Folios 151-160
Oct 1435 -

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

192-204

Citation Show another format:

'Folios 151-160: Oct 1435 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 192-204. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33721 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Folio 151.

Memorandum of an assay made of the King's measures by the City's standards at the Guildhall on Thursday after the Feast of St. Gregory [12 March], anno 14 [Edward II., A.D. 1320-1]. (fn. 1)

Eleccio Henrici Frowyk Maioris London.'

Thursday the Feast of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435], in the presence of Robert Otlee, the Mayor, John Symond the Recorder, the Prior of Christchurch, John Reynwell, John Gedney, William Estfeld, John Welles, John Brokle, Henry Frowyk, John Pattesle, Stephen Broun, Thomas Chaltone, William Milreth, John Hatherle, Thomas Catworth, Robert Cloptone, Ralph Holand, William Gregory, John Michell, Robert Large, Thomas Bernewell, and John Olney, Aldermen, Robert Cloptone and Thomas Catworth, Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Henry Frowyk was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast he was presented, accepted, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 151 b.

The Ordenaunce of Turnours.

7 Oct., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435], a bill presented to the Mayor and Aldermen by John White and John Hendon, Wardens of the craft of Turners, complaining of divers "foreins" making certain measures, viz., "Bussheltrees," "half busshel trees," and "pekkes," with "sappe" and green timber, and selling them by wholesale and retail within the City to freemen as well as "foreins" as truly wrought of dry and "clonghe" (fn. 2) timber; which measures, when sealed and put to use and are "clong," are deficient in measure to the extent sometimes of a quart in a bushel. They pray, therefore, that the Wardens of the Craft for the time being may have the search and oversight of all such measures brought into the City by "foreins" before they be put to sale, to see that they be not made of green timber nor "sappy," but well "clonge" and dry. They further pray that certain places may be assigned to such "foreins" where they may sell their "chaffare" and nowhere else. Their prayer granted, one of the houses under the Mayor's Court or Chambers at "Theldhall" being so assigned until further order.

Folio 152

Pro gardimote.

Precept to the Aldermen to hold their several Wardmotes, and to report such matters as they themselves cannot remedy to the General Court to be held by the Mayor at the Guildhall on Monday after the Epiphany [6 Jan.]; and further, to take steps for the preservation of the peace, the cleansing of the streets, &c., and cause a certain number of powerful and discreet men of their Ward to be returned to the Common Council. Dated under the Mayoralty seal, 8 Dec. [A.D. 1435].

14 Dec., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435], came Richard, son of William Waldern, late mercer, and acknowledged that he had received from John Chichele, the Chamberlain, by the hands of Thomas Donyngton, certain rents due to him.

Folio 152 b.

23 Jan., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435-6], William Munde, "talghchaundeller," discharged by Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Letter under their official seals from Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, and Alexander Anne the Recorder, to the Keeper of the Spiritualities of the Bishopric of London, sede vacante, (fn. 3) presenting Thomas Croxby, a chaplain of the diocese of Lincoln, for admission to the chantry of Roger Depham, late Alderman, at the altar of SS. Katherine and Margaret in the church of St. Swithin, vacant by the death of Sir Rotheland Archebaud. Dated 9 Feb., A.D. 1435[-6].

Exon'acio Will'i "Marowe" ab ass'.

20 April, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], William "Mawere," "taillour," discharged by Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his constant attention to the poor mad inmates of the Hospital of St. Mary de Bedlem without Bisshopesgate.

23 May, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], Sir John Paslewe, chaplain, John Wokkyng, vintner, and William Morys, fishmonger, executors of John Seynt John, ordered by the Mayor and Aldermen to bring into Court the sum of £258 due to Thomas, son of the said John Seynt John, before the 19th June.

Folio 153-155.

