House of Lords Journal Volume 5
20 July 1642

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 5: 20 July 1642', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 5: 1642-1643 (1767-1830), pp. 222-227. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=34854 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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Contents

Die Mercurii, videlicet, 20 die Julii.
Message from the H.C. about the Impeachment against the Lord Mayor. Letter from the Earl of Holland. Sent to the H. C. Sir Philip Vernatti and Jennings. Answer from the H. C. Bourne sent for, for Words against the Parliament. Pacquet from the Earl of Warwick, with the following Papers. To be communicated to the H. C. Message from the H. C. for the Lords to concur in the following Orders. Conference about Forces in Ireland reported. Answer to the H. C. Message to the H. C. that the Lords are ready to give Judgement against the Nine impeached Lords who went to York. Answer. Speaker of the H. C. demands Judgement against them. Their Sentence. Committee, who went with the Petition to the King, to return if they receive not a speedy Answer. The King's Warrant to the Naval Officers at Chatham, to supply Sir John Pennington with Stores. Sir William Russel's Letter to the E. of Warwick, about a Supply of Money for him. The King's Letter to the principal Officers of the Navy, not to obey the Directions of both Houses. The Earl of Holland's Letter, about the Delivery of the Petition to the King. Merchant Strangers to lend Money to the Parliament. Order against executing the Commissions of Array. Order for 200l. to L. Dowcray. Order for 200l. for the Archbishop of Cashell. Order for 200l. for Richard Fitzgerald. Order for 50l. for Roger Hodges. Order for 200l. for Dr. Jones. Order for 200l. for Lady Eliz. Gray. Order about the Propositions for raising Horse. &c. in Dorsetshire. Order about the Propositions for raising Horse &c. in Somersetshire. Bourne's Words against the Parliament. Forces in Ireland. Directions for subduing Munster and Limerick. Adjourn. Post meridiem. Adjourn. Footnotes

Die Mercurii, videlicet, 20 die Julii.

PRAYERS.

The Lord Kymbolton was appointed to be Speaker this Day.

The Messengers return this Answer, sent Yesterday to the House of Commons:

Message from the H.C. about the Impeachment against the Lord Mayor.

That they will send a Committee of their House, to manage their Evidence against the Lord Mayor; and will also bring Proofs, to make good their Impeachment against him.

Letter from the Earl of Holland.

The Speaker acquainted this House, "That he had received a Letter from the Earl of Holland;" which the House commanded to be read: videlicet, (Here enter it.)

Sent to the H. C.

Ordered, To be communicated to the House of Commons; and accordingly it was sent down, by Sir Robert Rich and Mr. Page.

Sir Philip Vernatti and Jennings.

Upon reading the Petition of Sir Phillibert Vernatti; it is Ordered, That Mr. Jennings shall have a Copy of this Petition, and return his Answer to it.

The Messengers return Answer:

Answer from the H. C.

That they have delivered the Letter of the Earl of Holland to the House of Commons; and they will return it by Messengers of their own.

Bourne sent for, for Words against the Parliament.

Upon an Affidavit made this Day, by Mr. Wendye Oxford, Gentleman, of scandalous Words spoken against the Parliament, by Anthony Bourne, of Thriptow, in the County of Cambridge; it is Ordered, That the said Anthony Bourne shall be sent for, as a Delinquent, to appear before this House, to answer the same. (Here enter it.)

Pacquet from the Earl of Warwick, with the following Papers.

A Packet was sent to the Speaker of this House, from the Earl of Warwicke; containing these Particulars following; which were read:

1. The King's Warrant to the Officers of the Navy, (fn. *) not to furnish the Navy with Provisions. (Here enter it.)

2. The King's Warrant to Captain Phineas Pett.

3. A Copy of a Letter written to his Lordship, from Sir Wm. Russell.

To be communicated to the H. C.

Ordered, To communicate these Letters to the House of Commons; and to represent to them the Necessity there is to to re-victual the Navy speedily, or else many of the Ships will be forced to come in to Chatham.

