Roll A 7
1354-55

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

A.H. Thomas (editor)

Year published

1926

Pages

241-257

Citation Show another format:

'Roll A 7: 1354-55', Calendar of the plea and memoranda rolls of the city of London: volume 1: 1323-1364 (1926), pp. 241-257. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36661 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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ROLL A7

Membr. 1

24 Nov. 1354

Pleas held before Thomas Leggy, Mayor, on Monday before the Feast of S t Katherine [25 Nov.] A o 28 Edw. III [1354]

Thomas de Mordon, chandler, was attached to answer a charge of forestalling the market (fn. 1) . He was found guilty, by a jury of Billingsgate, of having bought a cargo of salt from a ship belonging to John Rous, merchant of Brabant, before market hours, the said ship then being moored to the quay, and of having paid one penny a bushel more for it than was charged by other merchants of the City. Judgment deferred. (L)

16 Dec. 1354

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday after the Feast of S t Lucia [13 Dec.]

Thomas atte Hulle of Enfield, maltmonger, sued Simon de Rasne, armourer, for £4 4s 4d alleged to be due for malt purchased at Gracechurch. The defendant pleaded that all accounts between them were settled. A jury found that he had bought no malt from the plaintiff since the account. (L)

Henry le Bakere was committed to Newgate at the suit of Thomas atte Hulle for 18s due under a bond made pursuant to the Statute of Smithfield. (L)

22 Dec. 1354

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Monday after the Feast of S t Thomas the Apostle [21 Dec] A o 28 Edw. III [1354]

John de Strattone was attached to answer the King and the Sheriffs on a charge of having assaulted the Sheriffs' (fn. 2) officers, Robert de Nabourne and John Dyn, who had requisitioned the defendant's cart to carry certain robes from the King's Wardrobe to the manor of "Hampstede Marchal (fn. 3) ." He pleaded guilty and was committed to prison until etc. (L)

Robert de Caxtone, butcher, was attached to answer the Commonalty and the Sheriffs on a charge of having bought 12 pigs in West Smithfield and immediately sold them again (fn. 4) contrary to the custom and the statutes of the City. A jury was summoned. (L)

Membr. 1b

Richard de Stanford, "dighere," and Alice his wife were attached to answer a charge of having forcibly entered the house of John de Bergholte, carpenter, and carried off Agnes, daughter of the late Stephen atte Holte, his ward, as well as certain silver vessels, jewels, wool and linen value £10 belonging to the above John. The defendants pleaded not guilty, and a jury found a verdict for them. (L)

9 Jan. 1355

On Friday after the Epiphany [6 Jan.] Ao 28 Edw. III [1354-5] the above Agnes was for certain causes placed under the guardianship of William de Ockham, cordwainer, by order of the Mayor and Aldermen until the Court should make other arrangements. (L)

14 Jan. 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs on Wednesday after the Feast of S t Hilary [13 Jan.] A o 28 Edw. III [1354-5]

Henry Lyrpol, goldsmith, was attached to answer the Commonalty of the City and William de Burton and William de Berkyngg, Wardens of the mistery of Goldsmiths, on a charge of using counterfeit metal in his craft, to wit, a bar of false metal for the harness of a girdle, a seal of the same, and two small plates for cups, all of which metal was counterfeit for silver. The defendant admitted that the seal was false, but alleged that the bar was silver, and denied that the plates were found in his possession. He was found guilty by a jury of the whole craft of Goldsmiths and was forbidden to follow his trade in the City and suburbs for six months. The false metal was deposited in a little linen bag, sealed with the seal of the above Wardens, and entrusted to Thomas de Walden, Chamberlain. (L)

26 Jan. 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Monday after the Feast of the Conversion of S t Paul [25 Jan.] A o 29 Edw. III [1354-5]

William Kyng, butcher, complained that Walter, son of Roger Waleys of Grenfeld co. Beds, who was bound to him by a nine years' apprenticeship, had left his service before his term was completed. The apprentice pleaded that his master was unable to supply him with necessaries, as laid down in the indentures, and gave him leave to serve whom he would. A jury found for the apprentice. Judgment was deferred that the Court might be advised, and meanwhile the parties were counselled to come to an agreement. The indentures of apprenticeship were delivered to the Chamberlain until etc. (L)

Thomas Austyn, William Kyng and Laurence de Chippenham, butchers, were committed to prison, in accordance with the Statute of Smithfield, for debts due to John de Odyerne and John atte Stone. (L)

Membr. 2

15 Jan. 1355

A schedule of goods and chattels, taken as pledges by Thomas Broun and the other collectors, Ao 28 Edw. III [1354-5] and appraised on Thursday after the Feast of St Hilary [13 Jan.] the same year.

