter Mistery.

Fos. 91-91 b.

De pace inter Angliam et Franciam.

Writ to the Sheriffs to proclaim the terms of a peace between England and France touching friendly intercourse with Flanders, (fn. 17) a copy of which is set out. Witness the King at Westminster, 30 July, 4 Henry VI. [A.D. 1426].

[Folios. 92-93 blank.]

Folio 93 b.

Br'e contra Lollardos.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for stringent measures to be taken against Lollards, and for putting a stop to their seditious publications. (fn. 18) Witness Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Warden of England, at Westminster, 13 May, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431].

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation for all soldiers in the King's service who were to proceed to France in the retinue of William de Clynton, Knt., and Thomas Tunstall, Knt., to muster at the place appointed before 10 o'clock on Wednesday next, under penalty of forfeiting horse and harness, and imprisonment of their persons. Witness Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Warden of England, at Westminster, 24 April, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431].

Folio 94.

Precept to the Aldermen to hold their respective Wardmotes, and to report such matters as they could not themselves remedy to the General Court to be held at the Guildhall on Monday after the Epiphany [6 Jan.]. Defaulters to be fined fourpence for the benefit of the Guildhall. They are, further, to take steps to prevent night-walking without lights and the wearing of masks; and for lighting the streets and the preservation of the peace. (fn. 19) [No date.]

Arbitrium fact' int' partes.

14 June, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], agreement concluded by decree of the Mayor and Aldermen between John Bedham, junior, and Beatrix his wife, widow of Richard Gosselyn, late "irmonger," on the one part, and John Weston, of co. Southampton, Thomas White, and John Gretyng, executors of the said Richard, on the other, touching the amount due to the said Beatrix by way of "reasonable part" (fn. 20) of her late husband's goods, and also to her seven children by the said Richard. (fn. 21)

Folio 94 b.

De securitate debit' Cam'ar'.

21 Jan., 9 [sic] (fn. 22) Henry VI. [A.D. 1431-2], record of proceedings in the Common Council touching the reception to be given to the King in the City on his return from France after his coronation. On consulting the Chamberlain's accounts it was found that there was not sufficient money in the Treasury to provide for his reception and to complete the rebuilding of certain tenements in the parish of St. Peter de Cornhill, near "le Ledenhall"; moreover, a poll tax for the purpose would be a great hardship, inasmuch as the City had become impoverished by the war, and the Commonalty in Common Council had ordered that a sum of £1,000 should be levied by poll as a present for the King on his arrival, and that a new livery should be provided in his honour at their own expense. Whereupon John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, undertook to advance the money required out of his own purse, on receiving sufficient security for its repayment. Thereupon the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty granted to him the issues and profits of the Common Beam or City Tron, let to ferm to Richard Burtone, and also of the City's tenements in the parishes of St. Botolph, near Billyngesgate, and St. Peter de Cornhill, until the money shall have been repaid. They further granted that the said Chamberlain should for ever be discharged from serving any office in the City.

A deed of security for repayment of the money advanced to the City by John Bederendene, the Chamberlain. Dated 21 Jan., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431-2].

Folio 95.

De orphano.

10 June, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], the executors of Richard Gosselyn, late "irmonger," and Alderman, (fn. 23) bring into court before the Mayor and Aldermen the sum of £480 left by the said Richard to be divided among his six children, viz., John, Thomas, Richard, Nicholas, Johanna, and Katherine; but upon it being shown that after the death of the testator another child named Robert was born, the court ordered that the money should be increased to £500, and that Robert should receive an equal share with the rest.

24 Jan., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431-2], the guardianship of John, Thomas, Richard, Nicholas, Johanna, Katherine, and of Robert (aged 3 years), children of the above Richard Gosselyn, together with the sum of £400 (part of the sum of £500 ordered by the Mayor and Aldermen), committed by John Welles, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, to John Bedham, who married Beatrix, widow of Richard Gosselyn, to keep the same in trust until Easter, A.D. 1437. Sureties, viz., Thomas Badby, William Childe, John Astone, Thomas Westone, William Beaufitz, fishmongers, William Combes, "wolman," and John Sutton, junior, goldsmith.

