Third Parliament of Great Britain
Third session (continued from 17/4/1713)

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History of Parliament Trust

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1742

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1-57

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'Third Parliament of Great Britain: Third session (continued from 17/4/1713)', The History and Proceedings of the House of Commons : volume 5: 1713-1714 (1742), pp. 1-57. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=37683 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Contents

SPEECHES, DEBATES, &c.
IN THE House of Commons, FROM THE RESTORATION. Estimates and Accompts presented. ; Resolutions about the Supply. ; 540,321 l. granted for the South Sea Company. ; Bill against seditious and scandalous Books and Libels. Resolutions about the Supply. 30,000 Seamen voted for six Months. ; Debate about the Reports of the Commissioners of public Accompts. ; Ways and means. ; Resolutions against Petitions for Compounding Bonds without a Certificat, &c. ; Report of the Commissioners of the public Accompts, considered. ; Land Tax Bill. ; Bill for the Ease of Sheriffs. ; Resolutions for half Pay, to be given to Sea or Land Officers. Bill for the Compounding of Fines in Wales. ; Resolution that, the Trade to Africa ought to be free and open. Bill to secure the Freedom of Parliament. ; Estimates call'd for. ; Dr. Sacheverel desired to preach before the Commons. Estimate of the Clearings of the Troops in Spain and Portugal ; Bill to make effectual the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of ComMeets with great Opposition. ; Bill in favour of Officers and Soldiers. Bill to regulate Elections in Scotland. ; Bill against Robberies in Houses. ; Petition of the Proprietors of the two Millions Adventure in 1711. ; Land-Tax pass'd The New Barrier Treaty call'd for. ; Account of the unaccounted Part of 35 Millions call'd for. The Bill to lessen the Duties on French Wines committed. ; Petition against it. ; Treaty with Portugal call'd for. Proceedings on the Reports relating to the public Accompts. ; William Churchil Esq; censured. Resolution on the Supply. ; Petition of the Royal African Company. The Queen's Message to the Commons about the Treaties of Peace and Commerce. Which are communicated to them. ; Proceedings thereon. Report about the Ordinary of the Navy. ; Petition against the Bill to suspend the Duties on French Wines. ; Resolution on Ways and Means. ; The Malt-Tax continued. ; The Council of the African Company beard. Report of the Commissioners in Spain and Portugal called for. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; Papers relating to Trade, &c. ; Debate in the House of Commons about the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of Commerce. ; Bill to make effectual the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of Commerce. Motion to tack the Officers Bill to the Malt-Bill rejected. ; Bill against Duels. ; Bill to ascertain Freeholds of 40s. per Ann. ; Petition of Leeds about the Duties on French, Spanish, and Portugal Wines. ; Censure past on the Earl of Wharton. Account of the Exports of the Woollen Manufactures called for. ; Petitions about the home Distilling, and foreign Brandies. ; Petition of Baron de Walef. ; Amendments made to the Malt Bill. ; Reasons of the Scots against paying that Tax. ; The Amendment to reduce the said Tax recommitted. Three Petitions against suspending the Duties on French Wines. ; Petition of Mr. Paterson. The Tax on Malt laid equal in all Great Britain. ; Account of Brandies and Wines imported, and Woollen Manufactures exported. Petition of those concern'd in the Linnen Manufactures. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; And about Guards and Garrisons. ; Estimates call'd for. Petitions of the Clothiers. ; Bill to settle the Trade to Africa gone through. ; Several Papers laid before the House. Petitions of the London Weavers. Acts to be revived or coutinued. Petition of the Canterbury Weavers. ; Three other Petitions against the Trade with France. ; Bill to make the Treaty of Commerce offectual, read the first Time. ; Motion to print it rejected. ; Petition of the Turkey Compaany gainst it. Contract of the Assiento called for. ; Estimate of the Guards and Garrisons. ; Petitions of the Surgeons of the Navy not read. ; Bill for settling the Trade to Africa ordered to be engrossed. