House of Lords Journal Volume 6
8 January 1644

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 6: 8 January 1644', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 6: 1643 (1767-1830), pp. 369-371. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=37425 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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DIE Lunæ, videlicet, 8 die Januarii.

PRAYERS.

Lords present this Day:

Ds. Grey de Warke, Speaker.

Comes Northumb.
Comes Essex.
Comes Kent.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Bollingbrooke.
L. Viscount Say & Seale.
Comes Rutland.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Sarum.
Ds. Willoughby de Parham.
Ds. Howard.
Ds. Hunsden.

Report of the Conference about a Plot discovered, to make Divisions between the City and the Two Houses, and to dishearten the Scots from coming in to their Assistance.

The Speaker reported the Effect of the Conference on Saturday last with the House of Commons; which was, "To acquaint their Lordships with some Papers and Examinations, whereby is discovered a dangerous Plot and Design to make Division and Difference between the (fn. *) King and the Parliament; and to dishearten the Scotts from coming in to the Assistance of this Kingdom.

"These Papers following were read:

"1. A Letter sent to Mr. Ryley, under the Name of The Man in the Moon.

"2. Thomas Violett's Letter to Ryley, 3 January, 1643.

"3. A Second Letter to Mr. Ryley.

"4. The Lord Digbie's to Sir Basill Brooke, the 2 January, 1643.

"5. Another Letter to Sir Basill Brookes, the 29th December, 1643.

"6. The King's Letter to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London, and to all other wellaffected Subjects of that City.

"Next were read, certain Votes made by the House of Commons, upon the Consideration of this Business:

Votes upon it.

"That the Matter of this Report contains a seditious and jesuitical Practice and Design, under the fair and specious Pretence of Peace (having its Rise and Fountain from known Jesuits and Papists), to work Divisions between the Parliament and City of London, to raise Factions in both, thereby to render them up to the Designs of the Enemy; and tending also to the Breach of the Public Faith of this Kingdom unto our Brethren of Scotland, engaged by the late Solemn Covenant and Treaty entered into by both Nations; thereby not only to weaken us in our united Forces against our Popish and common Enemies, but to embroil the Two Nations in unhappy Differences."

Ordered, That this House agrees with the House of Commons in this Vote.

And further, "That the House of Commons had appointed a Committee, to communicate this Business to the City, at a Common Hall, on Monday next, at One a Clock; and also the King's Proclamation, requiring the Members of Parliament to meet the 22th of January next, at Oxford; and they desire their Lordships would please to nominate a Committee of this House, to join with the Committee of the House of Commons, to communicate these Things to the City."

Committee to go into the City, and acquaint them with the Discovery of this Plot.

And this House appointed these Lords as Committees, to go into London this Afternoon, at Three a Clock, with the Committee of the House of Commons, to acquaint the City with the Discovery of this Plot, and the Letter of the Lord Digby:

Comes Northumb.
Comes Essex, L. General.
Comes Sarum.
Comes Rutland.
Comes Manchester.
L. Viscount Say & Seale.
Comes Kent.
Ds. Wharton.

Message to the H. C. to acquaint them with it;

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Rob't Rich and Mr. Page:

and for some of their Members to assist in the Proceedings against the Queen.

To let them know, that their Lordships have appointed a Committee of Eight Lords, to join with a proportionable Number of their House, [ (fn. *) to go] to the Common Hall in the City, to acquaint them with the Discovery of this Plot: And further to let them know, that their Lordships have appointed a Committee, to consider of the Proceedings against the Queen; and they shall have Occasion to advise with Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Selden, and Mr. Glynn, and others, concerning the Precedents and Records; and in regard they are Members of their House, their Lordships desire their Leave that they (fn. †) may call them to their Assistance when they shall have Occasion.

Ordinance for an Excise on Flesh and Salt.

The Ordinance for putting an Excise upon Flesh and Salt was read, and Ordered to be taken into Consideration To-morrow Morning, by a Committee of the whole House.

Proclamation for adjourning Courts of Law to Oxford.