Extract from the King's Remembrancer Roll, Michaelmas Term, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435], recording proceedings taken against Henry Frowyk, the Mayor [similar to those recorded supra, pp. 184-6, as having been taken against Robert Otteley], for refusing to take a supplementary oath before the Barons of the Exchequer for the due observance of the statute touching weights and measures passed anno 11 Henry VI. The City's case stated by Alexander Anne the Recorder. Cur. ad. vult. A day given, viz., up to the quinzaine of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], for Henry Frowyk to hear judgment.

Folio 155.

Custodia liberi Nich'i Warner.

17 Sept., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435], the guardianship of Thomas, son of Nicholas Warner, late grocer, committed by Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, and the Aldermen to Richard Onhand, draper, for a term of seven years. Sureties, viz., Thomas Hardyng, draper, and Thomas Onhand, mercer.

Folio 155 b.

Custodia Joh'is lib'i Nich'i Warner.

17 Sept., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435], the guardianship of John, son of Nicholas Warner, similarly committed to William Bothe, grocer, for a term of seven years. Sureties, viz., Thomas Canynges and John Luttour, grocers.

15 Feb., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435-6], came William Morys, John Knot, John Wokkyng, and Thomas Kyng into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into a bond with John Chichele, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 800 marks for the production in Court of William Morys and John Wokkyng, executors of John Seynt John, on Friday the 24th Feb., to answer for money due to Thomas, son of the said John Seynt John.

Folio 156.

Letters patent appointing Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, William Cheyne, John Fray, Alexander Anne, William Estfeld, John Brokley, John Throkmerton, Robert Whytyngham, Thomas Walsyngham, and the Sheriffs to be Commissioners for assessing in the City the subsidy granted by the last Parliament, (fn. 4) viz., 2s. 6d. on an income of 100s.; 6d. in the pound up to £100; 8d. in the pound over £100 and up to £400; and 2s. in the pound over £400. (fn. 5) Witness the King at Westminster, 29 Jan., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435-6].

Folio 156 b.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, pursuant to the above, by oath of the following men of each Ward, viz.:-

Aldrichgate: John Stakkendene, John Werke, Thomas Longe, and William Moubray.

Crepulgate: Thomas Martyn, John Worsope, William Taverner, and Thomas Wright.

Farndone Within: John Huberd, Thomas Knovile, William Couper, and Thomas Reyner.

Farndone Without: William Auntrous, William Peper, John Hurloke, and James Knyght.

Bredstret: Thomas Stalbrok, Richard Vyncent, Thomas Cressy, and John Ingram.

Baynardescastel: John Fulborne, John Style, Hugh Dene, and John Sygor.

Quenhithe: Antony Astell, William Groos, and Rouland Caundisshe.

Vintry: William Abraham, John Wokkyng, William Scarburgh, and John Lillyk.

Bassyngeshawe: Thomas Bataille and John Bartone.

Colmanstret: Thomas Dentone and John Arnald.

Chepe: William Hervy, John Routhe, John Notebrom, and Thomas Shirwynd.

Cordewanerestrete: Robert Baytone, Saier Acre, John Ray, and John Gay.

Candelwykstrete: Robert Pellican, John Wotton, Geoffrey Chyttok, and John Kent.

Bridge: Thomas Folborne, William Bandone, Thomas Leget, and Thomas Robelard.

Walbrok: Thomas Holme, John Luttour, Richard Burdone, and Richard Alley.

Dougate: John Artall, John Stone, Richard Gerveys, and John Grene.

Langbourne: John Burley, John Halman, John Scarborogh, and Richard Lonney.

Cornhulle: John William, John Crompe, William Dillowe, and Stephen Grene.

Bradstret: Adam Semy, Richard Bradcok, Nicholas Dowelond, and John Lewgor.

Bisshoppesgate: Simon Bornham, Thomas Richer, John Brawell, and John Louthe.

Tower: John Costyn, Richard Stowe, Giles West, and John Bolle.

Billynggesgate: William Child, William Morys, John Bedham, and William Marwe.

