Folios 261-270
Sept 1452 -

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

347-355

Citation Show another format:

'Folios 261-270: Sept 1452 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 347-355. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33732 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


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Folio 261 - 270

Folio 261 b.

20 Oct., 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452], William Wyther, "letherseller," similarly discharged by William Gregory, the Mayor [sic], &c., on account of deafness and other infirmities.

21 Oct., the same year, came Richard Aubry, "wever," before William Gregory, the Mayor [sic], and the Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of "Wever," temp. Henry Frowyk, Mayor, and John Chichele, Chamberlain, viz., on the 15th March, anno 23 Henry VI. [A.D. 1444-5], he intended in future to use the mistery or art of "Haberdasshers," and not the art of "Wevers." He prayed, therefore, to be admitted into the freedom in the Art or Mistery of "Haberdasshers," His prayer granted at the instance of the masters and good men of the Art or Mistery of "Haberdasshers," viz., John Fulbourne, Richard Hille, Richard Ewet, Robert Chirche, John Colred, Geoffrey Fowler, and others [not named].

[Folios. 262-262 b blank.]

Folio 263.

The Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452], in the presence of William Gregory, the Mayor, Thomas Billyng the Recorder, Stephen Broun, Simon Eyre, John Hatherle, John Olney, John Norman, Robert Horn, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Derby, Thomas Scot, William Abraham, William Cantelowe, William Hulyn, Matthew Philip, Christopher Warter, and Geoffrey Boleyn, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs for the year ensuing, Richard Lee was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex [sic] by the Mayor, and Richard Alley was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day John Sturgeon, mercer, was elected Chamberlain; Thomas Cook, senior, draper, and Thomas Davy, tailor, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; and Thomas Scot, William Marowe, Aldermen, William Taillour, William Gregory, junior, John Maldon, and William Latoner, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the said Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Friday the Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452], in the presence of William Gregory, the Mayor, Thomas Billyng the Recorder, Henry Frowik, the Prior of Christchurch, Stephen Broun, John Hatherle, Simon Eyre, John Olney, Nicholas Wyfold, John Norman, Robert Horn, Stephen Forster, John Derby, Geoffrey Felding, Thomas Canynges, Thomas Scot, William Cantelowe, William Abraham, William Hulyn, William Marowe, Matthew Philip, Christopher Warter, William Dere, Richard Alley, Geoffrey Boleyn, and Richard Lee, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Geoffrey Feldyng, Alderman, was by favour of the Holy Spirit elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 263 b.

20 Sept., 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452], Paul Jonson, cordwainer, discharged by Geoffrey Feldynge, the Mayor [sic], and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., on account of deafness and other infirmities.

7 Dec., the same year, Robert Pitte, "pynner," similarly discharged for like cause.

17 Nov., the same year, came Katherine, widow of William Coumbys, late fishmonger, John Waldene, grocer, John Tate, mercer, William Alhede, draper, and Robert Fallans into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and entered into bond with John Sturgeon, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £420.

The above to be void on condition that the said Katherine deliver into the Chamber the sum of £400 as soon as George, son of the above William Coumbys, is twenty-four years of age, together with divers chattels, comprising a silver cup and covercle called "Le Vatte," two "bikers" of silver standing on lions, two silver-gilt cups fashioned like bells, and twelve silver spoons with "knoppes" of lions bequeathed by the said William Coumbys to his son.

Afterwards, viz., on Friday, the 16th May, 33 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], came the above orphan, being twenty-four years of age, into the Court of the lord the King, before Stephen Forster, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for the aforesaid money and goods. The said recognitors and also Thomas Thorntone, the Chamberlain, are therefore quit.

Folio 264.

Saturday, 27 Jan., 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452-3], came Richard Lovell into the Court of the lord the King, before Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, and Thomas Billyng, the Recorder, and was presented by Thomas Burgoyn and Roger Birkes, Undersheriffs, as an Attorney of the Sheriffs' Court. Thereupon he was admitted and sworn.

Folio 264 b.

"Secrete Instruccion yoven by the Maire Aldermen and Comunes of the Citee of London in their Co'e counseille holden in the Guyldhall of the same Citee the secund day of Octobre the xxxjt' yere of the Reign of Kyng Henry the vjte [A.D. 1452] unto their Right Trusty and welbeloved Maister John Aleyn doctor of lawe civile and Rogier Tonge co'e clerk and Secretarie of the"......[ends abruptly]. (fn. 1)

[Folios. 265 excised; Folios. 266 blank.]

Folio 266 b-267 b.

Ordinacio de Brocoures.

Friday, 15 Dec., 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452], ordinances made by Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty in Common Council assembled, for the regulation of Brokers, (fn. 2) to the following effect:-

(1) The Mayor and Aldermen for the time being shall yearly appoint two Commoners to have control over all brokers, who shall be Englishmen born and not exceed twenty in number.