Message from the H. C. for the Lords to concur in the following Orders.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Henry Mildmay, Knight:

1. To desire their Lordships Concurrence in the Order for the Arms to be delivered to Sir Wm. Belfore.

To be further considered of

2. To expedite the sending of Ten (fn. *) Thousand Men to Munster, to be drawn out of Ulster and Lempster.

3. He brought up the Letter of the Earl of Holland.

4. Desired their Lordships Concurrence in an Order, to be published by the Judges at the next Assizes, concerning the Commission of Array. (Here enter it.)

Agreed to, and Ordered to be printed.

5. To desire Concurrence in an Order concerning the Merchant Strangers, whereby the Parliament may be able to keep public Faith with the Scotts. (Here enter it.)

Agreed to.

6. An Order to be sent into Somersettshire, to tender the Propositions to them.

Agreed to.

7. The Order to pay Two Hundred Pounds to the Lord Dowera.

Agreed to.

8. The Order to pay Two Hundred Pounds to the Archbishop of Cashell.

Agreed to.

9. The Order to pay Two Hundred Pounds, given to Mr. Fitzgarrett.

Agreed to.

10. An Order to pay Fifty Pounds to Mr. Hodges.

Agreed to.

11. An Order to pay Two Hundred Pounds to Mr. Doctor Jones.

Agreed to.

12. An Order to pay the Lady Grey Two Hundred Pounds.

Agreed to.

13. An Order to be sent into Dorsettshire, to tender the Propositions to them.

Agreed to.

Conference about Forces in Ireland reported.

The Lord Kymbolton reported the Conference with the House of Commons on Saturday last, for drawing Forces out of Ulster and Lempster into Munster, in Ireland. (Here enter it.)

To be considered of.

The Answer returned to the House of Commons was:

Answer to the H. C.

That this House agrees (fn. †) in all the Orders now brought up; but concerning the Order for delivering Five Hundred Arms to Sir Wm. Balfore, and the drawing out of Forces to send into Munster, this House will send an Answer, by Messengers of their own.

Message to the H. C. that the Lords are ready to give Judgement against the Nine impeached Lords who went to York.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the Master of the Rolls and Doctor Heath:

To let them know, that their Lordships are ready to give Judgement against the Nine Lords impeached by them, if they will come up, and demand Judgement, with their Speaker.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That the House of Commons will come presently, with their Speaker, to demand Judgement against the Nine Lords.

The Lords being all set in their Robes;

Speaker of the H. C. demands Judgement against them.

The House of Commons being come with their Speaker, he said, "That the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the House of Commons, (fn. ‡) have impeached Spencer, Earl of North'ton, etc. for High Crimes and Misde meanors, to the Interruption of the Proceedings in Parliament and great Affairs of the Kingdom, and tending to the Dissolution of the Parliament, and Disturbance of the Peace of the Kingdom; for which the House of Commons have commanded him to demand their Lordships Judgement."

Then the Speaker of this House spake as followeth:

Their Sentence.