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; Estimate of the Debt to the Marines called for. Addresses about the Equivalent for Dunkirk, and the Trade in Flanders. ; Accounts of the Exports and Imports between France and England, and of the Woollen Mannfactures exported to Portugal, called for. Thirteen Petitions presented against the Trade with France. ; Accounts of Exports and Imports laid before the House. ; Mr. Gould. ; The Bill to make effectual the Treaty of Commerce committed. ; Estimate of the Half-pay of Land-Officers called for. Resolution on Ways and Means. ; The Proposal of the Bank accepted. ; Petitions of the Woollon Manufactures in London, and Bristol, against the Treaty of Commerce. The East-India Company resolves to Petition the Commons against the Treaty of Comerce. ; A Vote in their favour to prevent their Petition. ; Bill to prevent the Exporation A Petition against the Treaty of Commerce. ; The Bill for an open Trade to Africa read the 3d time and pass'd. ; Resolutions on Ways and Means. The Turkey Company heard before the Grand Committee of the Commons against the Commerce with France. ; General Stanhope. ; Act passed 13 Car. II. quoted by General Stanhope. ; A Mistake of the Speaker. ; The Assiento Contract laid before the House. Estimate of the Half-Pay to Land Officers. ; Acts passed by Commission. Bill for the better regulating the Forces. ; The Italian, Spanish and Portugal Merchants, and the Weavers of London, heard against the Bill for making effectual the Treaty of Commerce. ; Mr. Jennings, Gen. Stanhope, Mr. Lechmere. A standing Order about Petitions for Sums relating to public Service. ; Several Traders heard about the Treaty of Commerce. ; A farther Account of 35 Millions, &c. ordered to lie on the Table. Petitions of Plymouth against the Treaty of Commerce. ; Petition of Sir J. Lambert, and Mr. Shepheard. ; Resolutions about the Supply. Petition of Chester against the Treaty of Commerce. ; Clause order'd to be inserted in the Bill to make effectual the Treaty of Commerce. ; The Bill to prevent Duelling dropt. Petition of the Hamburgh and Bremen Merchants against the Treaty of Commerce. ; Papers relating to Trade laid before the Commons. ; Resolutions on Ways and Means. Address for the disbanding the Six Marine Regiments. Petition against the Exportation of Wooll. ; Mr. Meeres examin'd. ; Warm and long Debate in the House of Commons, about the Bill to make the Treaty of Commerce effectual. ; Sir Thomas Hanner's Speech. The Queen's Answer about the Equivalent for Dunkirk. Address relating to the Towns held by the Dutch Troops in Flanders. An unexpected Motion of Sir T. Hanmer's, for an Address of Thanks, &c. The Address. Queen's Answer. Accounts of some extraordinary Charges laid before the Commons. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; Estimate of Half Pay for the Marine Officers call'd for. Bill to encourage the Tobacco Trade. The Queen's Message about the Debts of Civil List. Exceptions to the Estimate of the Debts of the Civil List. ; Mr. Smith's Motion for an Account of those Debts rejected. ; Address about the Improving of the Fishery. Vote to impower the Queen to raise 500,000 l. to pay the Civil List. ; Petition of the Weavers. ; Petitions of the Booksellers Importers of Books. ; Debt of the Marines, &c. referr'd to the Commissioners of Accounts. The Bills to raise 500,000 l. for the Civil List, and 1200,000 l. by Exchequer Bills consolidated or tack'd. ; Accounts of the Debts on the Civil List, and of the Produce of the Civil List Funds call'd for. Address for removing the Pretender. ; Unanimous Resolution for it. Address on that Occasion. Queen's Answer. Bill to continue the Act to prevent double Returns of Members. Resolutions on the Supply. The Queen's Answer about the Towns in Flanders. ; Address thereon. ; The Speaker indispos'd. The Queen's Message to the Commons inviting them to go to St. Paul's on the Thanksgiving Day. ; Money Bills consolidated, amended, and order'd to be engross'd. Her Majesty's Message to the Commons about her not going to St. Paul's. ; Acts pass'd by Commission. ; Accounts of neat Money arisen for the Uses of the Civil Government. Proceedings on the conolidating Bill, &c. Resolutions in favour of Mr. Paterson. The Bill to encourage the Tobacco Trade sent up by the Lords. ; Rejected by their Lordships. Bill to prevent too frequent Excommunications. The Bill stopt in the Lords House. Address about Lands for the Fortifications of Portsmouth, &c. ; And against the Exportation of Wool. Acts pass'd, July 10. The Queen's Speech to both Houses of Parliament. The Parliament prorogued. Footnotes

