Roll A 5
(i) 1337-44

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

A.H. Thomas (editor)

Year published

1926

Pages

165-197

Citation Show another format:

'Roll A 5: (i) 1337-44', Calendar of the plea and memoranda rolls of the city of London: volume 1: 1323-1364 (1926), pp. 165-197. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36658 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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ROLL A5

Membr. 1

8 Jan. 1338

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make inquiry with regard to a complaint received from Bernard del Compre of Prymerole to the effect that he had embarked 50 casks of wine at Bordeaux in a ship belonging to Peter de Logar called "la Fraunceys de Bayon," and that the King's Serjeant-atarms, Reymund Guillim, had seized 31 casks and one pipe of the wine at London under the pretence that Prymerole had returned to the allegiance of the King of France. Arnald de Dureford and Nicholas Usus Marys, Constable of Bordeaux, had testified to the King's Council that the wine was embarked at a time when Prymerole was still in the King's power. Dated at Hertford 8 Jan. Ao 11 Edw. III [1337-8]. (L)

26 Jan. 1338

Record of inquest (fn. 1) taken before Henry Darcy, Mayor, pursuant to the above writ. The jurors found that the King's Serjeant-at-arms did not seize the wine, but attached the above-mentioned Bernard del Compre and handed him over to the Constable of the Tower, who took from him the keys of the cellar in Vintry where the wine was stored. The said Bernard had arrived first at Winchelsea, and his journey to London with the wine had taken from two days after the Feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist [24 June] until the Feast of St Mary Magdalene [22 July]. Dated on Monday after the Feast of the Conversion of St Paul [25 Jan.] Ao 12 Edw. III [1337-8]. (L)

7 Feb. 1338

Pleas held before Henry Darcy, Mayor, Nicholas Crane and Walter Neel, Sheriffs, on Saturday after the Feast of the Purification B. M. [2 Feb.] A o 12 Edw. III [1337-8]

Emma Clerkes, Cristiana atte Hurst, Stephen Michel, Henry de Kirkeby, Richard le Barber and Robert Flourman were attached to answer a charge of having forestalled the corn market. A jury from Gracechurch found only Robert Flourman guilty. He was committed to prison until he paid a fine to the King, but was mainprised the same day. (L)

No date

Letters testimonial from the Mayor of London to the Bailiffs of Great "Ockele" in favour of Richard, son and heir of Ralph de Dankewell, who was claiming his inheritance in their bailiwick. (F)

Membr. 1b

7 Feb. 1338

Pleas held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Saturday before the Feast of S t Valentine [14 Feb.] A o 12 Edw. III [1337-8]

John Odierne, butcher, and Robert Odierne were attached to answer a charge of carrying trade refuse into the street at Gracechurch, and feeding their pigs on it, thus defiling the street. Both afterwards paid a fine to the Sheriffs. (L)

18 Feb. 1338

Pleas held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Wednesday after the above Feast

John de Whitfeld, Laurence le Hurer, William de Bedeford, Francis le Seler, Anabilla le Hokester, Robert de Clyderhowe, cornmonger, Agnes Sigily, "hokester," and William Brythnoth were attached to answer the Commonalty and William de Iford, who prosecuted, on a charge of forestalling the corn market. All were found guilty except Agnes Sigily and were committed to prison until they should pay a fine to the King. (L)

26 Feb. 1338

Letter from the Mayor and Aldermen of London to the Mayor and Bailiffs of Lenne (Lynn, co. Norfolk) desiring them to assist Adam de Shadwell to recover his apprentice, Simon le Moneter, who had absconded with his master's goods. Dated 26 Feb. (F)

No date

The same to the Bailiffs and good men of the towns of Sandwyz and Fordwyz, desiring them to restore to William de Stanes his property, which had been seized at Fordwyz at the suit of Stephen de Messeberwe, who wished to recover certain cheeses from him. The owner of the cheeses, William le Goldsmyth of Sandwyz, had now testified before the Mayor and Aldermen that the above William de Stanes had taken charge of the cheeses at "Dordryght" in Holland and had lent him 23s 4d, when he was in a difficulty. (F)

No date

Letters testimonial from the same to the Bailiffs and good men of Northampton, certifying that John de Gayton was next heir to William Tabourer of Gayton, deceased. (F)

Membr. 2

19 June 1338

Pleas held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Friday before the Feast of the Nativity of S t John the Baptist [24 June] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

William de Dalton, spicer, was attached to answer a charge, brought by the Beadle of Castle Baynard Ward, of keeping a house of ill-fame to which married women and their paramours and other bad characters resorted. He was found guilty by a jury and committed to prison. After being in Newgate over two months he was released on mainprise. (L)

15 July 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and a great Commonalty on Wednesday after the Feast of S t Mildred [13 July] (fn. 2) A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

William de Iford, Common Serjeant, was instructed to go to the Abbot of Lesnes and to the locum tenens of the Abbot of St Augustine near Lesnes (fn. 3) , with a request from the Mayor and Commonalty that they should cause "bekenes" to be lighted on "Sheterselde (fn. 4) " and other places, so that notice might be given to the inhabitants of Kent, Surrey and London of the approach of the enemy (fn. 5) .

Also it was ordained that the Aldermen warn the men of their Wards to arm themselves according to their ability, and that any man who refused should be committed to prison as a traitor to the City. (L)

5 Aug. 1338

Note that on Wednesday after the Feast of St Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] Ao 12 Edw. III [1338], John Frere, skinner, came before the Mayor and Aldermen and complained of being threatened by John de Bedeford, senior, whom he wished to be bound over to keep the peace. This was accordingly done.

The same day sureties were accepted for the appearance, when required, of Nicholas de Hereford and Thomas de Roselyngton.

Sureties were also accepted for the appearance of Richard le Goldsmyth of "Lambhuth" in the matter of a pair of paternosters of copper-gilt and counterfeit silver.

The same day surety was taken for William Pecok to keep the peace with Maude de Stoke. (L)

7 Aug. 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty on Friday after the above Feast

It was agreed that John de Hereford, John son of the late Master Richard de Gloucestre and other incorrigibles should be committed to Newgate to prevent their doing mischief. (L)

Membr. 3

26 May 1338

Letter from Henry Darcy, the Mayor, and the Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of London to the Mayor, Bailiffs and Commonalty of York, desiring them to assist Robert de Heccham, attorney of Simon Sleyp, merchant of Louvain, to recover £9 10s due from John de Watterton to the above Simon. Dated 26 May. (F)

30 May 1338

Letters patent under the Mayoralty Seal certifying that certain merchants, William Meroud, Gysemannus de Cort, Walter Alard, John Hondessone, John Sourendok, Giles atte Ramme, Tarus de Hale, Henry de Loo, Walter de Loven, John de la Wode, John Pereman, Gerard de Akk, John de Folbek, Jacobus Flegh, Frankynus Depe and Giles Famsnen, had paid certain sums of money into the King's Court [i.e. Mayor's Court] due to Henry Rombaud for board and lodging, which sums were to be handed over to the latter's creditors. Dated 30 May 1338. [Marginal note that the certificate was issued on behalf of Brabantines.] (L)

29 May 1338

Letter from Henry Darcy, Mayor, and the Aldermen of the City of London to the Prior of "Croys Roys" [Royston, co. Herts.], desiring him to give up the goods of William Broune and Henry de Ware, which his bailiffs had seized, because such a seizure was contrary to the franchise of the City of London, and moreover the above merchants had entered into security to the Sheriffs of London to aid the King in the war with everything belonging to their trade. Dated 29 May. (F)

18 May 1338

Letter from the Mayor and Bailiffs of Oxford (fn. 6) to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London, offering them the honour and reverence due from a daughter to a mother (queuz fille deit a sa mere), and asking for particulars of the procedure in an Assize of Freshforce. Dated 18 May. (F)

Reply (fn. 7) to the above. Dated Tuesday after the Feast of St Barnabas [11 June]. (F)