"Whereas Spencer Earl of Northampton, William Earl of Devonshire, Henry Earl of Dover, Henry Earl of Monmouth, Charles Lord Howard of Charleton, Robert Lord Rich, Charles Lord Gray of Ruthen, Thomas Lord Coventry, Arthur Lord Capell, were, the 16th of June, 1642, impeached by the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the House of Commons, for these high Crimes and Misdemeanors following; videlicet, for that, contrary to their Duty, they being Peers of the Realm, and summoned by Writ to attend the Parliament, and contrary to an Order of the House of Peers of the 9th of April last, and several other Orders, requiring the Attendance of the Members of that House, and after a Vote passed in both Houses the 20th of May last, "That the King, seduced by wicked Counsel, intends to make War against the Parliament, and that whosoever served or assisted him in that War was adjudged a Traitor;" did, notwithstanding, afterwards, in the same Month of May, contemptuously, having Notice of the said Votes and Orders, withdraw themselves from the said House of Peers, and repair to the City of Yorke, where the Preparations of the said War were and yet are in Contrivance and Agitation, they knowing of such Preparations; and being, by an Order of the 30th of May, duly summoned by the House of Peers to make their Appearance before that House, upon the 8th Day of June last past, they refused to appear, and returned a slighting and scornful Answer, by a Letter under their Hands, directed to the Speaker of the Lords House, and remaining there upon Record: For which Crimes and Misdemeanors, to the Interruption of the Proceedings of Parliament and great Affairs of the Kingdom, and tending to the Dissolution of the Parliament, and Disturbance of the Peace of the Kingdom, the said Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, did demand, that the said Spencer Earl of North'ton William Earl of Devonshire, Henry Earl of Dover, Henry Earl of Monmouth, Charles Lord Howard of Charleton, Robert Lord Rich, Charles Lord Gray of Ruthen, Thomas Lord Coventry, Arthur Lord Capell, should be put to their Answers, and receive exemplary Punishments, according to their Demerits: And whereas it was Ordered, upon the said 16th of June, That the said Spencer Earl of North'ton, William Earl of Devonshire, Henry Earl of Dover, Henry Earl of Monmouth, Charles Lord Howard of Charleton, Robert Lord Rich, Charles Lord Gray of Ruthen, Thomas Lord Coventry, Arthur Lord Capell, should appear before the Lords in Parliament, and make their several Answers before their Lordships, on Monday the 27th of the said June, to the said Impeachment, or else this House would proceed in Judgement against them by Default; and whereas the said Spencer Earl of Northampton, William Earl of Devonshire, Henry Earl of Dover, Henry Earl of Monmouth, Charles Lord Howard of Charleton, Robert Lord Rich, Charles Lord Gray of Ruthen, Thomas Lord Coventry, Arthur Lord Capell, in Contempt of this High Court, have refused to appear, and make Answer to the said Impeachment; the Lords, having taken the said Charge into their due Consideration, do find the said Spencer Earl of Northampton, William Earl of Devonshire, Henry Earl of Dover, Henry Earl of Monmouth, Charles Lord Howard of Charleton, Robert Lord Rich, Charles Lord Gray of Ruthen, Thomas Lord Coventry, Arthur Lord Capell, guilty of the Crimes charged as aforesaid; and thereupon, and for their said Contempt, this High Court doth award and judge:

"1. That Spencer Earl of North'ton, Wm. Earl of Devon, Henry Earl of Dover, Henry Earl of Monmouth, Charles Lord Howard of Charleton, Robert Lord Rich, Charles Lord Grey of Ruthen, Tho. Lord Coventry, Arthur Lord Capell, shall not sit or vote in the Lords House, during this present Parliament.

2. That they shall not enjoy the Privilege of Parliament, as Members of Parliament.

"3. That they shall stand committed to The Tower, during the Pleasure of this House."

After this, the House of Commons departed, with their Speaker, to their own House.

Committee, who went with the Petition to the King, to return if they receive not a speedy Answer.

Ordered, That the Committee for the Defence of the Kingdom shall prepare a Draught of a Letter to be sent to the Earl of Holland, and the Committee which carried the Petition to the King, That, if they received not a speedy Answer from the King, that they shall return by Friday; which Letter is to be presented to the House.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Robt. Rich and Mr. Page:

To desire their Concurrence in an Order made on Saturday last, for the disposing of the Arms which came from Hull.

The King's Warrant to the Naval Officers at Chatham, to supply Sir John Pennington with Stores.

CHARLES R.

Whereas We have, for divers important Reasons much concerning Our Service, discharged Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor the Earl of Northumberland from the Office of Lord Admiral of England, and intend to put that Place into a Commission; and whereas We have appointed and authorized Our Servant Sir John Pennington to be Admiral in the Ship The James, of Our present Fleet at Sea: Our Will and Command therefore is, That you cause to be sent to the said Sir John Pennington (as soon as he shall send to you) Our Standard, and such other Necessaries and Provisions, for the Use of Our Ships and Fleet committed to his Charge, as he shall from Time to Time send to you for, until We shall have settled Our Commission for the Admiralty; for which this shall be your sufficient Warrant.

Given at Our Court at Yorke, the 28th Day of June, 1642.

"To Our Trusty and Well-beloved Captain Phineas Pett, now at Chatham, or to any of the Officers of Our Navy there."

