Folios 281-290
July 1455 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

369-380

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'Folios 281-290: July 1455 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 369-380. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33734 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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Folio 282.

17 July, 33 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], Thomas Cok, mercer, discharged by Stephen Forster, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Thursday, 28 August, the same year, came John, son of Alexander Anne, an orphan of the City, and of full age, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before the Mayor and Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for his patrimony of £20.

[Folios. 282 b blank.]

Folio 283.

6 Aug., 33 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], came John Kippyng and Richard Raulyn, grocers, John Langwith, tailor, and John Cotyngham, fishmonger, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Stephen Forster, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into a bond with Thomas Thorntone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £31 for the payment of 40 marks and the delivery of certain silver cups to the Chamberlain for the use of Robert and William, sons of Thomas Dunham, late fishmonger, as soon as they shall have come of age, the same having been bequeathed to the said orphans by their father.

4 Aug., 9 Edward IV. [A.D. 1469], came the above Robert Dunham into Court, before William Taillour, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for his property.

Exon' Ric'i Herryes ab assis'.

Tuesday, 23 Sept., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], Richard Herryes, "armorer," discharged by Stephen Forster, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Friday, 19 Sept., the same year, came Thomas Chambre, "gentilman," into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Stephen Forster, the Mayor, Thomas Ursewyk the Recorder, and the Aldermen, and was presented before them by Thomas Burgoyn and Roger Birkes, the Under Sheriffs, as an Attorney in the Sheriffs' Court, and was sworn and admitted.

Folio 283 b.

Eleccio Vicecom'.

The Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], in the presence of Stephen Forster, the Mayor, Thomas Urswyke the Recorder, Henry Frowik, John Hatherle, Simon Eyre, John Olney, Stephen Broun, William Gregory, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Norman, Thomas Scotte, William Abraham, William Marowe, William Hulyn, Matthew Philip, Christopher Warter, Geoffrey Boleyn, William Cantelowe, William Dere, John Waldene, and Richard Alley, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs for the year ensuing, John Yonge was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and Thomas Oulegreve was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day Thomas "Thorndone," draper, was elected Chamberlain; Thomas Cook, senior, and Thomas Davy were elected Wardens of London Bridge; Matthew Philip, William Hulyn, Aldermen, John Lok, Richard Nedeham, Thomas Wynslo, and John Plummer [Commoners] were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

L'ra d'ni Regis directa Maiori Aldr'is et Vicecom' London'.

Letter from King Henry VI. to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs of the City, in the following terms:-

"Trusty and welbeloved We wrote unto you nowe late oure othr l'res upon certeyn informac'ons made unto us that if it so were suche attemptatz were doon as was seid ayenst the libertees and privileges of our privilegied Churche and College of Saint Martyns within oure Citee of London by taking oute from the same diverse personnes that claymed the Immunite therof Wherupon we had matier and cause of displeasir as of reason we owed so to have if it so had be. Willyng therupon that ye shulde restore the said personnes unto oure said place The whiche oure l'res we sente muche the sonner unto you because relac'on was made unto us that as this day it shuld have be proceded to thexecucion of their personnes. So it is nowe by that we have herde by the Recordor of oure said Citee and othr' with hym commen from you that the matier requireth good and sadde direccion Wherfore we write unto you at this tyme doyng to wite that we have delibered that oure Chauncellr' and othr' lordes spirituell and temporell of oure Counseill callyng to theym the Juges of oure lawes shal have the matier in examinac'on and so by their advis it to be determyned as the cas requireth Charging you that in the meane tyme ther be no processe ner execucion doon ayenst theym by way of arraienement but that they be seurely kept as personnes of suche disposicion withouten any unreasonable duresse and of yor good and sadde demeanyng in kepyng of oure peas We thanke you as we have cause so to doo and desire you to contynue Latyng you wite that we wol see that ye have and enjoye the franchises & libertees of oure saide Citee to you by us and oure noble progenitours graunted and confermed as largely and freely as ye have had in tyme passed Yeven undre oure signet of the Egle at oure Castell of Hertford the xxvij daye of Septembre" [A.D. 1455]. (fn. 1)

Eleccio Maior'.

The Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], in the presence of Stephen Forster, the Mayor, Thomas Urswike the Recorder, the Prior of Christchurch, Henry Frowyk, Stephen Broun, John Hatherle, Simon Eyre, John Olney, William Gregory, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Norman, Robert Horn, Thomas Canynges, William Abraham, William Cantelowe, William Hulyn, William Deer, Christopher Warter, Richard Lee, John Walden, Aldermen, John Yonge and Thomas Oulegreve, the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, William Marowe was elected. Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Exoneracio Irrotulamentor' apprenticior' quorumcumque Joh'is Derby Aldr'i etc solvend.'

The Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], ordinance by Stephen Forster, the Mayor, Thomas Urswick the Recorder, Henry Frowyk, Stephen Broun, John Hatherle, Symon Eyre, John Olney, William Gregory, Geoffrey Felding, John Norman, Thomas Scot, William Abraham, William Marowe, Matthew Philip, Christopher Warter, Richard Alley, William Deer, Geoffrey Boleyn, and John Walden, Aldermen, in the Inner Chamber of the Guildhall, that John Derby, draper and late Alderman, should, like other Aldermen, pay nothing for enrolment of his apprentices, (fn. 2) in acknowledgment of his past services.

Folio 284.

Exon' acio Roberti Stephen.

15 Oct., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], Robert Stephen, tailor, discharged by Stephen Forster, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exoneracio Ric'i Saunder.

The same day Richard Saunder, "malemaker," similarly discharged for like cause.

Exoneracio Joh'is Abbey groceri.

17 Oct., the same year, John Abbey, grocer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Custodia pueror' Roberti Stokker.

Monday, 20 Oct., the same year, came John Stokker, "draper," John Styward, "chaundeler," William Swan, draper, John Hynde, draper, and John Pake, junior, draper, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Stephen Forster, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorntone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £160, for the payment of the sum of £40 to the Chamberlain for the time being, by the said John Stokker, when Petronilla, John junior, Robert, and William, children of Robert Stokker, late draper, shall respectively come of age.

Folio 284 b.

Exon'ac'o Joh'is Streme.

23 Oct., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], John Streme, tailor, discharged by Stephen Forster, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to infirmity.

Permutacio cum cantar' sup' ossamenta mortuor' in cimiterio Sc'i Pauli London.'

Letter from William Marowe, the Mayor, to Thomas [Kempe], Bishop of London, presenting Sir Bartholomew Colet, Rector of Danbury [co. Essex], for admission as chaplain of the chantry founded by Roger Beyvyn in the chapel over the bones of the dead in St. Paul's Churchyard, (fn. 3) in exchange with John Trafford, chaplain of the same. Dated 4 Oct., A.D. 1455.

Certificacio fact' d'no Cancellar' Anglie sup' expiracione cujusdam obligaco'is sub sigill' statut' mercator' etc.

A certificate made by William Marowe, the Mayor, and Roger Tonge, clerk for recognizances of debts in the City under the Statute of Acton Burnel, to Thomas [Bourchier], Archbishop of Canterbury and Chancellor of England, to the effect that Roger Perpoint, of Landeford, co. Nott, "gentilman," and John his son, had been bound to pay to Edward Grymstone, esquire, the sum of £90 8s. 5d. by a certain day, and had not paid it. He is, therefore, desired to effect payment of the same pursuant to the said statute. (fn. 4)

Folio 285.

10 Jan., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455-6], proceedings taken against Andrew Devyne of Venice for acting as a broker within the City, although not duly admitted, and he committed to prison. A writ of habeas corpus cum causa thereupon issued. The matter argued in the King's Chancery by both parties. Judgment given for the City and its liberties.

Folio 285 b.

Custodia filie Bertrandi Saunz.

Tuesday, 2 Dec., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], came John Silvestre, "sadeler," Richard Lokwode, John Cornyssh, "sadeler," John Abell, "sadeler," and John Bourtone, "sadeler," into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Marowe, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorntone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £20, for the payment of a like sum to the Chamberlain for the time being, for the use of Beatrix, daughter of Bertrand Saunz, late vintner, when she comes of age or marries.

