House of Lords Journal Volume 8
7 May 1646

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 8: 7 May 1646', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 8: 1645-1647 (1767-1830), pp. 304-307. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=34023 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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DIE Jovis, 7 die Maii.

PRAYERS, by Mr. Hicks.

Comes Manchester, Speaker.

Comes (fn. *) Warwicke.
Comes Kent.
Comes Bolingbrooke.
Comes (fn. *) Midd.
Comes Rutland.
L. Viscount Say & Seale.
Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Northumb'land.
Comes Essex.
Comes Suff.
Comes Lincoln.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Nottingham.
Ds. North.
Ds. Grey.
Ds. Robertes.
Ds. Willoughby.
Ds. Bruce.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard.
Ds. Berkley.
Ds. Dacres.
Ds. Wharton.

E. of Bath's Petition, to be released.

A Petition of the Earl of Bath was read, as follows:

"To the Right Honourable the Lords assembled in Parliament.

"The humble Petition of Henry Earl of Bath;

"Sheweth,

"That whereas your Petitioner, by your Lordships Order, hath been under the Custody of the Gentletleman Usher attending that Honourable House since Saturday last; he humbly prayeth, that he may be discharged from that Restraint.

"And he shall pray.

"He. Bathon."

To give Bail.

Ordered, That the Earl of Bath shall have Liberty, for his Health Sake, giving Security to this House for his forth-coming when he shall have Summons from this House.

L. Savill to be released, on giving Bail.

Ordered, That the Lord Savill shall be released from his present Imprisonment in The Tower, giving Bail to this House for his forth-coming when he shall be summoned by this House.

Letter from the Committee near Newark.

A Letter was read, from the Lord Mountagu, with an inclosed Paper, being a Copy of the Letter of the Scotts Commissioners, concerning the King's coming into the Scotch Army near Newarke. (Here enter them.)

Letter from the Scots Commissioners.

Next, a Letter from the Scotch Commissioners of the Kingdom of Scotland, was read. (Here enter it.)

Answer from the H. C.

Doctor Aylett and Doctor Heath return with this Answer from the House of Commons:

That they agree to the Alterations in the Ordinance for putting Delinquents out of the Line of Communication: (Here enter it.) To the rest of the Particulars, they will send an Answer by Messengers of their own.

Message from thence, for a Conference concerning Letters from the Committee before Newark.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Tho. Dacres Knight:

1. To desire a Conference with their Lordships, if it may stand with their Conveniency, touching some Letters received from the Commissioners near Newarke.

Ordered, To give a present Conference, in the Painted Chamber, as is desired.

and with Orders.

2. To desire Concurrence in an Order concerning Sir Wm. Lyster. (Here enter it.)

Read, and Agreed to.

3. To desire Concurrence in an Order for paying Twenty Pounds to a Trumpeter that brought the News of the Surrender of Banbury Castle. (Here enter it.)

Agreed to.

The Answer returned:

Answer.

That this House will give a present Conference, in the Painted Chamber, as is desired: To all the rest of the Particulars of this Message, their Lordships agree to them.

Committee for Irish Affairs.

"Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the Lord Lisle, Sir John Temple, Mr. Nathaniell Fiennis, Sir Gregory Norton, Sir John Evelyn of Wilts, and Mr. Chaloner, be added to the Committee of Lords and Commons for Irish Affairs.

"Ordered, That the Earl of Northumb. Earl of Essex, Earl of Nottingham, and the Lord Viscount Say & Seale, are added to the Committee for the Irish Affairs."

The Lords went to the Conference with the House of Commons; and the House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The Conference being ended, the House was resumed.

Report of the Conference concerning some Letters from the Committees near Newark, about the King's coming into the Scots Army.

The Speaker reported the Effect of the Conference; which was,

"That Sir Henry Vane Senior said, He was commanded by the House of Commons, to acquaint their Lordships with Three Letters which they have received from the Army near Newarke:

"The First was, a Letter from the Commissioners of the Parliament in the Army near Newarke.

"The Second was, a Copy of a Letter from the Scottish Commissioners in the Army.

"The Third was, a Letter from Major General Poyntz."

(Here enter them.)

"These being read, a Minute of a Letter which was sent from the Agent of the Parliament of England at Paris was read."

(Here enter it.)

"That Sir Henry Vane said, That, upon a serious Debate of these Letters, the House of Commons have made Three Votes, wherein they desire their Lordships Concurrence, as much conducing to the Good of the Parliament of England."

