House of Lords Journal Volume 5
22 August 1642

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 5: 22 August 1642', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 5: 1642-1643 (1767-1830), pp. 310-317. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=34881 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


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Contents

DIE Lunæ, 22 Augusti.
Answer from the H. C. about several Orders. Count Egmond, Order for his Safety. Sir Robert Dormer. Instructions for Berks sent to the H. C. Order for Indemnity for Voluntiers of Taunton. Instructions for the Berkshire Committee. Order for Indemnity for the Voluntiers of Bridport. Message to the H. C. for the Lords to concur in several Orders. Answer. Letter from the Earl of Warwick. The King laying Siege to Coventry. Message to the H. C. for a Conference. Dover Castle secured to the Parliament. Papists Houses to be searched. Earl of Warwick's Letter. Vice Admiral's Letter to him. Goods restored to P. Civell. Order for 4000l. to Sir Tho. Barrington, for Essex. Earl of Warwick's Letter, desiring Margate, Dover, &c. to be lecured. His Letter, about securing Dover and other Forts on that Coast. Trenchfield, the Vice Admiral's Letter, about sundry Persons he had stopped. Letter from the Cornish Committee, about the Militia, and opposing the Commission of Array. Earl of Warwick's Letter, about the Proceedings of his Vice Admiral's Fleet on the North Coast. Propositions between the Commissioners of Array, and Committee for executing the Militia, in Cornwall. Adjourn. Post meridiem. Message from the H. C. with an Order for 4000l. to Sir Tho. Barrington for Essex. Earl Bath, & al. sent for as Delinquents, from Cornwall. Staines Men released. Message from the H. C. with an Order for 5000l. to Mr. Frost, for Provisions for Ireland. The Order. Letter to The States General, with the Declaration of both Houses, for preserving Amity between England and Holland, sent to the H. C. Declaration of the Lords and Commons to the States General. Order for 1000l. Adventurers money for Mr. Halsteed. Adjourn. Footnotes

DIE Lunæ, 22 Augusti.

PRAYERS.

Lord Wharton, Speaker.

Answer from the H. C. about several Orders.

Sir Rob'te Rich and Mr. Page reported to the House, "That the House of Commons do agree with the Lords, in the Order touching the Office of the Ordnance in The Tower, and to the Amendments in their Order for the sending of Fifteen Thousand Pounds to Caregfargus; but touching the Order for the disarming the Earl of Wigorn, and that other for the disarming of all Papists by the Lords Lieutenants, they will return an Answer by Messengers of their own."

Count Egmond, Order for his Safety.

Ordered, That Count Egmond shall have the like Order that the French Lords have had.

Sir Robert Dormer.

Ordered, That Sir Rob'te Dormer's Commitment is referred to the Consideration of the Committee for the Defence of the Kingdom; and to make Report.

The Lieutenant of The Tower to deliver him to Mr. Maxwell, to be brought before the Lords.

The Instructions for Berks passed. (Enter Instructions.)

Instructions for Berks sent to the H. C.

Mr. Dr. Aylett and Mr. Dr. Heath sent to the Commons, to let them know, that the Lords concur with them, in the passing of the said Instructions.

"Die Lunæ, 22 Augusti, 1642.

Order for Indemnity for Voluntiers of Taunton.

"Whereas divers well-affected Persons, of the Town of Taunton, in the County of Somersett, have, as Voluntiers, exercised themselves in the Use of their Arms, by peaceable training and marching in the Fields near the said Town, the better to enable and prepare themselves for the Service and Defence of His Majesty and this Kingdom, when they shall be lawfully called thereunto: The Lords and Commons, taking the same into Consideration, do Order, That the said Persons shall have the Authority of both Houses of Parliament, for the Security and Indemnity, for their said Training and Exercising already past; and do further Ordain, That all such Inhabitants of the said Town, and Liberties thereof, as shall desire, and willingly submit, to be trained and exercised in the Use of their Arms, may, from Time to Time hereafter, in a peaceable and orderly Way, assemble themselves in Companies, to train and learn and exercise themselves in the Use of their Arms, and Order of Marching, at such convenient Times, and in such Places in the said Town and Liberties thereof, and Fields aforesaid, as shall be by them thought fit for that Purpose, until other Order shall be herein taken by both Houses of Parliament; and that they shall be saved harmless for so doing, by the Authority of both Houses of Parliament; and that the Mayor, Burgesses, and Justices of Peace of the said Town, and all others that encourage and assist the said Persons in their Training and Exercise aforesaid, shall be held, by both Houses of Parliament, to do a very acceptable Service therein, and have the Authority of both Houses of Parliament for their Indemnity in so doing; and the Mayor, Burgesses, Justices of Peace, and others aforesaid, are hereby required to take special Care, for the fortifying and safe guarding of the said Town, and preserving of the Magazine therein; and the said Voluntiers are to be aiding and assisting unto them therein, upon all Occasions; and lastly, that the Mayor and Burgesses of the said Town, or the major Part of them, shall hereby have Power and Authority, from Time to Time, to nominate and appoint a Captain, and other Officers, to train and muster the Inhabitants of the said Town."

"Instructions agreed upon by the Lords and Commons in Parliament, for Sir Francis Knowles the Younger, Knight, Henry Martin, Esquire, and Peregrine Hobby, Esquire, Members of the House of Commons, and Committees to be sent into Berks; and for Sir Francis Pile, Baronet, Sir Robt. Pye the Younger, Knight, Tanfield Vachell, Esquire, George Purefey, Thomas Fettieplace, Henrie Powle, and John Southby, Esquires, for the Preservation of the said County.

Instructions for the Berkshire Committee.