Afterwards, viz., on the 10th July, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1442], came Thomas and John, sons of the above Richard Gosselyn, being of full age, and acknowledged they had received from John Chichele, the Chamberlain, the sum of £500 left to them by their father.

Folio 95 b.

Exon'acio Simonis Heryng ab assisis.

29 March, 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1432], Simon Heryng, "pewtrer," discharged by John Welles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Consi'lis billa miss' cuilibet Aldr'o.

Precept under the Mayoralty seal to the Aldermen to cause an assessment to be made in their several Wards for levying a third of a fifteenth, and to deliver the money at the Guildhall by the 10th April next. Dated 22 March, 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431-2].

A letter [from the Mayor?] touching citizens dwelling outside the City sharing its burdens:-

Consi'les l're misse fuerunt divers' civib' exa civitat' manent' quor' no'ia patent in Camera de recordo.

"Right dere and Welbeloved we grete yowe well and late yow wite that where amonges other lib'tees and fraunchises of oure Cite which both we and ye be streitlich sworn to kepe and observe it is conceyned [sic] that all maner fre men of the said Cite wheither they duelle withynne the Cite or without shull be in lott and scotte and perteners to all maner charges of the Cite whan thei be duly requyred on peyne of losse of their said fraunchise. And al be it that be cause of youre continuel duellyng out of the Cite ye mowe nor can not be demed in trouth pertener in lott of such offices as we and other neighbours of oures dailich bere to oure grete charge withynne the Cite, yet on trust of eese and supportac'on that ye mowe do to the Cite in tyme to come ye be forborne and disported theroffe as for a while. But as nowe late amonges other of youre degree and condic'on ye be scotted and assessed in the some of xx lftoward the reparac'on of the walles and clensyng of the diches of the Cite whiche ben in grete perill and ruine. Wherefor we require yow be these l'res in especial that withoute excusac'on or delay ye brynge or sende un to us be the xx day of May now next folwyng the said xx lfor elles without doubte after thentent and special request of all the co'es made un to us bothe in their last co'e counseill and many tymes afore we shull procede to discharge yow of youre fredom as the custume and fraunchise of the Cite asketh and as it hath also be desired for diverse stiles (?) be the lordes of the Kynges Counseill that we shulde do in many parlementes and Counseills here to fore god knowith, which have yow in his kepyng Wreten at London the xxix tday of March."

13 Dec., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], order by John Welles, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty in Common Council assembled, that Thomas Donyngtone, one of the ancient Serjeants of the Chamber, shall have an annuity of 40s. and his clothing or livery of the same suit as the rest of the said Serjeants.

The same day the Commonalty complained that hostelers and other retailers of beer had not ceased to infringe orders made temp. Nicholas Wottone, the last Mayor, in spite of penalties and amercements, and prayed that heavier penalties might be ordained.

Folio 96.

Ordinacio per Maiorem et co'itat' fact' pro vendic' servicie.

An ordinance made accordingly, inflicting various penalties for breaking the assize. The said ordinance to come into force on the Feast of the Purification [2 Feb.] next ensuing.

Q'd indictat' in una Warde non recipiatur in alia.

Also it was ordained that whenever any suspect person came to take up his or her residence within a Ward the Constables, Beadles, or other officers of the Ward should make inquiries as to whence they come, and if they prove to have been charged with bad conduct, and are unwilling to give surety for good behaviour, that they be warned to quit the Ward within three or four days, under pain of imprisonment.

Folio 96 b.

Letter from the merchants, echevins, and inhabitants of Paris to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen of London, informing them of their having addressed a letter to the King of England-a copy of which is forwarded-complaining of the unhappy condition of their city since his departure, surrounded as it was by enemies, and praying him to cause the walls and fortresses of "Laigny" (fn. 24) and other towns to be levelled to the ground, otherwise they could not see how he would remain master of the realm; and, further, to mete out justice to his enemies, and not barter with them, a method which only encourages war, and is damnable in the sight of God, and contrary to reason. [No date.] The writers proceed to ask the civic authorities to use their influence with the King to induce him to accede to their wishes. Dated at Paris ...... March [A.D. 1432]. (fn. 25)

Folio 97-97 b.

Br'e de subsidio Regi concesso.

