House of Lords Journal Volume 8
26 November 1646

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 8: 26 November 1646', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 8: 1645-1647 (1767-1830), pp. 577-579. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=34147 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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DIE Jovis, 26 die Novembris.

PRAYERS, by Mr. Thoroughgood.

Domini præsentes fuerunt:

Comes Manchester, Speaker.

Comes Northumb.
Comes Kent.
Comes Lyncolne.
Comes Warwicke.
Comes Sarum.
Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Midd.
L. Viscount Hereford.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Suffolke.
Comes Denbigh.
Ds. North.
Ds. Grey.
Ds. Howard.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Willoughby.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Bruce.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Mountague.

Countess of Arundell, a Pass to come Home.

Ordered, That the Countess of Arundell shall have a Pass, to come into England, out of France, with Twelve Servants.

Valin, a Pass to France.

Ordered, That Valin shall have a Pass, to go into France.

Wright to be instituted to Bulwick.

Ordered, That Doctor Aylett shall give Institution and Induction to Christopher Wright, to the Rectory of Bulwike, with a salvo Jure cujuscunque; he taking the Covenant.

Preachers at the Fast thanked.

Ordered, That Mr. Ward and Mr. Price have hereby Thanks returned them, for their Sermons preached Yesterday before the Lords, at the Fast; and they are desired to print and publish their Sermons.

Preachers at the next.

Ordered, That Mr. Good and Mr. Horton shall be desired to preach the next Fast-day before the Lords in Parliament.

Banks' Ordinance.

The Ordinance for Mr. Bankes to be Rector to Ivy Church, was read, and Agreed to; and Ordered to be sent to the House of Commons for their Concurrence.

Captain Powell freed from an Arrest.

Ordered, That Captain Powell shall be discharged from his Imprisonment, being arrested for Debt; there being many Arrears due to him from the State.

L. Cottington's Petition.

A Petition of the Lord Cottington, was read, and Ordered to be laid aside.

Ordinance to explain the One for Sale of Bishops Lands.

The House was adjourned into a Committee during Pleasure, to take into Consideration the Ordinance for Explanation of the Ordinance for Sale of the Bishops Lands, and putting it into Execution.

The House was resumed.

Countess of Bedford's Petition, for a Maintenance for Ly. Digby's Children.

The Petition of Katherine Countess Dowager of Bedford, and on the Behalf of John, George, Wm. Diana, and Ann, Sons and Daughters of Anne Lady Digby; shewing, "That the Estate out of which the said Children have heretofore had Support and Maintenance is now under Sequestration; by reason whereof, they have for the present no other Livelihood but Charity; and their Condition is such, and so wanting and penurious, as that the Petitioner conceives it rather fit for Concealment than Expression: Therefore humbly prays, that, out of the said sequestered Estate, some competent Allowance for (fn. *) their Support and Livelihood may be allowed."

It is Ordered, To be sent to the House of Commons with Recommendations.

How and Williams in Error.

Ordered, That the Errors between How and Williams shall be argued, at this Bar, by Counsel on both Sides, To-morrow Morning, at which Time some of the Judges to attend this House.

Message from the H. C. with Papers accusing Two Peers;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Nicolls, &c. who was commanded to deliver to this House a Letter, with some Examinations, which concerns Two Peers of this House; and they had Directions only to deliver them.

and with Ordinances.

2. To deliver divers Orders and Ordinances to their Lordships, and desire Concurrence therein.

Papers accusing the Earls of Northumb. and Pemb. of supplying the King with Money.

The Letter and Examinations were read.

(Here enter it.)

The Purport of them is concerning the Earl of Northumb. and the Earl of Pembrooke; that they should (fn. †) have sent Four Thousand Pounds to the King at Oxford, and likewise some Members of the House of Commons.

They declare their Innocence.

The Earls of Northumb. and Pembrooke declared their Innocency in this Business; and desired the House would please to put it into a Way of Examination.

