Crown Pleas
42 Henry III - 44 Henry III (nos 78-107)

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London Record Society

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Author

Martin Weinbaum (editor)

Year published

1976

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Pages

24-30

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'Crown Pleas: 42 Henry III - 44 Henry III (nos 78-107)', The London eyre of 1276 (1976), pp. 24-30. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=35994 Date accessed: 23 September 2014.


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PLEAS OF THE CROWN 42 HENRY III [1257–8]

78. In the same year, Peter de Gysorz being chamberlain, Thomas son of Thomas and William Gratefige being sheriffs, for whom no one answers; Michael of Spain killed Nicholas de Ireland near Castle Baynard and was at once arrested and taken to Newgate. Afterwards King Henry pardoned him his suit for breach of the peace by writ in these words: 'Henry by the grace of God; because at the instance of bishop Silvens (fn. 2) of Spain and with the consent and will of Richard de Clare, earl of Gloucester and Hertford, we have pardoned Michael of Spain, the bishop's man, his suit for breach of the peace arising from the death of Nicholas de Ireland, the said earl's man, for which Michael was in outlawry; we order you to hand over Michael, with his chattels seized on that occasion, to John Maunsel, treasurer of York, to be handed over to the said bishop; at Westminster, 4 May 43 Henry III'. (fn. 3) Therefore nothing from the outlawry or chattels. All the neighbours except William Dybel come and are not suspected. William was attached by Alan de Castello and Hugh le Bucher. So they are in *mercy.

Nota 35. Carta de pace regis concessa cum catallis [cf. 524 no. 35].

79. Thomas son of Thomas Attewode of Barton took sanctuary in the church of St. Lawrence Candelwikstrete, confessed that he had stolen an ox and a horse and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. Chattels *1 mark for which the sheriffs are to answer. [cf. 597]

80. [m. 5] Oliver of Wynchelsee, Richard Fraunkeleyn and others were together in a ship on the Thames when a quarrel arose among them and Oliver killed Richard with a staff and threw him into the water. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Chattels 20 marks which were handed over on the king's command to Stephen Andreu of Wynchilse and his son John, provided that on their behalf Henry de Bathon and Matthias de Mara undertook to pay the king the said 20 marks by royal writ (fn. 4) in these words: 'Henry [III] to the sheriffs of London; because Henry de Bathon and Matthias de Mara on behalf of Stephen of Wynchelesse and his son John have undertaken before us to pay in fifteen days from Michaelmas [13 Oct.] the 20 marks at which was valued the fourth part which pertained to Oliver [son of] Robert, (fn. 5) of the ship belonging to Stephen and John from which, it is said, Oliver threw a sailor into the Thames near the Tower of London, so that he was drowned; together with eight tuns and one pipe of wine which Oliver had on the ship and which belongs to us because of the felony committed by Oliver; we order you to hand over without delay to Stephen and John or their attorney the ship with gear and appurtenances, and eight tuns and one pipe of wine; at Westminster, 18 July 42 Henry III [1258].' Because Henry and Matthias are dead, let their heirs answer for the *20 marks. No neighbour was attached because the incident happened on the Thames. [cf. 598]

81. Emma wife of John le Mazon took sanctuary in the church of St. Martin Isemongereslane, confessed that she had killed her husband John and abjured the realm before the chamberlain. No chattels. [cf. 84]

82. In the same year Thomas Esperon being chamberlain and [Thomas son of Thomas and] Matthew Bukerel being sheriffs; Peter son of Geoffrey de Bosco took sanctuary in the church of St. Lawrence Jewry, confessed that he had stolen a cow at Totenham and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriff. No chattels.

83. John Wodeman and Martin le Taylur were drinking together in a tavern in the ward of William de Essewy [Coleman Street ward] and when they returned home together from the tavern a quarrel arose between them as they were going towards the lodging and John killed Martin with a staff. He was at once arrested and taken to the house of Matthew Bukerel then sheriff, where he was imprisoned. Afterwards he escaped and took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary Wolmarchirch, where he remained for fifteen days and then escaped. Therefore to judgment on Matthew for the *escape. John has not [sic] absconded and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Chattels *14d. for which the sheriffs are to answer. Nothing is known of frankpledge because he was a vagabond. All the neighbours except Robert de Kopherlee do not [sic] come and he is not suspected. He was attached by Ralph le Large 'ayler' (fn. 6) and Geoffrey Long 'bateman'. So they are all in *mercy. [cf. 599]

84. Emma wife of John le Mazon and Joan daughter of Simon son of Mary, with other persons unknown, killed John le Mazon by night. Emma took sanctuary in the church of St. Martin Isemongerelane, confessed the deed and abjured the realm. No chattels. Joan fled and is suspected, so *let her be exacted and waived. No chattels. All the neighbours have died, so nothing from them. [cf. 81]

85. Christine daughter of John de Lincoln appealed Richard de Byllyng in the husting of rape. She does not come or prosecute her appeal, so let her be arrested and her pledges to prosecute are in *mercy, viz. John her father and the others who were under oath to prosecute. Richard does not come. He was attached by John de Hungrie and Abel the Goldsmith, John Trentemars and Andrew Spereon. So they are in *mercy. To preserve the king's peace let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and aldermen; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that the parties are not agreed and [Richard] is not guilty. Therefore he is quit.