(2) Any broker convicted of false " chevesaunce" or untrue bargain (fn. 3) to forswear the City after being "ledde thorough the Citee his heed discovered and wtouten hosen and ungirt upon an hors wtoute sadille." A Surveyor who meddles in any such bargain to be fined £100 for each offence.

(3) No broker to buy or sell fraudulently to his own profit or make any bargain between "forein & forein or forein & estraunger," (fn. 4) under penalty of £100.

(4) Every broker shall bring the buyer and seller together before making a bargain, (fn. 5) no seller to buy back goods he had sold.

(5) No broker shall obtain the selling of goods by promising merchants a higher price than they would otherwise get. (fn. 6)

(6) No broker to advise merchants to keep their goods in the hope of obtaining an enhanced price. (fn. 7)

(7) Brokers to make their bargains without respect to any particular craft.

(8) Sworn brokers not to advise the employment of brokers who are not sworn.

(9) No broker to "be in livere with any person," nor be host to any stranger, upon pain of losing his office.

(10) Brokers to keep books of their bargains, which they are to be ready to show to the Surveyors if required.

(11) Two brokers to be appointed for exchange of money, the same to be paid at the following rates, viz., of 100 ducats 6 pence; of 100 florins of "Jeane" (fn. 8) 6 pence; of 100 florins of Florence 6 pence; of 100 crowns (scudi) of Flanders 4 pence.

(12) No broker to lead any merchant stranger out of the City for the purpose of buying and selling. (fn. 9)

(13) No broker to go to Bakwellhalle for the purpose of advising a stranger in buying cloth.

(14) No freeman to set any man to work as a broker unless admitted and sworn as a broker.

(15) A bargain between a freeman and a stranger or alien shall not be recorded by one pretending to have been present at such bargain.

(16) Brokers to be paid according to the ordinance made temp. Robert Chichele, Mayor, (fn. 10) and of all other merchandise not comprised therein shall take for every 20 shillings worth 2 pence from every denizen and 3 pence from every forein or stranger.

(17) For every 20s. taken by brokers 2s. is to be given to the Surveyors, who shall deliver 12 pence to the Chamberlain for the use of the Commonalty.

(18) All fines levied shall be to the use of the Chamber.

Folio 267 b.

Exon'acio "Will'i" May ab assisis etc.

7 March, 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452-3], "Richard" May, "corser," (fn. 11) discharged by Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio 268.

8 March, the same year, came Robert Strother, William Denton, Richard Claver, Philip Howell, and William Pykeryng, mercers, and William Brampton, writer of the court-letter, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with John Sturgeon, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 250 marks for the payment into Court of that sum by the said Robert Strother and William Denton, or one of them, to the use of William, son of William Thornhill, late mercer, when he is twenty-eight years of age.

17 March, the same year, Warren Fowler, "brewer," discharged by Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Petition to the Common Council held on Monday the 5th March, 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452-3], by John Payn, " glover," setting forth that he had taken as apprentices James and Piers, sons of the late Godfrey Helmond and Katherine his wife, supposing them to have been born in England, whereas they had been born in "Maghlin," (fn. 12) in Flanders, and praying that the said apprentices, after serving their respective terms, according to the custom of the City, may be admitted into the freedom of the City, notwithstanding their place of birth. [English.]

Folio 268 b.

19 Jan., 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1452-3], ordinance by Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that freemen using the mistery of "Whitetawers" in the borough of Southwerk and in the wick (vico) of Bermondsey (not being in lot with other citizens) shall pay yearly 2s. into the Chamber of the Guildhall for their lot, and not pay the same to the Sheriffs, as used to be done.

20 July, 31 Henry VI. [A.D. 1453], came Nicholas Jepe, fishmonger, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and asked permission to prosecute at common law Hugh Wyche, mercer, and others, executors of William Wyche, late fishmonger. Permission granted to prosecute in any of the King's courts.

Wednesday, 3 Oct., 32 Henry VI. [A.D. 1453], a grant made by Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, Henry Frowyk, Simon Eyre, John Olney, Nicholas Wyfold, William Gregory, John Norman, Stephen Forster, Robert Horn, John Derby, Thomas Scot, William Cantelowe, William Abraham, William Marowe, Matthew "Phelip," William Dere, and Richard Lee, Aldermen, to Thomas Dounham, a Serjeant-at-mace to the Mayor, of an annual sum of 40s. in recognition of his services, like Ralph Vernon, a late Serjeant-at-mace.

Folio 269.

Ordinac'o de Berebruers.

8 Oct., 32 Henry VI. [A.D. 1453], ordinance by Geoffrey Feldyng, the Mayor, Henry Frowyk, Stephen Broune, John Hatherle, Simon Eyre, John Olney, William Gregory, Nicholas Wyfold, John Norman, Robert Horne, Stephen Forster, John Derby, Thomas Canynges, Thomas Scot, William Cantelowe, William Marowe, William Hulyn, Matthew "Phelip," Christopher Warter, Geoffrey Boleyn, and Richard Lee, Aldermen, and the Commonalty in Common Council assembled, that "Berebruers" make their vessels according to the assize, and have them stamped with their own iron marks, which marks are to be recorded in the Chamber, under penalty prescribed; and, further, that they sell their beer at prices prescribed and by sealed measures "full of clier bere wythoute vyall."