Exoneracio viginti libr' p'linenc' Jocose infra script.'

3 Dec., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], came John Silvester, "sadeler," who married Jocosa, daughter of Bertrand Saunz, late vintner, into the Court of the lord the King, before the said Mayor and the Aldermen, and acknowledged that he had received his wife's patrimony of £20 from John Adys, goldsmith.

4 Dec., the same year, came the above John Adys into Court and delivered to Thomas Thorntone, the Chamberlain, the sum of £20 to be kept by him for the benefit of Beatrix, daughter of Bertrand Saunz, as soon as she comes of age or marries.

Folio 286.

Exon'acio Will'i Turnham ab' assis.'

15 Dec., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455], William Turnham, draper, discharged by William Marowe, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

8 Feb., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455-6],.... (fn. 5) similarly discharged for like cause.

Proclamation forbidding ungodly contracts and unclean bargains of usury, and offering relief to those who have suffered therefrom [ends abruptly].

Folio 286 b.

15 Feb., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455-6], John Martyn, "peautrer," discharged by William "Marwe," the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

27 Feb., 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455-6], came the Wardens and other good men of the Mistery of Foundours into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Marowe, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and presented a petition as follows:-

"Unto the right reverend lord and maistres the Maire and Aldermen of the Citee of London

"Shewen mekely alle the goodmen of the Crafte of Foundours of the same Cite that where before this tyme ther hath be of the saide crafte a competent felisship of men of thrifte hable to bere and supporte charges of this Citee as the goodmen of othr' suche pouere Craftes of this Citee dooth and have doo unto nowe late that for lak of governaunce and of good reule the forsaide Crafte is gretly empoverisshed and almoste destroyed Wherfore it please you to ordeyn and graunte that thise articles folowing maye be observed and kept herafter and in yor Courte entred of recorde

"First where as before this tyme every man of þe saide Crafte hath ben at his liberte to take Apprentices as many as hath pleased hym, so þat some persones þt hath had scarcely to finde hym self eithr' werk or mete or drynke hath taken and useth to take iij or iiij Apprentices and them may neithr' can teche nor finde, Wherby good mens children of the Contrey have be gretely deceyved and this Cite disclaundered, It is accorded and ordeyned that no person of the forseid Crafte aftre this tyme take receyve ner have mo apprenticez then ij togedres at ones, And þat every persone of þe saide Craft er his apprentice be bounde unto hym shewe þe saide apprentice to the Wardeyns of þe same Craft þat shal be for the tyme that they mown knowe and see þat he be hole of lymmes (fn. 6) for the worship' of this Citee upon peyne of xls. to paie half to þe Chambre and þat othr' half to þe seide Craft. Savyng alwey that it shall be leefull to every hable persone of the seide Crafte ij yeer before eny of þe seide ij apprentices termes shal expire to take an oþere apprentice þat he maie be sumwhat lerned in the seide Craft ayenst the termes ende of þat oþere apprentice, And so evere to take a newe apprentice ij yeer before thende of þe terme of every apprentice.

"Also it is ordeyned þat no persone of þe seid craft þat maketh or dooth to make any furneys to melt in metall or queser (fn. 7) or herth to nele in mouldes þat it be not occupied ner set awerk unto þe tyme that the Wardeins of þe same Craft serche and see þat it be sufficient and hable to eschewe peril of fire upon the peyne aboveseide.

"Also þat no persone of þe saide Crafte have nor send ware longing to þe same craft oute of this Citee to no market nor feire unto þe tyme þat þe Wardeins of þe craft upon reasonable warnyng to them geven by thowner therof have seen and in due tyme serched if it be true stuf and truely wrought upon the forseide peyne." (fn. 8)

The above articles approved subject to revision by the Mayor and Aldermen.

