Colleges
Fraternity of the Holy Trinity and the Sixty Priests, Leadenhall Chapel

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Victoria County History

Publication

Author

William Page (editor)

Year published

1909

Supporting documents

Page

578

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'Colleges: Fraternity of the Holy Trinity and the Sixty Priests, Leadenhall Chapel', A History of the County of London: Volume 1: London within the Bars, Westminster and Southwark (1909), pp. 578. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=35392 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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40. THE FRATERNITY OF THE HOLY TRINITY AND OF THE SIXTY PRIESTS IN LEADENHALL CHAPEL

Simon Eyre, who built a granary for the City in Leadenhall, left by his will in 1459 3,000 marks to the Drapers' Company to establish within a year of his decease in the Leadenhall Chapel a college of a master, five secular priests, six clerks, and two choristers, and to found a school for teaching grammar, writing, and singing. (fn. 1) For some reason unknown the terms of the will were not carried out either by the Drapers' Company or by the prior and convent of Holy Trinity, who became legatees on the same conditions on the default of the company. (fn. 2) In 1466, however, Edward IV, at the request of Queen Elizabeth, granted licence to William Rous, chaplain, and John Reseby and Thomas Asheby, priests, to found in the Leadenhall Chapel a fraternity to be called the Fraternity of the Holy Trinity and the Sixty Priests of London. (fn. 3) If the rules of the Pappey were drawn up (fn. 4) at the time of that hospital's foundation in 1442 the brotherhood of the sixty priests must have been in existence before it was connected with Leadenhall, as it is there mentioned.

The City in 1512 seems to have attempted to carry out Eyre's wishes to some extent by granting to these priests the use of the chapel on condition that they prayed for the souls of Simon Eyre and his wife. (fn. 5)

There is no account of any endowment except the small bequests often made to them by will; such as the legacy of 20s. left to them in 1507 by John Overton, priest of St. Thomas of Acon, (fn. 6) 20s. to their common box by a chantry priest of St. Mary-at-Hill in 1509 (fn. 7) ; 10s. for a trental of masses in 1510 by the priest of St. Peter's Cornhill. (fn. 8)

The fraternity was suppressed at the general dissolution of chantries and gilds in the reign of Edward VI.

There is a fine example of the seal of this society, of fifteenth-century date. (fn. 9) It is a pointed oval and bears a representation of the Trinity in a niche with tabernacle work at the sides. In the bases, under a double arch, are two priests in the act of elevating the host. The inner edge is engrailed. Legend:—

S'BPE FRAT'NIT' SCE TRINITAT' ET . SEXAGINTA SACERDOTE LŌDŌNI . . . .

Footnotes

1 Stow, Surv. of Lond. ii, 84 (ed. Strype).
2 Ibid.
3 Cal. of Pat. 1461–7, p. 516.
4 Cott. MS. Vit. F. xvi, fol. 116b.
5 Rec. of the Corp. of Lond. Repert. 2, fol. 140.
6 Lond. Epis. Reg. Fitz James, pt. 2, fol. 2.
7 Ibid. fol. 1.
8 Ibid. fol. 5.
9 B.M. Seals, xxxvii, 64.