Membr. 3b

20 June 1338

Letter from Henry Darcy, Mayor, and the Aldermen of the City of London to the Bailiffs and good men of Staundon, desiring them to restore the distress they had levied on the goods of Margaret, relict of Ralph de Coventre. Dated Saturday before the Feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist [24 June]. (F)

Letter from the same to the Mayor, Bailiffs and good men of the town of Southampton, desiring them to see justice done to Andrew Aubrey, Alderman of London, whose goods had been arrested at the suit of William Maundelard, Thomas Bassyngrom and Nicholas atte Gate. Dated as above. (F)

1 July 1338

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of London to the King, notifying the despatch of 40 men-at-arms and 60 archers for his service (fn. 8) . Certain men chosen for the contingent had left the City, saying they were going to the war in the retinues of great men. The King is requested to say what shall be done with such men, if they return to the City without the King's leave and warrant. Dated 1 July. (F)

The same to the King's Chancellor, praying that the City may obtain from the King the usual warranty that the despatch of 100 men to the war shall not be drawn into precedent to the City's prejudice. Same date.(F)

A note of a similar letter having been sent to Master Richard de Bynteworth, Bishop-elect of London. (L)

Letter to Sir Henry de Ferrers, desiring him to see that the soldiers recently despatched by the City were duly presented to the King. Same date. (F)

A note of a similar letter having been sent to Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (fn. 9) .

4 July 1338

Letter from Henry Darcy, Mayor, and the Aldermen of the City of London to Adam le Keu and others of Gravesend, desiring them to restore to John de Martyncroft the goods they had taken from his apprentice Richard de Saye. Dated 4 July. (F)

No date

Another letter to the same effect. (F)

No date

Letter from the same to the Bailiffs and good men of the town of "Kedwelly" in Wales, desiring them to give seisin to Richard Hendy of certain lands and tenements in Kid welly lately conveyed to him by John Wrenche, son of the late William Wrenche of Kidwelly. (F)

Membr. 4

Letters and Memoranda of the time of Henry Darcy, Mayor, A o 11 Edw. III [1337-8]

1 Nov. 1337

Writ under the Privy Seal to the Mayor and Sheriffs for an inquest to be held as to when Thomas de Chedyndon of Fleet Street died. Dated at Tame, 1 Nov. Ao 11 Edw. III [1337]. (F)

7 Nov. 1337

An inquest was accordingly held and a return (F) made to the effect that the above Thomas died at daybreak on Wednesday before the Feast of St Luke the Evangelist [18 Oct.]. Dated 7 Nov. Ao 11 Edw. III [1337].

4 Oct. 1337

Letter from Henry Darci, Mayor, and the Aldermen of London to the Mayor and Bailiffs of Southampton, desiring them to restore to Gerard Corp of London the distress they had taken for the payment of a custom called "Barbecage (fn. 10) ." Dated 4 Oct. (F)

13 Nov. 1337

The same to the Bailiffs and good men of Jernemue (Yarmouth), desiring them to restore the distress taken from William Box, John de Gloucestre and other citizens of London, and promising redress for any offence committed against burgesses of Yarmouth. Dated Thursday after the Feast of St Martin [11 Nov.]. (F)

No date

The same to the Mayor and Barons of Wynchelse, declaring their inability to compel the heirs and executors of Thomas de Upton to satisfy Roger Salerne and Richard his merchant for a sum of money due to the said Roger by the said Thomas—for the reason that the heirs and executors had no property in the City. (F)

4 Dec. 1337

The same to the Mayor and Bailiffs of Winchester, desiring them to restore to William de Stowe the distress they had taken. Dated 4 Dec. (F)

13 Dec. 1337

The same to the Mayor, Bailiffs, and good men of the town of Drogheda, desiring them to assist the bearer, Robert de Pyrlee, to recover a debt due to him by John Beaumond of Beverley, who was under their jurisdiction. Dated Saturday the Feast of St Lucia [13 Dec.]. (F)

12 Jan. 1338

The same to the Bailiffs and good men of the town of Orford (fn. 11) , desiring them to restore the distress they had taken for payment of custom from John de Ware, John de Bixele and James de Norhampton. Dated 12 Jan. [Ao 11 Edw. III, 1337-8]. (F)

Membr. 4b

21 Jan. 1338

The same to the Mayor, Bailiffs and good men of the town of Hampton, notifying that they had lately arrested certain goods belonging to Spanish merchants (fn. 12) , captured at sea on the ship "la Carrak" of Cateloigne and subsequently found in London. Among these goods were 7 fardells of cloth belonging to Laurence de Gardak, merchant of Bayonne. Piers Cisers, attorney of the Spanish merchants, had given evidence that they had no claim on Gardak's cloth, which had been brought to England in the ship "La Naude" of Bayonne. Accordingly the latter had been allowed to have his cloth on payment of the custom due, and had received permission to take it to Hampton and elsewhere in the way of trade. Dated Wednesday after the Feast of SS. Fabian and Sebastian [20 Jan.]. (F)

24 Jan. 1338

Letter from Henry Darcy, the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to the Bailiffs and good men of the town of Yarmouth, calling upon them to see restitution made to John de Mockyng, William Haunsard, Richard Dubble, Walter Turk, John de Gloucestre, William de Ware, Roger de Bernes, William de Watford, Walter de Reynham, Richard le Long, Simon le Baker and John de Shirbourn for the loss of their merchandise, which had been forcibly seized in the port of Kirkele (fn. 13) and other coast-towns by the mariners of certain ships, who were Yarmouth men. Dated Saturday before the Conversion of St Paul [25 Jan.]. (F)

30 Jan. 1338

Reply to the above, expressing regret and promising that the merchandise so taken in "la Rode" of Kirkele and other places should be restored. Dated Friday before Candlemas [2 Feb.]. (F)

19 Feb. 1338

Letter from the Mayor, Henry Darcy, and the Aldermen of the City of London to the Bailiffs and good men of Coventry, desiring them to constrain Roger atte Newelond and Ralph Billyng to pay the money due on a bond to Thomas de Sewell, citizen of London. Dated Thursday after the Feast of St Valentine [14 Feb.]. (F)

20 Feb. 1338

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs under the Privy Seal for an inquiry to be made by the oaths of Antoigne Bachoun, Francekyn Bachoun, Antoigne Malusel, Johan Piselagle, Barthelmeu Thomasyn, Bronnette Guilliam, Nicholas Guilliam, Pieres Jacoby and Juste Chaucer as to whether Antoigne Chetron, merchant of Genoa, was bound to Guy Lespicer in £78 sterling. Dated 20 Feb. Ao 12 Edw. III [1337-8]. (F)

25 Feb. 1338

Return to the effect that Antoigne Chetron was so bound. Dated 25 Feb. (F)

Membr. 5

24 July 1338

Pleas held before Henry Darcy, Mayor, and the Sheriffs on Friday the Vigil of S t James the Apostle [25 July] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

Robert de Stratford, cordwainer, was attached to answer a charge of harbouring Alice Donbely, Alice Tredewedowe and other prostitutes, on the prosecution of William de Iford (fn. 14) . He was found guilty by a jury, damages being taxed at 6s 8d, and was mainprised to come up for judgment. (L)

The same day William de Farnberwe and John atte Grove, armourer, being sworn and examined separately, gave evidence that Roger de la Tour had threatened John de Hadyngton. The said Roger was bound over, with six sureties, to keep the peace. (L)

3 Aug. 1338

Pleas held before the same on Monday after the Feast of S t Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.]

Thomas de Sharnebrok, baker, was attached to answer a charge of having taken his corn out of the City to be ground and having the meal brought in by way of Cripplegate, instead of by way of Aldgate or London Bridge, where the corn would have been weighed for the payment of pesage (fn. 15) , thus defrauding John de Romeseye, the collector. The defendant admitted passing two cartloads through Cripplegate, but pleaded that he had paid pesage therefor to the plaintiff. A jury found that he had passed four cartloads through Cripplegate. Judgment deferred. (L)

17 Aug. 1338

On Monday after the Feast of the Assumption B.M. [15 Aug.], Laurence de Dailing was bound over to keep the King's peace.