And after Debate;

This Question was put, "Whether, at the Desire of the Earl of Northumb. and the Earl of Pembrooke, there shall be a Committee appointed; and that the House of Commons be acquainted that this House desires them to appoint a Committee of their House, who may be present, if they think fit, to examine this Business?"

And it was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Ordered, That this be communicated to the House of Commons To-morrow Morning, at a Conference.

Message to the H. C. for a Conference about it.

And presently a Message was sent to the House of Commons, to desire a Conference, To-morrow Morning, at Eleven of the Clock, in the Painted Chamber, concerning the Business brought up at the last Message, mentioned in the Letter out of Cornwayle.

Lloyd to be attached, for this Scandal.

Ordered, That the Gentleman Usher attending this House shall attach the Body of Richard Lloyd, and bring (fn. †) him in safe Custody to this House, to answer the Scandal raised by him against the Earls of Northumb. and Pembrooke.

Committee for the Conference.

The House nominated this Committee following, for the Business aforesaid:

Comes Kent.
Comes Rutland.
Comes Sarum.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Midd.
Comes Manchester.
Ds. Howard.
Ds. Dacres.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Mountague.

E. of Suff. and the Executors of Sir R. Hitcham.

Whereas a Cause is depending in this House, between the Right Honourable the Earl of Suffolke, and Edward Alpe and others, the Executors of Sir Robert Hitcham, and others; and whereas, by a former Order, the Rents paid into the Chancery by the Tenants of the Manors of Framlingham and Saxted, in the County of Suff. should remain there, and not be disposed of or taken out until the Business depending in this House were determined; and the House being this Day informed, that there is an Order in the Chancery, betwixt Edward Alpe Plantiff and others, and Robert Butt and others Defendants, for taking out the said Monies: It is hereby Ordered, That the said Money shall remain in the Chancery where now it is, and not taken forth until the said Cause be determined in this House, notwithstanding the Order in July last, or any Order made by the Chancery to the contrary; and that the Officers of Chancery do forbear to pay or issue out any Money, by colour of any Order or Direction, till the said Determination of the Cause in this House.

Lloyd's Examination, about his Report of the Earls of Northumberland and Pembroke having sent Money to the King at Oxford.

"Richard Lloyd, of The Inner Temple, Esquire, upon his Examination before this Committee, confesseth, That, on Sunday last, he being at Dinner, at the Sign of The Bull, in this Town of Truroe, together with Mr. Cowes and Mr. Treise, he, amongst other Things, told them of certain Monies that was sent from Two Lords of the Parliament to the King at Oxford, during the late Wars in this Kingdom: And this Examinant now saith, That he, being at Oxford about Four Years last past, was a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber Extraordinary to the King, and rid in His Troop; and about that Time there were Two Gentlemen that came from London, the One called Mr. Compton who was a Page to the Earl of Pembrooke, and another whose Name he doth not now remember, but had formerly been a Page to the said Earl of Pembrooke, and was then (as (fn. *) this Examinant believeth) One of the King's Servants; and that they told this Examinant, That they had brought from London Four Thousand Pounds in Gold, quilted about them, from the Right Honourable the Earl of Northumberland and the aforesaid Earl of Pembrooke, from each Two Thousand Pounds, which they had sent to the King; and that the said Compton lay in the same House in Oxford where this Examinant lay; and that they were so sore with carrying the said Money, that they told this Examinant they kept their Beds Three or Four Days: And he further saith, That Sir George Crymes, of Pelham, in Surrey, being then at Oxford, told this Examinant, That he had brought One Hundred Pounds to the King, which Sir Poynings Moore a Member of the House of Commons had sent to the King from London; and that Sir Thomas Longvill, near Stonny Strattford, told this Examinant, about Two Years last past, that he had Four or Five Hundred Pounds sent by some Parliament Men, Friends of his, to the King: And this Examinant knoweth that there was of the said Monies One Hundred and Forty or One Hundred and Fifty Pounds paid, by Order from Sir Edward Hide the Chancellor, to Sir Thomas Lunsford, by the said Sir Thomas Langvill, for the said Lunsford's Pay: And he further confesseth to have said, That the Reason why the said Persons sent the Money aforesaid was, because the Parliament was weak, and they knew not how Things would fall out. And more he sayeth not.