Nota 36. De appello facto in hustengo. 14th cent.: Scribatur nota [cf. 524 no. 36].

PLEAS OF THE CROWN 43 HENRY III [1258–9]

86. In the same year, Peter de Gysors being chamberlain, who answers, John Adrian and Robert de Cornhull, who has died, being sheriffs, for whom John Adrian answers; a stranger was found dead on the bank of the Thames with his throat cut. The mayor and aldermen are asked who killed him and say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not know, nor how he was washed up there, unless by the tide. John de Couventre, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Peter de Hamiston and Reginald le Barbur. So they are in *mercy. All the other neighbours attached for the death have died, so nothing from them. [cf. 600]

87. John la Persone with others unknown went by night to the house of William de Clerkenwell and his wife Alice and killed them and carried off all their goods. They at once fled and John is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. Nothing is known of chattels or frankpledge because he was from the county of Southampton, so let him be exacted and outlawed there. The mayor and aldermen are asked if they know who the men were who went with John to commit the murder and say in the faith [in which they are bound to the king] that they do not know and cannot discover by inquest because it happened by night; but they say that John's sister, Catherine, and her maid Dulcia (fn. 11) and also Maud de Horseye were attached on suspicion of the death and have now died, so nothing from them. Because it is found in the rolls of the coroner and sheriffs that the neighbours were attached by six pledges contrary to the custom of the City, *to judgment on the chamberlain and sheriffs. [cf. 600]

Nota 37. De camerario et vicecomitibus amerciatis pro attachiamentis vicinorum per vi plegios contra consuetudinum Civitatis.14th cent.: Scribatur nota [cf. 524 no. 37].

88. Theobald servant of Roger le Fuster was crushed to death by a stone wall in the ward of William Bukerell [Broad Street ward]. Value of the wall *3s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Thomas de St. Edmunds, one of the neighbours, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Reginald custodian of the houses of the abbot of St. Albans and Adam de Hormade of Hertfordshire. So they are in *mercy. Walter le Dormur falsely presented himself as a neighbour, so he is in *mercy. Likewise, because the men of the ward presented him as a neighbour, *to judgment on them.

Nota [38]. De vicino amerciato et warda amerciata pro falsa presentacione. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 38].

89. A woman called Felice, while passing through Wodestrate in the ward of Richard de Ewell [Farringdon ward], came upon Lucy brewster of Maunsell the Tailor standing in his doorway. Lucy seized Felice and dragged her into the house, charging her with taking away her business (vendicionem servicie sue). Thereupon Lucy, with William le Mercer and Alan de Cheddeworth, beat Felice so that she died on the third day after. William, Alan and Lucy have now fled and are suspected of the death, so let William and Alan be *exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. They had no [chattels]. Let Lucy be *exacted and waived according to the custom [of the City]. Chattels *3s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. Because the chamberlain and sheriffs made no enquiry about the chattels, *to judgment on them. It is testified that they were harboured in the ward after the deed, so the ward is in *mercy. All the neighbours attached for the death have died, so nothing from them. [cf. 601]

90. Alan de Ireland took sanctuary in the church of St. Michael in Hoggelane, confessed that he had killed a man of Wymundeham and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. No chattels nor frankpledge because he was a stranger.

91. Adam le Hert, while building a house with many other workmen, was crushed to death by a beam in the courtyard of Simon Passelewe. Value of the beam *18d. for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours have died. John de Chingeforde, Robert de Warr', Stephen de Smethefeud, William de Romoney and William de Upton were attached for the death because they were present when Adam was crushed, but they do not come and are not suspected. John was attached by Wibert de Opton and Walter de Plumstede, Robert by Thomas de Donstable mason and John de Middleton, Stephen by Thomas le Soper and John le Cordewaner, William by Master Andrew the Mason and John Frere, William de Opton by Adam de Lamburne and Simon Passelewe. So they are in *mercy. Because the men of the ward of Peter de Edelmeton [Castle Baynard ward] only valued the deodand at 12d., to judgment on the whole ward. (Infortunium.) [cf. 602]