"Whereas it doth appear to the Lords and Commons now assembled in Parliament, That the King, seduced by wicked Counsel, hath raised War against His Parliament, and other His good Subjects, and hath drawn together great Troops of Papists and illaffected Persons, and sent out Commissions for the levying of others, to the great Hazard of Religion, and the Public Peace of the Kingdom: You shall therefore take special Care, that the Ordinance concerning the Militia be forthwith put in Execution, through the County of Berks; and the Sheriff, and all other Officers and Subjects of that County, are hereby enjoined to assist you, and every of you, therein; and, if any Person whatsoever shall levy, or endeavour to levy, or billet, any Soldiers, or to draw or keep together the Trained Bands, or other armed Forces of the said County, or any other Forces, by Colour or Pretence of any Commission or Warrant from His Majesty, under the Great Seal, or otherwise, without Order or Consent of both Houses of Parliament, you are to make known to the Trained Bands, and other Inhabitants, of the said County of Berks, that those who shall appear upon any such Warrant, or obey any such Commission, shall be held Disturbers of the Public Peace; and those who shall not appear upon any such Warrant or Commission, nor do any Thing in Execution thereof, shall be protected by both Houses of Parliament; and you, and every of you, shall, in the Name and by the Authority of both Houses of Parliament, require and command all Persons to forbear the Execution of such Commission or Warrant, and the same to be delivered up to you, or any of you, to be sent to the Speaker of the House of Commons; and you, and every of you, Deputy Lieutenants, are hereby required to draw together such of the Trained Bands, and other Forces of the said County, as shall be expedient for the suppressing of all such Assemblies, and for the apprehending of all or any Person or Persons as shall, after Admonition and Command by you, or any of you, made unto them, to forbear the Execution of any such Commission or Warrant, or the calling or gathering or keeping together of any such Forces or Assemblies, still persist in doing the same, and likewise such as shall bear Arms, by Colour of any Warrant or Commission from His Majesty, under the Great Seal, or otherwise, without Order or Consent of both Houses of Parliament, and also such disaffected Persons as shall be found raising any Parties or Factions against the Parliament, to be sent up hither, to answer such their Offences, as to Law and Justice shall appertain.

"And you, and every of you, the abovesaid Members of the House of Commons, shall, in the Name of the Lords and Commons, require and command the several Sheriffs of the said County to publish throughout the said County the Declarations to be published by both Houses of Parliament.

"2. You are required to suppress all Persons whatsoever, who shall levy any Soldiers, or draw together any of the Trained Bands, by Colour or Pretence of any Commission from His Majesty, under the Great Seal, or otherwise; and you shall seize upon all Horses, Arms, Ammunition, Money, Plate, or other Provision whatsoever, raised or provided, under Pretence of His Majesty's Service, for the fomenting or maintaining any such unnatural and unlawful War against His People.

"3. You shall observe and execute the Ordinance of both Houses of Parliament, of the 8th of this Month, for the Suppression of the Rebellion and Commotion raised by the Marquis of Hertford, in the County of Soms't, and other Western Counties, and, by the Earl of Northampton and others, in the Counties of Leicester, Northampton, Warwick, and other adjoining Parts, and of any other Rebellion and Commotion raised, or that shall be raised, by any other Person or Persons, within the said County of Berks.

"4. You shall conduct and lead all such Forces of Horse and Foot as shall be appointed by the Lord General (the Earl of Essex) for his Service, and shall fight with, kill, and slay, all such as shall by Force oppose you in the Execution of that Ordinance, and all other Assistants, Aiders, and Abettors; and you shall levy such other Forces of Horse and Foot as his Excellency shall, by his Commission, give you Power to levy, under such Colonels, Commanders, and other Officers, as shall be by him appointed or directed; and you shall pursue the said Rebels and Traitors, in the said County, or in any other Counties or Places of the Kingdom into which they shall retire themselves; all which Forces, so to be raised, shall have the same Pay as the rest of the Army is to have; and you shall defend and protect His Majesty's Subjects from Violence and Oppression, by the illegal Commission of Array, or otherwise; and you shall hinder and forbid the Execution of that illegal Commission, and in all Places, to the uttermost of your Power, endeavour to preserve and restore the Peace of the Kingdom.

"5. You shall take from the said Rebels and Traitors all such Arms, Ordnance, and Ammunition, as they have taken from His Majesty's Subjects, and restore the same to the Owners.

"6. You are hereby authorized and required to disarm all Popish Recusants, and all such other dangerous and ill-affected Persons, as well Clergymen as others, as have testified, or shall testify, their ill Dispositions to the Peace of the Kingdom.

"7. You, and every of you, shall further take Care, that such Resolutions and Orders of both Houses as have been, or shall be, delivered or sent down unto you, or any of you, be put in Execution; and shall require the several Sheriffs, and Justices of the Peace, and all other His Majesty's Officers and Subjects of the said County, to be aiding and assisting to you, and every of you, for that Purpose: You shall declare unto all Men, That it hath ever been, and still shall be, the Care and Endeavour of the Parliament, to provide for His Majesty's Safety; and that they do not, nor ever did, know of any Evil intended to His Majesty's Person, which might move Him to require any extraordinary Guard; that His greatest Safety is in the Affections and Fidelity of His Subjects, and in the Advice and Counsel of His Parliament; and His greatest Danger in withdrawing Himself from them; so that, under Colour of doing Him Service, disaffected and malignant Persons, obnoxious to Justice for their great Enormities, have raised Forces, which they labour to increase, to the Disturbance and Hazard of the Kingdom.

"8. You, the said Members of the House of Commons, and every of you, shall endeavour to clear the Proceedings of Parliament from all Imputations and Aspersions, and shall from Time to Time certify us of all Things which you conceive necessary for the present Service: And that we may have a speedy Account of it, and that our Directions to you, as well as your Advertisements to us, may have clear and ready Passage, you, and every of you, shall lay a strict Charge upon all Post-masters and Messengers, that they do not suffer any Letters, or other Dispatches, to or from the Parliament, to be intercepted or stayed; and, if any shall presume to make Stay of such Dispatches, you, and every of you, shall direct the Postmasters and Messengers to repair to the Justices of the Peace, Constables, and other Officers, for their Aid and Assistance, who are hereby required to take special Care that there may be no such Interruption.