From Weighing For Workmanship Total
John de Rothyng, 1 silver cup 30s and 6s 36s
William Brangweyne, 1 piece of silver 13s 4d 2s 8d 16s
Zanabi Chaungeour, 1 spicedish and 4 pieces 71s 8d 14s £4 5s 8d
Wynde Lombard, 2 pieces of silver 20s 4s 24s
Gilbert Steindrop, 2 "bolles," 2 covercles 70s 17s £4 7s
William Dalby, 3 mazers (fn. 5) , 1 godet (fn. 6) 30s
William Fazantdes, 2 mazers 5s
Valuers: William Tyngwyk and Thomas Bamme, goldsmiths
John Burgeys, 2 cloths of raye 7 marks
1 cloth " steynnet (fn. 7) " 30s
Hugh de Waltham, 1 cloth of ray 24s
Valuers: John de York and Philip Taillour, drapers
William de Wykham, 7 "potes dareym (fn. 8) " 14s
William Arnold, vintner, 1 "bacyn" and 1 "lavour (fn. 9) " 8s
John Barnet, mason, 1 basin and 1 laver 2s 6d
William de Stoke, 1 laver of pewter 4s
William Chaundeler, 2 pewter "potzs," 1 hanging laver, 2 basins and 1 laver 9s 6d
John Moncoy, 1 basin 6s
John Whelere, 1 "paiele," 2 basins, 2 lavers 3s 6d
John Fesaunt, 2 pewter pots, 1 "paiele," 1 "dudde (fn. 10) " 10s
Valuers: William Foundour and John Beste
John Peutre, 38 "keverchiefs relusauncz (fn. 11) " £6 6s 8d
Simon de Lycoln, 1 piece of wax "de Pollane (fn. 12) ," weighing 214 lbs, at 47s the cwt.
William Cosyn, 1 piece of wax "de lubik (fn. 13) ," weighing 252 lbs, at 44s the cwt.
Valuers: Thomas Mordale and Thomas de Cavendish (F)

William de Greyngham, serjeant, was ordered to summon the above persons to redeem these pledges within a fortnight. (L)

Note that there remained in the hands of John Deynes and the other collectors of the fifteenth a sum of £61 2s ad, out of which they paid £11 16s 8d to the labourers working in the Tower Ditch by order of Adam Fraunceys late Mayor, and £30 15s 2d to the Chamberlain, leaving a sum of £18 10s 4d still in their hands. (L)

A fine of 10s was paid into the King's Exchequer for William Doget, vintner, who had sold 20 gallons of red wine for more than 6d a gallon contrary to the proclamation. Previously Robert Furneux, fishmonger, William Turk, fishmonger, and John de Hatfeld, Warden of London Bridge, had entered into recognizances of £15 for the payment of any sums due from the said William Doget. (L)

Membr. 2b

A schedule of the names of the sub-collectors of taxes for the Wards of Bridge, Tower, Broad Street and Cheap, with the sums of money which they had in hand for the purpose of cleansing the Tower Ditch. (L)

Membr. 3

24 Feb. 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday after the Feast of S t Peter in Cathedra [22 Feb.] A o 29 Edw. III [1354-5]

William Dalman was convicted and committed to prison for selling beer at 2d the gallon, instead of 1½d, contrary to the proclamations. (L)

Walter de Wyrchestre, William Sevenesterre, John de Stratton, John atte Noke and William West, brewers, were committed to prison for similar offences. (L)