Writ to Henry Darcy, the Mayor, in his capacity as the King's Escheator, to hold an Inquisition post Mortem as to the estate of Giles de Badelesmere. Dated at Walton, 16 July. (L)

Return to the above [membrane torn]. (L)

Membr. 5b

25 Aug. 1338

Inquisition post Mortem as to the estate in the City of Thomas (de Brotherton), Earl Marshal (fn. 16) . The jury find that on the day of his death he held a ruined house with a vacant plot of ground in the parish of St Mary Somerset, which could not be let and was of no annual value; also nine shops and eight solars of an annual value of £4 15s, charged with a quitrent of 8s to the Abbot of Messingdene, and two marks for repairs, leaving a net annual value of 60s 8d. The next heirs were Margaret, wife of Sir John de Segrave (fn. 17) and Alice, wife of Sir Edward de Montacute. Dated Tuesday before the Feast of the Decollation of St John the Baptist [29 Aug.]. (L)

13 Aug. 1338

Schedule of victuals and other stores purchased for the King's use by John de Pulteneye (fn. 18) , Henry Darci, Mayor, John de Preston, John de Oxford, Richard de Rothyng, Henry Combemartyn and William ..., by order under the Privy Seal received on Thursday after the Feast of St Laurence [10 Aug.].

600 qrs of wheat at 4s 6d the qr. £135
For carriage to the mill at 1d the qr. 50s
For grinding the same at 4d the qr. £10
For bolting the flour at 1½d the qr. 75s
100 casks at 2s each £10
Sum, £161 5s
100 carcases of oxen at 12s £60
10 qrs of salt for salting the same at 6s the qr. 60s
25 casks at 2s each 50s
Sum, £65 10s
3000 horseshoes at 106s 8d the thousand £16
30000 nails for the same at 20d the thousand 50s
Sum, £18 10s
Sum total, £245 5s

The above schedule was sent to the Chancery and delivered to the Bishop of London, the Chancellor, with a note that the King was bound to John de Pulteneye, Henry Darci and John de Oxford in the said sum. (L)

5 Sept. 1338

At a Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and a great Commonalty on Saturday before the Feast of the Nativity B.M. [8 Sept.], three nets (fn. 19) taken in the Thames on the east of London Bridge were condemned and destroyed as contrary to the Assize. (L)

Ordered that when an assessment should in future be made in the City no one should be assessed outside the Ward where he dwelt. (L)

9 Sept. 1338

At a Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and a great Commonalty on Wednesday after the above Feast, it was agreed that two deeds of Edmund Hardel, made to John de Oxford, Alderman, should be enrolled at the next Husting. (L)

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor and King's Escheator, to give seisin to Elizabeth, relict of Giles de Badelesmere, of certain shops formerly part of her late husband's estate near Aldgate. Dated at Windsor.... (L)

Membr. 6

11 Oct. 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Sunday after the Feast of S t Dionysius [9 Oct.] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

Measures taken for the defence of the City: Simon Turgys, with six men by day and twelve by night, was assigned to guard the Postern by the Tower, with one springald (fn. 20) . Sections of the Thames from the Lion Turret (fn. 21) to the Stonewharf (fn. 22) by the Woolwharf, from the Stonewharf to the Bridge, from Ebbegate (fn. 23) to Castle Baynard, and the Bridge itself, were allocated to the Aldermen and men of various Wards to guard, four springalds being mounted on the new tower in the first section. The neighbouring Wards were charged with the defence of Ludgate, Newgate, Aldersgate and Cripplegate. Fifteen men of Farringdon Ward were placed under the command of Richard de Hakeneye, and the men of Bassishaw and Coleman Street were attached to the contingent of William de Brickelesworth.

It was agreed to drive piles in the Thames to prevent ships from passing, except one at a time.

Richard de Hakeneye and Richard de Rothyng, Aldermen, Alan Gille and Henry de Preston, Commoners, were chosen to supervise the pile-driving, and Henry Darci, the Mayor, Sir John de Pulteneye, Richard de la Pole and Reginald de Conduit to supervise the Watches.

It was ordered that each alderman should hold an inquiry in his Ward as to the number of able-bodied householders not possessing arms.

It was agreed that all persons having quays on the Thames between the Tower and the Bridge should construct brattices (bretagiis) of boards thereon as a defence. William de Brikelesworth said he had a quay called "Baudries Wharf" by the Stonewharf on a four years' lease from Petronilla Turk (fn. 24) , who refused to protect the wharf with brattices, and he desired the Mayor and Aldermen to say whose duty it was to fortify it. It was agreed, with the consent of the parties, that the above William should carry out the work, and have the quay beyond the term of the lease until he had recovered his expenses. Thereupon he paid John de Totenham £10 6s 8d to erect the brattices on the quay. (L)

Membr. 6b

20 Oct. 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty on Tuesday after the Feast of the Translation of S t Edward [13 Oct.] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

Simon Fraunceys and Andrew Aubrey were appointed to buy heads (capita) for the quarrels (fn. 25) of the arbalests (balistarum), and to provide shields (targeas) for the City's safety. (L)

John de Preston, William de Causton and Richard de Berkyng, Aldermen, were appointed to levy 800 marks, being arrears of the fifteenth, which arrears were assigned for the payment of certain creditors of the King by an indenture in the hands of Thomas de Maryns, the Chamberlain. John de Grantham and the Sheriffs' sergeants, John atte Rye and William de Morle, were chosen to assist them. (L)

Richard Costantyn and Richard de Forsham, Aldermen, John de Bredestrete and John de Aylesham, Commoners, were elected to raise a common tax for providing piles to be sunk in the river and other necessaries for the City's defence. (L)

23 Oct. 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty on Friday after the Feast of S t Luke the Evangelist [18 Oct.] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

It was ordered that every freeman for the future might sell oxhides and cowhides, freely and without hindrance from the Sheriffs, but foreign butchers were to continue to sell flesh, hides and fells, as formerly set forth in Letter Book... fo.... (fn. 26) . (L)

2 Nov. 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty on Monday the Feast of All Souls [2 Nov.]

Robert Flambard brought a letter (fn. 27) from the King (F) desiring that he might be excused attending to his duties as Mace-bearer in the City, because he was a serjeant-at-arms of the King and was at present required by the latter. Dated at Antwerp, 18 Oct.—In the same congregation John Benyn was sworn as locum tenens in the place of the said Robert Flambard, who also resigned his bailiwick in Southwark. (L)

The custody of Ludgate was entrusted to Nicholas le Calicer and John atte Watre, with orders not to pass any one through the gate after curfew sounded at St Martin's le Grand. (L)

Membr. 7

No date

Letter from the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London to the Mayor, Bailiffs and good men of the town of Southampton, testifying to the good character of Henry de Dynant, who had been arrested on suspicion, and requesting his release. (F)

No date

Letter from the same to Robert Baret, steward of the Countess of "Holestre (fn. 28) ," desiring him to give orders to the bailiffs of the Countess to surrender the distresses which they had made on the goods of William Knyght, John Odyerne and Richard Daukes, citizens of London, at Leighton Buzzard co. Beds. (F)

17 Nov. 1338

The same to the Mayor, Bailiffs and good men of Sandwich, desiring them to see that Richard Lucas rendered account to Alexander Lucas, a vintner of London, of moneys received. Dated 17 Nov. (F)

No date

The same to the Bailiffs and good men of Great Yarmouth, acknowledging their letter (p. 173). (F)

No date

Petition to the King's Council from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of London, praying that certain aldermen and commoners, whom the Council had summoned before them and ordered abroad, might be allowed to remain at home and carry out the defence of the City, in accordance with the promise made personally to the King at the Tower that they would hold the City for him. (F)