Next, a Proclamation was read, intituled, "A Proclamation for removing of the King's Bench and Exchequer from Westm. to Oxford."

House to be called.

Ordered, That this House shall be called the 22th of January next; and a Letter shall be sent to those Lords as are absent, to give them Notice to appear that Day, and give their Attendance on this House; and the Assistants of this House are hereby commanded to give their Attendance that Day.

Arundel taken by Sir Wm. Waller.

Next, a Letter from Sir Wm. Waller, written to the Lord General, was read, giving an Account of his taking the Castle of Arrondell. (Here enter it.)

Mr. Smart's Cause.

Ordered, That this House will hear the Business of Mr. Smarte this Day Three Weeks, at which Time the Parties and Witnesses are to attend.

Sir W. Middleton and the Bishop of London.

Upon reading the Petition of Sir Wm. Middleton: It is Ordered, That the Examination of the Business between him and the Bishop of London is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Reeves and Mr. Justice Bacon, who are to report the same to this House.

Sequestration of the Earl of Westmorland's Estate stayed.

"Whereas the Petition of the Earl of Westmerland, lately presented to the Lords in Parliament, and recommended by them to the House of Commons, touching the Sequestration of his Estate, depends yet under Consideration: Upon reading the Petition of Mary Countess of Westmerland, it is this Day Ordered, by the Lords in Parliament, That the Committees for Sequestrations in the County of North'ton are hereby required to forbear any further Proceedings upon the Sequestration of the said Earl's Estate, until some Resolution be given upon the said Petition."

Earl of Clare, D°.

"Whereas the Petition of the Countess of Clare, lately presented to the Lords in Parliament, and by them recommended to the House of Commons, concerning the Goods of her Husband's the Earl of Clare, in her Custody, which are sequestered and prized, depends yet under Consideration: It is this Day Ordered, by the Lords in Parliament, That the Committees for Sequestrations, their Agents and Deputies, are hereby required to forbear any further Proceeding concerning the said Goods; and to permit the said Countess quietly to enjoy the same, until some Resolution be given upon the said Petition."

Sir William Waller's Letter, that he has taken Arundel.

"My Lord,

"On Thursday the Enemy sent a Drummer to me, with a Letter, signifying their Willingness to furrender the Castle, if they might have Honourable Conditions: I returned Answer, That when I first possessed myself of the Town, I summoned them in the Castle to yield upon fair Quarter; but they were pleased to refuse either to give or take Quarter: I now took them at their Word, and bid them yield to Mercy. That Night I heard no more of them; but the next Morning the Drummer came to me again with another Letter, wherein they disavowed that Answer to my Trumpet, laying the Fault upon One (who they said had no more Soldiery than Civility) that without their Assent or Knowledge had given that Language. I sent them Answer, That I was very much satisfied, that, in this Disavowing that Harshness, they had made room for Courtesy; and that I was contented to give them fair Quarter; and that, according to their Desire formerly expressed, if they would send out to me Three Officers of Quality, I would employ Three of equal Condition to them, to treat with them about the Particulars of the Surrender: Within a short Time after, there came out unto me Colonel Bamfeild, Major Bovill, and Captain Hodgido, who pressed very much that they might have Liberty to march away like Soldiers, otherwise they should chuse Death rather than Life; and so broke off: About Two Hours after, they sent out to me Lieutenant Colonel Rawlins and Major Moulin, who, after some Debate, came to Agreement with me, that this Morning they would deliver the Castle into my Hands, by Ten of the Clock, with Colours, Arms, &c. undefaced and unspoiled; and that the Gentlemen and Officers should have fair Quarter and civil Usage, the ordinary Soldiers Quarter: For Performance of Covenants, Sir Edward Ford and Sir Edward Bishopp were immediately to be yielded to me; which was accordingly done. This Morning we entered; and are now, blessed be God, in Possession of the Place. We have taken Seventeen Colours of Foot, and Two of Horse; we have taken One Thousand Prisoners one with another, besides One Hundred and Sixty which we took at the first entering of the Town, and such as came from the Enemy to us during the Siege. I humbly desire the London Regiments may be speedily sent hither, to secure this important Place, whilst I advance with that Strength I have towards the Enemy, who lies still at (fn. *) Havant. I humbly rest,

"Your Excellency's
Most humble Servant,
Wm. Waller."