Portsoken: John Domer, Geoffrey Bridde, Richard Hylle, and Roger Baroun.

Algate: Robert Russe and John Hoke.

Lymstrete: John Berstone and John Bonantre.

On the 19th March the above jurors made their return to the Commissioners of the names of those liable to the tax, and these were thereupon summoned to appear before the Commissioners to be examined. The names and the amount to which each was found liable were recorded on rolls. [Particulars not recorded in the Letter-Book.]

Folio 157.

Ordinacio Zonarior.'

Petition [undated] of the good men of the Craft of "Gurdillers" to the Mayor and Aldermen that articles touching the craft made on Saturday after the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr [7 July], anno 18 Edward III. [A.D. 1344], (fn. 6) may be amended as follows:-

The first article touching the length and assize of tissue of silk, wool, and thread, they say, cannot be kept, because it was only ordained for tissues called "bastardis," (fn. 7) which always were made of one length and assize, and so may it remain, but they pray that "they may harneys all other maner corses of what length or assise that thei be after the desyre of her Chapmen, the seid olde ordenaunce nat wtstondyng."

The article that no tissue of silk, wool, thread, or leather that was of the size of "seszein," "cynkeyn," "treszein," or "doublein" should be garnished, unless it had double "naille" in the "bocle" and "pendant," (fn. 8) and also the bars with double "naille" with a "ryvet" (fn. 9) under, that is to say of "cloosharneys" as well as of other,-

This, they say, they cannot keep, because the terms of "seszein," &c., are strange and unknown to them, and they desire that the following ordinance may take its place, viz., "that no manere tissue nor garter hereafter be garnisshid......but it be double nayled in the bocle and in the pendant also and that the gurdyng barres be sufficient to bere the gurdyng and that they be sette on with double naille with revettes under And that all other barras be rivetted under except pipid barres souded that ben substanciall to rivet hem self except also small botenettz that atteyne nat to the brede of a ferthyng of silver."

Folio 157 b.

As to the ordinance forbidding work on the Saturday or the eves of double Feast (fn. 10) after "noone" rung; the petitioners say that it was never thereby intended that the Feasts of St. "Austyn," St. Barnard, and other double Feasts which the Church had not commanded to be observed in the City should be included. They say also that "non" is rung sometimes at 11 o'clock, sometimes at 12, and sometimes at 1 P.M., and these divers ringings produce discord. They pray, therefore, that the following may be substituted for the ordinance, viz.: "That non of the seid Crafte wirke in the same Crafte the Saturday nor the evens of the festes of the Assumpcion, Nativite, Concepcion, Purificacion and Annunciation of our lady seint Marie nor the evens of Apostles that ben fastyd nor on the evens of the Nativite, Circumcision, Epiphanye, ad [sic] Assencion of owre lord Jesu Crist nor on the evens of Corporis Christi, Nativite of Seint John Baptist, Seint Laurence and All Halowes after xii of the clok smyten atte noone."

They pray that the ordinance forbidding the working "Roset" or "tirlet" be annulled as they do not understand those terms.

They further pray that the ordinance forbidding any of the craft to open his shop on Sundays and double Feasts may be restricted to Sundays and Feasts prescribed supra.

As regards the ordinance forbidding working by night they pray that it may be restricted to work which is "overstreite," and that they may be allowed to "cerge, brusshe and sorte" their ware by night notwithstanding the said ordinance.

The ordinance forbidding the making of "gurdelles" of worse leather than "oxe lethir" they pray to be withdrawn, and that they may be allowed to use any suitable leather, inasmuch as ox-leather was not so much used as in old time.

The ordinance touching fines amended to the effect that one-half shall go to the alms-box of the craft, instead of the whole going to the use of the Chamber.