Ordered, That this Business shall be taken into Consideration To-morrow Morning, at Ten of the Clock.

Letter of Sir T. Fairfax, that the D. of Richmond and the E. of Lindsay are to be brought to Windsor, in Custody of the Black Rod.

"SIR,

"The Lords in Parliament, having considered of your Letter, and the Paper containing the Desires of the Duke of Richmond and the Earl of Lindsey, have commanded me to acquaint you, That they have Ordered, That the Duke of Richmond and the Earl of Lindsey be committed to the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod (they being Peers of this Kingdom), and by him to be brought with a safe Convoy to Windsor Castle, there to remain in his Custody until the further Pleasure of the Lords be known; which former Resolution their Lordships have directed me to signify unto you, who am

"Your humble Servant,

"Manchester."

Letter from the Committee near Newark, that the King is come into the Scots Army.

(fn. *) "For the Right Honourable the Speaker of the House of Peers pro Tempore.

"Edward Mountagu.

"Wm. Pierrpont. Haste, Haste, Haste.

"May it please your Lordships,

"We were this Morning, about Ten of the Clock, credibly informed, that the King with Three others came in great Speed this Morning, about Seven of the Clock, to Southwell, and went to the House of Monsieur Montrelle the French Agent about Twelve this Day. Two of the Scottish Commissioners brought us a Letter, a Copy whereof is here inclosed. The Two Commissioners presently returned; and in this Surprize we could not for the present think further than to desire of them He might not remove, which they approved of; and that we might speedily meet the rest of them at Farnton, which was consented unto, and we are now going thither accordingly; and I shall immediately advertise your Lordships of our further Proceedings: And we beseech to know the Pleasure of the Houses, with all possible Speed, how we shall direct and guide ourselves herein.

"Your Lordships

"Most humble Servant,

"Edw. Mountague."

From Col. Rosseter's Tent, at the Leaguer before Newarke, the 5th of May, 1646.

Letter from the Scots Commissioners with their Army near Newark, about it.

(fn. †) "Right Honnorable,

"The discharging of ourselves of the Duty wee owe to the Kingdome of England, and unto you as Commissioners from the same, moves us to acquaint you with the King's comeinge into our Army this Morninge; which, haveinge overtaken us unexpectedly, hath filled us with Amazement, and made us like Men that dreame. Wee cannott thinke that He would have bin soe advised in His Resolutions, to have cast Himselfe upon us without a reall Intention to give full Sattisfaction to both Kingdomes in all their just and reasonable Demaunds, in all those Things that concerne Religion and Righteousnes: Whatsoever bee His Disposition or Resolutions, you may bee assured that wee shall never entertaine any Thought, nor correspond with any Purpose, nor countenance any Indeavor, that may in any Circumstance intrench upon our League and Covenant, or weaken the Union or Confidence betwixt the Nations: That Union unto our Kingdome was the Matter of many Prayers; and as nothinge was more joyfull to us then to heare it sett on Foote, soe hitherto have wee thought nothinge to deere to mayntayne it; and wee trust to walke with such Faithfullnes and Truth in this Perticuler, that, as wee have the Testimony of a good Conscience within ourselves, soe you and all the World shall see that wee mynd your Interest with as much Integrity and Care as our owne; being confident you will entertaine noe other Thought of us.

Southwell, 4th of May, 1646.

"Signed, by Warrant, and at Commaund, of the Commissioners of the Parliament of Scotland, by

"Your Lordships

"Most humble Servaunt,

"Louthian.

"For the Right Honnorable the Commissioners of the Parliament of England."

Letter from the Scots Commissioners, that they have no authentic Intelligence of it.

"For the Right Honnorable the Speaker of the House of Peeres pro Tempore.

"My Lord,

"Haveing received noe other Advertisment, neither from the Committee of Estates at the Scottish Army, nor by any other Way, but that wee heare this Afnoone that Letters are come to the Honnorable Houses, giveing Notice that the King is come to the Scottish Army neere Newarke; wee have judged it incumbent to us to represent to the Houses, That, if His Majesty bee gon thither, wee are very confident that the Lord Generall and Committee with that Army, from whome wee looke to heare speedily, will doe that which be comes their Places and Trust for the Good of both Kingdomes, according to the Conditions of the mutuall Covenant and Treaty betweene the Nations; and doe desire that, by common Advise, the present Oppertunity may bee improved, for setlinge of Religion and the Peace of both Kingdomes, which as yet hath alwayes beene, soe is it now, and shall ever bee, the earnest Desire and constant Indeavor of

"Your Lordships very affectionate Freinds and humble Servaunts,

Worcester House, 6th of May, 1646.