Arundell, 6 Januarii, 1643.

Letters concerning the Design of disuniting the City from the Two Houses. Reade's Letter to Ryley.

"For The Man in the Moon.

Reade's Letter to Ryley:

"SIR,

"I assure you, I have not been wanting to further your good Desires; and, if it be not your own Faults, I make no Doubt but Things will have a happy Issue; for I find those that are not concerned in it forward enough. Reflect upon the Misery of the Times, and of the Groans and Sufferings of those you see not, which hitherto hath been nothing to what it will be, if it be not prevented by a speedy Peace; which to obtain, I beseech you let it not only be your own Care, but the Care of all those you love or have Power with; otherwise be confident of a general Ruin, which certainly will be inevitable both to yourselves and Posterity; and therefore take it into your serious Consideration, and let not causeless Jealousies hinder you to apply yourselves in a humble and submissive Manner to His Majesty, who, I am sure, will yet look upon you with a gracious Eye. Lose no Time; for the longer you do it, it may prove more difficult.

"For Mr. Theophilus Reyley. This."

"Thomas Violett's Letter to Ryley, 3 Januarii, 1643.

Violett's Letter to Ryley.

"Good Mr. Ryley,

"These are to let you know, that I am returned with good Success in my Business; and perceiving that you have appointed to meet B. B. at Nine of the Clock, I pray, without Fail, be here at The Lyon before Eight of the Clock To-morrow Morning.

Wednesday, 3 Januarii, 1643.

"T. V."

"Read's Second Letter to Ryley.

"For The Man in the Moon.

Reade's Letter to Ryley.

"SIR,

"I wrote to you formerly, but never had any Answer. I assure you faithfully, I have not been wanting to do what you desired (as you may perceive by the Effects); and if you have not your Desire, blame yourselves: But give me Leave to tell you, that, if you neglect the Opportunity now offered you, it may be you shall have never the like again; for I have made those whom you have given just Occasion to be your worst Friend to be your best, and the only Instrument to procure what here is sent you; and be confident she shall still be so, provided you do your Parts. Consider, I beseech you, what a Gate is opened, by bringing in of the Scotts, for the Destruction of this Kingdom; if there be not a Peace (which I pray God Almighty to send speedily), you must expect Armies of Strangers from several Places, who are now a preparing, who certainly at their In-coming will over-run the whole Kingdom; and, when it is past Remedy, you will see your own Error; and therefore, to prevent more Misery than I am able to express to this deplorable Kingdom, and the Effusion of the Blood of Millions of Men, Women, and Children, which must infallibly be this Summer, apply yourselves in an humble and submissive Way to His Majesty, whom I know you will find ready with Arms out-stretched to receive you, both to Favour and Mercy, and even grant you Graces beyond your Expectation. Defer no Time, for God's Sake; and what you will do, do it speedily: I say again, do it speedily, and lose no Time, for Reasons I may not write."

"Digbye's Letter to Sir Basill Brooke, the 29th December, 1643.

"For yourself.

Lord Digby's Letter to Sir Basil Brooke.