"Be it Remembred that the xxvijth day of Marche the xxjth yeere of the Reign of Kyng Edward the iiijth [A.D. 1481] It is accorded by John Broune Mair and the Aldremen of the Citee of London that it shal be lefull to every persone of the saide Craft of Founders to take and have an' (fn. 9) other apprentice ovir & beside ij apprenticez accordyng to the ordenaunce abovesaid by þe settyng over of the Chamb'leyn of þe said Citee for the tyme being and so to have iij apprenticez togeder & in no noþere wise &c."

3 Sept., 35 Henry VI. [A.D. 1456], Walter Hunte, grocer, discharged by William "Marwe," Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age. (fn. 10)

Folio 287.

L're etc sub privato sigillo Maiori Aldr'is et vic' pro conservaco'e pac' infra Civitatem London' direct.'

Letter of Privy Seal to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs of the City reminding them of disturbances that had lately arisen which threatened danger to the City (fn. 11) -"the King's Chamber"-and enjoining them to allow no one to enter the City except he came peaceably and with a moderate retinue as became his estate and degree. Dated at Lychefeld, 3 Sept., 35 Henry VI. [A.D. 1456]. (fn. 12)

Pleas held in the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Thomas Canyng', Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Steward and Ralph Verney, the Sheriffs, on Tuesday, 14 June, 35 Henry VI. [A.D. 1457]:-

Austyn Cassyn, merchant of "Jean," attached to answer a charge of having on the 15 Sept., 33 Henry VI. [A.D. 1454], and with the aid of Richark Cok, "couper," servant to Richard Hergode, "couper," "falsely and decevably contrefeted coloured dubbed and medled vj pipes of white Rochell wyne olde and feble of colour and tast thenne in þe celer of þe said Austyn there beyng with rede wyne called teynt (fn. 13) and with eggs alom gummes and oþere horrible & unholsome thinges for to induce & bring ageyn a pleasant color to þe sight and likly maner drinkyng of rede wyne to þe tarrage (fn. 14) smelle and taste of þe people"-contrary to the ordinance.

[Fos. 287 b-288 blank.]

Folio 288 b.

L're etc de privato sigillo promalefactor' et pirat' quasdam naves divers' lanis onustas apud Tilbery fery spoliantib' capiendis arrestand' et imprisonand.'

Letter of Privy Seal [to the Mayor, &c.], ordering the seizure of certain ships of war of Calais and Sandwich which had unlawfully attacked ships of Zeland, laden with wool and other merchandise belonging to Italian merchants, in the Thames at or near Tilbury, when under the King's safe conduct, to the discouragement of all commercial intercourse, on which the welfare of the nation so much depended. Dated at Coventre, 10 March [A.D. 1456-7]. (fn. 15)

L're d'ni Reg' regracrator' sub signeto suo etc l'ras p' dc' as in parte recitantes.

Letter under the King's signet to the Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs, and Commonalty of the City, thanking them for their attempts made to arrest the ships which had unlawfully attacked foreign merchant vessels in the Thames, and bidding them to seize the ships when found in their jurisdiction, and also to suppress any disturbance that might arise in the City. Dated at Kenilworth Castle, 22 March [A.D. 1456-7]. (fn. 16)

Folio 289.

Veredc'm Jurat' s. q'd novum edificium etc situat' in Corn'io angulari vici de Lombardestrete assideri debet et taxari int' hoi'es Warde de Bisshoppesgate.

8 April, 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1456], precept by the Mayor and Aldermen to John West and Thomas Dounham, Serjeants-atmace to the Mayor, to summon good men from the following Wards, viz., Cornhill, Lymestrete, Bridge, and Billingsgate, to inquire whether a new building with its shops, &c., situate in the churchyard of All Hallows Graschirche, from the corner of Lumbardestrete on the north side as far as the said church, belongs to the Ward of Langbourn or the Ward of Bisshopesgate. On the 15th April the jurors met, viz., John Shopman, John Gugge, Thomas Pyriell, and Stephen Salman of the Ward of Cornhill, John Estwelle and John Neweman of the Ward of Lymestrete, Thomas Partriche, John Stephens, Richard Frecok, Nicholas Balke, and Richard Whaplode of the Ward of Bridge, (fn. 17) and they found that the building in question was situate in the Ward of Bisshopesgate and not in that of Langbourn, and its tenants ought to pay subsidies, &c., in the former Ward, accordingly.

