House of Lords Journal Volume 9
30 July 1647

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 9: 30 July 1647', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 9: 1646 (1767-1830), pp. 358-361. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=37095 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Contents

DIE Veneris, 30 die Julii.
Answer from the H. C. Message from thence, to sit a while. Answer. Letters from the Commissioners with the Army. Preachers at the Fast thanked. Petition from the L. Mayor, Aldermen, &c. and an Order of their Militia Committee. Answer to them. Message from the H. C. to sit a while. Answer. New Speaker of the H. C. presented. Approved of. Message from the H. C. with an Ordinance;—with a Letter about the Intentions of the Army; and to sit a while. Answer. Message from the H. C. to secure the Great Seal; about consulting with the City Militia for the Safety of the Parliament; and with a Letter, &c. to Sir T. Fairfax. Answer. Letter from the Commissioners with the Army, concerning the Treaty with the Commissioners appointed by the Army. Propositions between them, concerning the Relief of Ireland. Letter from the Commissioners with the Army, that it is going to march towards London. Letter from Sir T. Fairfax to them, that he is going to march towards London, for Security of the Parliament. Letter from him to the L. Mayor, &c. about it; and censuring them for the late Insult on the Parliament. Petition from the L. Mayor &c. to order the Army not to come within Thirty Miles of London. Order of the City Militia Committee to protect the Parliament and City; and to stay Horses for their Defence. Order for 7000 l. for Munster. Ordinance for the Committee for the Militia to consult for Defence of the Parliament and City, &c. Massey, Waller, added to the Committee Militia, 11 Junii, 1647. City Militia to choose Commanders. The Great Seal to be secured. Order for the Army not to come within Thirty Miles of London: Letter to Sir T. Fairfax, to observe this Order. Lords to attend To-morrow. Footnotes

DIE Veneris, 30 die Julii.

PRAYERS, by Mr. Carter.

Domini præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Willoughby, Speaker.

Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Lyncolne.
Comes Suffolke.
Comes Midd.
Ds. Hunsdon.
Ds. Barkley.
Ds. Robertes.

Answer from the H. C.

Doctor Heath and Mr. Page return with this Answer from the House of Commons:

That they agree in the Two Ordinances, for re-calling the Ordinance for the Militia and the Declaration.

Message from thence, to sit a while.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Rob't Pye Knight:

To desire their Lordships would be pleased to sit a while, about the great Affairs of the Kingdom.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That this House will sit a while, as is desired.

Letters from the Commissioners with the Army.

Two Letters were read, from the Commissioners in the Army. (Here enter it.)

Preachers at the Fast thanked.

Ordered, That Doctor Love and Mr. Langley shall have Thanks given them, for their Pains in Preaching on Wednesday last, being the Fast-day.

Petition from the L. Mayor, Aldermen, &c. and an Order of their Militia Committee.

A Petition from the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of London, was presented to this House by the Two Sheriffs of the City of London, was read. (Here enter it.)

Also an Order made by the Committeee of the Militia, was read. (Here enter it.)

The House, upon Consideration, gave them this Answer following:

Answer to them.

"That the Lords do return them hearty Thanks, for their continual Care of the Safety of the Parliament; and do very well approve of the Order that the Militia of the City hath lately taken; and that the Lords will take the rest of their Particulars into speedy Consideration; and nothing shall be wanting that in them lies, to give them all Furtherance for the Preservation of the Parliament and City."

Message from the H. C. to sit a while.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Rob't Harley Knight:

To desire their Lordships would please to sit a while, for they had an Intention to come and present their Speaker to their Lordships.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That this House will sit a while, as is desired.

Then the House was adjourned during Pleasure, to put on their Robes.

The House was resumed.

The House of Commons came up.

New Speaker of the H. C. presented.

And Henry Pelham Esquire made a short Speech, to this Effect: "That the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, being in present Want of a Speaker, had make Choice of so bad a Speaker as himself; and had commanded him to acquaint their Lordships with such their bad Choice."

Approved of.

Then the Speaker returned this Answer:

"That this House very well approves of the Choice of the House of Commons; he being a Person of such Abilities, Integrity, and Faithfulness to the Parliament."