"9. You, and every of you, shall take Care, that none of the Recusants Arms, or other Ammunition, of the said County of Berks, shall be carried or taken out of the said County, upon any Pretence or Command whatsoever, without Warrant from both Houses of Parliament; and you, and every of you, shall give Order and Directions to the several Sheriffs of the said County, and Towns therein respectively, Justices of Peace, and other Officers, to require and command all Popish Recusants, in the said County, to confine themselves to their Dwellings, according to the Statute in that Case provided; and, if any such Recusant shall be found to transgress therein, you, and every of you, shall cause the Justices of the Peace forthwith to bind them to their good Behaviour; and, upon Refusal or Neglect to give Security accordingly, to commit them to Prison, and further to proceed against them according to the Law.

"10. You shall also, in the Name of both Houses of Parliament, require all such Persons who have in their Custody any Part of the Public Magazine of the said County of Barks, to deliver the same unto you, or some of you, to be disposed of and employed for the Defence of the said County; and, in case of Refusal, you are hereby authorized to seize, take, and carry away, and dispose of the same, for the Purpose aforesaid.

"11. And you, and every of you, are likewise to give Charge, from both Houses of Parliament, to all Captains, Lieutenants, and other Officers for the Militia, that they be observant to such Directions as they shall receive from Time to Time from the Lord Lieutenant of the said County of Berks, or his Deputies, or any of them, for due Performance of any the Commands of the said Houses.

"12. You, and every of you, shall resist and repel, and are hereby authorized to resist and repel, by the Power of the said County of Berkes, and by all other Ways and Means, all such Force and Violence as shall be raised or brought, by any Person or Persons, to the Hindrance or Disturbance of this present Service, or for the arresting or seizing of the Persons of you, or any of you, or of any others which shall be employed in the Performance of the Ordinances, Instructions, and Commands of both Houses of Parliament, for any Thing done in the Execution thereof; and the Sheriffs and Justices of Peace of the said County of Berkes, and Towns thereof respectively, and all other Officers and Subjects, are hereby required to be aiding and assisting to you, and every of you, for the better and more speedy Execution of the Premises.

"13. You, and every of you, shall hereby, with the Consent of Two of the Members of the House of Commons aforenamed, have Power and Authority to fortify any Town, within the said County of Berks, in such Manner and Sort as you, or any of you, with the Consent of Two of the House of Commons aforenamed, shall think fit, for the Safety of the said County; and, for the more Security of the same, shall set such several Guards and Forces, in all such Places and Towns in the said County, as you, or any of you, with the Consent of any Two of the Members of the House of Commons, shall think it requisite; and to watch and ward the Beacons within the County aforesaid, and them to guard and fire, as Occasion shall require.

"14. You shall observe and execute all such further Directions and Instructions as you shall from Time to Time receive from both Houses of Parliament; as likewise such Instructions and Directions as you shall from Time to Time receive from the Committee of the Lords and Commons, appointed to take Care of the Safety of the Kingdom; and whatsoever you shall do therein, or any other Person in Aid or Assistance of you, it shall be accepted as a good and necessary Service to the Kingdom; and for their and your so doing, they and you shall be defended and protected, by the Authority of Parliament; and this Resolution of the Lords and Commons, to protect those that shall obey and further their Commands, you shall publish and declare upon all Occasions, for the better Encouragement of the Subjects of this Kingdom in that Behalf.

"15. You, and every of you, shall take Care to put in Execution the Propositions and Orders, made by the Lords and Commons now assembled in Parliament, for bringing in of Money or Plate, to maintain Horse, Horsemen, and Arms, for the Preservation of the Public Peace, and for the Defence of the King and both Houses of Parliament; as also other Instructions and Additions, for Deputy Lieutenants which are Members of the House of Commons, and other Lieutenants of several Counties, concerning the last Propositions, according to a Declaration of the Lords and Commons made thereupon."

"Die Lunæ, 22 Augusti, 1642.

Order for Indemnity for the Voluntiers of Bridport.

"Whereas divers well-affected Persons of the Town of Bridport, in the County of Dorset, have, of themselves, as Voluntiers, under the Leading of Nicholas Sampson, One of the Burgesses of the said Town, exercised themselves in the Use of their Arms, by peaceable training and marching in the Fields near the said Town, the better to enable and prepare themselves for the Service and Defence of His Majesty and this Kingdom, when they shall be lawfully called thereunto: The Lords and Commons, taking the same into Consideration, do Order, That the said Persons shall have the Authority of both Houses of Parliament, for their Security and Indemnity for their said Training and Exercising already past; and do further Ordain, That all such Inhabitants of the said Town, and Liberties thereof, as shall desire, and willingly submit, to be trained and exercised in the Use of their Arms, may, from Time to Time hereafter, in a peaceable and orderly Way, under the Leading of the said Nicholas Sampson, assemble themselves in Companies, to train and learn and exercise themselves in the Use of their Arms, and Order of Marching, at such convenient Times, and in such Places in the said Town and Liberties thereof, and Fields aforesaid, as shall be by them thought fit for that Purpose, until other Order shall be herein taken by both Houses of Parliament; and that they shall be saved harmless for so doing, by the Authority of both Houses of Parliament; and that the Bailiffs, Justices of the Peace, and Burgesses of the Town, and all others that encourage and assist the said Persons in their Training and Exercise aforesaid, shall be held, by both Houses of Parliament, to do a very acceptable Service therein, and have the Authority of both Houses of Parliament, for their Indemnity in so doing; and the Bailiffs, Justices of Peace, and Burgesses aforesaid, are hereby required to take special Care for the fortifying and safe guarding of the said Town, and preserving of the Magazine therein; and the said Nicholas Sampson, and the said Voluntiers, to be aiding and assisting unto them therein upon all Occasions; and lastly, that the Bailiffs and Burgesses of the said Town, or the major Part of them, shall hereby have Power and Authority to nominate and appoint, (fn. *) from Time to Time, a Captain and other Officers, to train and muster the Inhabitants of the said Town and Borough."