Lastly, they pray that no one of the craft on the Saturdays or the evens of the Feasts above specified after xii o'clock at noon or by night shall "cute thonges to be hernysid......nor naile ne smyte gurdels ne thownges for gurdles ne chape bokels (fn. 11) ne poynte wyre for gurdels ner hole gurdels for pipidbarres ne wirke nor sette on bokels nor oþer harneys belongyng to þe makyng of gurdels except cheynes and ryngis; and also that none of the seid Craft here after sette in werk to the sale (fn. 12) chape pendant nor barre but such as ben and shull be made and wrought by persons enfraunchised of the seid Craft wt in þis Citee on the peyne above expressid."

The above petition granted.

Folio 158.

Ordinacio Zonarior.'

10 Nov., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435], petition of good men of the Craft of Girdelers to the Mayor and Aldermen, setting forth that an ordinance had been made of old time by the Craft to the effect that no man of the Craft should have more than two apprentices together, but he might take another apprentice for a year and a half or two years to fit him for taking the place of an out-going apprentice; that the ordinance had long been observed and had proved beneficial to the Craft, but that lately divers of the Craft, understanding that the ordinance had not been enrolled in the Guildhall and that no penalty attached to its non-observance, had taken many apprentices "in so muche þat nowe adayes þer is so gret abondaunce of apprentices of þe seid craft þat many freemen of þe same craft which have but small quantitee of goodes of their owen and were wont to live by þe werk þat þei made to oþer men of the same craft may now have no werk wt in þe seid craft but some of hem be come Waterberers and laborers and som of hem gone home ageyn to her owen contreys and gone to cart and plough and leven this Citee for ever to grete repreef and sclaundre aswele to all þis worthy citee as to the craft aforeseid." They therefore pray that the said ordinance may be enrolled in the Guildhall to be thenceforth observed, under penalty of 100s. They further pray that it may be ordained that no one of the Craft attend any Fair, Chepyng, or Market until the Wardens of the Craft have examined his wares to see if they be good and able for the King's people, under penalty.

And forasmuch as many girdles have been brought into the City whereof the buckles have been made of "feble stuffe, and sette on unfyled wherthurgh þe stuffe þer of might nat be knowen whether it were able or nat," they pray that it may be ordained that "no bokels of latone iren nor steell, except bokels for halpenyware, herafter be sette a werk by ony of þe seid craft but suche as shull be wele and clenly and also suffisantly filed and wroght, so þat by þe filyng þer of it may veraily be knowen whether the stuffe of þe bokels be able or nat," under penalty prescribed.

Their prayer granted during the pleasure of the Court.

Folio 158 b.

1 Feb., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435-6], came Geoffrey Boleyn, "hatter," before Henry Frowik, the Mayor, and the Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of Hatter temp. John Gedney, Mayor, and John Bederenden, Chamberlain, viz., on the 23rd June, anno 6 Henry VI. [A.D. 1428], he had long used, and was now using, the art of Mercery and not the art of Hatter. He therefore prayed that he might be admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of Mercery. His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the said Art, viz., Robert Large, John Dawtre, William Olyver, John Sturgeon, Richard Riche, Thomas Bataille, and others [not named].

22 March, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435-6], came John Legge, fishmonger, before Henry Frowik, the Mayor, and the Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of Fishmonger on the 26th July, anno 6 Henry VI. [A.D. 1428], he had long used, and was now using, the art of Vintner and not the art of Fishmonger. He prayed, therefore, to be admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of Vintner. His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the said Art, viz., Guy Sholdham, Nicholas Kent, Thomas Style, Robert Kyngesson, and others [not named].

24 May, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], John Kellyk, vintner, discharged by Henry Frowik, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

10 Sept., 15 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], came Stephen, son of Stephen (fn. 13) Barry, late "stokfisshmonger," before the Mayor and Aldermen, and acknowledged that he had received from John Maynard, executor of Robert Barry, the sum of £20, which the said Robert left by will to the said Stephen his son.

Folio 159.

Custodia.