John de Pykenham and John de Graveneye pleaded guilty of forestalling malt, which they bought at Billingsgate from Robert Harriesone, master of the ship "Seynte Marie" of Grimsby. Judgment deferred. (L)

28 Feb. 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Saturday after the Feast of S t Mathias [24 Feb.]

Robert de Stratford, cordwainer, was convicted and committed to prison for selling beer contrary to the proclamations. (L)

William atte Welde and Simon de Worsted, Aldermen, and Thomas Dolsely, Richard de Cauxston and Simon de Mordon, Commoners, were elected auditors of the account of John le Chaundeler, Warden of London Bridge, by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty. (L)

Membr. 3b

2 March 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Monday before the Feast of SS. Perpetua and Felicitas [7 March] A o 29 Edw. III [1354-5]

John le Brewere "atte None," Walter de Wyrchestre and other brewers pleaded guilty of having sold beer against the proclamations, and were committed to prison. (L)

Elias le Glovere was committed to prison for a similar offence, and William de Cusynton for selling grain by false and unsealed measures. (L)

William Cook, "webbe," claimed damages of 100s from John Chaumbre, fuller, for tearing a cloth left with him for the purpose of cleaning. A jury assessed damages at 16s 8d. The defendant was committed to prison until he paid the above sum. (L)

3 March 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Friday after the Feast of S t Gregory [12 March] A o 29 Edw. III [1354-5]

Robert Carlel, butcher, sued William de Coreslee, butcher, for £7 19s 6d for cattle bought at West Smithfield, which sum should have been paid on the spot according to the Statute of Smithfield. The defendant alleged that he had already paid sums of 40s and 119s 6d to the plaintiff on London Bridge and at East Cheap. The plaintiff admitted receiving 40s, but said it was in respect of another debt. The matter was left to a jury. (L)

Thomas Frithebek and John de Blithe, saddlers, John de Crepulgate and William de Whetele, cordwainers, were sworn to settle a dispute between the Saddlers and Cordwainers by Wednesday before Palm Sunday. (L)

Membr. 4

20 March 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Friday before the Annunciation B.M. [25 March] A o 29 Edw. III [1354-5]

Simon de Worstede, mercer, and Alice his wife demand an Assize of Nuisance against Richard Lacer, goldsmith, touching their free tenement in the parish of St Alban, Wood Street. (L)

Note that at the instance of John de Herpesfeld, a writ was received, dated at Westminster 5 March, ordering the Mayor and Sheriffs to bring into Chancery the record and process of an action before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen between Alice, widow of Walter Neel, plaintiff, and the above John with regard to John Hamond, kinsman and heir of the said Walter.

A return to the above was drawn up, in case the Chancellor insisted on having a return, to the effect that the writ was contrary to the custom of the City. The return stated that in an action terminated before the Mayor and Aldermen or Sheriffs outside the Husting an aggrieved party might cause the record and process to come before the Husting by a writ de venire faciendo, in order that they might be examined and reviewed, and if in that court a further error occurred, an aggrieved party might obtain a further writ ordering the record and process to come before the King's Justices at St Martin-le-Grand (fn. 14) , and there the record and process would be delivered oretenus.

Meanwhile Roger de Depham, the Recorder, visited the Chancellor at Westminster to explain that the writ was against the liberty of the City. The Chancellor agreed, and after cancelling it, gave it back to the Recorder to show it to the Mayor and other good men of the City, after which the writ was deposited among the writs of the time of Thomas Leggy, Mayor, for which no returns were required. (L)

24 March 1355

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Tuesday before the Feast of the Annunciation B.M. [25 March]

Giles Motard, Peter Pape, John Pape, John atte Ryk, Peter Sys, John van Lethe, John Tybbes and Race Gabryel, Flemish weavers (fn. 15) dwelling in London, were attached to answer a charge of having made a confederacy among themselves not to work for less than 7d a day, and if any of them were committed to prison for any offence, to cease from their weaving until he was liberated. They were further charged with having threatened the bailiffs of their own nation, Giles Robyn and Baudewyn T..., with personal violence. They all pleaded guilty, with the exception of Giles Motard, Peter Pape and John Pape, who were in Newgate. In order to keep the peace between the English and Flemish weavers, all the defendants were released on mainprise of Henry Werre, Giles Rydekest, Peter van Brugge, John Persone, John van Somerkyn, Henry van the Rothe, James de Lowe, Lenin Godhalse, John Gyngivere, Maas van Brugge, Martin van Iverle and William van Brake.