"Loudon.

Lauderdaile.

"Johnston.

"Hew Kennedy.

Ro. Barclay."

Order for 1500£. to Sir W. Lister, in Consideration of his Losses.

"Whereas Sir William Lister, of Thornton, in Craven, in the County of Yorke, Knight, in these distracted Times, hath suffered very much, his Eldest Son slain in the Service of the Parliament, his Estate of great Value plundered by the Enemy, his Mansionhouse at Thornton and other Out-houses burned down to the Ground, the said Mansion-house being made a Garrison formerly for the Parliament, and so continued for the Space of Three Years, himself and Family being driven into the Southern Parts for Protection and Relief, hath not at present whereby to sustain himself and Family, his Estate lying under the Power of the Enemy: Be it therefore Ordered and Ordained, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the said Sir William Lister shall, towards his present Support and Maintenance, have and receive the Sum of Fifteen Hundred Pounds, out of the Fine and Composition which shall be set and made by the Two Houses of Parliament with Sir Humphrey Tracy, of Stanway, in the County of Gloucester, Baronet, for his Delinquency; and the Committee of Gouldsmiths Hall, or the Treasurer there, is hereby required to pay the Sum of Eight Hundred Pounds unto the said Sir William Lister, which is already paid in by the aforenamed Sir Humphrey Tracy; and that the Seven Hundred Pounds resting unpaid be appointed to be paid to the said Sir William Lister, or his Assigns, by the said Sir Humphrey Tracy; and this present Ordinance shall be a sufficient Warrant to the said Committee or Treasurer for the Payment of the said Sum of Eight Hundred Pounds, and to the said Sir Humphrey Tracy for the Payment of the said Sum of Seven Hundred Pounds, to the said Sir William Lister, or his Assigns, whose Receipt shall be a sufficient Discharge to them, or any of them, in that Behalf."

Order for 20£. to the Messenger from Banbury.

"Ordered, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, That the Committee of Lords and Commons for Advance of Monies at Habberdash'rs Hall do forthwith pay unto the Trumpeter that brought the News of the Surrender of Banbury Castle Twenty Pounds, bestowed upon him for this and other Services."

Letter from the Committee near Newark, that the King is come into the Scots Army.

"For the Honourable William Lenthall Esquire, Speaker of the House of Commons, Westm. These.

"Edward Mountagu.

" (fn. *) Mr. Perrepont. Haste, Post Haste.

"SIR,

"We were this Morning about Ten of the Clock, credibly informed, that the King with Three others, came in great Speed this Morning, about Seven of the Clock, to Southwell, and went to the House of Monsieur Montrell the French Agent, about Twelve this Day. Two of the Scotts Commissioners presently returned; and in this Surprise we could not for the present think further than to desire of them He might not remove, which they approved of; and that we might speedily meet the rest of them at Farnton, which was consented unto, and we are now going thither accordingly; and shall immediately advertise you of our further Proceedings; and do beseech to know your Pleasure, with all possible Speed, how we shall direct and guide ourselves herein.

"Your humble Servants,

"Wm. Pierrepont.

Wm. Armyne.

"Edw. Ayscoughe.

"Anthony Irby.

Tho. Hatcher."

From Col. Rosseter's Tent, at the Leaguer before Newarke, the 5th of May, 1646.

Letter from the Scots Commissioners with their Army near Newark, about it.

"Right Honnorable,

"The discharging of ourselves of the Duty wee owe unto the Kingdome of England, and unto you as Commissioners from the same, moves us to acquaint you with the King's comeing into our Army this Morninge; which, haveing overtaken us unexpectedly, hath filled us with Amazment, and made us like Men that dreame. Wee cannott thinke He would have beene soe unadvised in His Resolutions to have cast Himselfe upon us without a reall Intention to give full Sattisfaction to both Kingdomes in all their just and reasonable Demaunds, in all those Things that concerne Religion and Righteousnes: Whatsoever bee His Disposition or Resolution, you may bee assured wee shall never entertaine any Thought, nor correspond with any Purpose, nor countenance any Endeavors, that may in any Circumstance incroach upon our League and Covenant, a weakening the Union and Confidence betwixt the Nations: That Union to our Kingdome was the Matter of many Prayers; and as nothing was more joyfull to us then to have it sett on Foote, soe hitherto have wee thought nothinge too deere to mayntayne it; and wee trust to walke with such Faithfullnes and Truth in this Particular, that, as wee have the Testimony of a good Conscience within ourselves, soe you and all the World shall see that wee mynd your Interest with as much Integrity and Care as our owne: being confident you will entertaine noe other Thought of us.