Sir William Russel's Letter to the E. of Warwick, about a Supply of Money for him.

Right Honourable,

By the inclosed from Mr. Greene, your Lordship will perceive the great Care which the Parliament hath taken to supply your Lordship with Money, who this Day had delivered me One Thousand Pounds to be presently sent your Lordship; and as I was dispatching the Messenger, there came unto Me His Majesty's Pleasure, signified to the principal Officers of the Navy (some being at Yorke, and the rest absent, a Copy whereof I therein inclosed send your Lordship); and presently, upon Receipt thereof, I addressed myself to the Committee of Parliament for the Navy, and shewed them His Majesty's Commands and Prohibition; whereupon I am commanded by Mr. Greene, notwithstanding, to send away the said inclosed from him, to the End your Lordship may see their Cares for your Lordship's Supplies: And although the Monies be stop in my Hands, yet such Course shall be taken within Three or Four Days, that your Lordship shall otherwise be supplied; which is the Commandment laid upon me by the Committee, to let your Lordship know by this Bearer. Craving your Lordship's Pardon, I take Leave, and rest

London, Navy Office, this 15th of July, 1642.

"Your Lordship's most humble Servant, William Russel."

The King's Letter to the principal Officers of the Navy, not to obey the Directions of both Houses.

Charles R.

Trusty and Well-beloved, We greet you well. Whereas We have discharged the Earl of Northumberland from the Office of Lord High Admiral of England, so as at the present We have no Admiral; and whereas We have likewise commanded the Earl of Warwick, upon his Allegiance, to deliver the Possession of Our Ship The James, and the rest of Our Fleet, to Sir John Pennington, to whom We have given Warrant to take the Charge and Command of Our Fleet; and whereas the said Earl of Warwick, notwithstanding Our said Command, doth rebelliously withhold from Us our said Ship and Fleet: We do therefore, by these Our Letters, will and command you, upon your Allegiance, not to obey any Order, Ordinance, or Warrant whatsoever, which shall be sent unto you, or any of you, from one or both Our Houses of Parliament, or from the said Earl of Warwick, or any other, for any Stores or Provisions, or for any Business whatsoever concerning Our said Fleet, Navy, or Ships; and that you take special Care, that no Monies or Provisions of any Kind whatsoever be issued or expended by you, or any of you, or any Officer subordinate to you, for the Use of any of the Ships belonging to Our Fleet now at Sea, without Warrant from Us, or such as We shall appoint Commissioners for Our Admiralty and Navy; and herein We require your exact Obedience, as you tender the Forfeiture of your Places, and will answer the contrary; for which this shall be your Warrant.

Given at Our Court at Yorke, the 7th Day of July, 1642.

"To Our Trusty and Wellbeloved the principal Officers of Our Navy, or to any of them."

The Earl of Holland's Letter, about the Delivery of the Petition to the King.

My Lord,

Our Admittance to His Majesty was very quick; for that Night We arrived here, being Saturday, after His Supper (through He came Home late from Lyncolne), He commanded us to attend Him; where we found Him accompained by many Officers, but few Lords, for most of them were absent (they say here) to put in Execution the Commission of Array in those Shires whither the King's Commands hath directed them. After we had read your Petition, His Majesty told us it was a Business of great Importance, and required Time for to advise of His Answer; yet then He observed with some Sharpness Parts of the Petition, that I shall give my Lords an Account of. I believe we may be dispatched To-day, or at the farthest To-morrow; for His Majesty goes to Nottingham and Leycester, to call those Countries together, and to assure them unto Him, as He believes He hath already done those where His Presence hath been. His Forces appear not to be so great as they are; for it is said here (and I believe with some Truth) that He may when He please call a very considerable Number together, that are ready upon the least Command to move towards Him; but it is declined, for Two respects; the one until He hath received a direct Answer concerning Hull; the other, to ease His Charge for the present. There are several Troops of Horse, that have been raised by Noblemen and Gentlemen, which are quartered in this Country. These Generals are only proper to be delivered unto you at this present; when I attend you, which shall be with all the Diligence I may, my Lords shall have a very particular Account of the Knowledge and the Duty of

Beverley, this 18th of July, 1642.