Hereupon the Commons, with their Speaker, returned to their own House.

Message from the H. C. with an Ordinance;—with a Letter about the Intentions of the Army; and to sit a while.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Colonel Jepson, &c.

1. To desire their Lordships Concurrence in an Ordinance for sending Seven Thousand Pounds, for Relief of Munster. (Here enter it.)

Agreeed to.

2. To communicate to their Lordships a Letter, without a Name, written to the Speaker, which shews the Intentions of the Army; and that the latter Part of it is written by One that was an Assistant to the Clerk of the House of Commons. (Here enter it.)

Read.

3. That their Lordships would please to sit a while.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That this House agrees to the Order for sending Seven Thousand Pounds to Munster; and that their Lordships will sit a while.

Message from the H. C. to secure the Great Seal; about consulting with the City Militia for the Safety of the Parliament; and with a Letter, &c. to Sir T. Fairfax.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Swinfild, &c; who brought up several Particulars, wherein they desire their Lordships Concurrence:

1. An Ordinance for a Committee to consult with the Militia of London, about the Safety of the Parliament and City. (Here enter it.)

Read, and Agreed to.

2. That Sir Wm. Waller and Colonel Massie be added to the aforesaid Committee. (Here enter it.)

Agreed to.

3. That the Great Seal be secured. (Here enter.)

Agreed to.

4. A Vote to give Power to the Militia of London to choose a Commander in Chief and other Officers.

(Here enter it.)

Agreed to.

5. A Letter to Sir Thomas Fairefax was read, with an Order inclosed. (Here enter it.)

Agreed to.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That this House agrees to the Letter, and all the Orders, now brought up.

Letter from the Commissioners with the Army, concerning the Treaty with the Commissioners appointed by the Army.

"For special Service of the Parliament.

"For the Right Honourable Edward Earl of Manchester, Speaker of the House of Peers. These.

"May it please your Lordship,

"We acquainted you by our last, that we were to meet with the Commissioners of the Army, about the Relief of Ireland. We met accordingly on Monday last; and, after a serious Debate thereupon, we thought fit to deliver in to the Commissioners of the Army a Paper, containing the Result of our Desires upon that Debate had with them, a Copy of which Paper we send you here inclosed. At this Meeting, the Commissioners of the Army shewed very great Affection for the expediting Relief to Ireland, as we desired; and promised to give us their particular Answer in Writing very speedily: But the unexpected News of Monday's Work at the Houses, and the several Rumours that Hourly follow thereupon, have so altered the Frame of Things here, that as yet we cannot receive their Answer, as we expected. We find them now upon new Counsels, having ordered the contracting their Quarters in relation to their March towards London. This Day the Head Quarter removes to Laiton Budesart, and (as we hear) some of the Army are to be To-morrow Night at Uxbridge, or Colebrooke. So we rest

Bedford, 29 Julii, 1647.
Your Lordship's
Humble Servants,
C. Nottingham. P. Wharton."

Propositions between them, concerning the Relief of Ireland.

"Whereas it hath pleased both Houses of Parliament to put all the Forces within the Kingdom of England and Dominion of Wales under the Command of his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairefax, not only in order to the Peace and Security of this Kingdom, but for the Reducement of Ireland; we, according to the Power lately sent unto us from both Houses, to treat with his Excellency and Commissioners of the Army, for the present Relief of that poor Kingdom, do desire that you would take it speedily into your Consideration; and that you would declare what Number both of Horse and Foot (the Security of this Kingdom being provided for) you conceive may conveniently be spared for the Service of Ireland; and because we find, by our Debate with you this Morning, it will be necessary to have a true State of all the Forces and Garrisons within Ireland as well as in this Kingdom, before that great Work can be in all the Pieces conducing thereunto fully resolved upon, we do farther desire, that no Time may be lost for the Service of that Kingdom, in Answer to what is brought down from the House of Commons by Sir John Temple, concerning the Preservation of the Interest of the Parliament in the Province of Lemster, and the Relief of their Forces there; that you would take into your speedy Consideration these Propositions annexed, offered unto us by Sir John Temple and Sir Hardresse Waller.

From The Swan in Bedford, 26 Julii, 1647.
By Appointment of the Commissioners of Parliament residing with the Army.
Signed,
Geo. Pyke, Secr.
Vera Copia."