By order of the Mayor and Aldermen, the Flemish weavers chose six good men of their nation and trade, viz. John van Somerkyn, Giles Ripegast (sic), Henry van the Rothe, Peter van Brok, John Marchaunt and John atte Wyre, and the English weavers elected Richard le Cook, John Payn, William Waryn, Walter Harneys, John Godhere and William le Cook, which twelve men were charged to agree on a daily wage for both Flemish and English weavers, and to report their decision to the Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday before Palm Sunday. On that day the weavers came into Court and said they could not make any ordinance without the advice of the Mayor and Aldermen. The matter was adjourned in order to take the opinion of the King's Council. (L)

Membr. 4b

14 April 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday the morrow (fn. 16) of the Close of Easter [12 April] A o 29 Edw. III [1355]

Names of butchers sworn to supervise their trade, to prevent the sale of bad meat, to keep prices at a reasonable level, to see that no animals were sold in secret places or forestalled before they reached the market, and to report offenders to the Mayor and Aldermen.

Butchers of East Cheap: William Lemman, John de Spaldyngge, Richard atte Dans, William Ivory, John Vannere. Butchers of S t Nicholas Shambles: William Ryf, John atte Stone, William Soudan, William Mareschal, Robert atte Grene, Nicholas de Thame. Butchers of the Stocks: Thomas Copyn, William Fourner, Thomas atte Hoke, Maurice de Caxston, Nicholas le Long, Godfrey le Clerk.

Simon de Iswode, bailiff of Smithfield and Farringdon, Simon de Godestowe, bailiff of Cheap, and Simon de Beverle, saddler, beadle of Cheap, were sworn to assist them.

Names of poulterers sworn to supervise their trade, to see that foreign poulterers sold their goods in open market at the Leadenhall (aula plumbia), and to ensure fair prices etc.

Poulterers of Leadenhall: Roland de Colbrok and Walter Martyn. Poultry: William Pykebon, Osbert Wynter. S t Nicholas Shambles: John de Shirbourne.

John de Braynford, brewer, and John de Chalton were sworn to search the lodgings of foreign poulterers, and to see that they did not sell their goods in such places to citizens, but only in open market, and that they did not lodge in the houses of free poulterers. A commission under the Mayoralty Seal was issued to them, and they were ordered to seize the poultry of offenders, and carry it to the Sheriffs' houses. (L)

John Mychel, Thomas de York, Henry de Boseworth, John Chaucer, William Doget, William Sterre, Bernard Prichemerol and Thomas de Berkele were accepted as sureties for the payment of a fine by John de Dytton, taverner, whose wines had been sequestrated by the Sheriffs, because he had sold two pipes of red wine for 12 marks, contrary to the King's proclamation. Subsequently the Mayor and Sheriffs were debited at the Exchequer with a quarter of a cask of light (debilis) red wine, value one mark, as the fine due from the above John de Dytton. (L)

Membr. 5

16 April 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Thursday after the morrow of the Close of Easter [12 April] A o 29 Edw. III [1355]

Names of. certain fishmongers of Old Fish Street and Bridge Street [appointed to supervise their trade etc.?]. (L)

Adam de Goldeburgh, carpenter, William de Goldesburgh (sic), carpenter, and William de Kent, cordwainer, were attached to answer a charge of causing an affray in the parish of St Michael, Cornhill. A jury was summoned. (L)

29 April 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday after the Feast of S t Mark [25 April]

John Godard was attached by members of the household (gentes de familia) of Edward, Prince of Wales, in Fleet Street, and carried to the house of the Sheriff, Richard Smelt, for pretending to be Purveyor to the Prince, and for having set his seal on certain casks of beer in Fleet Street, without any warrant from the Prince. On news of this, the Prince ordered the Sheriff to bring the man before him at his Manor of Poplar (del Popeler), where the said John confessed his offence. The Prince then sent him back to the Sheriff with a letter from Edmund de Wauncy, requesting that he might be put on the pillory. After being examined by the Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs, the said John was ordered to stand for three hours on the pillory, the reason of his punishment being there proclaimed as a warning to other evildoers. (L)