Return made to a writ of habeas corpus [not recorded] by Thomas Canyng', Mayor, John Steward and Ralph Verney, the Sheriffs, to the effect that Elizabeth Rypley had been committed to prison, according to the immemorial custom of the City, for leading an immoral life in the house of a Lombard in the Ward of Walbroke.

Folio 289 b.

Wednesday, 21 April, 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1456], came John Walsha, Thomas Bernewey, and Richard Payne, drapers, John Kendale, "peautrer," and George Irland, grocer, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William "Marwe," Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas "Thorndone," the Chamberlain, in the sum of £1,400.

The above recognizances to be void provided that the said George Irland, who married Margaret, the widow of Thomas Hawkyn, pay, or cause to be paid, into Court the patrimony due to Thomas, Richard, Elizabeth, and Johanna, children of the said Thomas Hawkyn, so soon as they come of age, or, being females, marry.

Folio 290.

A schedule of silver plate presumably the property of the children of the above Thomas Hawkyn, comprising (inter alia) the following, viz., half a dozen cups "paris werk," covered; a "becur" cup, covered, with a "faucon"; a standing cup, covered, with "pomell of levys" (fn. 18) ; "rose" cups, covered; a spice plate; a pair of "trumpesalers" (fn. 19) ; a dozen spoons with square "pomells"; a "chalis cup gilt chast with plummetes" (?) (fn. 20) ; a "notte," covered, with a "wodewose" (fn. 21) ; a "serpentyne" (fn. 22) cup; a great "maser" with a turning "borselle" (fn. 23) ; a standing "maser" with a "prent" (fn. 24) ; a flat pouder box; and a pair of "saltsalers chased wrethe."

5 March, 5 Edward IV. [A.D. 1464-5], John Brokford alias Wakeley admitted a surety by the Court for goods bequeathed to the children of Thomas Hawkyn, loco John "Walsa," Alderman, before Ralph Josselyn, Mayor, and the Aldermen, and he entered into bond with Robert Colwych, the Chamberlain.

17 Aug., 8 Edward IV. [A.D. 1468], came Alan Lumour (?) and Johanna his wife, daughter of the above Thomas Hawkyn, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's patrimony.

Folio 290 b.

Exon'acio Magr'i Gervasii etc ab Imposico'e alienigenar' nup' auctoritate Parliamenti d' no Regi concess' etc.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London, and also to the collectors of the tax recently imposed on foreigners by the last Parliament at Redyng, (fn. 25) not to exact the tax from Gervase le Vulre, one of the King's French Secretaries and a naturalized English subject, or from any of his household. Witness the King at Westminster, 13 July, 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1456].

Exon'acio Walteri Hunt ab assisis.

3 Sept., 35 Henry VI. [A.D. 1456], Walter Hunt, grocer, discharged by William "Marwe," Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age. (fn. 26)

Br'e de proclamaco'e sup' quodam actusive ordinaco'e sequent' et Silkewymmen tangen.'

Writ to the Sheriffs to cause proclamation to be made of an ordinance made in the last Parliament touching "Silkewymen" and "Throwesters" engaged on "Silkewerk" and herein enclosed. Witness the King at Westminster, 16 March, 34 Henry VI. [A.D. 1455-6].

Actus sive ordinac'o Silkewymmen concernen.'

The ordinance mentioned above set out, to the effect that with the view of protecting silk-women in their industry, no manufactured silk shall thenceforth be brought into England from abroad, except only from "Geene" (Genoa), under penalty of forfeiture and fine. The ordinance to remain in force for five years from Easter next. (fn. 27)