"Propositions made by Sir John Temple and Sir Hardresse Waller, concerning the Relief of Ireland.

"1. That it would please his Excellency to take Order, that, towards the providing of a Train of Artillery, which they exceedingly want at Dublin, and deprives them of all Means of doing Service, there may be sent unto the Ports of Bristoll and Chester Four Pieces of Battery, Eight Field-pieces, One Mortar-piece of the largest Size, with Granadoes, to be presently transported over to Dublyn: These, together with their Carriages, to be taken out of the Garrisons of Gloucester, Bristoll, Chester, and Shrewsbury.

"2. That to the Seven Hundred Horse which the Committee at Derby House hath contracted for with Colonel Pownsly, there may be added Three Hundred Horse more; and these presently dispatched away, by express Orders from the General.

"3. That the Regiment of Foot under the Command of Colonel Birch may be compleated and sent away.

"4. That Two Regiments of Foot, under good Officers, may be presently commanded away, for the Service of Dublyn. These Forces being dispatched, they do not doubt but they will arrive Time enough, not only to preserve the Interest of the Parliament in the Province of Lemster until a more considerable Army be sent over; but that they shall be able to enlarge their Quarters, and keep the Enemy at a farther Distance.

"Vera Copia, ex'r."

Letter from the Commissioners with the Army, that it is going to march towards London.

"For the special Service of the Parliament.

"For the Right Honourable Edward Earl of Manchester, Speaker of the House of Peers. These.

"May it please your Lordship,

"We gave you this Day an Account, from Bedford, of the Resolutions of the Army to march towards London; the Grounds whereof are now expressed by themselves, in a Letter which we have received from the General since we came to this Place, together with a Copy of his Excellency's Letter sent upon this Occasion to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of London; the Copies of both which are here inclosed. The Head Quarter moves from hence (as we hear) To-morrow to Wickham, or thereabouts; and some of the Army will be nearer towards London. Thus rests

Layton Budezart, 29th of July, 1647.
Your Lordship's
Humble Servants,
C. Nottingham. P. Wharton."

Letter from Sir T. Fairfax to them, that he is going to march towards London, for Security of the Parliament.

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"Having resolved upon this inclosed Dispatch for the City of London, I thought it my Part to give you an Account of it; and to give you all Assurance, that my Heart is deeply affected with the late Carriages towards the Parliament: And however others have neglected their Duty towards them, for their Security and Defence, yet, as God shall enable me, it shall be my Business to improve all that (fn. *) is in my Hand, for the Preserving of them, and in them the Interest of this Nation. And what Construction soever some formerly may have put upon the Pro ceedings of this Army, I trust the Lord will by His good Hand lead us into such Actions, as shall witness our End answerable to all our Professions; to wit, to the Good of the Kingdom; and therein to be an effectual Saving to the great and just Authority of the Kingdom in the Parliament.

Bedford, July 29th, 1647.
Your Lordships
Humble Servant,
T. Fairefax.

"For the Right Honourable the Lords and Commissioners of Parliament residing with the Army.

"Vera Copia, ex.

"per Geo. Pyke."

Letter from him to the L. Mayor, &c. about it; and censuring them for the late Insult on the Parliament.

"My Lord and Gentlemen,

"You may please to remember the forward Compliance of this Army with your Desires, to remove to this Distance; and that, upon the Assurance you gave them of your Concurrence with their declared Desires for settling the Liberties and Peace of this Kingdom, against which you never yet offered us One Exception, or any Ground of Dissent; as also of your great Tenderness and Resolution to secure the Parliament and their Privileges from any Violence or Attempt, the chief Reasons given us of your late Listing of new Forces, and wherein we did most acquiesce; that, upon this Confidence, we had disposed the Army into several Parts of the Kingdom, for the Ease of the Whole, to above an Hundred Miles Distance; we had given up ourselves to the Perfecting of such Proposals as might tend to the comfortable Settlement of this poor Kingdom; and we were in a hopeful Way of speedy Relief to Ireland: We cannot then but be deeply sensible of that unparalleled Violation acted upon the Parliament on Monday last, by a rude Multitude from your City, because therein the Guards sent from the City did not only neglect their Duty for Security of the Parliament from such Violence, and the whole City to yield any Relief to the Houses in that Extremity; but I am assured from Eye and Ear Witnesses, that divers of the Common Council gave great Encouragement to it; which doth not only gainsay your former Professions, but does Violence to those many Obligations that (by your Charter, Protestations, and sundry other Ways) lie upon you to protect the Parliament.