Henry de Walmesford, cook, was attached to answer a charge brought by Robert de Pokebrok, chaplain, of having sold him some veal for supper the preceding day, which, when it came to the table, was found to be hashed up (recalefactas), stinking and abominable to the human race, to the scandal and opprobrium of the City and the manifest danger of the plaintiff and his friends. The meat was produced in court. The defendant declared that it was sound and wholesome when sold. The meat was immediately submitted to the inspection of Thomas Maluele, John Wenge and Geoffrey Colman, cooks of Bread Street, and of John de Ware and John de Stoke, cooks of Ironmonger Lane, each of whom certified independently on oath that the meat was good. In order to be the more sure, the Mayor and Aldermen ordered the meat to be submitted to public inspection, when, after careful examination inside and out, it was again declared to be good and wholesome. Judgment was given that the cook be acquitted, and that the plaintiff gain nothing by his action. (L)

Membr. 5b

12 May 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday after the Feast of S t John ante Portam Latinam [6 May] A o 29 Edw. III [1355]

William [de Edindon], Bishop of Winchester, brings a plaint of Intrusion against Nicholas de Loveyne, "chivaler," and Margaret his wife, Thomas de Swanlond, Cecilia relict of Bartholomew Denmars, Thomas Peytevin and Sarra his wife, and John de Weston and Idonia his wife, touching his free tenement in the parish of All Hallows at Hay. (L)

Michael de la Pole, "chivaler," demands an Assize of Nuisance against John de Rokesleie, clerk, touching his free tenement in the parish of St Mary Wolnoth. (L)

William de Bristow, Whetemann atte Broke and Thomas de Haukeshale were accepted as sureties for Nicholas de Thame to keep the peace with Edmund Beneyt of Sandwich. (L)

Two calves were confiscated from Roger de Bibbesworth, butcher, who admitted having bought them from William Rappe outside Newgate, while the animals were being driven to market, thus forestalling them. (L)

13 May 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor on Wednesday before the Feast of S t Dunstan [19 May] A o 29 Edw. III [1355]

Thomas de Folkeshull was found guilty by a jury of having enticed Henry Basset from the service of his master, Henry Sibly, in Phelippeslane, contrary to the Statute (fn. 17) . Damages of 100s were awarded, and the defendant was committed to William de Tudenham, Sheriff, to keep him in prison till the money was paid. (L)

John Rasne, meter at Billingsgate, and four porters certified the Mayor and Aldermen on oath of the removal of four quarters of wheat belonging to Walter Josekyn. (L)

Walter Josekyn claimed from Thomas Strode, baker, the sum of 36s for four quarters of wheat sold to him in Candlewick Street. The defendant denied the sale and debt. A jury summoned. (L)

Membr. 6

17 June 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday the Feast of S t Botolph [17 June] A o 29 Edw. III [1355]

Robert de Thorp demands an Assize of Nuisance against Thomas Pipehurst and Joan his wife, touching his free tenement in the parish of St Mary Stanynglane. (L)

Isabella atte Grene brings a plaint of Intrusion against Richard Sterre, fishmonger, son of Geoffrey Sterre, touching her free tenement in the parish of St Margaret, Bridge Street. (L)

Writ under the Privy Seal, dated at Westminster 13 June Ao 29 Edw. III, to the Mayor and Sheriffs, bidding them investigate certain complaints of a poor woman, Emma de Whitewell, against William Ammory, paviour, and to do justice therein. (F)

The complaint above-mentioned, enclosed in the writ, was addressed to the King and his Council, and set forth that the said William had forced his way into the complainant's house on Ash Wednesday and, after throwing her down, had beaten and assaulted her so violently and in so horrible a manner that she gave birth to a dead child and kept her bed for seven weeks. She prayed the King's aid, since she could obtain neither right nor justice in the Guildhall. (F)