[Folios. 269 b blank.]

Folio 270.

12 Oct., 32 Henry VI. [A.D. 1453], came John Dogowe, John Kendal, and Robert Chamberleyn, "peautrers," and John Burveyn, "brewer," into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and entered into bond with John Sturgeon, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £20 for the payment of that sum into Court by the said John Dogowe to the use of Katherine, daughter of Thomas Whyte, late "bruer," when she shall come of age, the said John having been appointed her guardian.

Folio 270 b.

Bartholemewe faire.

Indenture made between Geoffrey Feldynge, the Mayor, and Commonalty on the one part, and Reginald Colyer, Prior of St. Bartholomew's in Westsmythfeld, and Convent of the same on the other part, whereby it was agreed (inter alia) that on occasions when Bartholomew Fair is held, pickage (fn. 13) and stallage (fn. 14) levied in Westsmythfeld outside the precinct of the Priory and certain other places prescribed by metes and bounds, should thenceforth belong to the Mayor and Commonalty without objection being raised by the Prior, and that the same tolls taken within the close and precinct of the said Priory should be the property of the Prior and Convent for the time being, without challenge by the civic authorities. It was further agreed that the Mayor and Commonalty and their successors should exercise the scrutiny of weights and measures and of goods exposed for sale at the Fair and adjacent places aforesaid outside the precinct of the Priory as well as within the said precinct, the Prior for the time being and his successors being at liberty to join the Mayor in his yearly visit for the purpose within the said precinct; also that all forfeitures and tolls, excepting pickage and stallage, both within and without the precinct of the Priory, should in future be levied and collected by officers appointed both by the Mayor and Aldermen and by the Prior, the said officers making a return of the value of such forfeitures, &c., to the men of law presiding over the Fair Courts; that one half of the tolls should go to the Sheriffs of the City, one half of forfeitures to the Mayor and Commonalty, and the other half both of tolls and forfeitures to the Prior and Convent. It was further agreed that the Prior for the time being should hold his Court of Pie-powder (pedis pulver') on the prescribed days by his Steward or other person learned in law, in conjunction with the Common Serjeant-atlaw of the City, one of the Under Sheriffs, or some other person learned in law (fn. 15) appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, the said Steward and his associate having suitable food and drink with the Prior during the time of the Fair. It was likewise agreed that no arrest, attachment, or execution by authority of the said Court of Pie-powder should be made except by Serjeants-at-mace of the Mayor or Sheriffs or by others specially appointed, and that all fines and amercements issuing from the said Court should be for the use of the Prior for the time being. Dated the eve of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], 32 Henry VI. [A.D. 1453].

Footnotes

1 The proceedings of the Common Council on the 2nd Oct., 1452, as recorded in the Journal of that date, relate to the City's defence of Robert Wright in a case of appeal against the curates of the City in the Court of Rome, and the appointment of solicitors in a matter touching offerings. On the 10th October the Journal further records that certain instructions for Master John Aleyn and Roger Tonge, who were to be sent to the Court of Rome as counsel (oratores) for the City, were read and ordered to be sealed with the City's Common Seal. These delegates (of whom Roger Tonge, otherwise known as Roger Spicer, was Common Clerk or Town Clerk of the City) appear to have been seized on their way to Rome by the Bishop of Cologne, and to have been released only after the intervention of the Pope himself.-Journal 5, fos. 99 b, 112 b, 122 b. The question of offerings was a frequent cause of dispute between the citizens and the curates. Cf. infra, fos. 273-273 b.
2 The regulations had previously been submitted to a committee of five Aldermen and fourteen Commoners for consideration. Journal 5, fo. 97 b.
3 Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' pp. 157, 365.
4 Among the regulations for brokers ordained temp. Edward II. was one to the effect that no broker should bring a stranger to another stranger for the purpose of buying and selling. 'Cal. Letter-Book D,' p. 219. The distinction here drawn between a foreigner and a stranger is noteworthy. In a petition, however, presented to the Common Council in 1433 (supra, p. 161), we find "foreins" embracing both "strangiers" and "denizeins," a denizen, strictly speaking, denoting an alien or stranger who had obtained letters of denization, but, in this case, probably, meaning no more than one residing within the City (O. F. deinzein). See Notes and Queries, 6 and 20 Aug., and 3 Sept., 1910.
5 Cf. 'Letter-Book I,' p. 63.
6 Idem, p. 64.
7 Id. ibid.
8 Genoa.
9 Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 219.
10 See ' Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 264.
11 Horse-dealer.
12 Mechlin.
13 Toll paid for breaking ground.
14 Toll paid for erecting booths.
15 It had been decided at a Common Council held on the 15th March, 1452-3, that these should sit with the Steward at the Court. Journal 5, fo. 106 b. See also Journal 5, fos. 107, 126 b.