Read, and agreed.

Message to the H. C. for the Lords to concur in several Orders.

A Message from the Commons, by Sir Hen. Mildmey and others:

That the House of Commons desire the Lords to concur with them in several Orders, etc.

1. A Letter and Instructions to The States of Holland.

2. An Order touching Ireland.

3. An Order Indemnity for Voluntiers of the Town of Bridport, in Dorsettshire. (Enter it.)

Read, and agreed.

4. An Order of Indemnity for Voluntiers of Tainton, in Som'settshire. (Here enter it.)

Read, and agreed.

Answer.

The Messengers called in, and told, "That the Lords agreed with them in the Two Orders of Indemnity; and would send them an Answer to the other Two, by Messengers of their own."

Letter from the Earl of Warwick.

A Letter of the Earl of Warwick's, to the Speaker, read; dated 18 August, 1642.

The King laying Siege to Coventry.

A Letter of Jo. Brownerich, to the Lord Brooke, "That the King lay now before Coventry, and He was playing upon the Town with His Ordnance, and desired his Lordship's Aid." (Taken out of the House.)

Another Letter, of Tho. Ballard, to the Earl of Essex, to that Purpose (which Letter was taken out of the House by Earl Essex).

Message to the H. C. for a Conference.

Sir Robt. Rich and Mr. Page sent to the Commons, for a present Conference, touching the Safety of the Kingdom.

Dover Castle secured to the Parliament.

The House was informed, "That the Arms at Cobham, in Kent, were secured; and that Dover Castle was at the Disposure of the Parliament.

Papists Houses to be searched.

"That the Committee for the Defence of the Kingdom hath Ordered, That all Papists Houses, in and about London and Westm. and within Ten Miles of the Town, shall be searched;" which, being reported, the House approved.

Earl of Warwick's Letter.

A Letter of the Earl of Warwicke, to the Speaker, was read, dated 19 August, 1642.

Vice Admiral's Letter to him.

A Letter of Tho. Trenchfeild; to the Earl of Warwicke, was read, dated 4th August, 1642.

Goods restored to P. Civell.

ORDERED, That the Goods of Peter Civell, taken from him by Soldiers, and remaining in several Mens Hands, shall be restored to him, and the Receivers of the Goods left to the Law.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Lords went to the Conference with the Commons; and, being returned, adjourned the House.

"Die Lunæ, 22 Augusti, 1642.

Order for 4000l. to Sir Tho. Barrington, for Essex.

"It is this Day Ordered, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament, That Four Thousand Pounds shall be presently delivered unto Sir Thomas Barrington, Knight and Baronet, by the Persons appointed to receive Plate and Money in the Chamber of London, upon Subscriptions for the Defence of the King, Kingdom, and Parliament, which Sum of Four Thousand Pounds is wholly to be employed for the Defence of the County of Essex, whereof Fifteen Hundred Pounds (or more of it, as shall be conceived necessary) to be laid out about the fortifying of the Town of Colchester, and the repairing of the Blockhouse there, being a great Port Town, and a Place of the greatest Importance and Strength in that County: And it is hereby further Ordered, That the said Sum of Four Thousand Pounds, and every Part thereof, shall from Time to Time be issued forth, for the Purposes aforesaid, by the said Sir Thomas Barrington, as he shall be directed by the Earl of Warwick, Lord Lieutenant of the said County, or by his Deputy Lieutenants, or any Two of them, under their Hands, whereof a just and true Accompt shall be given, as shall be Ordered by both Houses of Parliament; and the said Deputy Lieutenants are hereby required to present the Gentlemen, Freeholders, and other the Inhabitants of that County, with Thanks, for the free and liberal Expressions of their good Affections to the King, Kingdom, and Parliament, in their Subscriptions for the advancing of Horse, Arms, Money, and Plate, whereof both Houses have taken special Notice, and shall not only be willing to encourage them in such their faithful Services, but be ever likewise as ready to protect and defend them, upon all Occasions, with their Lives and Fortunes, wherein both Houses do desire them to rest confident."

Earl of Warwick's Letter, desiring Margate, Dover, &c. to be lecured.

"My very good Lord,

"Though, upon Examination of the Persons touched upon in my Letter dated last Night, I find not any so considerable Matter against them as to stay any of them (other than the Son of Captain Lee of Rochester, that he may give his Father an Account of his absenting himself from him); yet I am thereby further so confirmed in my former Opinion, of the Necessity of having Margett, Dover, and other Ports where Passengers from Holland, etc. do usually arrive, well looked to, that all Passengers giving any Cause of Suspicion may be strictly examined; I finding some of these Persons to be Soldiers, of Colonel Goreing's Regiment; and that the Access of Persons of that Quality into England is very frequent; which humbly recommending to your Lordship's Consideration, I take my Leave, and rest

From aboard The James, in The Downes, this 19th of August, 1642.

"Your Lordship's

"very humble Servant,

"Warwick.

(fn. *) "To the Right Honourable the Speaker of the House of Peers. These, Present."

His Letter, about securing Dover and other Forts on that Coast.

