House of Lords Journal Volume 9
2 August 1647

Sponsor

History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Year published

1767-1830

Pages

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'House of Lords Journal Volume 9: 2 August 1647', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 9: 1646 (1767-1830), pp. 366-368. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=37098 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

DIE Lunæ, 2 die Augusti.

PRAYERS, by Dr. Staunton.

Domini præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Hunsdon, Speaker.

Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Lyncolne.
Comes Suffolke.
Comes Midd.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Willoughby.

Letter from the Scots Commissioners.

A Letter from the Scotts Commissioners of Scotland, was read. (Here enter it.)

King to come to London.

Resolved, That London be the Place whither the King shall be desired to come to; where both Houses of Parliament and the Commissioners of the Kingdom of Scotland may make their Addresses to Him, for a safe and well-grounded Peace.

Message to the H. C. about it; and with Letters to Sir T. Fairfax and the Commissioners with the King on that Subject.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Edward Leech and Mr. Page;

To desire their Concurrence in these Particulars:

1. In the Letter to the King, with the Vote inclosed, "That the King be desired to come to such Place as both Houses shall appoint."

2. The Letter to the Commissioners residing with the King.

3. A Letter to the General, with the Vote aforesaid inclosed.

4. The Vote this Day made, for London to be the Place whither the King shall be desired to come, &c.

Committee to consider of a proper Place for the King's Children:

Ordered, That the Earl of Pembrooke, Earl of Lyncolne, and the Lord Hunsdon, do consider of what Place is fittest to remove the King's Children to at St. James', there being none now to take Charge of them; and to examine what Practice hath been to convey them away from St. James'; and to send to the House of Commons, to appoint a Committee of a proportionable Number of their Members, to join with the Lords:

Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Lyncolne.
Ds. Hunsdon.

Any Two, to meet this Afternoon; and to report the same to the Houses.

Provision to be made for them.

Ordered, To send to the House of Commons, to desire that the Committee for the Revenue may meet, (fn. *) to take some Course to make Provisions of Money for the King, and the King's Children's present Occasions.

Ordinance for Commissioners of the Great Seal.

The Ordinance for the Commissioners of the Great Seal, was read; and Agreed to, with an Alteration; and Ordered to be sent to the House of Commons for their Concurrence therein.

Message from the H. C. with an Order to remove the King's Children.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Carr:

To desire their Lordships Concurrence in an Order for removing the King's Children at St. James'.

Agreed to.

Committee to put it in Execution.

The Earl of Pembrooke is appointed to join with a proportionable Number of the House of Commons, to take Care for the removing of the King's Children, as is expressed in the Order.

The Answer returned was:

Answer to the H. C.

That this House agrees in the Order now brought up; and have appointed One Lord, to join with a proportionable Number of the House of Commons, to see the said Order put into Execution.

Enquiry to be made about the Attempt to carry away the King's Children.

Ordered, That this Committee that goes to see the Order put in Execution for removing the King's Children shall examine concerning what Practice hath been to convey them away from St. James'; and to report the (fn. *) same to the Houses.

Ordinance to appoint Commissioners of the Great Seal.

An Ordinance was presented to the House, for making Sir John Bramston Knight One of His Majesty's Serjeants at Law, Sir Thomas Beddingfield Knight, and Challoner Chute Esquire, Commissioners of the Great Seal of England; which being read, was approved of; and sent down to the House of Commons, by Sir Edward Leech and Mr. Page, for their Concurrence.

Letter to the E. of Northumb. to attend the House; and return to his Charge of the King's Children.

A Letter was written to the Earl of Northumberland, as follows, from the Speaker of this House:

"My Lord,

"I am commanded, by the Lords in Parliament assembled, to let you know, That they do expect you should repair to the Charge committed to you by both Houses of Parliament, for the Care of the King's Children; as also to give your Attendance in Parliament. This is all for the present I have to trouble your Lordship withal. I rest

"Your Lordship's
Very humble Servant."

E. of Denbigh and L. Wharton to attend.

Ordered, That the Earl of Denbigh One of the Commissioners with the King, and the Lord Wharton One of the Commissioners with the Army, shall be sent to, for to come and give their Attendance on this House; and the Concurrence of the House of Commons to be desired herein.