22 May, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], the guardianship of Richard, son of John Joynour, late "irmonger," together with his patrimony and divers vessels of silver, committed by Henry Frowik, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Chichele, the Chamberlain, to John Wakeryng, Master of the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, near Smythfeld. Sureties, viz., Robert Marchall, grocer, William Scarburgh, vintner, William Olyver and John Willam (?), mercers.

28 May, 21 Henry VI. [A.D. 1443], came Thomas Knollys, grocer, before John Hatherle, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and became one of the above sureties in place of Robert Marchall.

21 June, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], came Thomas atte Gate of Bealbroughton, co. Worces., an apprentice of Thomas Ankes, fuller, before Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, and the Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of Fullers temp, William Waldern, Mayor, and John Proffyt, Chamberlain, viz., on the 3rd Nov., anno 14 Henry IV. [A.D. 1412], he had long used, and was now using, the art of "Shermans" and not the art of Fullers. He prayed, therefore, that he might be admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of "Shermannes." His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the said Art, viz., William Spaldyng, John Horold, Nicholas Wylard, Thomas Halman, John Buyggham, Matthew Stygan, and others [not named].

Exon'acio Joh'is Fynch ab assisis.

8 Oct., 15 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], John Fynch, salter, discharged by Henry Frowik, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio 159 b.

Exon'acio Will'i Warde ab assisis.

12 Sept., 15 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], William Warde, draper, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Will'i Rede ab assisis.

20 Oct., 15 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], William Rede, "fruyterer," similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Assaitor' Corii ab assisis.

10 Oct., 15 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], Thomas Robenet, Thomas Ricard, Clement Glascombe, and William Brownyng, Masters of the Mistery of Cordwainers, similarly discharged on account of their being engaged every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday on the scrutiny and assay of leather exposed for sale in the City.

Friday, 12 Oct., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], ordinance by Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, Nicholas Wotton, John Michell, John Reynwelle, William Estfeld, John Welles, John Brokle, Thomas Wandesford, Robert Large, William Melreth, Thomas Bernwell, John Atherlee, Thomas Catteworth, William Gregory, John Olney, and John Suttone, Aldermen, sitting in the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, that Hugh Asshe should thenceforth be one of the three permanent Serjeants-at-mace attending the Mayor for the time being-the other two being Thomas Holgreve and Ralph Vernon - and receive the accustomed fee and reward.

Folio 160.

Commission, by advice of the King's Great Council, to Henry Frowyk, the Mayor, William Cheyne, John Fray, and Alexander Anne, to inquire upon oath of good men of the City touching the truth of matters alleged in a petition presented by Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland, to the effect that Henry Percy, late Lord Percy, granted to Henry Percy his son in tail a certain messuage, with shop, garden, &c., in the parish of St. Agnes without Aldresgate, (fn. 14) and that the said son became seised thereof per formam doni (fn. 15) in the time of King Edward III., and the same messuage, &c., should have so descended to the petitioner, but that King Henry IV., by divers letters patent dated 22 July, anno 6 of his reign [A.D. 1405], and 8 April, anno 7 [A.D. 1406], granted the aforesaid messuage, &c., to Queen Johanna, his Consort, by the name of the Hostel of the Earl of Northumberland, the same having become forfeited to the King owing to the Earl's treason; (fn. 16) and the same King by other letters patent, dated 17 June, anno 11 [A.D. 1410], granted the reversion of the said messuage after the death of the said Queen to John, late Duke of Bedford, (fn. 17) at whose death the reversion devolved upon King Henry VI., the said Duke's nephew, and so remains in the said King's hands.

The Earl therefore prays that consideration may be paid to the foregoing, and that justice may be done to him accordingly. Witness the King at Westminster, 17 Dec., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1435]. (fn. 18)

Folio 160 b.