"For my Part, I cannot but look upon yourselves (who are in Authority) as accountable to the Kingdom for the present Interruption of that hopeful Way of Peace and Settlement Things were in for this Nation, and of relieving Ireland, occasioned by that late treasonable and destructive Engagement, especially by that latter prodigious and horrid Force done upon the Parliament, tending to dissolve all Government; upon which Score also we and the whole Kingdom shall have Cause to put every Thing of the like Nature that may happen to the Parliament, or to any who are Friends to them and this Army; except, by your Wisdom, Care, and Industry, the chief Actors in the Premises may be detected, secured, and given up to the Proceedings of Justice for the same, and your best Endeavours used to prevent the like for future.

Bedford, July the 29th, 1647.

"Your most assured Friend to serve you.

"For the Right Honourable the Lord Mayor, Aldermen; and Common Council, of the City of London."

Petition from the L. Mayor &c. to order the Army not to come within Thirty Miles of London.

"To the Right Honourable the Lords assembled in High Court of Parliament.

"The humble Petition of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commons, of the City of London, in Common Council assembled;

"Humbly acknowledging the great Favour of this Honourable House, in re-establishing the Militia of this City, according to their late Petition; whereby, the Petitioners are confident, the Distempers which they then feared are well allayed, and will be wholly appeased, if the Rumours of the Army's Advance towards the City do not again stir up the People. The Petitioners are not conscious to themselves of any Thing that hath proceeded from them which may justly provoke the Army; and will least of all believe that their late insisting on the Militia of this City can be any Reason thereof, especially now that the Parliament have declared themselves therein: But whatever the Cause be, or whether the Army march this Way or not; yet, that the City may have some Assurance,

"The Petitioners humbly pray this Honourable House, speedily to dispatch their Pleasure to the Army, requiring it not to advance nearer to the City than Thirty Miles; whereby as many great Dangers will be avoided, and all Jealousies removed, so the Petitioners do, in the Name of the City, hereby promise, that there shall be no Endeavours omitted on their Part, for the timely and safe Guarding of the Parliament at all Times, and for the effectual Suppression of all Violences and Tumults which shall be raised under any Pretence whatsoever.

"And the Petitioners shall pray, &c.

"Michel."

Order of the City Militia Committee to protect the Parliament and City; and to stay Horses for their Defence.

"Guildhall, London, Die Veneris, 30 julii, 1647.

By the Committee for the Militia of the Londan

"Ordered, That the Sheriffs of the City of London be hereby desired, in case the Parliament sit, to acquaint the House with the Care of this Committee to defend and preserve the Parliament and City in Safety; and that they, seeing Danger approaching, intend to stay all Horses within the Lines, and to secure all Horse within the Lines and Weekly Bills of Mortality, except the Horses of Marketfolks, Carriers, and others that bring Trade and Provision to the City; and further to do what shall be necessary for their and the City's Safety; and to desire the Advice and Encouragement of both Houses in their Proceedings, and to confer such further Addition of Power upon this Committee as they shall think fit.

"Tho. Bartington,
Clerk to the said Committee."

Order for 7000 l. for Munster.

"Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That Mr. Loftus, Deputy Treasurer at Wars for Ireland, do forthwith deliver over the Seven Thousand Pounds assigned for the Forces of Munster unto Captain Richard Swanley, to be by him transported into Munster, for the Pay of the Forces there, and disposed of according to Order of the 23th of July, 1647."

Ordinance for the Committee for the Militia to consult for Defence of the Parliament and City, &c.