King's Children to be removed into the City.

"Ordered, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That the Children of the King at St. James' be removed into the City; and that the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs be desired to take Care of them, till further Order of both Houses, in respect of the Danger they are now in at St. James'."

Letter from the Scots Commissioners, desiring the King may be invited to come to London;—complaining of the E. of Lauderdail's being driven away from Woburn by a Party of the Army, without being permitted to speak with the King;—and recapitulating other Violences of the Army.

"Right Honorable,

"The Committee of Estates of the Kingdome of Scotland haveinge sent us frequent Directions, since the late Commotions, to give them a true Account, from Tyme to Tyme, of His Majesty's Condition; in Pursuance thereof, wee desired the Earle of Lauderdaill to repaire to His Majesty at Wooburne, where wee expected that he should have bin used with that Respect which is due to a Commissioner of the Parliament of Scotland: But wee are herein extreamly disappointed; for, upon Saterday Morninge early, before his Lordship was out of his Bed, a greate many Souldiers rushed into his Chamber, and, comeing to his Bed-side, desired him speedily to be gone, without any Delay. He represented unto them his Imployment; that he was there in the Capacity of a Commissioner from the Parliament of Scotland, to attend His Majesty; that he had resolved to goe away that Morning; and intreated that he might have the Liberty first to speake with His Majesty: Which they would not graunt; but violently insisted that what they demaunded might forthwith be put in Execution; and would not hearken to any Reason he offered unto them; telling him, "it was past Dispute, it was resolved upon; what they did herein would be owned by the Army, and they would maintayne it;" with other Expressions of that Kinde. Wee doe acknowledge the Civility of the Commissioners of both Houses, who acted their Parts in dissuading them from soe unwarrantable an Action; and One of the Commissioners in particuler represented unto them the Danger thereof; acquainted them, "That he had bin an Ambassador Abroad, and did very well understand that this Injury done by them to a Commissioner of the Parliament of Scotland was of a very high Nature;" intreating, "That, if they apprehended any Thing from Scotland, the Breach might not be made upon the Kingdome of England's Part; and that they would not give just Cause, by this Action, to the Kingdome of Scotland, to make Warre against England." But noe Arguments did prevaile; soe at Length the Earle of Lauderdaill was forced to depart, haveing first publiquely protested, before the Commissioners of both Houses, "That he was debarred from Accesse to the King of Scotland; and his Liberty taken from him, contrary to the Lawe of Nations, and a particuler Agreement betwixt the Kingdomes." Wee have formerly represented to the Honorable Houses, how His Majesty's Person was carryed away from Holdenby by a Party of Sir Thomas Fairefaxe's Army (which the Souldiers before mentioned did, on Saterday last, before the Earle of Lauderdaill, and some of the Commissioners of both Houses, owne to be the Act of the whole Souldiery of the Army): Wee did likewise acquaint the Houses how our Letters to Scotland were intercepted by some of that Army: And now, to compleate these Injuryes, they offered Violence to a Commissioner of the Parliament of Scotland, debarred him from Accesse to His Majesty, deprived him of his Liberty, and drove him away. Soe that there remaines noe Hope, that there can be any Application made hereafter to His Majesty from the Kingdome of Scotland; nor can wee be able to give that Account of His Majesty's Condition to that Kingdome which is expected from us, soe long as He is in the Power of that Army.

"Wherefore wee doe desire that the Houses of Parliament will, in their Wisdome, take such Course herein, as Reparation may be made to the Kingdome of Scotland of these multiplyed Injuryes; and especially of the last, done against the Person of a Publique Minister of the Kingdome of Scotland in soe violent a Manner: And, to the End there may bee a free and unrestrained Application to His Majesty from the Parliaments of both Kingdomes, wee doe earnestly desire the Honnorable Houses to invite His Majesty to come to London; and to declare, That He shal be here in Safety, Honnor, and Freedome; then which wee see noe other probable Meane for the present to obtayne a safe and well-grounded Peace. And soe wee rest

Worcester House, the 1 August, 1647.

"Your Lordship's
Humble Servaunts,
Lauderdaill.
Charles Erskine.
Hew Kennedy.
Ro. Berclay.

"For the Right Honnorable the Speaker of the House of Peeres pro Tempore."