Writ to the Sheriff to make proclamation forbidding the molestation of any natives of Flanders residing in England who remain loyal to the King of England and France, and have not been led astray from their allegiance by the wiles of the socalled Duke of Burgundy (fn. 19) and Count of Flanders. It is the King's will, however, that such Flemings should personally come to the King's Chancery and there take an oath of fealty by the Feast of Pentecost next [27 May]. Witness the King at Westminster, 28 March, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436]. (fn. 20)

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation forbidding the spreading of seditious reports and to arrest those they find so doing and return their names into Chancery. Witness the King at Westminster, 4 May, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436].

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for all soldiers, knights, esquires, &c., in the retinue of Richard, Duke of York, Richard, Earl of Salisbury, and William, Earl of Suffolk, to leave the City and hasten to Wynchelse, (fn. 21) there to muster by Thursday next at the latest. Witness the King at Westminster, 1 May, 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436].

Footnotes

1 The proceedings, which appear to have taken place during an adjournment of the oppressive Iter which was being held at the Tower, are recorded in the 'Liber Custumarum,' i. 382-3. On this occasion the City bushel was found to be more true than the King's, whilst the City's weight of 8 marks was found to be deficient to the extent of 2½d.
2 "Clung"=shrunk. Cf. "When thaire huske is drie and clonge." 'N.E.D.,' s.v.
3 Robert Fitz-Hugh had died on the 15th Jan., and his successor in the see, Robert Gilbert, was not appointed until the following May.
4 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 486-7.
5 This heavy graduated income tax was of a novel character at that time, although in after years it became "too familiar." Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' iii. 122.
6 The articles are set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 216-17, from Letter-Book F. They were confirmed ten years later. See 'Cal. Letter-Book G,' p. 66.
7 Imitations of more expensive material. 'Drapers' Dict.,' s.v.
8 Mordaunt (F.). Cf. note, supra,p. 65.
9 Ruel (F.).
10 Described as a feast on which the antiphon, or short versicle said before and after the Psalms, was repeated at length, or "doubled,"before and after. On ordinary feasts only part of it was said before.(Orby Shipley, 'Glossary of Ecclesias.Terms.') The explanation of "doublefeast" as given by the editor of the'Memorials,' viz., "when two feasts or festivals fall on the same day," is open to question. In 1423 flecchers were for bidden to open their shopson any feast having a double vigil(supra, p. 11). Such a feast may possibly have been known as a doublefeast.
11 To put "chapes" or loops on buckles through which the strap passes. 'N.E.D.,' s.v.
12 Apparently some part of a girdle, but what part it is difficult to ascertain.
13 Probably a clerical error for Robert.
14 Northumberland House, in St. Martin's Lane, Aldersgate (Stow's 'Survey,' ed. Kingsford, i. 309).
15 Otherwise known as a writ of formedon, which enabled a tenant in tail to recover his estate per formam doni, i.e., according to the form of the gift, in spite of any attempt made to destroy the entail.
16 The first Earl was attainted in 1406 and died in 1408. Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 228n.
17 The Queen continued to hold the property, which came to be known as "Queen Johanne Wardrobe," until her death in July, 1437 (Stow's 'Survey,' ed. Kingsford, ii. 343; Gregory, p. 180). Bedford had predeceased her by nearly two years.
18 From a note in Kingsford's ed. of Stow's 'Survey' (ii. 343) already referred to, we learn that the Earl eventually succeeded in recovering his City mansion.
19 He had recently forsaken the English cause, and had thrown in his lot with Charles VII. of France.
20 Set out by Delpit (op.cit., p. 265).
21 Gregory ('Chron.,' p. 178) states that this year (1436) the Mayor, after consultation with the crafts, "sent sowdyers to Calys for hyt was sayde that the Duke of Burgone lay sege unto Calis...... And at the Parlyment be-fore hyt was ordaynyde that the Duke of Yorke shulde in to Fraunce with certayne lordys with hym..... And whythe hym went the Erle of Salysbury." Cf. Kingsford's 'Chronicles of London' (Cleopatra C iv., fo. 53), p. 141.