Thereupon both parties were summoned, and the said William Ammory having pleaded not guilty, the matter was left to a jury, who found the defendant not guilty. (L)

William Crafte, John Rudde, James le Cordewaner, William le Cotyller and Cristina, wife of Roger Blake, were found guilty of regrating (fn. 18) beer and selling it at 2d a gallon against the proclamation. They were committed to prison. (L)

John atte More, Walter le Wyrdrawere and others were accepted as surety for the good behaviour of William Ammory towards Reginald le Callere and Joan his wife and Henry de Ledes and Emma his wife. (L)

John le Barber of Tower Ward was acquitted of a charge of selling beer against the proclamation. (L)

Membr. 6b

22 June 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Monday after the Feast of S t Botolph [17 June]

John le FitzJohan brings a plaint of Intrusion against Robert de Brome, clerk, Thomas de Morlee and Idonea his wife, and Thomas de Baldeswell and Joan his wife, touching his free tenement in the parish of St Andrew, Cornhill. (L)

25 June 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor on Thursday after the Nativity of S t John the Baptist [24 June]

Emma called "Smale Emme," Agnes wife of John Braselegg, and several other women were charged with selling beer against the proclamation. Three were acquitted, and the others found guilty and sent to prison. (L)

6 July 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Monday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June]

Plaints of Intrusion. The Prior of the New Hospital of St Mary within Cripplegate against Alice, daughter of John Minot, touching a tenement in the parish of All Hallows, Honey Lane; the Prior of St Bartholomew Smithfield against John de Harpesfeld, spicer, and Cristina his wife, Thomas Vymon, Richard de Depham, John Pope, tailor, Robert de Somersete, tailor, and Thomas atte Bowe, cordwainer, touching a tenement in the same parish; John de Toppesfeld and Katherine his wife against Brother Thomas de Berkhampsted, Master of the House of St Thomas of Acon, Brothers Robert Tyeys, John de Sauntford, John Deynes, Henry de Ware, William Fromond and Richard Brunne, touching a tenement in the parish of St Olave, Coleman Street. (L)

Lists of persons committed to prison for selling beer against the proclamation, among them being women named Englesia la Huxtere, Margery atte Cocke and Alice atte Harpe. (L)

Membr. 7

11 July 1355

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs on Saturday after the Feast of the Translation of S t Thomas the Martyr [7 July] A o 29 Edw. III [1355]

Nicholas Ploket, mercer, proffered a deed, dated 10 June, acknowledged by Simon and Richard de Worstede, executors of William de Causton, late mercer, by which they granted him the reversion of certain tenements devised to Cristina, wife of the said William de Causton, for life or until remarriage. The properties consisted of a capital messuage near Sopers Lane in the parish of St Pancras, which the testator had acquired from Joan Corp, widow of Simon Corp, pepperer, Thomas Corp, Simon's son, and John de Duresme, who were executors of the said Simon; two plots of land near the door of the great warehouse, late belonging to Roisia de Coventre, with a stall near the door facing on Sopers Lane; a solar on the other side of the door; and a portion of the warehouse then in the occupation of William Cove—subject to a rent charge for the support of a chaplain in St Pancras Church.

This deed was opposed by the widow, who, the same day, produced another deed, dated Friday after the Feast of St Augustine [26 May], whereby John atte Berne, another executor of her late husband, conveyed to her a fee simple in the above-mentioned properties and in certain tenements in the parish of St Mary Aldermanbury, acquired by the testator from Stephen Assheby. Nicholas Ploket, in turn, opposed this deed. (L)

Membr. 8

6 July 1355

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Monday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June] continued

Richard le Cook, piebaker of Ironmonger Lane, was convicted of selling beer at 2d a gallon contrary to the proclamation, and committed to prison. (L)

18 July 1355

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Saturday before the Feast of S t Margaret [20 July]

It was agreed to make a levy of a fifteenth for City purposes, and precepts were issued to the Aldermen of the Wards to summon Wardmotes for the election of assessors and collectors. (L)

Precept to the Aldermen (F) and schedules of the assessors of the several Wards.