(fn. †) "May it please your Lordship,

"This Morning I received Notice from Mr. Dawkes, that, in Pursuance of a Commission to him granted from the Lord General his Excellency, he had taken Possession of Dover Castle, also a Request from the said Mr. Dawkes to be furnished by me with some Powder Match, and a Quantity of Musqueteers, he having taken with him into the Castle no . . . . than about a Dozen Men. Upon Notice hereof, . . . . . presently applied myself to the Performance of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and sent away, in my Ketch, 40 proper Men, . . . . . . . . . . . . Corporal, with a Barrel of Powder, Match, and . . . . . . . . ., which Men are all admitted into the Castle, and th . . . . . . . . . . . . . the same is for the present well secured to His M. . . . . . and the Parliament. I perceive that Captain Collins intercepts from the Castle both Powder and Victuals, so that the Thing re . . . . . . . to be done, for the compleat assuring of his . . . . ., is an Order of Parliament, for the speedy send . . . down of a trusty Commander, to undertake the Ch . . . ., about 100 Men for the manning of the Castle, . . . . . . 4 Troops of Horse to procure the free Access of . . . . . . Victuals, and other Necessaries, thereunto.

"I have also this Day sent into Sandon Fort . . . . near Deale, and under Sir John Pennington's . . . . ., Ten Seamen, for the Assistance of Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . better to maintain that Fort in Safety, . . . . . . . . . . . . now remains that the said Fort and the 2 . . . . . . . . . . . Command of Sir John Mennes and Captain Binge, be . . . . . . . . . . secured, and put into safe Hands; Twenty . . . . . . . ., added to their present Number, will be, I conceive, . . . . . . . . . . . . . for the Defence of them. In this, I think . . . . . . . . . . . . fit to use Expedition, lest His Majesty's Ships . . . . . . . . . . . be debarred from the Benefit of Watering . . . . . . . . . . . . Advantages, which those Forts have in their Power.

"Also, in the other Matter of Dover Castle, I conceive an effectual and speedy Dispatch is very requisite, the Body of the Town being not well affected, it consisting in a great Part of Papists; and Captain Collins (as I am informed) intended (before the Entrance of these 40 Men) to have attempted the regaining of the Castle, though now, I believe, that Resolution is diverted.

"And, for the better preventing of Inconveniencies, I purpose, To-morrow Morning at farthest, to send Two of the Ships, under my Command, to ride near the Castle, and to keep the Town in Awe, till the Parliament shall do something for further settling thereof.

"The coming down of these Troops of Horse will also give the more Facility in settling of the Militia in the County of Kent, which may be a Means to depress some discontented Spirits there, that are apt enough for Action, if an Opportunity were in their Hands.

"This Night I shall endeavour the putting of Five or Six Barrels of Powder into Dover Castle, that the same may thereby have the better Command over the Town.

"And so, having nothing else at present to trouble your Lordship withall, praying to God to prosper the the Counsels of the Parliament, I rest

. . . . aboard The James, in . . . Downes, this 21st of August, 1642.

"Your Lordship's

"humble Servant,

"Warwicke.

"To the Right Honourable, my very Noble Lord, The Speaker of the House of Peers. These, Present."

"Right Honourable, and my very good Lords,

Trenchfield, the Vice Admiral's Letter, about sundry Persons he had stopped.

"These are to give you to understand, that, this 4th of August, 1642, Captain Jon. Stevens, in The London, brought hither to me a Ship, called The Mary of Scarborow, William Hixson, Master, in which there (fn. *) was found Ten Horses, with Seven small Saddles, a Colloso, and Five Men to attend them, having, for their safe Transportation, the Queen's Pass; in which Pass was mentioned, that the said Horses belongeth to Prince Robert, which, by reason of the Nearness, and doubting that your Honours would not make them Prize, being small Horses, only Two Coach Horses, I thought fit to send them and all that belongs to them to Hull, to Sir Jo n. Hottham, by him to be kept till your Honours dispose of them.

"Also, by Captain John Bowen, in His Majesty's Ship The Antelop, a Scotchman, by Name James Grey, taken with a Packet of Letters in a Bark of Whittby; the Letters I have not opened, but sent them all to Sir John Hottham, only the Superscription of each I took, as is here inclosed.

"The First of this Instant August, 1642, we took a Fisher-boat of Skevellen, in Holland, which brought over a Gentleman who had the Queen's Pass; in that Pass, the Gentleman was named Mr. Coocke: This Boat had Order from the said Gentleman to wait on him here at Burlington, for to convey him back, which I yet detain, till I shall see fitting Time to discharge him. Here hath been these Six Days, Captain Tayler, with Sixty Musketeers and Ten Horse, expecting the Ship with Ammunition to come hither. Likewise Captain Gee is, with his Company, at Scarborow, attending the same Service; but now we are certainly informed, that Mr. Boaves, who should have brought over the Ammunition, hath utterly refused it, and is now arrived at Sunderland, who reports that the said Ammunition is to come in a Flemish Pink, which we shall use our best Diligence to intercept; but, for Want of small Shipping, we may be frustrated of our Hope.

"Valentine Pyne, Servant to Sir John Pennington, wrote a Letter to Thomas Arkenstall, our Boatswain, with many Compliments, to get him to come ashore; but we sent him an Answer suitable to his false Pretence.

"Sir John Pennington, who names himself Sir John Porter, was here, with Captain Scudimoore and Captain Carterett, and also at Scarborow, who made much Enquiry what Barks and Boats were here to be had, and what Store of Seamen; as I am informed, hath some Design against us, or any other Ship in this Service, which, I hope, God will enable us to withstand. The People of this Town are very kind and faithful to us, as also all this Coast of Holdernes; and, as they profess, are for the Parliament, although forced to the contrary. This, in all Humbleness, I thought fit to acquaint your Honours with. Not having else at present, I pray for your Honours Health; and, with all Humility, I rest at your Honours disposing.

Aboard His Majesty's Ship Unicorne, this 4th of August, 1642, in Birlingtton Bay.

"Tho. Trenchfield.