Southwell, the 5th May, 1646.

"Signed, by the Warrant, and at the Commaund, of the Commissioners of the Parliament of Scotland, by

"Your Lordships

"Most humble Servaunt,

"Louthian."

Letter from Col. Poyntz, about it, and the Surrender of Newark.

"SIR,

"I sent you this Day Notice of a Relation of the King's coming to the Scotts Quarters; the Confirmation whereof I conceive to be a Business of that Consequence, that I posted away my Secretary, to assure you that He is safely secured at Kelham by the Scotts. Our Process in the Treaty was in very good Forwardness; but we now rather expect His Majesty's Commands for a Surrender, than the Prosecution of the Parley. However, within few Days, I shall be able to give you Satisfaction therein. In the mean Time, this with my humble Service; and the Bearer I desire may be represented to the House, from

5th May, 1646.

"Your most humble Servant,

"Sidenham Points.

"The Bearer will give you our Condition more particularly, if you please to command it.

"For the Honourable William Lenthall Esquire, Speaker of the House of Commons."

"Minute of a Letter from Monsieur Angier, from Paris, of 4May24 April, 1646.

Letter from Paris, that the Queen has sent for the P. of Wales to come there.

"At last the Prince of Wales is at Jarsey. The Queen his Mother doth send Mr. Jarmin's Brother, Captain Cooke, and some others, to fetch him hither, where he will expect what will be the King his Father's Success. Monday last, the said Queen received Intelligence he would go out of Oxford, in Spite of His Enemies, to join the Scotts, as being agreed with them. Many do flatter themselves as if the said Prince would be sent into Scotland, to raise again Mountrosse's Party, because the King could not do it Himself.

Order to continue the Ordinance for keeping Delinquents without the Line of Communication.

"Whereas the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, by an Ordinance of the 31th of March, for the Reasons therein mentioned, have Ordered, That all Papists whatsoever, and all Officers and Soldiers of Fortune, and other Persons that have borne Arms against the Parliament, not being under Restraint, should, before the End of the Sixth Day of April last past, depart out of the Cities of London and Westminster and Lines of Communication, the said Order to continue for the Space of One Month after the said Sixth Day of April, under divers Penalties, Limitations, and Provisos, in the said Ordinance mentioned, whereunto Relation being had doth and may appear; and whereas the said Lords and Commons do take Notice, that divers Persons, in Obedience to the said Ordinance, have departed the said Cities and Lines of Communication, and yet do remain in the Towns and Villages near adjoining, who, upon all Attempts that might be made to the Disturbance of the Peace of the said Cities, can sooner draw themselves for Action, and put themselves into a Condition to act any mischievous Design that may be against the said Cities: The said Lords and Commons, for the Safety of the Parliament and Cities of London and Westm. do conceive it most necessary, that further Care and Provision should be had, to prevent the great Inconveniencies that may arise by the Continuance of the said Persons in the said Places, or their present Resort to the said Cities, do Ordain and Declare, That the said Ordinance, and all and every Clause and Article and Provisos thereof, shall continue, and be in Force, to all Intents and Purposes, under the Penalties therein mentioned, against all and every such Person and Persons, for the Space of One Month more from the End and Expiration of the aforesaid Month, as if the said Ordinance had been made to have continued for Two Months from the said Sixth Day of April: And it is further Ordained, That all Persons that have borne Arms against the Parliament, and all Papists whatsoever, which went out of the Lines of Communication in Obedience to the said Ordinance, and all other such Persons as aforesaid as have since come from the Enemy's Quarters to or near the said Cities, shall, by the Twelfth Day of this Instant May, depart and remove themselves Twenty Miles at the least distant from the said Cities and Lines of Communication, under the Penalties mentioned in the said recited Ordinance; and of the Places whither they intend to resort shall give or send particular Notice under their Hands in Writing unto the Committee sitting at Goldsmiths Hall, mentioned in the said recited Ordinance, before the said Twelfth Day of May."

Footnotes

* Bis in Originali.
* A Duplicate of this Letter, addressed to the Speaker H. C. occurs in the next Page, with some small Variations.
A Duplicate of this Letter occurs also in the next Page; but as there are some Variations, they are all inserted.
* Sic.