13 Jan. 1338?

Letter from the same to the Bailiffs and good men of Great Yarmouth, complaining that they had not restored certain goods that had been taken from William Haunsard and others, as promised. Dated Wednesday the Feast of St Hillary [13 Jan.]. (F)

No date

Petition of Henry Darcy, Mayor, to the King and Council, to take into consideration the fact that, owing to the war, he could not collect the 50 marks annual rent which the Mayor of London, for the time being, was wont to receive from the merchants of Amiens, Corby and Nesle, this rent being the only certain revenue appurtenant to the Mayoralty. (F)

No date

Letter from the Mayor and Aldermen to the Mayor, Bailiffs and good men of Oxford, desiring them to see that Richard de Bedeford, Richard de Selwode and other burgesses of Oxford satisfied John Doxenford as regards the money due to him. (F)

Membr. 7b

No date

Letter from the Bailiffs of Great Yarmouth, notifying that certain merchandise that had been unlawfully seized had been offered to Thomas de Ware and Simon, the servant of William Haunsard, who refused to accept it as not being their own property. They pray for further time to set the matter right. (F)

No date

Reply to the above, refusing further time, and desiring them to forward the goods at once to London by sea, with a deputation to treat. (F)

5 Feb. 1339

Letters patent from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of London, certifying that Master Henry de Lyndeseye, clerk, was the right heir of Master Adam de Lyndeseye, called "de Butterwyk," who owned property in the Isle of Axholme. Dated Friday after the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.] Ao 13 Edw. III [1338-9]. (F)

No date

Letter from Henry Darcy, Mayor, and the Aldermen of the City of London to the Mayor, Bailiffs and good men of Oxford, desiring them to see that Henry de Hampton satisfied John de Stanhop for a debt, vouched by two tallies and sealed with the seal of the said Henry. (F)

27 April 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty on Monday after the Feast of S t George [23 April] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

It was agreed that whereas the City had written three times to Great Yarmouth for redress to be made to William Haunsard, William de Ware and other citizens of London who had been robbed of merchandise at Kirkele and the neighbourhood, and nothing had been done, Withernam (fn. 29) should be taken (quod homines . . .wythernamientur) of the goods and chattels of men of that town. (L)

Membr. 8

25 Aug. 1338

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor and King's Escheator, to hold an Inquisition post Mortem as to the estate of the late Earl Marshal in the City. Witness, Edward, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester, Warden of England; Windsor, 25 Aug. Ao 12 Edw. III [1338]. (L)

28 Aug. 1338

Return to the above, dated Friday after the Feast of St Bartholomew [24 Aug.], (Identical with return on p. 174, dated Tuesday 25 Aug.)

28 Oct. 1338

Account of issues and profits received by the Mayor as King's Escheator for one whole year from 28 Oct. 1337, and paid into the King's Treasury, from which a tally was received. The profits accrued from certain tenements, gardens and shops within Aldgate and Lime Street belonging to the late Giles Badelesmere. No issues were received from the properties of Thomas, late Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England, as they were unlet. Total, 12s 8d. (L)

No date

Letter from Henry Darcy, Mayor, and the Aldermen to Richard Sperlyng and Nicholas Horn, collectors of wool for the King, desiring them to surrender certain cloth they had taken from Adam de Louthe at Stratford (fn. 30) , which cloth had been entrusted to him by good men of the City for the purpose of manufacture. The said Adam had already been assessed for his wool, as well as the Master of St Thomas of Acres, whose mill the said Adam rented. (F)

3 Dec. 1338

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor and King's Escheator, to hold an Inquisition ad quod Damnum on a proposal by Walter de Fulbourne, parson of the Church of Upton Skydemor (fn. 31) , to grant two-thirds of a messuage in the parish of St Nicholas Olave in Bread Street to the Abbot and Convent of Sautre (fn. 32) for the purpose of a chantry in the Abbey Church, as well as the reversion of the rest of the messuage coming to him after the death of Alice, widow of Ralph de Berkwey, who held the same in dower. Dated at Byflet, 3 Dec. Ao 12 Edw. III [1338]. (L)

Membr. 8b

Return, to the effect that the messuage was held of the King in free burgage, like the rest of the City, and that the proposed grant was not to the prejudice of the King. The annual value was 60s, less 21s quitrent to the Abbot of Sautre, 12s quitrent to the Prior of Bermondeseye. and 10s annual repairs, leaving a net annual value of 17s. (L)

2 Nov. 1338

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor and King's Escheator, to hold an Inquisition ad quod Damnum on a proposal by William Elsyng to grant five messuages in the parishes of All Hallows, Honey Lane, and St Laurence Jewry to the Wardens and Chaplains of the Hospital of St Mary of Aldermanbury (fn. 33) . Dated at Kenyngton, 2 Nov. Ao 12 Edw. III [1338]. (L)

11 Dec. 1338

Return to the above to the effect that the proposed grant would not prejudice the neighbourhood or prevent the donor's discharge of his obligations. The two messuages in the parish of All Hallows, Honey Lane, were of £13 10s annual value, less quitrents to the Nuns of Clerkenwell, the Conversi, the Canons of Merton and the Nuns of St Helen, and 30s repairs, leaving a net annual value of 20s. The three messuages in Laurence Lane were of £6 10s annual value, less quitrents to John de Preston, Sibil Potyn, the churches of St Mildred Bread Street, St Laurence Jewry and St Sepulchre, the heirs of David le Foundour, Richard de Betoygne, Henry de Gisors, Maud de Leyre, and the church of St Mildred in the Poultry, and 30s repairs, leaving a net annual deficit of 8s 4d, to which must be added a payment of 4 marks per annum to John Marchaunt for life. But to meet these charges the donor possessed other messuages in the parishes of St Botolph without Aldersgate and St Andrew Holborn, charged with quitrents to the Hospital of St Mary within Cripplegate and St Paul's, of a net annual value of £11 1s 4d. Dated Friday after the Feast of St Nicholas [6 Dec.]. (L)

20 Nov. 1338

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor, to view the stones of the old Fleet Prison (fn. 34) , which the King had been asked to give to Richard de Potenhale and which had been valued at 10 marks, and to make a return of their value. Dated at Kenyngton, 20 Nov. Ao 12 Edw. III [1338]. (L)

Return to the effect that as the stones had been viewed by the King's Chancellor and Treasurer and many Barons of the Exchequer and others, there was no necessity for the Mayor to give further information, but he would be ready to do so if necessary. (L)

Membr. 9

11 Dec. 1338

A Congregation of the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen on Friday after the Feast of the Conception B.M. [8 Dec.] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

An inquest was held as to the cause of the affray which took place in Holborn the night of Tuesday before the Feast of St Katherine [25 Nov.]. The jurors found that certain clerks of the King's Chancery, named William de Appelton, Richard Hauberk, Laurence Hauberk and Richard Fauksos broke into the houses of Richard de Ledrede and Richard le Heyward in Holborn, and grievously assaulted them, breaking Heyward's left leg, and then drawing their swords resisted arrest by the constables, wounding one of them named Reginald le Brewere. (L)

Nicholas Bonere, saddler, was summoned to show cause why a sum of £40, which he acknowledged to be due to Ralph de Blythe, William Pykerel, Robert de B..., and Richard de Arderne, should not be levied on his goods and chattels. Thereupon the above Nicholas, by Walter de Gilyngham, produced the King's writ of protection, accorded to him during his absence abroad with Thomas de Ferariis on the King's business, dated at Kenyngton 21 Nov. Ao 12 Edw. III [1338]. Proceedings were stayed. (L)

The same day precept was issued to summon John de Sydenham, Master of the Hospital of St James the Apostle (fn. 35) , to show cause why a sum of £40 due to Walter de Chesthonte and Henry Cheyner should not be levied on his goods and chattels. As the said John failed to appear on the day appointed, execution was ordered to take place. (L)