Footnotes

1 During the national commotions of 1455 some of the bad characters who had taken refuge within the precinct of St. Martin le Grand broke out and severely assaulted several of the citizens, retiring again into sanctuary. They were, however, forcibly taken out and committed to prison by the civic authorities. Thereupon the Dean had, as on former occasions, complained to the King, who was then in Hertfordshire, of breach of privilege. The result was as here recorded. The City was treated with consideration, and directed to keep its prisoners until the matter could be fully investigated. -Kempe, op. cit., pp. 145-6. See also Fabyan (pp. 629-30), where the King is described as then "lying at the castell of Egle in Herefordeshyre"!
2 See 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 446n.
3 See the will of Roger Beyvin, proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting in 1278 ('Cal. of Wills,' &c., i. 29). The bones of this Charnel House, over which the chapel stood, were removed in 1549 to Finsbury, and the chapel and charnel were converted into "dwelling houses, ware houses and sheades before them for Stacioners in place of the Tombes." Stow, 'Survey' (ed. Kingsford), i. 330.
4 The Statute of Acton Burnel (11 Edw. I., A.D. 1283) enacted (inter alia) that if a debtor had no movables within the jurisdiction of the Mayor whereon the debt might be levied, but had some elsewhere within the realm, the Mayor shall "send the Recognisance made before him and the Clerk aforesaid unto the Chancellor under the King's seal, and the Chancellor shall direct a writ unto the Sheriff, in whose Bailiwick the Moveables of the Debtor be, and the Sheriff shall cause him to agree with his Creditor in such form as the Mayor should have done in case that the Moveables had been within his Power." 'Statutesat Large' (ed. 1758), i. 75. Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 79 n. ; 'Cal. F,' p. 111 'Cal. G,' p. 67.
5 The name "John Taillour" (?) has been erased.
6 In 1420 it had been ordained that no one was to become an apprentice who was not handsome of stature and had not straight and proper limbs. See 'Cal. LetterBook I,' p. 250.
7 In a similar ordinance made in 1592 the word is spelt "qweser." Repertory 22, fo. 392 b. Probably a scoop or ladle wherein to melt small quantities of metal. Cf. Fr. cuire, cuisine.
8 No mention is made either of these ordinances or of the ordinances of 1389 (see 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 348) in the 'History of the Founders' Company,' by W. M. Williams.
9 Ane, i.e., one.
10 Also recorded infra, p. 380.
11 Alluding, probably, to the disturbance or "hurlynge," as it was called, that had recently taken place in the City between mercers of the City and Lombards.-Gregory, p. 199.
12 Set out in Sharpe's 'London and the Kingdom,' iii. 376-7.
13 An early mention of Tent as a wine. Mr. Andre Simon, in his 'Hist. of the Wine Trade in England' (ii. 242), finds it mentioned for the first time in Galway in 1578.
14 Tarage appearance (Halli well). Cf.- "In every part the tarage is the same, Liche his fader of maneris and of name."-MS. Digby 232, fo. 1.
15 Set out in 'London and the Kingdom' (iii. 377-9).
16 Set out ibid., pp. 379-80.
17 No jurors are recorded for Billingsgate Ward.
18 "Pomel" appears to be synonymous with "knop." Cf. pomellum amellatum de azuro cum j chapellette viridi et iiij rosis albis. See Paper on 'English Medieval Drinking Bowls called Mazers,' by W. H. St. John Hope, F.S.A. (Archæol., vol. 50).
19 Trumpet-shaped salt cellars.
20 Little balls like plummets (of lead).
21 The figure of a "wild man of the woods," a satyr or faun. See Notes and Queries, 10 Dec., 1910, pp. 471-2.
22 "Cf. a Sarpentyne cuppe fassheon with a cover of a masor garnysshed with sylver" (Archæol., vol. 50). So called from its being made of a mineral of a rich green colour known as "serpentine," from its being of a spotted or mottled appearance resembling a serpent's skin.
23 Bourselle = a mariner's compass or dyall (Cotgrave). The mazer thus had for its cover, in all probability, a dial which could be turned round = a turnyng borsell.
24 A circular medallion found at the bottom of every mazer, and sometimes known as founce or frounce, and sometimes as the boss.
25 The Parliament which met at Reading on the 6th March, 1453, had granted the alien tax (originally granted by the Parliament of 1439 and frequently renewed) to the King for the term of his life. Vide supra, pp. 236-7, note.
26 Also recorded supra, p. 376.
27 Set out in 'Rot. Parl.,' v. 325. Cf. Stat. 33 Henry VI., cap. v.