(fn. *) Post Meridiem.

PRAYERS, by Mr. Whittaker.

Domini præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Hunsdon, Speaker,

Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Suffolke.
Ds. Willoughby.
Ds. Maynard.

Answer from the H. C.

Sir Edward Leech, &c. return this Answer from the House of Commons:

That they agree to the Votes to be sent to the King, and the Letter to the Commissioners with the King, and to the General. (Here enter them.)

Message from the Assembly.

Mr. Palmer and divers Ministers of the Assembly of Divines presented to this House a Paper; which was read. (Here enter it.)

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That this House gives them Thanks, for their Care and good Affections to the Good and Peace of the Kingdom; and their Lordships shall not be wanting in any Thing to effect it.

Ordered, That the Votes sent to the King shall be printed; and published, by the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs of London, by Trumpet, within the City of London and Lines of Communication and Weekly Bills of Mortality.

Invitation to the King, to come to London:

"Die Saturni, 31 Julii, 1647.

"We, Your Majesty's loyal Subjects the Lords and Commons assembled in the Parliament of England, (fn. †) having agreed upon these following Votes, do humbly present them to Your Majesty; (videlicet,)

"Whereas the King hath been seized upon, and carried away from Holdenby, without His Consent, or the Consent of the Houses of Parliament, by a Party, into the Army, where His Majesty yet remaineth: The Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled do desire that His Majesty will be pleased immediately to come to such Place as both Houses of Parliament shall appoint; and they do declare, That He shall there be with Honour, Freedom, and Safety; and that they, with the Commissioners of the Kingdom of Scotland, will make their Addresses unto His Majesty for a safe and well-grounded Peace.

2 Augusti, 1647.

"Resolved, upon the Question, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That London be the Place whither the King shall be desired to come to; where both Houses of Parliament and the Commissioners of the Kingdom of Scotland may make their Addresses to Him, for a safe and well-grounded Peace.

To be published.

"Ordered, by the Lords in Parliament assembled, That these Votes be printed and published; and that the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs of the City of London do cause the same to be published, by Trumpet, within the City of London and Lines of Communication and Weekly Bills of Mortality, with all Speed."

Letter to the Commissioners with the King, with them;

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"The Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled have commanded us to let you know, that they have passed Two Votes, which they have sent inclosed, and desire you to deliver them to His Majesty; and to signify to the Houses His Majesty's Pleasure therein. This is all we have in Command.

Westm'r, 2d Aug.' 1647.

"Your affectionate Friends to serve you."

and to Sir T. Fairfax.

"SIR,

"The Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled have passed Two Votes concerning His Majesty, a Copy of which they send you here inclosed; and desire you to take Notice of them. This is all we have in Command.

Westm'r, 2 Aug. 1647.

"Your affectionate Friends."

Message from the Assembly, to mediate Peace between the City and the Army.

"To the Right Honourable the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament.

"The Assembly of Divines, being by their Profession Ministers of the Gospel of Peace under Christ the Prince of Peace, hearing of Preparations tending to a sudden War between the Army and the City, do, in the Name of Jesus Christ, humbly crave Leave, in these few Words, to mediate for Peace, at the Hands of all that have any Interest in the managing thereof, as that wherein are most deeply concerned, the Glory of God, which all Parties profess to regard and advance; the Safety of the King, Parliament, and Kingdom, which, being lately in a hopeful Way to be established in a happy Peace, is now in Danger to be overwhelmed with a Sea of Blood, the End and sad Consequences whereof no Man is able to foresee; and the Welfare of all the People of God in the Land, who are likely to be engaged one against another:

"Wherefore we humbly pray, in the Bowels of Jesus Christ, that all possible Means may be used, by Treaty or otherwise, that the Effusion of Christian Blood may be prevented, Ireland relieved, and all God's People enjoy the Fruit of their Prayers, in the Flourishing of the true Religion, and Settlement of the Peace and Prosperity of the Three Kingdoms.

"Charles Herle, Prolocutor.
Herbert Palmer, Assessor.
Henry Roborough, Scriba.
Adoniram Byfield, Scriba."

Footnotes

* Bis in Originali.
* Origin. House.
* Origin. Julii.
Origin. have.