11 March 1339

A Congregation of the above on Thursday before the Feast of S t Gregory Pope [12 March] A o 13 Edw. III [1338-9]

Petition of Francis Bonatours (fn. 36) , brother of Gore Lespicer, a citizen of London, that John Bryan alias Jakelot Palmere, "Lyour de Bales (fn. 37) ," whom he had put in charge of the King's wool on its way to Brabant, might be made to give up the arms with which he had been furnished. The above John was brought before the Mayor, and committed to prison until he had satisfied the petitioner in the matter. (F)

Membr. 9b

27 Jan. 1339

A Congregation of the above on Wednesday after the Feast of the Conversion of S t Paul [25 Jan.] A o 13 Edw. III [1338-9]

Richard de Swanlond was summoned, on the prosecution of William de Iford, Common Serjeant, to answer a charge of having committed waste in certain tenements and gardens outside Bishopsgate called "Bedlem," which he held under a lease granted by the City in the mayoralty of Simon Swanlond. A jury found him guilty of having destroyed a wardrobe, thirty elms and willows growing in the garden, a bridge and a wooden sphere (spera) (fn. 38) , besides carrying off a table called "Dormant (fn. 39) ," and committing other waste to the City's damage, 1000s. Judgment deferred. (L)

Membr. 10

15 Dec. 1338

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor and King's Escheator, to the effect that the King had assigned to Edward de Monte Acuto and Alice his wife (fn. 40) , daughter of Thomas, late Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England, with the assent of John de Segrave and Margaret, his wife, the earl's elder daughter, the following manors and rents as her purparty, viz. the manor of Haneworth co. Norfolk, extended at £53 9s 4d yearly; the manor of Orsham in the same county, extended at £31 19s 8½d yearly; the manor of Dychyngham in the same county, extended at £30 yearly; the manor of Redenhale in the same county, extended at £28 14s 1¾d yearly; the manor of Keleshale co. Suffolk, extended at £47 19s 11d yearly; the manor of Bungeye in the same county, extended at £43 2s 4¼d yearly; the manor of Stanerton (fn. 41) in the same county, extended at £35 19s 10¾d yearly; the borough of Bungeye in the same county extended at £7 6s 8d yearly; the hundred of Lose in the same county extended at 100s yearly; a plot of ground called "Kaye" in Ipswich, which is not extended; and a messuage, nine shops and eight solars in the parish of St Mary Somersete in the City of London extended at 70s 8d yearly, as appears by the extents returned to Chancery by William Trussel, Escheator on this side of the Trent, and the Mayor; and £8 16d yearly from Norwich Castle by the hands of the Sheriff of Norfolk, of those £33 6s 8d which the late earl was wont to receive therefrom. The Mayor is bidden to deliver to the above Edward and Alice the messuages etc. in London. Dated 15 Dec. Ao 12 Edw. III [1338].

Note that in obedience to this writ, received on Thursday after the Feast of St Lucia [13 Dec.], delivery was made to Sir William de Langele, attorney of the said Edward de Monte Acuto. (L)

28 Jan. 1339

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor and King's Escheator, to hold an Inquisition post Mortem as to the property in the City of Edmund Cheyne, deceased. Dated at Berkhampstede, 28 Jan. Ao 13 Edw. III [1338-9].

Note that the writ was delivered to the Mayor 2 Jan. (fn. 42) Ao 13 Edw. III [1339-40] by John Shench, who said he was the son of John Shench and Joan his wife, and heir of the said Joan as regards certain tenements charged with the custody of Fleet Prison, and the repair of Fleet Bridge when required. (L)

5 Feb. 1339

Return to the above, in which the jury find that the said Edmund had by courtesy (per curialitatem Anglie) a lifeinterest in a messuage called the Prison of Flete and certain rents, value £10, held of the King by serjeanty of keeping the prisoners there confined, and of repairing Fleet Bridge when required. This life-interest he had by right of Joan, late his wife, and daughter and heiress of Stephen de Lenelonde. The above John Shench was the next heir. Dated Friday after the Feast of the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.] Ao 13 Edw. III [1338-9]. (L)

6 Oct. 1339

Writ to Henry Darcy, Mayor and King's Escheator, to hold an Inquisition ad quod Damnum on a proposal of William de Elsyng (fn. 43) to convey two messuages in the parish of St Mary Aldermanbury in Gaysporelane, late belonging to Stephen de Clopton, porter, and Maud de Hales, and two messuages in the parish of St Alphege within Cripplegate, late belonging to Thomas de Eu and Maud la Bakere, to the Warden and Chaplains of the Hospital of St Mary of Aldermanbury. A report is also to be made regarding a messuage in the parish of St Alphege, formerly belonging to Agnes de Norton of Ripon, which the Warden etc. acquired without the King's licence from Thomas de Maryns, apothecary, subsequent to the Statute of Mortmain—as to whether they should be allowed to retain it, under the terms of a general permission to acquire lands, tenements and rents to the value of £10 yearly, recently granted. Dated at Wyndesore, 6 Oct. Ao 13 Edw. III [1339]. (L)

18 Oct. 1339

Membr. 10b

Return to the above, in which the jury find that the two messuages in Gaysporelane were of an annual value of 26s, less quitrent 13s 4d to Maud de Hales, 2s to the Nuns of Haliwell, and 13s 4d repairs, leaving a net annual deficit of 2s 8d; the two messuages in the parish of St Alphege were of an annual value 60s, less quitrent 12d to the Prior of the Hospital of St Mary without Bishopsgate, 20s to John de Hegham, 18d to the Prior of Holy Trinity and 20s repairs, leaving a net annual value of 17s 6d; and the other messuage was of an annual value of 13s 4d, less quitrent 5s to the Nuns of Klerkenewell and repairs 10s, leaving a net annual deficit of 1s 8d. The donor possessed other tenements in the City of sufficient value to meet all charges on what he had given and what remained to him. Dated Monday the Feast of St Luke [18 Oct.] Ao 13 Edw. III [1339]. (L)

Membr. 11

28 March 1338

Precept by the Mayor to the several Aldermen to hold their Wardmotes on Sunday following and to make a return of suspicious and disreputable inhabitants. Taverners were to be warned to harbour no one for whom they were not prepared to answer, and the inhabitants were to hold themselves ready to take arms for the defence of the realm. Dated Saturday after the Feast of the Annunciation B.M. [25 March] Ao 12 Edw. III [1338]. (F)

Return for the Ward of Farringdon Without. The jurors present that Ellen de Evesham, living in the rents of Robert Petyt in Fleet Street, keeps a disorderly house and harbours thieves and prostitutes, and that in Christmas week last after midnight certain foreigners from her house attacked a man, who was passing along the highway with a light, and after felling him with blows on the head and body, bound his arms and legs and carried him within the said Ellen's house, and that she was present with a lighted candle in her hand during the assault. What happened to the man afterwards the jury do not know.

They also present that Gilbert le Strengmakere, living in the rents of the Hospital in Fleet Street, Margery de Wantynghe and Isabella de Actone, living in the rents of the Hospital opposite Chauncelereslane, Joseph Sewy and his concubine Salerna, living in Faytereslanende in the rents of the Prior of St Mary of Southwark, William de Whitefeld and Isabella de Eye, living in Holbourne in the rents of John atte Bowe, and William le Maunciple of Oxford, living in the same, keep common disorderly houses and harbour prostitutes and men of ill fame.