"To the Right Honourable the Lords now assembled in the High Court of Parliament these, present, in Westminster."

"My Lord,

Letter from the Cornish Committee, about the Militia, and opposing the Commission of Array.

"After our Resolutions only in our Persons, and in a peaceable Way, at first to oppose the Proceeds of the Array, we received from the brave Deputy Lieutenants of Devon a very courteous Letter, for a Contraction of mutual Assistance; on Tuesday last, we received a Letter of the great Affections of the Town of Plymouth, to wait on the Committee, with a considerable Number, if they desire it, in the Commands of the Parliament. On Wednesday Morning, the Committee and Deputy Lieutenants, and many Gentlemen of this County, met by Eight of the Clock at Bodmyn, where the First great Meeting of near Forty Parishes were to appear for the Array. We found my Lord of Bath, who was accompanied with the Commissioners. We told them our Errand. Sir Bevile Grenvile and Sir Nicholas Slanninge came on Bodmyn Downes, with all the Strength they could make, which was, in several Places, One Hundred and Eighty, as Intelligence presents us, a great Number serving with Sir Bevile Grenvile's Arms. There was great Distraction, in Countenance and Words, that their great Expectation fell so short. At Three, Sir Bevile and Sir Nicholas came into the Town, from their Company, to my Lord of Bath, and the Commissioners of Array; and a Council held on all Sides, many Gentlemen being engaged, it was a general Desire to quiet this County all that possible might be. There came Propositions in Writing to us, at Seven of the Clock at Night; at Ten in the Morning, we condescended according to this Copy; and we all upon the Place do aver, that the Reputation of the Militia is advanced by it, and growing, and the great Sufferance of the Array is apparent; and we are most confident, that the Parliament hath a strong Interest in this County; and the greatest Part will appear with us, your most humble and faithful Servants,

Bodmyn, 18 Augusti, 1642.

"Rich. Buller,
Al. Carew,
Richard Erisey,
Fran. Buller,
Tho. Armyn,
Francis Godolphin."

Earl of Warwick's Letter, about the Proceedings of his Vice Admiral's Fleet on the North Coast.

"My very good Lord,

"The inclosed Letter from Captain Trenchfeild, rec. . . . . . . . . . . this Evening, may advertise your Lordships of the Proceedings of those Ships that are now employed on the North Coast of England, for the Service of His Majesty and the State (as also of the Nature of some Passes, under the Countenance whereof Ships and Goods are sent to England), and of the Usefulness and (as I conceive) Necessity of sending forth some small Shipping, to guard these Parts; the Smallness and Swiftness of these Vessels, that are, or may be, employed to Purposes very prejudicial to this Kingdom, making the Ships of greater Burden uncapable of the Services that may be expected from them; especially towards Winter; which Inconveniency may be prevented, without any extraordinary Expence to this State. Three or Four . . . . . . . . Ketches, with about 4 Pieces of Ordinance, a . . . . . . . . . . 20 Men apiece, requiring no more Ch . . . . . . than One of the Ships now employed; . . . . . . such one may be sent in by Way of Exchange, balancing of the said Charge, as your Lordships sh . . . please to appoint. As for these Passa . . . . . . . the inclosed, which concerns Sir John Hotham . . . . . . . . . . not but your Lordships have received thereof from Sir John himself, and have given Direc . . . for the settling thereof. This Night there is c . . . . . . . into this Road a Vessel from Holland; have . . . . . . . . in it divers Germans and others, touching wh . . . . . . I intend to make exact Enquiry in the Morning. They are described to be some of them Persons of Quality, and Soldiers, which shews how needful it is, that a strict Course be taken for Examination of such Persons at Dover, Margett, and the other Ports, to which they usually apply themselves, before they be admitted to pass further into the Kingdom, in these distracted Times; and that an Eye be likewise had upon Gravesend, in case they should pass thither unexamined: By which Means much of that Inconveniency might be prevented, that arises from the Recourse of Commanders and Soldiers from other Parts to England. I have this Night received several Letters from the Ships riding before Portsmouth, touching which I forbear to give any particular Account (for that Information is sent immediately from thence to your Lordships), other than that I am informed, that Captain Turney, who is a dangerous Man and totally my Lord of Portland's, is taken, as also Mr. Jeremy Weston, and another Gentleman; nor shall I need to remember your Lordships how precious Opportunities are, and how seasonable it may be to direct a vigorous and speedy Prosecution of these Advantages, that God hath offered, for the securing of Pourtsmouth to His Majesty and the Parliament. In these Letters, I am likewise solicited to move for small Ketches for the Western Parts, and to put your Lordships in Mind of the Shortness of their Victuals; for Supply whereof, I believe, your Lordships have by this Time taken Order. Such of these Particulars as you shall conceive necessary, your Lordships may please to impart unto the House of Commons. And so, presenting my humble Service to your Lordship, I rest

From aboard The James, in The Downes, this 18th of August, 1642.

"Your Lordship's

"very humble Servant,

"Warwicke.

"To the Right Honourable, my very Noble Lord, the Speaker of the House of Peers. These, Present."

"Propositions touching His Majesty's Commissioners of Array, and the Committee concerning the Militia.

Propositions between the Commissioners of Array, and Committee for executing the Militia, in Cornwall.

"That there be a Cessation of both Sides, concerning the Array and the Militia; and that both the Commissioners and the Committee, and other Gentlemen with them of the County, promise (for the Quiet of the Country) each to other, that they will not move any further, either in the Execution of the Array or Militia, unless it be upon a new Command from His Majesty for the Array, or from the Parliament for the Militia (except in Case of Foreign Invasion or Rebellion): And, if any such Command come to either Part, they do promise, each Side to other, to give Fourteen Days Warning before they proceed any farther.