Letters patent appointing the Mayor, William Crowemer, Henry Bartone, and John Symond, or three of them, to make inquiry on oath as to all manors, lands, and tenements within the City and suburbs held by knight service; and to make a return of the names of such tenants as hold an entire knight's fee, or less, down to a tenth of a knight's fee, with the view of levying the subsidy of 20s. granted the King on the knight's fee or £20 rental by the last Parliament. (fn. 26) Witness Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Warden of England, at Westminster, 12 April, 9 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431].

Folio 98.

Officium Balliagii aquar' Thames' et Medewaye conc' Joh'i Houghton cum cs.

14 Dec., 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431], William Talworth, bailiff, and under-conservator of the waters of the Thames and Medway, allowed by John Welles, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty in Common Council assembled, to retire from office, owing to infirmity, retaining a pension of 4 marks out of his salary of 100s., and John Houghton appointed in his place, with the balance of the said sum of 100s. for his salary, so long as the said William Talworth continued to live; but upon remonstrance being made by the Duke of Gloucester (at whose instance the said John Houghton had been appointed) the full salary of 100s. was granted.

Br'e pro Rege Dacie.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation of an ordinance made in the Parliament held at Westminster, anno 8 Henry VI., (fn. 27) to the effect that merchants and others visiting Norway must not land elsewhere than at the town of Northbarn, where the King of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden had established his staple, promising merchants the same advantages as they enjoyed in the Hanse towns. Witness the King at Westminster, 1 March, 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1431-2]. (fn. 28)

Folio 98 b.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the proclamation of a statute made in the last Parliament re-establishing a statute passed anno 21 Richard II., but revoked anno 1 Henry IV., to the effect that all vessels, excepting fishing boats, coming to Calais shall carry ballast of stone, to be used for maintaining "le Bekenes" outside the harbour and the place called "Paradys" near the foss of the said town, under penalty of paying 2d. per ton; also that all ships entering "Paradys" to lie up shall pay 4d., for which sum they might stay four days and four nights, and that any vessel attached by cable or cord to the said "Bekenes" or "Paradys," or to the new quay otherwise called "querf," shall be made to pay 40d. (fn. 29) Witness the King at Westminster, 20 July, 10 Henry VI. [A.D. 1432].

[Folios. 99, 99 b blank.]

Folio 100.

Folio 100 b.

The Marks of the following Coopers.

Thomas Rolf, John Norys, Richard Mosehech, Robert Hynton, Thomas Pope, John Frebarn, John Beche, Thomas Balle, Walter Taylour, Richard Partriche, Henry (?) Langshot, William Bytham, William Danvers, John Heyward, John Saundre, John Englissh, Richard Fleccher, Robert Faren, William Baker, John Longe, junior, Thomas Attewell, Richard Banastre, John Fox, Simon Dame, Matthew Barbour, John Plomer, Edmund Lete, John Abbot by John Pertriche Gard' [Guardian ?], Simon Caryngtone, Robert Hewet, Henry Longe, John Bracher, Richard Hardgood, Hugh Soper, Richard Rauf, Richard Bartone, Simon Leem obiit, Christopher Lute, William Baret, Robert Fleccher, Thomas Rigman, Richard Wrenne, Thomas Fraunceys, William Swift, John Bacheler, William Auncell, Richard Baldok.