They also present two sisters, Agnes and Juliana, living in the rents of Roger Chauntecler in Holbourne as prostitutes and harbourers of men of ill fame; Agnes, widow of Robert atte Hole, for letting a house in Sholane to a woman of bad character, whose associates were dangerous persons; and Juliana atte Celer of Cokkeslane, Alice de Lincoln, living in the rents of John le Bellere in Cokkeslane and keeping a disorderly house in Hosierlane, Ferandus le Corsour, living opposite Holbourne Cross, Henry de Bridport, "nortor (fn. 44) ," Thomas de Houndesmor and Isabella his wife, Robert Petyt, living by the Bar of the New Temple, and Beatrice la Welsshe of Holbourne, living next to John le Bokbyndere's house, as guilty of similar offences, and as being a source of danger to the neighbourhood. (L)

20 April 1338

Record of the visit of the Mayor and Aldermen to the King and Council at Westminster on Monday after the Feast of St Alphege [19 April] Ao 12 Edw. III [1338], when they promised to safeguard the City for the King during his absence abroad, and to present a scheme for so doing before the Council on the following Friday. (L)

The manner of safeguarding the City above referred to: Every alderman and his household to be armed. The better men of the Ward to inspect all hostelries. Innkeepers to enter into security not to harbour persons for whom they cannot answer. All householders and inhabitants to pay charges for guarding the City, and for the provision of arms. Six, eight or twelve of the best men of each Ward to patrol the City day and night and to see that the King's peace is not broken. The names of persons entering into conspiracies or covins to be reported to the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen. Any person making cry or noise near the windows or doors of houses and shops, so as to create a riot in the City, to have forthwith judgment of life and limb. None to go armed in the City save the King's servants and those assisting them. No one to aid or help persons of evil covin or alliance under penalty of forfeiture to the King and the City.

The manner of guarding the Gates of the City: All the Gates to be closed at sunset by two of the most loyal and able-bodied members of the Watch assigned to the Gates, who shall keep the keys. The wickets (Guychets) to be kept open till curfew sounded at St Martin le Grand, and then be closed all night till prime sounded at St Thomas of Acre, when they shall be open till sunrise, at which time the great Gates are opened. (F)

These measures were approved by the King's Council. On Saturday the Feast of St Mark the Evangelist [25 April] twelve, eight or six good men of each Ward were elected and sworn to put them into operation. (L)

List of the men sworn in each Ward [vide Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. 21-3].

Membr. 11b

27 April 1338

Precept to the Aldermen to search their Wards, in accordance with the above scheme. Dated on Monday after the Feast of St Mark the Evangelist [25 April] Ao 12 Edw. III [1338]. (F)

9 May 1338

On Saturday after the Feast of St John ante Portam Latinam [6 May] the Mayor and Aldermen were summoned to meet the King and Council at the Tower on the following Monday. Being asked how many men they were prepared to send to the war they desired leave to consult the Commonalty, for which purpose they were allowed till Tuesday before the Feast of the Ascension [21 May]. Eventually they agreed to furnish 100 men (40 men-at-arms and 60 archers), and these were dispatched to Ipswich under Nicholas de Abyndon on 1 July (fn. 45) . (L)

Names of persons sworn before the Mayor and Aldermen to keep the King's peace, followed by those to whom the keys and custody of the several City Gates were entrusted. (L)

Membr. 12

9 May 1338

A Court held before Henry Darcy, the Mayor, and Nicholas Crane and Walter Neel, Sheriffs, on Saturday after the Feast of S t John ante Portam Latinam [6 May] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

Stephen Page, "cotiller," was attached at the suit of William de Iford and John de Horwode, who prosecuted for the King, to answer a charge of having abused the jury of the Sheriffs' Court, which found a verdict against him in a plea of covenant, by shouting out, as he went through St Laurence Lane, Cheap and Coleman Street, that the jurors were liars. A jury drawn from those streets (fn. 46) found him guilty. Judgment was deferred. (L)

18 May 1338

John de Donmowe, skinner, and John Maygnard, who were carried before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen on Monday before the Feast of St Dunstan [19 May] for fighting with swords on Cornhill, acknowledged their offence and were committed to Newgate. Mainprise was allowed to them the same day. (L)

Adam de St Albans complained of being threatened by William de Hodisdone, and demanded that the latter should find security for keeping the peace. Thereupon William le Hore, Simon le Bakere, fishmonger, Richard le Longe, fishmonger, William atte Folde, Gilbert de Bromle and Roger de Shorne were accepted as mainprise for the above William's good behaviour. (L)

5 June 1338

On Friday after the Feast of St Petronilla [31 May], Roger de la Tour, armourer, was carried before the Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs by John de Knopwede, Robert de Seynt More and other inhabitants of Cheap, and accused of being a common disturber of the peace, and of having assaulted Thomas de Kestevene. He was committed to prison, but subsequently mainprised by Geoffrey le Cotiller, William de Sancta Elena, John Tavy, armourer, Henry de Morle, armourer, William de Trente, armourer, and John atte Barnet, girdler. (L)

On Thursday after the Feast of St Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] the same year, the said Roger de la Tour was charged with using threats against John de Adyngton, and was mainprised for his good behaviour. (L)

Membr. 12b

23 May 1338

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commoners on Saturday after the Feast of the Ascension [21 May] A o 12 Edw. III [1338]

Names of those present.

Aldermen: Henry Darcy, Mayor, Gregory de Norton, John de Causton, Simon Fraunceys, John Hamond, Andrew Aubrey, Richard de Rothyng, Richard de Berkyng, Richard Lacer, William de Causton, Ralph de Upton, John de Mockyng, Nicholas Crane.

Commoners: from the east of Walbrook, William Haunsard, William de Brykkelesworth, Walter de Mordon, Adam Pykeman, William Box, Bartholomew Denmars, John de Northall, Thomas de Swanlund, Simon Turgys, William de "Braughyng, John de Brendwode, Adam de Bury, Thomas de Canterbury, Richard de Lambhuth. From the west of Walbrook, Thomas de Waledene, John de Dallyng, John de Aylesham, Reginald de Thorp, William de Pountfreyt, John de Gloucestre, John de Denham, Robert de Shordych, Richard de Welleford, Richard Denys, Thomas de Worstede, Geoffrey atte Gate, John Tornegold, John de Bredestrete.

The names of the men-at-arms and archers chosen by the Commoners to cross the sea to assist the King in his war, under the command of William Hauteyn, vintener and centener. [See Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. 26-7.] The men are ranged under their several vinteners or section-leaders of twenty. (L)

Membr. 13

31 Dec. 1343

Pleas held before John Hamond, the Mayor, and John de Aylesham and John Syward, Sheriffs, on Wednesday before the Feast of the Circumcision [1 Jan.] A o 17 Edw. III [1343]

Inquiry as to the cause of an affray on the confines of Cripplegate and Bassishaw Wards on Saturday night the Feast of St John the Apostle [27 Dec.] in which Richard Tailboys, the beadle of Cripplegate Ward, had his left arm broken. The jury found that a certain Thomas le Goldsmyth of Faversham, servant of Gerard Corp, accompanied John Frere from the house of Thomas de Meldeburne in Melkstrete to Frere's lodging in Bassieshawe, and on his way met the beadle and the Watch at Cheynereswelle, where he assaulted them and called them "ribalds." After depositing the said John in his house, the said Thomas returned and met the Watch again opposite the late Richard Costantyn's inn, where he assaulted them once more and broke the beadle's arm with his staff and caused a great affray, after which he fled. (L)

Inquest held the same day as to the cause of an affray in Vintry Ward on Sunday night the Feast of Holy Innocents [28 Dec.] in which the beadle of the Ward was assaulted. The jury found that on the night mentioned a certain John de Oxford, skinner, John de Clyf and Henry de Ledham were walking with a light before them, when they met John Harry, the beadle of the Ward, and his men at la Ryole, and quietly passed on. After them came two of John de Oxford's company, who were without a light. On their being asked by the beadle what they were doing without a light and whither they were going, they replied that it was no business of his. Thence arose words and a noisy quarrel, and on this the said John de Oxford and Henry de Ledham hurried back with drawn swords and assaulted the beadle, wounding him in the right arm. (L)

19 Jan. 1344

Pleas held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Monday after the Feast of S t Hilary [13 Jan.] A o 17 Edw. III [1343-4]