"Rich'd Lloyd.

"Examined by us,

"Ioh. Trefusis.

Rich. Carter.

"Chist. Worthevale.

Jo. Trefusis."

Treise's, about the same.

"Cornub. ff. "At the Standing Committee of Parliament, in Truroe, the 18th Day of Nov'r, 1646.

"The Examination of John Treise, Gentleman.

"This Examinate, sworn, saith, That he being on Sunday last at Dinner, at the Sign of The Bull in this Town, together with one Mr. Cowes and one Mr. (fn. *) Lloyd (who is reputed to have been One of the Prince's Servants, and to have remained about this Town ever since the Prince went hence), he heard the said Mr. Lloyd to say, That, in the Time of the late Wars between King and Parliament, he knew Two great Lords that now sit in Parliament, and have ever sat in Parliament since the Beginning of the Troubles, and are as great Men as any in the House, that sent to Oxford to the King, by Two of their Servants, Four Thousand Pounds in Gold: And the said Mr. Lloyd then further said, That he knew the Men that brought the said Four Thousand Pounds to Oxford; and that they lay in Oxford in the same House where he did; and that they kept their Beds Three or Four Days after they came thither, being weary and sore with carrying the said Money quilted about them: And he said also, That One of the said Servants returned soon after to London, and the other remained with the King, and was afterwards slain in the King's Party before Winchester: And this Examinant further saith, That the said Mr. Lloyd did then also say, That he knew divers eminent Members of the House of Commons (and now sitting in the House), that, in the Time of the said late Wars, (fn. *) sent divers Sums of Money to the King at Oxford (some One Hundred Pounds, some Two Hundred Pounds, some Three Hundred Pounds, at a Time): And the said Mr. Lloyd said, That he thought they did so because the Parliament Party was at that Time weak, and they were not assured which Way Things would go, or Words to the like Effect: And this Examinant saith, That this Examination is by him set down full in Sense to what the said Mr. Lloyd then spake, and as near in Words as this Examinant can now remember.

"John Treise."

and Cowes.

"Henry Cowes, Gentleman, sworn, and examined, saith, That, on Sunday last past, he this Examinant was at Dinner, at the Sign of The Bull, in this Town of Truroe, together with Mr. John Treise and Mr. Lloyd (who is reputed One of the Prince's Servants, and hath remained in this Town since the Prince went hence); and there, amongst other Discourse, he heard the said Mr. Lloyd say, That, in the Time of the late Troubles or Wars in this Kingdom between the King and Parliament, he knew One or Two of the chief Lords that now sit in Parliament to have sent to the King to Oxford, by their Servants, Four Thousand Pounds in Gold; and that he knew the Men that brought the said Four Thousand Pounds; and that they lay in Oxford in the same House where he the said Mr. Lloyd did lye; and that they kept their Beds Three or Four Days after they came thither, being weary with carrying the said Gold quilted about them, or Words to that Effect: And this Examinate further saith, That the said Mr. Lloyd did then also say, That he knew divers eminent Members of the House of Commons (and now of the House,) that did in the Time of the late Wars send divers Sums of Money to the King at Oxford, some One Hundred Pounds, some Two Hundred Pounds, some Three Hundred Pounds at a Time: And the said Lloyd said, That he thought they did so, because the Parliament Party was at that Time weak, and they knew not which Way Things would go; or Words to that Effect.

"Henry Cowes."

Footnotes

* Origin. the.
Deest in Originali.
* Origin. then.
* Origin. Llyod.
Origin. send.