Footnotes

1 Set out in 'London and the Kingdom,' iii. 372-4.
2 In other words, his own testimony on oath, without corroboration, would no longer be deemed sufficient. Cf. 'Liber Albus,' i. 521; 'Cal. Letter-Book G,' pp. 73, 128; 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 402; Bateson, 'Borough Customs' (Selden Soc.), i. 184.
3 This convent was particularly favoured by the City, the Mayor and Aldermen paying it an annual visit at what was known as "the pardon time of Sion," in the month of August. In return for the hospitality bestowed by the lady abbess on these occasions, the Court of Aldermen occasionally made her presents of wine. See 'London and the Kingdom,' i. 391 n.
4 See 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust.,' i. 609.
5 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 370-1.
6 Stow mentions a messuage or tenement on Cornhill as having belonged to Lord Zouch, on the site of which a house was afterwards erected, with a high tower that overlooked the City, by Richard Wethell or Whethill, a merchant-taylor ('Survey,' Kingsford's ed., i. 151).
7 An enclosed place for storing timber. There was a similar close belonging to John Wolfey in the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate ('Cal. of Wills,' ii. 385). Cf. "Timberhithe," in the parish of St. Mary Somerset (Stow, 'Survey,' ii. 10).
8 Paul's Wharf.
9 See 'Calendar Letter-Book I,' pp. 129n., 171.
10 It is to be noted that the Painters and the Stainers originally formed distinct Guilds. At the present day they form but one Company, known as "Painters, otherwise Painter Stainers." Stow, however, writes that of old time they were called Painter Stainers, "but now [i.e., at the close of the sixteenth century] that workmanship of stayning is departed out of use in England" ('Survey,' Kingsford's ed., ii. 3-4).
11 The Parliament which met on the 22nd Sept., 1429.
12 Aspley-Guise, co. Beds.
13 The articles (which chiefly relate to the election and duties of the Masters) are more than a century older than anything mentioned in the return made by the Company to the Commission on the City Livery Companies of 1884.
14 In or about 1393 it was ordained (inter alia) that prisoners in certain cases might remain in the Compters, on terms, instead of being removed to Newgate or Ludgate. See 'Liber Albus,' i. 523. Cf. 'Letter-Book H, fo. cclxxxvi b.
15 By an ordinance of 1393 it appears that Porters, &c., of Compters might sell any kind of provisions, including beer, at a reasonable price and by measure (sinoun par mesure et a resonable pris). See 'Liber Albus,' i. 523. It is to be noted, however, that the same ordinance as recorded in 'Letter-Book H,' fo. cclxxxvi b, from which the record in 'Liber Albus' purports to have been transcribed, omits altogether the closing words sinoun, &c. Cf. infra, fo. 141.
16 In the ordinance of 1393 the word is suwette, the editor of the 'Liber Albus' (i. 524, ii. 217) translating this word as "surety," whilst interpreting suetz as "customary fees." It is doubtful, however, if such a distinction is correct, more especially as we find here the Fr. seurte for "surety" more than once. See. article on 'Suete de Prisone,' and its correct interpretation, by R. Stewart-Brown, in English Hist. Review, vol. xxiv. pp. 506-10.
17 See Rymer's 'Fodera,' x. 367-8.
18 The "political" Lollards were attempting to raise a rebellion, under the leadership of one styling himself Jack Sharpe, for the purpose of confiscating and appropriating the temporalities of the Church, as had been suggested in 1410. He was captured at or near Oxford a few days after the issue of this writ, and was drawn, hanged, and quartered, his head being set up on London Bridge. Gregory, p. 172; 'Chron. Lond.,' p. 119; Fabyan, p. 602.
19 Unlike former precepts since 1423, this precept contains no order for the election of members to sit on the Common Council. See 'Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 90 n.
20 By the custom of London, a freeman's personal estate was, on his death, divided into three parts, whereof one third went to his wife, another to his children, and the residue was at his own disposal. The shares of the wife and children were called their "reasonable" or "legitimate" part, to recover which there was at common law a writ de rationabili parte bonorum. See Pollock and Maitland, 'Hist. of English Law,' ii. 347 et seq.
21 The will of Richard Gosselyn, dated 26 April, 1428, was proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting in June, 1433. Only six children are mentioned in the will, viz., John, Thomas, Richard, Nicholas, Johanna, and Katherine. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 464-5. It will be seen (infra, p. 130) that a child named Robert was born after the testator's death.
22 Nono by mistake for decimo.
23 Castle Baynard Ward.
24 Lagny-sur-Marne.
25 Set out by Delpit, pp. 248-50.
26 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 369. This complicated grant of land and income tax, which it was found impossible to collect, was annulled in the next Parliament. Ibid., iv. 409.
27 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 347-8: Stat. 8 Hen. VI., cap. ii. Cf. writ dated 13 May, 7 Hen. VI. [A.D. 1429], supra, p. 99. The statute was repealed by Stat. 1 Hen. VIII., cap. i.
28 Rymer, 'Fodera,' x. 503-4.
29 'Statutes at Large,' i. 435, 437, 567; 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 405.