William Toppeclyf and Geoffrey Pokerich, smiths, were attached to answer a charge of having set a light to some straw which Agatha, wife of John Freman of Maldon, was carrying to Gracechurch for sale, to the damage of the said John and Agatha 20s. A jury acquitted William Toppeclyf, but found Geoffrey Pokerich guilty, assessing the damages at 12d, which the latter paid, together with a fine to the King. (L)

Membr. 13b

John de Ware, "bocher," was attached to answer a charge of neglecting to pay 16s for a bullock, which he had bought from John Cok, drover, in accordance with the Statute of Smithfield (fn. 47) . A jury found him guilty and he was committed to prison until he should satisfy the plaintiff for the debt. (L)

Similar verdict and judgment in an action between the same parties with regard to the sale of two bullocks. The defendant John de Ware pleaded that he bought the animals, in conjunction with another butcher, William Rich, and that he was always willing to pay his half-share of the price. (L)

23 Jan. 1344

A Congregation of the Mayor and Aldermen and the better and wiser Commoners on Friday after the octave of S t Hilary [13 Jan.] A o 17 Edw. III [1343-4]

It was agreed that every one who took part in the loan of £5000 to the King should pay 2d in the pound towards the expenses of the Common Serjeant, William de Iford, in executing the King's writs to the various Sheriffs for the repayment of the money. (L)

27 Feb. 1344

A Congregation of the Mayor and Aldermen and one of the Sheriffs on Friday after the Feast of S t Matthias the Apostle [24 Feb.] A o 18 Edw. III [1343-4]

Walter Lumbard and Simon de Snellyng, Serjeants of the Mayor, brought into court divers pairs of gilded spurs and several pieces of iron for making spurs found in the possession of Thomas Aleyn, spurrier, William Passefeld, Gilbert de Waltham, Adam de Peveneyeand John atte Crouch. The articles were submitted to the examination of certain men of the mistery of Lorimers, sworn for the purpose, viz. Walter le Cok, Robert de Sutton, Roger de Woxebrigg, William Gay, John de Sutton, John de Chigewell, John Parrat and William Randolf, and were found to be false and of false material. Judgment that they be confiscated. (L)

Membr. 14

14 March 1343

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Friday after the Feast of S t Gregory [12 March] A o 17 Edw. III [1342-3]

It was agreed to make a present to the King on his arrival from foreign parts (fn. 48) , and in order that the present might be made properly, quietly, circumspectly and in silence, without any noise, a precept was sent to each Alderman ordering him to summon the good men of his Ward to elect two, three or four good men to attend at Guildhall on Monday for the consideration of matters touching the honour and profit of the City. (L)

List of those elected whose names were returned on the back of the precepts.

23 May 1343

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Friday the morrow of the Ascension [22 May]

William de Causton, Richard de Rothyng, Richard de Berkyng, Bartholomew Denmars and William de Pountfreyt, Aldermen, and John de Enefeld, John de Worth, John Cole, Richard de Preston, Edmund de Saunford, Richard de Thorp, John Tornegold, Robert de Shordiche and John Yonn, Commoners, were chosen to undertake the proper distribution of the sum of 200 marks, the amount paid for the "pardon" of an Iter held Ao 14 Edw. III, and allowed by the King to be set off against the sum of £5000 lent to him by the City. (L)

The same body was deputed to examine the names of those rebellious persons in the Wards who refused to make any contribution to the present given to the King on his return from overseas. (L)

The custody of Ludgate was granted to Robert de Beverley for life, on condition that he kept the walls and buildings appertaining to it in proper repair to the satisfaction of the Alderman of the Ward and Thomas de Maryns the Chamberlain. (L)

Membr. 14 b

10 March 1343

At a Husting for Common Pleas, held on Monday before the Feast of St Gregory [12 March] Ao 17 Edw. III [1342-3], complaint was made by the inhabitants of the neighbourhood of Gracechurch that the shadows under a house built on beams, belonging to Roger de Haveryng alias atte Sele and Christiana his wife, were the resort of bad characters, who sprang out on passers-by and robbed them. The said Roger was summoned to show cause why the house should not be pulled down, and neither he nor his wife had anything to say for themselves. Order was given to demolish the house at the owner's expense, and the latter was fined 40s for contempt. (L)

Membr. 15

10 Oct. 1343

Pleas held before Simon Fraunceis, Mayor, and John de Aylesham and John Syward, Sheriffs, on Friday after the octave of S t Michael [29 Sept.] A o 17 Edw. III [1343]

Nicholas atte Forde, William le Clerk and John Pategrys were attached to answer Thomas de Russie on a charge that they, together with Robert Pategrys, Richard Dyke, Thomas de Wyndesore, Peter atte Forde, John de Burgh and John de Bissheye, against whom the plaintiff would have made his declaration, if they had been present in court, assaulted him at Fanchirche with swords, bucklers and staves, and inflicted damage on him to the amount of £1000. A jury found them guilty to the extent of 40s. Judgment that they be committed to prison till they pay these damages and a fine to the King.

Similar judgment in an action by the above plaintiff's wife Margery, who claimed £500 and was awarded 40s. (L)

15 Oct. 1343

Inquest held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Wednesday before the Feast of St Luke [18 Oct.] as to the persons who committed the above assaults. The jury found the following guilty, viz. Richard atte Dyke, Peter atte Ford, John de Burgh, Thomas de Burgh, Thomas de Wyndesore and Richard Pykard, journeymen (garciones) of the mistery of Tapicers. They also found Richard atte Dyke and the rest, together with John de Dunmowe, John de Watford, Simon le Strengere and Simon le Flecchere to be nightwalkers and common evil-doers. (L)

Membr. 15b

Pleas and Memoranda temp. John Hamond, Mayor, A o 17 Edw. III [1343-4]

31 Oct. 1343

Inquest held before the Mayor and Sheriffs in the presence of John de Foxton, Coroner (fn. 49) , on Friday the eve of All Saints [1 Nov.] as to the persons who caused an affray in the parish of St Bartholomew the Less on the preceding Tuesday night, and knocked down and robbed Hamo de Waltham, fishmonger. The jury found that while the said Hamo was proceeding to a friend's house in the parish of St Margaret Lothbury with a jar of wine, he was set upon by John Spencer, John Hilbourword, Roger Wygenhale and William de Lynne, servants of Alan Meyn, skinner, and John de Pokenhale, servant to Peter de Pountfreit, skinner, who knocked him down and broke his jar of wine, and though he raised the hue and cry, they pursued him to the churchyard of St Bartholomew, knocked him down again, and robbed him of his girdle and purse, worth 40s, with 43s 5½d in the purse, and that afterwards they were harboured by their masters, who well knew that they were guilty of a felony.

This inquest was delivered to Stephen de Waltham sealed with the seals of the jurors. (L)

3 Dec. 1343

Pleas held before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen on Wednesday after the Feast of S t Andrew [30 Nov.]