"Be it Ordained, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the Committee of Lords and Commons appointed upon the 11th of June last, to join with the Committee of the Militia of the City of London, whereof Two Lords and Four Commoners to be of the Quorum, shall be, and are hereby made and appointed, a Committee, to consult, advise, and put in Execution, all Ways and Means which in their Judgements may be necessary, for the Defence of the Kingdom, Parliament, and City, according to the Covenant, with Power to raise Horse and Foot for that Purpose; and to send unto the Militia and Common Council of the City of London, and all Committees, Deputy Lieutenants, or other Person or Persons, such as they shall think fit, for their Advice and Assistance, in order thereunto: Provided, That this Ordinance shall continue for a Month, and no longer."

(fn. *) Massey, Waller, added to the Committee Militia, 11 Junii, 1647.

"Resolved, by the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled, That Colonel Massey and Sir William Waller be added to the Committee of the 11th of June, 1647, that were to join with the Committee of the Militia of London, to consult, advise, and put in Execution, all Ways and Means which in their Judgements may be necessary, for the Defence of the Kingdom, Parliament, and City."

City Militia to choose Commanders.

"Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the Committee of the Militia of London have Power to choose a Commander in Chief, and all other Commanders as they shall think fitting for the Service; and that they be desired forthwith to do it accordingly."

The Great Seal to be secured.

"Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the Great Seal be secured."

Order for the Army not to come within Thirty Miles of London:

"Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the General be required, not to advance with his Army, or any Part thereof, within Thirty Miles of London; and in case the Army, or any Part thereof, be within Thirty Miles, that they go back."

Letter to Sir T. Fairfax, to observe this Order.

"SIR,

"The Houses having this Day received from their Commissioners a Copy of your Letter to them, dated at Bedford, July 29th, with a Copy of another Letter of the same Date, writ to the City of London; in both which though there be no Account at all of the Motion of your Army, yet the Houses understand, by the Letter from their Commissioners in which the said Copies were inclosed, and otherwise, that you have given Orders for the Marching of the Army towards London, upon Pretence of defending the Houses from the Danger of Tumults: Upon Consideration whereof, the Houses have commanded us to let you understand, that, as they cannot but have a deep Sense of the undue Liberty which some Apprentices of the City of London and others (from whom they might have expected more Obedience) have taken to themselves, to violate the just Authority, Privileges, and Freedom of Parliament, in which the Safety of the whole Kingdom is concerned; so they doubt not but the Sense of so great an Offence will at last strike their Breasts that have been accessary thereunto, with a Detestation of any Practices of the like Nature for the future. And as the Houses cannot imagine that the Disorder committed by some Apprentices, or those that mingled with them, had the Allowance of the City of London, so they have since received full Satisfaction, by the strict Orders given out by the Lord Mayor and Common Council of the City, to all Masters, to have Care of their Servants, and, by their Declaration proclaimed in the several Parts of the City, for the preventing and suppressing of Tumults, that they shall sit with much Freedom and Security from any Disturbance for the future: And therefore the Houses, seeing no Cause to command that Army, or any Part thereof, to march up for their Defence; but rather judging (by the Distractions raised at the News thereof) that the Motion of the Army nearer the City is like to precipitate the City and Army in a desperate and bloody Engagement, not only to the Disturbance of the Parliament's Sitting, but also to the Destruction thereof, and of all Authority, by casting the whole Kingdom into Confusion; for Prevention thereof, they have sent you this inclosed Order, requiring you, as you tender the Freedom of Parliament, the Safety of this City and whole Kingdom, to give exact Obedience thereunto. This being all we have in Command, we rest."

Lords to attend To-morrow.

Whereas these Lords following attended not the House this Day, according to an Order of the 26th of this Instant: It is Ordered, That their Lordships shall have further Notice, to attend the said House peremptorily, without Excuse, on the 31th of this Instant July, at Ten of the Clock in the Morning; notwithstanding any former Leave granted to them, or any of them, to be absent: And herein a ready Obedience is to be given:

E. Northumb.
E. Kent.
E. Rutland.
E. Salishbury.
E. Warwicke.
E. Denbigh.
E. Manchester.
E. Mulgrave.
E. Stamford.
Viscount Hereford.
Viscount Say & Seale.
Ds. La Warr.
Ds. Dacres.
Ds. North.
Ds. Grey.
Ds. Robertes.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Bruce.

Footnotes

* Origin. as.
* This Marginal Note is in the Original.