"Jo. Gryles, Vicecomes.
He. Bathon.
William Wrey.
John Trelawny.
John Arundell, of Trerise.
Nicholas Slanning.
Fran. Bassett.
Warwick Mohun.
William Courteney.
Bevill Grenvile.
William Coryton.
Cha. Trevanion.
John Arundell.
Peter Courteney.
Walter Langdon.
Sam. Cosowarth."

Adjourn.

Adjourn, quarta post meridiem.

Post meridiem.

PRAYERS.

Lord Kymbolton, Speaker.

Message from the H. C. with an Order for 4000l. to Sir Tho. Barrington for Essex.

A Message from the Commons, by Sir Tho. Barrington and others:

That the House of Commons desire the Lords Concurrence with them, in

An Order that Four Thousand Pounds shall be paid to Sir Tho. Barrington, for the Defence of Essex and Colchester. (Enter it here.)

Read, and agreed unto.

A Letter of Rich. Buller, and others, sent to the Lord Rob'ts, was read.

Earl Bath, & al. sent for as Delinquents, from Cornwall.

Ordered, etc. That the Committee of Parliament, appointed for the County of Cornewall, shall use all Diligence, to apprehend the Bodies of the Earl of Bath, the Lord Mohun, Sir Bevill Greinvile, Sir Peter Courtney, Sir Nicholas Slaninge, Jo. Arundell of Terice, Jo. Arundell the Younger; and them to convey to the Sheriff of Devonshire, and from Sheriff to Sheriff, until they shall be safely brought before the Lords in Parliament.

The General Instructions, and this Order, to be sent, by the Lord Rob'ts, to the Committee in Cornewall.

Staines Men released.

Ordered, That the Men of Staines (fn. *) be released, without Fees; but those that Captain Temple took, to be brought to the House.

Message from the H. C. with an Order for 5000l. to Mr. Frost, for Provisions for Ireland.

A Message, by Sir Rob't Harley and others, from the House of Commons:

That the Commons desire the Lords to concur with them, in an Order for Five Thousand Pounds, to be paid to Mr. Frost.

The Order.

"It is this Day Ordered, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament, That the Treasurers, appointed to receive the Monies that come in upon the Subscriptions from the Adventurers of Ireland, do forthwith pay unto Mr. Frost, Commissary for Ireland, for making Provision of Victuals for Ireland, the Sum of Five Thousand Pounds, out of such Monies as come in upon the said Adventure."

A Letter, with Instructions from the Parliament, to The States in Holland, being read, were returned to the Commons, with some Amendments, by Mr. Doctor Aylett and Mr. Doctor Heath.

Letter to The States General, with the Declaration of both Houses, for preserving Amity between England and Holland, sent to the H. C.

"High and Mighty Lords,

"We are commanded, by the Lords and Commons assembled in the Parliament of England, to signify to your Lordships, That they have chosen and appointed the Bearer hereof, Walter Strickland, Esquire, to repair to your Lordships, and to present to you, in their Name, and in the Name of the whole Kingdom, a Declaration, and some Propositions and Desires, very much importing the Maintenance of the Protestant Religion, which is the surest Foundation of the Safety and Prosperity of this Kingdom, and of your State, and of the ancient Amity betwixt us, to the Advantage of both; desiring your Lordships to give Credit to what shall be delivered or propounded to you by the same Mr. Strickland, and to expedite your Answers thereunto, in such Manner as shall stand with your Wisdoms, and the due Respect of the common Good of this State and of yourselves, which is the earnest Desire of

"Your Lordships

"Affectionate Friends and Servants.

"To the High and Mighty Lords, the Lords The States General of The United Provinces."

This was signed by the Speakers of both Houses of Parliament.

"The Declaration of the Lords and Commons, assembled in the Parliament of England, to the High and Mighty Lords, The States of The United Provinces.

Declaration of the Lords and Commons to the States General.

"We, the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, taking into our serious Consideration the Means of composing the great Distempers and Combustions begun in this Kingdom, which threatens the Ruin and Destruction of it, and of all other Protestant Princes and States, have thought good to make this Declaration to the High and Mighty Lords The States of The United Provinces, That we understand, by a Letter of the Lord Digby, a Person fled out of this Kingdom for High Treason, that, as he often endeavoured, by his wicked and malicious Counsel, to make a Division betwixt His Majesty and His Parliament, and hath been in a great Part the Cause of that miserable and unnatural War which is made against us by His Majesty; so he hath laboured, by all Means, in divers Parts of The United Provinces, to provide Arms, Powder, and other Ammunition, for the fomenting of that War, and making it more dangerous to this Kingdom; and, for this Purpose, did address himself to the Prince of Orange, by whose Countenance and Help, as we are informed by the Lord Digbye's own Letters, he hath made Provision of great Quantities of Ordnance, Powder, Arms, and divers other Sorts of Warlike Provisions; and we are further informed, by credible Advertisements, that the Prince of Orange, in Favour of the Lord Digby, and those other wicked Counsellors and Incendiaries who are joined together in these mischievous Practices against the Peace of this Kingdom, hath not only licenced, but, the better to encourage divers Commanders, experienced Officers, and Soldiers, to resort into this Kingdom, in Aid of them against this Parliament, hath promised to reserve their Places for them in their Absence, and doth cause other Provision of the same Kind to be made, and prepared to be sent over, for their Supply, to the great Hurt of this Kingdom, and the Danger of interrupting the most necessary, profitable, and longcontinued Amity betwixt the Two States.