Richard Saleman, hosier, was attached to answer the Mayor's Serjeant, Walter Lombard, for refusing to surrender a piece of cloth, which John de Romeseye had bought from a foreigner, and which the defendant had arrested, on the ground that it had been bought and sold by foreigners. This cloth the defendant had claimed as a forfeit to the mistery of Hosiers (caligariorum). He now appeared in court and threw himself on the mercy of the Mayor and Aldermen. He was committed to prison, but on Saturday following, at the request of certain men of his craft, the Mayor and Aldermen pardoned his contempt and set him at liberty. (L)

Edward Houle, chaucer (fn. 50) , was attached to answer a charge of having been impertinent to Andrew Aubrey, Alderman. When the latter called on him to desist from beating a stranger, who asked too much for the price of a cup, the defendant said that as the Alderman had interfered, he would give the man another beating. He now appeared and acknowledged his guilt, and was thereupon committed to prison to remain there during the pleasure of the Mayor and Aldermen. On the following Saturday he was released at the request of certain men of his craft. (L)

Footnotes

1 As the result of this verdict and other information, the King ordered that "Bernard de les Compres" be satisfied for the price of 27 tuns of wine. Cal. Close Rolls, 1337-9, p. 332.
2 Apparently the Deposition of St Mildred is intended.
3 The two persons here mentioned were (1) the Abbot of the House of Augustinian Canons at Westwood in Lesnes in the parish of Erith, and (2) the local representative of the Abbot of St Augustine, Canterbury, whose House possessed lands lying near those of Lesnes Abbey.
4 "On the top of the hill (i.e. Shooter's Hill) was formerly a beacon. In the old accounts of the churchwardens of Eltham various payments are recorded 'for watchinge the beacon on Shutters Hill.'" Walford, Greater London, ii, p. 34.
5 See p. 102, n. 1.
6 See p. 7, n. 3.
7 The reply follows the description of the Assize in Lib. Alb. i, pp. 195-7, but adds that by writ of error the record and process could be reviewed in the Husting. If either party were still grieved, they could sue in Chancery for a commission of Justices at St Martin-le-Grand, where, after a respite of forty days, the record and process were delivered oretenus by the Recorder in accordance with ancient custom. See also above, p. 141, n. 1.
8 They accompanied the King on his first expedition to France, which sailed on 12 July 1338. Rymer's Foedera, vol. ii, pt. ii, p. 1050. For the names of these men and further correspondence relating to them see Col. of Letter Book F, pp. 25-7.
9 Chief Justice of the King's Bench.
10 Sc. barbicanage, a custom, similar to murage, taken for the upkeep of a barbican or watch-tower.
11 Probably co. Suffolk.
12 See above, pp. 147-9.
13 Kirkley co. Suffolk.
14 Common Serjeant.
15 Pesage was a custom for the weighing of corn and other commodities. The whole question of the City's right to exact this custom by its Sheriffs was discussed at the session of the Itinerant Justices at the Tower in a.d. 1321. Lib. Cust. i, pp. 326-33, 380.
16 Thomas called "de Brotherton" was the fifth son of Edw. I and uncle of Edw. III. He was created Earl of Norfolk in 1312 and Earl Marshal in 1315. He died in 1338.
17 Summoned to Parliament as a baron by writ from 1336 to 1351.
18 John de Pulteneye, who is mentioned before the Mayor, was one of the most influential citizens of the time and had held the mayoralty four times. He was often employed on important public business by Edw. III and is again mentioned before the Mayor in 1340, when the City sent a deputation to suggest to the King a loan of £5000 in answer to his demand for a gift of £20,000. Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. 45-6. See biography of Sir John de Pulteneye by C. L. Kingsford in D.N.B.
19 The Assizes regulating the mesh and size of nets are printed in Lib. Cust. i, pp. 116-7; ii. pp. 543-4.
20 N.E.D. An engine of the nature of a bow or catapult, used in mediaeval warfare for throwing heavy missiles.
21 One of the defences of the Outer Ward of the Tower of London.
22 Described in 1306 as being a messuage and wharf in the parish of All Hallows de Berkingcherche. Husting Rolls, 32 (40).
23 An ancient water-gate near St Laurence Pountney Church but within the parish of St Martin Orgar. "In place of this gate, is now a narrow passage to the Thames, and is called Ebgate, but more commonly the Old Swanne."Kingsford's Stow, i, p. 42. Represented to-day by Swan Lane.
24 In 1349 Petronilla Turk left to her sons, Richard and Richard, a tenement with shops and brewing utensils in Thames Street near "le wolle wharf." Husting Rolls, 78 (97).
25 N.E.D. A short heavy square-headed arrow or bolt formerly used in shooting with the cross-bow or arbalest.
26 Ordinances relating to the foreign butchers are to be found in Letter Book A, fo. 130 (printed in Lib. Alb. i, p. 274; ii, p. 92). They were repeated in Letter Book D, fo. 158.
27 Printed in Riley's Memorials, p. 203. Flambard carried the Mace, as Common Cryer and Common Serjeant-at-arms of the City. His duties are described in Lib. Alb. i, p. 49.
28 Matilda, widow of William de Burgh, Earl of Ulster.
29 The City's right to take withernam from the citizens or burgesses of other cities and boroughs, in reprisal for toll taken from, or debts incurred to, citizens of London, was granted by the charter of Henry I (W. de G. Birch, Historical Charters of the City of London, p. 5), and afterwards many times confirmed. The common procedure was to attach men of the offending town in the Mayor's Court to make good the loss of the aggrieved citizen of London. Cf. Cal. of Early Mayor's Court Rolls, p. 115.
30 Stratford was a centre of fulling-mills, to which cloth was sent from the City, though the practice was forbidden.
31 Upton Scudamore co. Wilts.
32 The Cistercian Abbey of Sawtry co. Hunts.
33 Later known as Elsing Spital. William Elsyng, mercer, obtained a licence in 1329 to alienate in mortmain certain houses in the parishes of St Alphege and St Mary Aldermanbury to found a hospital for 100 blind people in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1327-30, p. 360. The deed of foundation was confirmed in 1330. Ibid. 1330-4, p. 49. The original establishment consisted of a warden and four secular priests, Elsyng himself being warden. Cal. of Wills in Court of Husting, i, p. 362. In 1340 he obtained a licence from the Bishop of London to change the secular canons into canons regular of the order of St Augustine, the Bishop himself adding a fifth canon. Newcourt's Repertorium, i, p. 347; C.P.R. 1340-3, p. 416. Elsyng's gifts were confirmed by his will. Cal. of Wills, i, p. 562. His son Robert was also a generous benefactor. Ibid, i, p. 637; Kingsford's Stow, i, p. 294. The Hospital was dissolved in 1536, and about 1623 Sion College was erected on the site (Trans. London and Middlesex Arch. Soc. vi, 53), which lay N. and S. of the present Aldermanbury Avenue.
34 Cf. Cal. Close Rolls, 1337-9, pp. 156-7.
35 An ancient hospital for leprous women, already existing temp. Rich. i. Ancient Deeds, A, 7822; Kingsford's Stow, ii, p. 374. It lay west of Charing Cross and was founded, according to Stow, by citizens of London "for 14 sisters maidens that were leprouse." It was surrendered to Henry VIII, who built there "a goodly Mannor, annexing thereunto a Parke, closed about with a wall of bricke, now called saint James Parke...." Ibid. p. 101.
36 Sic, but possibly meant for Bonacours, a member of the Buonaccorsi, Italian merchants. Cf. Cal. Close Rolls, 1337-9, pp. 179, 574.
37 Binder or sewer of bales ?
38 Sc. sphaera, a globe or other construction illustrating the place and motions of the celestial bodies. N.E.D. The word occurs again in Husting Rolls, 103 (189), "a cuppebord cum speris," possibly meaning with round knobs. R. R. Sharpe (Cal. of Wills, ii, p. 179) translates, a cupboard "with mirrors."
39 N.E.D. A table fixed to the floor or forming a fixed piece of furniture.
40 Cf. pp. 174-5. Alice de Montacute appointed William de Langele her attorney to receive her purparty 18 Oct. 1338. Cal. Close Rolls, 1337-9, p. 539. Other divisions of Thomas de Brotherton's lands are recorded in ibid. 1339-41, pp. 35, 37-9.
41 Stanton co. Suffolk?
42 There is an error of date here; probably 2 Feb. 1339 was intended.
43 Cf. p. 182, n. 3.
44 Possibly a male nurse.
45 Cf. Letter to the King, 1 July 1338, p. 170. The names of the men are printed in Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. 26-7.
46 In accordance with the principle that the best jury was one which knew the facts. See Cal. of Early Mayor's Court Rolls, pp. xlii-xliii.
47 See p. 95, n. 1.
48 In March 1343 Edw. III returned home after making a truce with France for three years.
49 See p. 126, n. 3.
50 Shoemaker.