Your Lordship's most humble Servant, Holland.

"To the Right Honourable the Speaker of the House of Peers."

Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Merchant Strangers to lend Money to the Parliament.

"It is this Day Ordered, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, That every Alderman of the City of London, and their Deputy where no Alderman is, be hereby required forthwith to send out his Warrant unto the Common Council Men of his Ward, requiring them with all Speed, in some convenient Place within his Ward, to call before them all and every the Merchant Strangers, together with other Inhabitants that are not free of the said City, dwelling within their foresaid Ward, to know what Sums of Money they have underwritten or promised, or shall by their good Persuasions underwrite or promise, to lend towards the Sum of Fifty Thousand Pounds, desired by both Houses of Parliament to be borrowed of them, to supply many great and urgent Occasions the Parliament at present hath for Money; and forthwith to make Payment of the same into the Chamberlain's Office, in The Guildhall, London; and to return the Names of the several Persons, together with their particular Sums they have or shall lend, unto some one of the Citizens that serve in Parliament for the City of London; and the Officers appointed to receive the Hundred Thousand Pounds lent by the several Companies of London are hereby likewise authorized to receive the several Sums lent by any particular Person that is a Merchant Stranger, or other Inhabitant that is no Freeman of the City, and to give Acquittances for the same."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order against executing the Commissions of Array.

"Whereas several Commissions of Array have lately issued out, under the Great Seal of England, into the several Counties of Leicester, Worcester, and other Counties of this Realm, tending to the great Danger of His Majesty, and the Disturbance of the Peace of this Kingdom: For the preventing thereof, and of the Execution and issuing out of any such Commissions for the Time to come; it is Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the Judges and Justices of Assize of the several Counties of England and Wales be required, in their several Circuits, at the Assizes and Great Sessions to be next held for each County within this Realm and the Dominion of Wales respectively, in open Court, and in their several Charges to be delivered to the Grand Juries at the said Assizes and Great Sessions, openly to declare and publish, That the said Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament have, upon mature Deliberation, Resolved, upon the Question, That the said Commissions of Array are against Law, and against the Liberty and Property of the Subject; and that all those that are Actors in putting the same in Execution shall be esteemed Disturbers of the Peace of the Kingdom, and Betrayers of the Liberty of the Subject."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order for 200l. to L. Dowcray.

"The Lords and Commons in Parliament, taking Notice of the Worth and Quality of the Lord Theodore Docwra, and how much he hath suffered by the Cruelty of the Rebels in Ireland, being by them dispoiled of a very fair Fortune, and of all the Means of Livelihood he hath; in Consideration thereof, and in Memory of the Worth of Henry Lord Docwra his Father, deceased, and of the great Services by him done to the Crown of England, do Order, That the Treasurers at London, appointed to receive the Monies that come in upon the Act of Loan and Contribution for Ireland, do forthwith pay unto the said Lord Theodore Docwra, or his Assigns, the Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, out of the Monies that are or shall come in upon the said Act of Loan and Contribution; and this Order, together with an Acquittance under the Hand of the said Lord Theodore Docwra, or his Assigns, shall be a sufficient Discharge to the said Treasurers for so much Money as they shall hereupon pay in Manner as aforesaid."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order for 200l. for the Archbishop of Cashell.

The Lords and Commons in Parliament, taking Notice of the Quality, Learning, and Sufferings, of Archibald Archbishop of Cashell, in the Kingdom of Ireland, and how, by the Power and Cruelty of the Rebels in Munster, he hath been deprived of all his Means; his Cathedral Church, being the First Place of Note in that Province, seized upon by the Rebels, and defiled with the idolatrous Mass; in Consideration thereof, conceiving him a fit Object of their Charity, do Order, That the Treasurers at London, appointed to receive the Monies that come in upon the Act of Loan and Contribution for Ireland, do forthwith pay unto the said Archibald Archbishop of Cashall, or his Assigns, the Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, out of the Monies that are or shall come in upon the said Act of Loan and Contribution; and this Order, together with an Acquittance under the Hand of the said Archbishop or his Assigns, shall be a sufficient Discharge to the said Treasurers for so much Money as they shall hereupon pay in Manner aforesaid."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order for 200l. for Richard Fitzgerald.