92. Henry de Wokenden of Essex took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary de Wollochirch, confessed that he had stolen two oxen and abjured the realm. Chattels *5s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. Because it is found in the rolls of the chamberlain and sheriffs that he was harboured in the ward of John Adrian [? Walbrook ward] (fn. 14) in a house which he rented there, *to judgment on the whole ward. [cf. 603]

93. A man called Warin was bathing himself in the Thames when he accidentally fell in and was drowned. Peter le Fleg', the second neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by William le Mannec' and John de Turribus. So they are in *mercy. The other neighbour has died. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. [cf. 604]

94. Geoffrey le Gylour killed William le Werkeman in the ward of Richard de Ewell [Farringdon ward]. Afterwards he was arrested and taken to Newgate and there before Laurence de Brok he was convicted and hanged. All the neighbours have died, so nothing from them. Let enquiry be made about the chattels in the rolls of Laurence de Brok because the mayor and aldermen do not know whether he had chattels or not.

95. John son of Alexander Fresharing was scalded to death in his father's house in a tine full of hot mash. Value of the tine *6d. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. John Takepeny, a neighbour, does not come and was attached by Paul warden of London Bridge, and John Godale 'oystrer'. So they are in mercy. John's father Alexander and his wife Margery were attached for the death, but do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by Peter the Goldsmith, John le Treyer, Reginald Fresharing and Robert de Coventre. So they are in *mercy. (Infortunium.)

96. Robert Perdriz of Weng fell and broke his neck. The neighbours come and are not suspected. Master Walter under Wall (sub Muro) and Thomas de Heltham capper were attached for the death because they were with Robert when it happened, but they do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by Philip de Neuchirch, Thomas de St. Albans, Thomas de Travers, and William le Cuver. So they are in *mercy. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

97. [m. 5d] Hamo Home was in a boat at Billingesgate in the ward of Ralph Sperling [Billingsgate ward] when William Nasegor and William le Hore came up and, a quarrel ensuing, killed Hamo. William Nasegor at once took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary de la Hulle, confessed the deed and abjured the realm. No chattels. William le Hore at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. Because he was from Kent, the sheriff is ordered to have him exacted and outlawed in the county and to enquire about chattels and frankpledge.

Nota 39. Quod forincecus exigatur in comitatu unde est [cf. 524 no. 39].

98. William de Torington, accused of the deaths of William de Brustowe and John de Feltham and arrested and detained by the sheriffs of London, comes and denies the death and everything and for good or ill puts himself upon his country. Because he is from Surrey, the sheriff of Surrey is ordered to cause to appear twelve [men] of the neighbourhood of Puttenheth. William is meanwhile committed to the custody of the sheriffs of London. Thereupon the constable of the Tower claims that no prisoner should be delivered to the sheriffs of London once he has entered the gate of the Tower, but that custody belongs to him until judgment has been passed. The mayor and citizens say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that in other eyres they have always been accustomed to have custody of their prisoners even though they have entered the Tower; the constable shows no reason why he should have this custody even though they have entered the Tower. So it is adjudged that William be committed to the custody of the sheriff saving the constable's claim. Afterwards on the appointed day the twelve jurors from the neighbourhood come and say on their oath that William is not guilty of the death, so he is quit. Then William de Allegate and his wife Alice, John Postel, Walter Morket and his wife Alice were arrested for the death, come and deny the death and everything and for good or ill put themselves upon the verdict of the twelve [jurors], because they are strangers; they say on their oath that none of them is guilty of the death except Walter Morket, so [let him be hanged] (suspensus) and all the others are quit. Walter had no chattels.

Nota 40. Quod vicecomites habebunt custodiam prisonum licet Turrim intraverunt non obstante calumpnia constabularii et hoc patet hic [cf. 524 no. 40].

99. Henry le Baude was killed on London Bridge; Nicholas Russell, Hugh the Butcher, Ranulf Lyne and Richard Curteys were attached for the death because they came up when he was killed, but they do not come and the mayor and aldermen say that they do not suspect them. Nicholas was attached by Ailward le Keu of Estchep and Hugh le Flaoner, Hugh by Adam de Hak and William the Goldsmith, Ranulf by Gilbert le Melker and Richard Sharp, Richard by Robert Nicholas and Laurence Soutere. So they are in *mercy. The four neighbours come except Hamond le Drawer and he is not suspected. He was attached by Fulk le Drauer and Henry le Drawere. So they are all in *mercy. [cf. 605]

Nota 41. Quod illi qui attachiati sunt eo quod fuerunt presentes quando infortunium vel felonia accidit et similiter vicini attachiati se debent acquietare per veredictum maioris et aldermannorum [cf. 524 no. 41].