"We further desire, to let them know, that we cannot believe that this is done by any Authority or Direction of their Lordships, considering the great Help that they have received from this Kingdom, when heretofore they lay under the heavy Oppression of their Princes; and how conduceable the Friendship of this Nation, concurring with the Wisdom, Valour, and Industry of their own People, hath been, to the Greatness and Power which they now enjoy: neither can we think that they will be forward to help to make us Slaves, who have been so useful and assistant in making them Freemen, or that they will forget that our Troubles and Dangers issue from the same Fountain with their own; and that those who are set at Work to undermine Religion and Liberty in this Kingdom are the same which by open Force did seek to bereave them of both: It cannot be unknown to that wise State, that it is the Jesuitical Faction here, which have corrupted the Counsels of our King, the Consciences of a great Part of our Clergy, which hath plotted so many mischievous Designs to destroy the Parliament, and still endeavoureth to divide Ireland from this Kingdom by a most wicked and cruel Rebellion there, and to divide the King from this Parliament and People here, and, by false Slanders, and Imputations of Things never done nor intended by us, hath so incensed His Majesty, as that (after many bitter Invectives published against us, without any just Cause given) He hath now at last resolved to set up His Royal Standard, and drawn His Sword for the Destruction and Ruin of His most faithful and obedient People, whom by the Laws and Constitution of this Kingdom He is bound to preserve and protect.

"The Cases and the Fortunes of both States being so involved and united, we cannot expect to be hindered by them in our just Defence, or that they will do any Thing to aggravate the Miseries and Troubles of this Kingdom, in the Peace and Happiness whereof they have found so much Advantage, and, by such unfriendly and unseasonable Supplies of our common Enemies, make Way to their own as well as to our Ruin.

"Wherefore we desire (fn. *) they would betimes look into this Mischief; and, having searched it to the Bottom, to stop the further Progress of it; that they will not suffer Money, Ordnance, Arms, or any other Warlike Provision, to be brought over, to strengthen those, who, as soon as they shall prevail against this Parliament, according to those Principles and Interest by which they are guided, will use that Strength to the Ruin of those from whence they have had it.

"We desire they would not send over our Countrymen to further our Destruction, who were sent to them for their Preservation; that they will not anticipate the spilling of English Blood in an unnatural Civil War, which hath been so chearfully and plentifully hazarded and spent in that just and honouraable War, by which they have been so long pre served, and to which the Blood of those Persons and many other Subjects of this Kingdom is still in a Manner dedicated; but rather that they would cashier and discharge from their Employments those that shall presume to come over to that Purpose.

"And, in satisfying these our reasonable and necessary Desires, they shall thereby not only secure us, but themselves; yea, they shall most of all advantage His Majesty, for whose Service those Things are pretended to be done. The Question between His Majesty and this Parliament is not, whether He shall enjoy the same Prerogative and Power which hath belonged to our former Kings, His Majesty's Royal Predecessors; but whether that Prerogative and Power should be employed to our Defence, or to our Ruin.

"We expect nothing from Him but Security and Protection from those mischievous Designs, which have been so often multiplied and renewed against us, though hitherto (through God's Providence) as often frustrated.

"It cannot be denied, by those who look indifferently upon our Proceedings and Affairs, that there will be more Honour, Safety, Wealth, and Greatness, to His Majesty, in concurring with His Parliament, than in the Course which He now is; but so unhappy hath His Majesty and this Kingdom been, in those who have the greatest Influence upon His Council, that they look more upon the prevailing of their own Party, than upon any of those great Advantages, both to His Crown and Royal Person, which He might obtain by joining with His People: And so cunning are these Factors for Popery in the Prosecution of their own Aims, that they can put on a counterfeit Visage of Honour, Power, and Greatness, upon those Courses and Counsels which have no Truth or Reality, but of Weakness, Dishonour, and Misery, to His Majesty and all His People.

"We have lately expressed our earnest Inclination to that National Love and Amity with The United Provinces, which is nourished and confirmed by so many civil Respects and mutual Interest, as make it even natural to us, in that we have this Parliament, in our humble Petition to His Majesty, desired that we might be joined with that State in a more near and strict League and Union; and we cannot but expect some Return from them of the like Expressions, and that they will be so far from blowing this Fire, which begins to kindle amongst us, that they will rather endeavour to quench it, by strengthening and encouraging us, who have no Design, but not to be destroyed, and to preserve our Religion, save ourselves, and the other Reformed States of Christendom, from those Massacres and Extirpations, with which the Principles of the Popish Religion do threaten us and them, and which are begun to be acted in Ireland, and, in the Hopes, Endeavours, and Intentions of that Party, had long since been executed upon us, if the Mercy, Favour, and Blessing of Almighty God had not superabounded, and prevented the Subtilty and Malignity of cruel, wicked, and blood-thirsty Men."

An Order sent from the House of Commons, touching Ireland, was read and agreed unto.

Order for 1000l. Adventurers money for Mr. Halsteed.

"Whereas the Copy of a Contract between the Lords Justices and Council of Ireland, and the Factor of Mr. Quarles, for providing of certain Arms in Holland, and Delivery of them at Dubline, for the Service of that Kingdom, hath been read and considered of in both Houses of Parliament; and the same Contract by the Lords and Commons: It is therefore Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That a Thousand Pounds, mentioned in the said Contract, shall be advanced to Mr. Halsteed, out of the Adventurers Monies for Ireland, upon Accompt; and that the Correspondents of the said Mr. Quarles and Mr. Jossua Carpenter here in London do give Bond to Mr. Fitz Gerrard, Agent for the Lords Justices and Council of Ireland, for the Delivery of the said Arms at Dublin (Casualty and Danger of the Sea excepted).

Adjourn.

Adjourn, 10 To-morrow.

Footnotes

* Origin. for.
* This and many Directions of Letters about this Time are some Pages distant from the Letters themselves in the Journal, and can only be ascertained to belong to them by attending to the Binding, as they are the Original Letters, with the Seals, bound up in the Journal.
This Letter is somewhat torn at the Edges in the Original, which occasions some Lacunæ here.
* Deest in Originali.
* This Letter is somewhat torn at the Edges in the Original, which occasions some Lacunæ here.
* Origin. to be.
* Origin. the.