The Lords and Commons in Parliament, taking Notice of the Worth and Quality of Richard Fitzgerald, and of his good Services heretofore and now by his Agency done to his Country and this Parliament, and in Consideration of his great Sufferings by the Rebels in Ireland, who have a greater Malice towards him, being their Countryman, and a constant zealous Professor of the true Protestant Religion; and for the Support of him the said Richard Fitzgerald, and Encouragement to others who shall shew the like Zeal and Constancy in these Times of Danger and Distress; do Order, That the Treasurers at London, appointed to receive the Monies that come in upon the Act of Loan and Contribution for Ireland, do forthwith pay unto the said Richard Fitzgerald, or his Assigns, the Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, out of the Monies that are or shall come in upon the said Act of Loan and Contribution; and this Order, together with an Acquittance under the Hand of the said Richard Fitchgerald, or his Assignees, shall be a sufficient Discharge to the said Treasurers for so much Money as they shall hereupon pay in Manner aforesaid."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order for 50l. for Roger Hodges.

The Lords and Commons in Parliament, taking Notice of the distressed and miserable Condition of Roger Hodges, a poor Minister, lately driven out of Ireland, by the Rebels there, from all his Means and Fortunes, do Order, That the Treasurers at London, appointed to receive the Monies that come in upon the Act of Loan and Contribution for Ireland, do forthwith pay unto the said Roger Hodges, or his Assigns, the Sum of Fifty Pounds, out of the Monies that are or shall come in upon the said Act of Loan and Contribution; and this Order, together with an Acquittance under the Hand of the said Roger Hodges, or his Assigns, shall be a sufficient Discharge to the Tresurers for so much Money as they shall hereupon (fn. *) pay in Manner as aforesaid."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order for 200l. for Dr. Jones.

The Lords and Commons in Parliament, taking Notice of the great Learning, Prudence, and Piety, of Henry Jones, Doctor in Divinity, and his great Services done, both here and in Ireland, since the Beginning of this Rebellion, having employed himself in the Behalf of the distressed Church and Protestants of that Kingdom; in Consideration of his great Losses, and long Captivity endured by the cruel and wicked Rebels of Ireland, do Order, that the Treasurers at London, appointed to receive the Monies that come in upon the Act of Loan and Contribution for Ireland, do forthwith pay unto the said Doctor Jones, or his Assigns, the Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, out of the Monies that are or shall come in upon the said Act of Loan and Contribution; and this Order, together with an Acquittance under the Hand of the said Doctor Jones or his Assigns, shall be a sufficient Discharge to the said Treasurers for so much Money as they shall hereupon pay in Manner as aforesaid."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order for 200l. for Lady Eliz. Gray.

The Lords and Commons in Parliament, taking Notice of the great Worth and Quality of Dame Elizabeth Gray, Mother to the Right Honourable the Earl of Stamford, and of the great Extremity the Cruelty of the barbarous Rebels in Ireland hath brought a Person of her Condition unto, having despoiled her of a fair and large Estate in that Kingdom; in Consideration of her Sufferings, do Order, That the Treasurers at London, appointed to receive the Monies that come in upon the Act of Loan and Contribution for Ireland, do forthwith pay unto the said Lady Gray, or her Assigns, the Sum of Two Hundred Pounds, out of the Monies that are or shall come in upon the said Act of Loan and Contribution; and this Order, together with an Acquittance under the Hand of the said Lady Gray, or her Assignees, shall be a sufficient Discharge to the said Treasurers for so much Money as they shall hereupon pay in Manner as aforesaid."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order about the Propositions for raising Horse. &c. in Dorsetshire.