PLEAS OF THE CROWN 44 HENRY III [1259–60]

100. In the same year, Peter de Gysorc' being chamberlain, Henry de Coventre, who answers for himself, and Adam Bruning, for whom his son John answers, being sheriffs; Ralph son of Robert de Catton of Norfolk, took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary Abbechirch in the ward of Richard de Ewelle [Farringdon ward], confessed that he was a sheep-thief and abjured the realm. No chattels.

101. Peter le Gardiner was climbing a ladder to put a board (tabulam) above the beams in his house when he fell upon his neck and died forthwith. Value of the ladder 6d. and of the board 6d. (*deodandum 12 [sic]) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Because the chamberlain and sheriffs made no enquiry about the ladder, to judgment on them. Ralph le Gardiner and Thomas le Keu [who] were in the house do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by Terry le Lorimer, Ralph de Neuport 'lorimer' and Thomas de Norhamton. So they are in *mercy. Two neighbours have died and William le Taylur and Thomas de Norhamton falsely presented themselves as neighbours, so to *judgment on them. Likewise because the men of the ward of Cheap produce (proferunt) them as neighbours and they are not, to *judgment on them. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. [cf. 606]

Nota 42. De warda et illis qui presentaverunt se vicinos et non fuerunt amerciatis.14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 42].

102. Robert de Berkyng, William de Walehop, Walter de Marlebergh, William Knith and John le Cordewaner were drinking together in the house of Albin the Baker in the ward of Richard de Ewell [Farringdon ward] when a quarrel arose among them and William and the others beat Robert de Berkyng to death and then dragged him to the Thames. They at once fled and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. They had no chattels and were not in frankpledge but William de Walehop and Walter were in the mainpast of John Skylman, and William Knyth in the mainpast of Thomas Purtre. So they are in *mercy. (fn. 22) Also because William and Walter were harboured in the ward of Thomas son of Thomas [? Queenhithe ward], and William Knyth and John le Cordewaner in the ward of Richard de Ewell, outside frankpledge, *to judgment (fn. 23) on the wards. The four neighbours and all the others attached for the death have died, except Eve, Albin's wife, who comes and is not suspected, so she is quit. [cf. 607]

Nota 43. De wardis amerciatis pro franco plegio et similiter de quibusdam amerciatis in quorum manupastu etc. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 43].

103. William de Hakeney who had the falling sickness fell dead in the ward of Adam de Basing [Cheap ward]. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Richard de Ambersbyre, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by William le Chandeler and Adam the Baker. So they are in *mercy. Because the men of the ward do not know who the neighbours are, *to judgment on them. [cf. 608]

104. Five unknown malefactors killed Master John le Gras and Besance the Roman outside St. Paul's churchyard towards Westchep in the ward of Richard de Ewell [Farringdon ward] and at once fled. It is not known who they were, but they (fn. 24) believe they were of the household of John de Crakehale, (fn. 25) who is dead. All the neighbours have died.

105. Thomas Bagard capper and William Frere were quarrelling together in the ward of Peter Aunger [Broad Street ward] and William killed Thomas and at once fled, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Nothing is known of chattels, but he was harboured in the ward outside frankpledge, so the ward is in *mercy. All the neighbours have died except Humphrey le Megucer who does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by William le Megucer and Gilbert le Marischall. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 609]

106. Robert de Naun took sanctuary in the church of the Friars Minor in London, confessed that he was a thief and plunderer and abjured the realm. No chattels nor frankpledge because he was a vagabond.

107. Henry Joie was found killed on London Bridge; Robert le Taylour absconded and is suspected of the death, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Chattels 6 marks for which the sheriffs are to answer. He had a messuage and eight acres of land at Depteford in Kent and the annual value is unknown. Therefore the sheriff [of Kent] is ordered to produce on Monday twelve men. All the neighbours come and are not suspected. Afterwards Robert was arrested and comes now and does not wish to put himself upon the verdict of his country, so let him be committed to gaol (fn. 26) and nothing from his outlawry.

Footnotes

2 Silves, Portugal (C. Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica i (1913), 452).
3 Recte 4 May 42 Henry III (C.R. 1256–9, 218).
4 C.R. 1256–9, 249, 28 July 1258.
5 Oliveri Roberti.
6 Garlick-seller.
11 Cf. C.P.R. 1247–58, 666.
14 St. Mary Woolchurch is in Walbrook ward (cf. Rotuli Hundredorum, i (1812), 407; cf. Beaven, i, 373).
22 *Misericordia twice in margin.
23 *Ad iudicium twice in margin.
24 ? The mayor and aldermen.
25 Archdeacon of Bedford and Treasurer of the exchequer, 1258–60 (Tout, Chapters, i, 296 n. 3).
26 Cf. C.C.R. 1272–9, 285.