John Beauvys of Hoggestone, drover, sued John Adam, butcher, for £13 10s due for 140 sheep bought at East Cheap. The defendant was committed to prison till he paid the debt. (L)

Roger Wenlok and Adam de Thame, brewer, were committed to prison for selling beer at 2d a gallon. (L)

William de St Albans, chandler, Roger Sprot, brewer, and Robert Lacer, cutler, were accepted as sureties for the good behaviour of Ralph Hobbecastell toward Whytyng Flemyng.(L)

Membr. 8b

25 July 1355

View of the account of the Mayor and Sheriffs concerning wines sold at an unlawful price from the 7 Sept. Ao 28 Edw. III [1354]—the day they received the King's writ and issued the proclamation forbidding the sale of the gallon of wine for more than 6d—up to 25 July following. They answer for a quarter of a cask of light red wine value 13s 4d belonging to John de Dytton and 20 gallons of red wine belonging to William Doget, value 10s, forfeited to the King. Total, 72½ gallons of red wine. (L)

9 July 1355

John de Sharryngworth called "Eberton," a "faytour (fn. 19) ," was sent to the pillory by order of the Mayor and Sheriffs, for being an able-bodied vagabond, who would not work and pretended to be an invalid. Wednesday after the Feast of St James the Apostle [25 July]. (L)

30 July 1355

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty on Thursday after the Feast of S t James the Apostle [25 July]

Thomas Wyr, Adam atte Belle, John de Chykesond and other brewers were bound over not to sell beer to regrators. (L)

15 Sept. 1355

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday the morrow of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross [14 Sept.]

Thomas de Morlee brings a plaint of Intrusion against John Tyntegel, Thomas, son of William de Cornewaille, Robert de Thame, William, son of Robert de Thame, and Juliana his wife, and John Boton and Margaret his wife, touching his free tenement in the parish of St Mary Colchurche. (L)

Nicholas de Burle, "curreyour," Nicholas le Smyth of Waltham and Peter de Thornton were mainprised for their good behaviour and that they would not play again the game called "le bon (fn. 20) dictum Piggesfot." (L)

Salamon Brounyng, carpenter, was attached to answer the Sheriff, William de Tudenham, for taking, in return for the services of John Symond and Nicholas Brounyng, the sum of 8s for six days and 8d a day commons for each man, contrary to the Statute (fn. 21) . He was ordered to return 4s to the Sheriff, and was committed to prison until he paid a fine to the King. (L)