It is this Day Ordered, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, That Sir Thomas Trenchard, Sir Walter Earle, Mr. John Browne, Mr. John Trenchard, Mr. Fitz James of Lewson, Mr. John Hill of Dorchester, Mr. Giles Greene, Mr. Dennis Bond, Mr. Richard Broderip, or any Two or more of them, shall have Authority to assemble and call together all such Persons as they shall think fit, within the Country of Dorsett, at such convenient Times and Places as they shall appoint, and shall tender unto them the Propositions of both Houses of Parliament, concerning the raising of Horse, Horsemen, and Arms, for the Defence of the King and both Houses of Parliament, and shall receive their Subscriptions, according to the said Propositions; and they, or any Two or more of them, shall have Authority to nominate and appoint such other Persons within the said County as they shall think fit, to assemble and call together every Person of Ability, or to repair to their several Houses or Dwellings, and take their Subscriptions according to the said Propositions; and shall return the said Propositions unto such Persons as shall be appointed Receivers in the said County, who shall from Time to Time certify the Sums, Values, and Proportions of such Subscriptions to the Treasurers of London, nominated in the said Propositions; and shall have Power to name Receivers, and to do all other Things that the Deputy Lieutenants, or any of them, are appointed or have Authority to do, by the said Propositions, Instructions, or Additions concerning the said Propositions, in as full and ample Manner as if every Particular thereof had been expressed in this Order; and the said Receivers, and other Persons appointed by them for this Service, shall have as full Power to execute their Directions as if they had been appointed by the Deputy Lieutenants of the said County: And it is further Ordered, That the Persons above-named, or any Two or more of them, do signify to their Country, That, out of their own Money, there shall be such Allowance made for Horse, Arms, aud Officers, if they will voluntarily raise any Horse for the Defence of that County."

Die Mercurii, 20 Julii, 1642.

Order about the Propositions for raising Horse &c. in Somersetshire.

Ordered, by the and Commons assembled in Parliament, That Sir John Horner, Mr. Wm. Strode of Barrington, Mr. Hill of Punsford, Mr. Roger Hill of Taunton, Sir Thomas Wroth, Mr. Wm. Long of Stretton, Mr. John Harrington, Mr. Alexander Popham, Mr. John Ashe, Mr. John Pyne, Mr. George Searle of Taunton, Mr. Hugh Rogers, or any Two or more of them, shall have Authority to assemble and call together all such Persons as they shall think fit, within the County of Somerset, at such convenient Times and Places as they shall appoint, and shall tender unto them the Propositions of both Houses of Parliament, concerning the raising of Horse, Horsemen, and Arms, for the Defence of the King and both Houses of Parliament, and shall receive the Subscriptions, according to the said Propositions; and they, or any Two or more of them, shall have Authority to nominate and appoint such other Persons, within the said County, as they shall think fit, to assemble and call together every Person of Ability, or to repair to their several Houses or Dwellings, and take their Subscriptions, according to the said Propositions; and shall return the said Propositions unto such Persons as shall be appointed Receivers in the said County, who shall, from Time to Time, certify the Sums, Values, and Proportions of such Subscriptions, to the Treasurers of London, nominated in the said Propositions; and shall have Power to name Receivers, and to do all other Things that the Deputy Lieutenants, or any of them, are appointed or have Authority to do, by the said Propositions, Instructions, or Additions concerning the said Propositions, in as full and ample Manner as if every Particular thereof had been expressed in this Order; and the said Receivers, and other Persons appointed by them for this Service, shall have as full Power to execute their Directions as if they had been appointed by the Deputy Lieutenants of the said County: And it is further Ordered, That the Persons above-named, or any Two or more of them, do signify to their Country, that, out of their own Money, there shall be Allowance made for Horse, Arms, and Officers, if they will voluntarily raise any Horse for the Defence of that County."

Wendy Oxford deposed upon Oath this Information to be true, the 20th July 1642:

The scandalous Speeches of Anthony Bourne, of Thriptow, in the County of Cambridge, Gentleman, and Muster-master of the Horse Troop of the aforesaid County, in the Presence of these Men underwritten, in Fowlemire Town, spoken against this Honourably assembled Parliament:

Bourne's Words against the Parliament.

Imprimis, That he hoped that no honest and well-disposed Man would join with the Parliament: Some saying, God forbid; he replied, That it was an insanum Parliamentum, swearing (by the Lord God) that it was worse than the mad Parliament which was held at Oxford; affirming, that they did traiterously go about to bring in a Democratical Government, and depose our Gracious Majesty and all His Royal Branches.

