House of Lords Journal Volume 5
29 September 1642

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 5: 29 September 1642', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 5: 1642-1643 (1767-1830), pp. 376-377. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=34912 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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DIE Jovis, videlicet, 29 die Septembris.

PRAYERS.

The Lord Grey de Warke was appointed to be Speaker this Day.

Message from the H. C. for a Conference on Irish Affairs.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Robert Parkhurst, Knight:

To desire a present Free Conference (if it may stand with their Lordships Conveniency), touching the Affairs of Ireland.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That this House will give a present Conference, as is desired, in the Painted Chamber.

Sir Thomas Dawes's Creditors Petition.

The Petition of Sir Tho. Crymes, Knight, Dame Rebecca Rumney, Widow, Rob't Doddington, Gentleman, and Eleven other Creditors of Sir Tho. Dawes, Knight, desiring, "That the Bill remaining in this House may be dispatched; and, in the mean Time, to grant an Order, to sequester all the Rents and Profits of the said Lands now due at this Michaelmas, and so from Time to Time, until the full enacting of the said Bill; and that the same may go towards Satisfaction of the Debt due to His Majesty, and to be paid to Cornelius Holland, Esquire, late Pay-master of the Household for His Majesty's Royal Children, and the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury; and, in the mean Time, that no Extent may be issued out against the Estate of the said Tho. Dawes."

Lady Dawes's Petition.

Ordered, That the Petition of the Lady Dawes shall be read, together with this, To-morrow; and then this House will take the same into Consideration.

Conference to be had, about the King's Speech and Protestation at the Head of His Army.

His Majesty's Speech and Protestation, made in the Head of His Army, between Stafford and Wellington, the 19th of September, 1642, was read: And because this Protestation and Speech is conceived to be much prejudicial to the Parties that are employed by the Parliament in the Army, the House Resolved, To have a Conference with the House of Commons, that a Committee may be appointed, of both Houses, to consider of something to be printed, by Authority of both Houses, with the said Protestation, to vindicate the Reputation of those Persons that are concerned; and that something may be expressed, that it is not the Intent of the Parliament utterly to take away the Common-Prayer-Book, as it is rumoured abroad.

Judges to attend the House.

Ordered, That all the Judges shall have Notice, and (fn. *) be commanded, to attend this House, according to their Writs.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Lords went to the Conference; which being ended, the House was resumed.

Message from the H. C. for Concurrence in an Order.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Rigby:

To desire their Lordships Concurrence in an Order, which they intend to frame into an Ordinance; which said Order was read, in bæc verba: (Here enter it.)

Ordered, That this House agrees with the House of Commons in this Order.

The Answer returned to the Messengers was:

Answer.

That this House agrees with the House of Commons in this Order; and that it be framed into an Ordinance.

Message from the H. C. with another Order.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Jo. Goodwin:

To desire their Lordships Concurrence in an Order, That Mr. Reynolds and Mr. Goodwin, that are to go into Ireland as Committees, shall be allowed Three Pounds per Diem a-piece; which was read, in bæc verba: (Here enter it.)

Agreed to.

The Answer returned to these Messengers was:

Answer.

That this House agrees with the House of Commons in this Order.

Ordered, That this Report shall be made To-morrow.

"His Majesty's Speech and Protestation made in the Head of His Army, between Stafford and Wellington, the 19th of September, 1642, after the reading of His Orders:

King's Speech and Protestation at the Head of His Army.

"Gentlemen,

"You have heard these Orders read: It is your Part, in your several Places, to observe them exactly: The Time cannot be long before we come to Action; therefore, you have the more Reason to be careful: And I must tell you, I shall be very severe in the punishing of those, of what Condition soever, who transgress these Instructions. I cannot suspect your Courage and Resolution; your Conscience and your Loyalty hath brought you hither, to fight for your Religion, your King, and the Laws of the Land; you shall meet with no Enemies but Traitors, most of them Brownists, Anabaptists, and Atheists, such who desire to destroy both Church and State, and who have already condemned you to Ruin for being loyal to Us. That you may see what Use I mean to make of your Valour if it please God to bless it with Success, I have thought fit to publish My Resolution to you in a Protestation, which when you have heard Me make, you will believe you cannot fight in a better Quarrel, in which I promise to live and die with you.

I do promise, in the Presence of Almighty God, and I hope for His Blessing and Protection, That I will, to the utmost of My Power, defend and maintain the true Reformed Protestant Religion established in the Church of England; and, by the Grace of God, in the same will live and die.

"I desire to govern by the known Laws of the Land, and that the Liberty and Property of the Subject may be by them preserved with the same Care as My own just Rights; and, if it please God, by His Blessing upon this Army, raised for My necessary Defence, to preserve Me from this Rebellion, I do solemnly and faithfully promise, in the Sight of God, to maintain the just Privileges and Freedom of Parliament, and to govern by the known Laws of the Land, to My utmost Power, and particularly to observe inviolably the Laws consented to by Me this Parliament: In the mean while, if this Time of War, and the great Necessity and Streights I am now driven to, beget any Violation of those, I hope it shall be imputed, by God and Man, to the Authors of this War, and not Me, who have so earnestly laboured for the Preservation of the Peace of this Kingdom.

"When I willingly fail in these Particulars, I will (fn. *) expect no Aid or Relief from any Man, or Protection from Heaven: But, in this Resolution, I hope for the chearful Assistance of all good Men, and am consident of God's Blessing."

Order for 1000 Dragoons, with some Troops of Horse, to be sent into Lancashire.

"The Lords and Commons in Parliament do conceive, and find it so necessary, that a Thousand Dragoons, with some Troops of Horse, should be raised speedily, and be set forth, for the suppressing of the malignant Party in Lancashire, and such other Parts as my Lord General shall appoint, for protecting the well-affected People, and preventing of Foreign Power from landing; that it will not only be taken and resented by the House for an acceptable Service, in a Time of great Need, if any the well-affected and disposed Persons of the City of London shall advance the Sum of Sixteen Thousand Pounds for setting forth of such a Power; but do Declare, That such Advancers shall have the Public Faith for the Re-payment of such Monies so to be advanced, with Interest, after Eight Pounds per Centum; as also shall be taken into Consideration by the House, for a further Recompence of their so forward and pious Act, in a Time of so great Necessity and Danger."

Order for 3 l. per Diem, and 250 l. apiece, for the Committee to be sent to Ireland.

"Whereas, by a former Order of the House of Commons, of the 10th of this Instant September, Two Members of the said House were Ordered to go, as Committees, into Ireland, to pursue such Instructions as should be agreed on by both Houses of Parliament; and whereas the House of Commons have now nominated Mr. Reynold and Mr. Robert Goodwin for that Service: It is this Day Ordered, Established, and Ordained, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament, That Three Pounds per Diem shall be paid to each of the said Members, by the Receivers of the Adventurers-money for Ireland, at The Guild-hall, London, to commence from the Day of their taking their Journey from this Town, to go over: And it is also Ordered, That Two Hundred and Fifty Pounds apiece, towards their Charges in preparing for their Journey, be forthwith paid to the said Mr. Reynolds and Mr. Goodwin, by the said Receivers of the Adventurers-money; and the several Acquittances of the said Mr. Reynolds and Mr. Goodwin (as well for the said Three Pounds per Diem as for the Two Hundred and Fifty Pounds apiece) shall be a sufficient Discharge to the Receivers for the same."

Adjourn.

Adjourn till 10a cras.

Footnotes

* Deest in Originali.
* Origin. except.