"SIR,

"The King and Queen have both commanded me to give you Thanks, in their Name, for your Care and Diligence in their Service; and His Majesty hath so much Confidence in your Discretion and Wariness not to be deluded, that, in Hopes of the good Effects towards a happy Peace which you seem to promise yourself from this Negociation, His Majesty is pleased to descend very far, in writing so gracious a Letter to those who may seem to have deserved so ill of him. I send you herewithall a Copy of the Letter itself, which varies only in the Stile, not in the Matter, from that Draught which was sent down hither; which if you like, and continue your Confidence that it might be effectual to so blessed an End as Peace and Union, you are to deliver to those Parties, seconded with Assurances of His Majesty's most gracious and sincere Inclinations to give them full Satisfaction in all their reasonable Desires: But, if you shall find Cause to lessen the Belief you had of a powerful Effect by this Letter of His Majesty, it is then recommended to your Discretion to forbear the Delivery of it, since it would be a very unfit Thing to expose so great a Grace and Condescending of His Majesty to Hazards of being made frustrate and contemned. God send you happy Success in this great Undertaking; I profess it is that wherein my Belief and Reason goes along with more comfortably than with any Thing that I have known in Projection since these Troubles: But it is not fit to ravel further into the Business this hazardous Way; and therefore I shall add no more but that I am

"Your very affectionate Servant,
George Digby."

Ox. December 29th, 1643.

"Lord Digbye's Letter to Sir Bazill Brooke, 2d January, 1643.

Lord Digby's Second Letter to Sir Basil Brooke.

SIR,

"The King and Queen have both commanded me to give you Thanks, in their Name, for your Care and Diligence in their Service; and His Majesty hath so much Confidence in your Discretion, and Wariness not to be deluded, that, in Hope of the good Effects towards a happy Peace which you seem to promise yourself from this Negociation, His Majesty is pleased to descend very far, in writing so gracious a Letter to those who may seem to have deserved so ill of him. I send you herewithall a Copy of the Letter itself; which if you like, and continue your Confidence that it may be effectual to so blessed an End as Peace and Union, you are to deliver to those Parties, seconded with Assurances of His Majesty's most gracious and sincere Inclinations to give them full Satisfaction in all their reasonable Desires: But, if you shall find Cause to lessen the Belief you had of very good Effects by this Letter of His Majesty's, it is then recommended to your Discretion to forbear the Delivery of it, since it would be a very unfit Thing to expose so great a Grace and Condescending of His Majesty to Hazards of being made frustrate and contemned. God send you happy Success in this great Undertaking; I profess it is that wherein my Belief and Reason goes along with more comfortably than with any Thing that I have known proposed since these Troubles. I shall add no more, but that I am

"Your very affectionate
Friend to serve you,
George Digby."

Oxford, this 2d of January, 1643.

The King's Letter to the Lord Mayor, &c.

"CHARLES R.

"Trusty and Well-beloved, We Greet you well: When We remember the many Acts of Grace and Favour We and Our Royal Predecessors have conferred upon that Our City of London, and the many Examples of eminent Duty and Loyalty for which that City hath been likewise famous; We are willing to believe, notwithstanding the great Defection We have found in that Place, that all Men are not so far degenerated from their Affection to Us, and to the Peace of the Kingdom, as to desire a Continuance of the Miseries they now feel; and therefore, being informed that there is a Desire in some principal Persons of that City to present a Petition to Us, which may tend to the procuring a good Understanding between Us and that Our City, whereby the Peace of the whole Kingdom may be procured, We have thought fit to let you know, that We are ready to receive any such Petition; and the Persons who shall be appointed to present the same to Us shall have a Safe Conduct: And you shall assure all Our good Subjects of that Our City, whose Hearts are touched with any Sense of Duty to Us, or of Love to the Religion and Laws established, in the quiet and peaceable Fruition whereof they and their Ancestors have enjoyed so great Happiness, that We have neither passed any Act, nor made any Profession or Protestation, for the Maintenance and Defence of the true Protestant Religion and the Liberty of the Subject, which We will not most strictly and religiously observe; and for the which We will be always ready to give them any Security can be devised: And of these Our gracious Letters We expect a speedy Answer from you; and so We bid you farewell.

"Given at Our Court at Oxford, this Six and Twentieth Day of December, in the Nineteenth Year of Our Reign, 1643.

"By His Majesty's Command,
George Digby.

"To Our Trusty and Well-beloved Our Lord Mayor and Aldermen of Our City of London, and to all other Our well-affected Subjects of that City."

Footnotes

* Sic.
* Deest in Originali.
Origin. they their Lordships.
* Origin. Harant.