Footnotes

1 In accordance with the general City regulations against forestalling. See Lib. Alb. i, p. 263, copied from Liber Custumarum, fo. 201 b. The charge against the defendant was that he cornered the whole available supply before market-hours, and in order to do so paid higher than the usual price.
2 The King's right of seizing what was necessary for his household, known as purveyance, was a constant grievance in the City. Frequent cases of resistance are recorded. Cal. of Early Mayor's Court Rolls, pp. 72, 181, 189, 194-5, 229. No fewer than twelve statutes were passed in the reign of Edw. III denning and restricting the right. By Stat. Ao 4 Edw. III, c. 4 (Statutes of the Realm, i, p. 262) it was granted that fair payment should be made, and by Stat, Ao 10 Edw. III, c. 2 (ibid. p. 277), that purveyance for transport should be made by the Sheriffs.
3 Hampstead Marshall co. Berks.
4 No ordinance dealing with the purchase of beasts in market has survived, but the offence was clearly one of buying up the available supplies to the prejudice of the other butchers, thus forestalling the market. As regards victuals in general it was laid down that all buyers should have equal rights, without interference by regrators. Lib. Alb. i, p. 275. The offence of going to meet drovers bringing beasts, and of buying cattle in secret places out of market, was frequently forbidden both by royal and City ordinances. Cf. Cal. of Letter Book E, p. 43.
5 A hard-wood cup, originally made of maple-wood.
6 A drinking-cup.
7 Cloths and hangings were frequently "stained," i.e. stencilled or painted in colours. The Stainers, who performed this work, amalgamated with the Painters in 1501, joint ordinances being approved by the Court of Aldermen on 19 Oct. See Letter Book M, fo. 36.
8 Brass pots.
9 A wash-bowl.
10 An old cloak.
11 Sc. lustrous coverchiefs, i.e. head-dresses of a satin or sheen material.
12 Poland.
13 Lübeck.
14 The earliest recorded instance of a special commission of Justices sitting at St Martin-le-Grand to review actions in the Husting occurred on 5 Aug. 1247, when Henry de Bathonia annulled the judgment against Margery Viel, on the ground that the process was faulty. Lib. de Ant. Leg. Camden Society, pp. 13-14. Several similar commissions followed from 1252 onwards. Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1247-58, pp. 138, 583, 585, 593-4. As the Mayor's Court grew into distinctness, appeals from judgments there were likewise heard by the Commissioners of Error. Ibid. 1301-7, pp. 403, 538, 546. Meanwhile there is mention in 1290 of the custom whereby the record and process were brought before the Commissioners not in writing, but oretenus. Lib. Cust. i, p. 173. In Edw. II's charter of 8 June 1319 the Commission of Error is said to be of ancient usage. Ibid. p. 267. In a return to a writ of 1341 it is claimed that the presentation of the record and process by the mouth of the Recorder was "custom," though the first mention of the Recorder in this connection occurs only in 1338. See Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 64, and above, p. 169, n. 2.
15 Flemish weavers are found entering the kingdom soon after the Norman Conquest, many of them being settled by Henry I in the districts of Tenby and Gower. Giraldus Cambrensis, Iter Camb. i, p. xi. Edw. III strongly encouraged them with the view of improving the native clothtrade. In 1331 and 1336 he issued writs of protection to Flemings (Rymer's Foedera, ii, pp. 823, 954) and in 1337 he promised by Statute to protect them and give them satisfactory franchises. Statutes of the Realm, i, p. 281. As several Flemish towns attempted to establish monopolies of weaving at the expense of the villages, there was no lack of men willing to migrate. Diegereck, Inventaire des Chartres d' Ypres, i, pp. 245, 289, 291; ii, pp. 313, 378, 515, 516. Their competition was regarded with some anxiety by London weavers, and in 1347 the Court of Aldermen resolved that they should be ruled in the same manner as denizen weavers of the City, and neither should work by night. Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 173. An attempt was made in 1351 by certain London weavers to force the foreign weavers to belong to the Weavers' Guild, but John atte Wyre and others secured a stay of the proceedings in the Exchequer on the strength of the above statute. Madox, Firma Burgi, pp. 283-4 and note. By letters patent of 8 Feb. 1352 the King granted them exemption from membership of the Weavers' Guild and power to elect two of their own number to supervise their trade (Cal. of Letter Book G, p. 130), and from this date the elections of their wardens are regularly recorded. Ibid. pp. 2, 16, 48, 104, 131, 146. In 1362 and again in 1366 the Mayor and Aldermen approved regulations proposed by the foreign weavers for the conduct of their trade. Riley's Memorials, pp. 306-8, 331-2.
16 The clerk counts the Monday after Quasimodo, and not Quasimodo itself, as the Close of Easter.
17 Regulations against enticing away apprentices and servants were usual in the organised trades of London. The earliest belong to A.D. 1261, when the Lorimers forbade the practice. Lib. Cust. i, p. 78; ii, p. 536. Enticing was forbidden by implication in the Ordinance concerning labourers and servants of 18 June 1349, c. 2. Statutes of the Realm, i, p. 307.
18 I.e. buying up victuals in the markets in order to sell again at a profit. Hucksters were forbidden to buy any kind of ale for resale. Lib. Alb. i, p. 360.
19 An impostor, who pretended to tell fortunes or simulated illness. See Statute 7 Rich. II, c. 5. Statutes of the Realm, ii, p. 32.
20 Sc. knuckle-bones, a game played by tossing and catching the metatarsal or metacarpal bones of a pig or sheep.
21 By the Statute of Labourers 25 Edw. III, c. 5 (Statutes of the Realm, i, p. 313) it was ordered that excess of wages paid above the rates obtaining in the twentieth year of the King's reign should be refunded, if claim was made, and, if not, should be paid towards the fifteenth.


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Roll A 6:
1349-50