Item, That there were Ten or Twelve in the Parliament, the Plotters of this Treason; and, unless they were made off, either by Sword or Halter, that they would not only bring in the rest of the Members into like Treason, but the whole Kingdom to Ruin; for they went daily about to compare with The States of Holland for Government.

Item, That none but Rascals and Traitors would take Part with the insanum Parliamentum, against their Sovereign Lord and King; saying, That the greatest and most factious were the Sons of Whores; naming the Lord —, and the Lord —, with Mr. Pym of the Lower House.

Item, He rapt out divers and sundry Oaths, That he would have as good a Share in the Estate of John Welbore, Esquire, or of Tho. Hobson, Gentleman, or any other, as they had themselves, either in Lands or Stock, or both; what he could first attempt.

Item, That this Bowrne hath been (as it is generally reported) an Incendiary and factious Fellow ever since this Parliament began.

The Names of them that were present at these Speeches, spoken the 28th of June 1642:

"John Welbore, Esquire.
Tho. Hobson, Gentleman.
Edward Morelen, Physician.
Wendye Oxford, Gentleman.
J. Taylor, Gentleman.
John Watson, Yeoman."

Forces in Ireland.

"14 Julii, 1642:

Ulster: Scotts, 10000
English, 2000
New taken into Pay, 7500
Londonderry, 400
Horse with the Scotts, 300
Dragoons new taken into Pay, 600
Two old Troops of Horse, 120
Train of Artillery, Apothecaries, Surgeons, &c. near, 300
In Lemster, by List:
Foot, 15000
Horse there, Connaught 1500
Foot. 2000
Horse, Munster 140
Foot in Pay, 4000
Horse in Pay, 460
(fn. *) 44800
The Adventurers, 5000
And Horse, 500

Directions for the taking of Lymricke, and the subduing the Rebels of Munster:

Directions for subduing Munster and Limerick.

Munster affords a Lead Mine, within Twenty Miles of Lymricke, that furnisheth the Rebels with Bullet; and they make at Limricke Powder, and in the County of Kerry they make Iron Guns.

This Province is of great Importance, and to be subdued Prout &c.

Out of Ulster, 6000 Foot, and Four Troops of Horse; videlicet,

The Lord Conway in Person, with his whole Regiment of Foot, 1000
Out of the Lord of Ardes's Regiment, 0500 These 2000 to have Cloaths and Shoes beforethey can march.
Out of Sir James Mongom'y's Regiment, 0500
Out of Lord Clandeboy's Regiment, 0500
Colonel Chichester's Regiment, 0500
Sir John Clotworthy's Regiment, 0500
The Scotts, out of their 10000 Foot, which is a Fourth Part, 2500
Horse:
The Lord Conwaye's Troops, the Scotts to spare Three Troops of the Ten Troops that attend them; in all, of Horse, Four Troops
Lemster:
That out of Lemster, Foot, 4000
And of Horse from thence, so many more Horse and Foot to be added out of Lemster Forces, as the Lord Lieutenant upon his Arrival there shall think fit. 0500

That presently a Post be sent to Port Patricke in Scottland, with Order both to the Scotts General and the Lord Conway, to pursue their Directions, and draw forth their Men.

A Post presently to Dublyn, to the Lords Justices, to prepare the Lemster Forces, and to consider of the Conduct, and all other Necessaries for this March into Munster.

"That these Forces march with all possible Speed; that the Victualer of Kirecfergas do furnish Victual for the Ulster Forces, to carry them to Dundalke, where Mr. Frost is to prepare Victual for them for Four Days March; and after, the Lord Lieutenant and Lords Justices to provide for their Victual, Carriages, and all other Necessaries."

Adjourn.

Quarta post meridiem.

Post meridiem.

PRAYERS.

The Lord Kymbolton was appointed Speaker this Day.

Adjourn.

Adjourn till nona cras Aurora, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

* Bis in Originali.
* Deest in Originali.
Bis in Originali.
Origin having.
* Origin. upon pay.
* Sic.