SPEECHES, DEBATES, &c.

IN THE House of Commons, FROM THE RESTORATION.

Estimates and Accompts presented. ; Resolutions about the Supply. ; 540,321 l. granted for the South Sea Company. ; Bill against seditious and scandalous Books and Libels.

On the 17th of April, Mr. Aislaby, from the Commissioners of the Admiralty, presented to the House, pursuant to their Address, the Ordinary of the Navy for the Year 1712, and the other Accompts and Estimates, relating to the Navy. After which, Mr. Lowndes laid before the House an Estimate of the Provision to be made for the South-Sea Company for the Year 1713, and a Person from the Queen's Remembrancer's Office in Scotland, presented also to the House, Copies of the several Establishments that were made of the Forces in Scotland, during the last Peace: All which Papers were referred to the grand Committee of the Supply. Then the House went into the said Committee, and resolved, 'That the Sum of 540,321 l. 12s. half-penny, be granted to her Majesty, to make good (for the Services of the Navy) the like Sum, granted in the Year commencing from Christmas 1712, to be paid by the Treasurer of the said Navy, by quarterly Payments, to the South-Sea Company, pursuant to the Act of Parliament in that behalf; which Payment so to be made by the Treasurer of the Navy, (with the estimated Value of Money arisen, and to arise out of certain Duties on Salt for this purpose) are to complete the Sum of 576,279 l. 10s. for the Fund of the said Company for the Year aforesaid. This Resolution being the next Day reported, was agreed to by the House, after which a Bill was ordered to be brought in to prevent the Printing, and Publishing blasphemous, treasonable, seditious, and scandalous Books and Libels, and for the better regulating the Press. Mr. Lowndes presented to the House two Accompts relating to the Supplies; as Sir William Wyndham did two Accompts relating to the Land-Forces: All which were ordered to lie on the Table, and, That it be an Instruction to the Committee of the Supply, that they do consider of that Part of her Majesty's Speech, which recommends 'the Care of those brave Men who have served well by Sea or Land this War, and cannot be employ'd in time of Peace.'

Resolutions about the Supply.

The 20th, the House in a grand Committee, considered further of the Supply, in relation to the Navy; and though it was suggested, that they ought to know the Contents of the Treaties of Peace and Commerce, before they could determine what Number of Sea-Forces was necessary for the Trade and Security of the Nation, yet it was resolved,

30,000 Seamen voted for six Months. ; Debate about the Reports of the Commissioners of public Accompts. ; Ways and means. ; Resolutions against Petitions for Compounding Bonds without a Certificat, &c. ; Report of the Commissioners of the public Accompts, considered. ; Land Tax Bill. ; Bill for the Ease of Sheriffs. ; Resolutions for half Pay, to be given to Sea or Land Officers.

'1. That 30,000 Seamen be allowed for the first six Months of the Year 1712. 2. That 4 l. per Month be allowed for maintaining the said 30,000 Men, including the Ordnance for the Sea-Service:' Which Resolutions were the next day reported, and agreed to by the House. The same Day the Commons took into Consideration the Reports from the Commissioners of the public Accompts, particularly that Part of the first Report that relates to the Lord Wharton, which having occasioned a warm Debate, the same was put off to the next Thursday. That Day likewise, and the next, the Commons received and read several Petitions relating to the Trade of Africa, which were referred to the Committee of the whole House, who were to consider of that Trade. On the 22d, in a grand Committee on Ways on Means, it was resolved, 'That two Shillings in the Pound, and no more, be raised in the Year 1713, upon all Lands, Tenements, Hereditaments, Pensions, Offices, and personal Estates, in that Part of Great-Britain called England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick upon Tweed: And that a proportionable Cess, according to the 9th Article for the Union, confirmed by Acts of Parliament, be laid upon that Part of Great-Britain called Scotland. Which Resolution was the 23d reported, and unanimously agreed to, and a Bill was ordered to be brought in thereupon. On the 23d, the Commons received several Petitions relating to the Trade to Africa; and upon a Petition of Dean Cock of London, Merchant, praying, 'That leave be given to bring in a Bill to compound with the Treasury for the Bonds entered into by him as Surety for Robert Wise, and others, (who had fail'd) for Customs for Tobacco, without discharging their Bonds: To which Petition, some Exceptions being taken, the same was by leave of the House withdrawn; and it was resolved, 'That this House will not receive any Petition for compounding any Sum of Money owing to the Crown upon any Branch of the Revenue, without a Certificate from the proper Officer or Officers annexed to the said Petition, stating the Debt, what Prosecutions have been made for the Recovery of such Debt, and setting forth how much the Petitioner and his Security are able to satisfy thereof.' Then the House took into Consideration such Parts of the first Report of the Commissioners of public Accompts as related to the Transport Service, and Sick and Wounded; and William Churchil Esq; a Member of the House, late one of the said Commissioners, was heard in his Place, as to what concerned him in the said Report, and desired farther time to make his Defence. Upon which the House ordered, 'That the said Report be taken into farther Consideration that Day Fortnight, and that the Commission, appointing Commissioners for sick and wounded Sea-men, (wherein Mr. Churchil was appointed a Commissioner) and Instructions to the said Commissioners, be laid before the House.' The 24th Day the Land-Tax Bill was read the first time, and a Bill was ordered to be brought in for the Ease of Sheriffs in the Execution of their Offices, and in passing their Accompts: After which in a grand Committee on the Supply, it was resolved, 'That a Supply be granted to her Majesty for allowing Half-Pay for one Year to the several Officers, who have served well by Sea or Land in the last War, and shall not be employed in time of Peace.' This Resolution was on the 25th reported and agreed to by the House; and resolved, 'That an Address be presented to her Majesty, that her Majesty's Directions relating to the Establishment for the Half-Pay to the disbanded Officers, be laid before the House.'

Bill for the Compounding of Fines in Wales. ; Resolution that, the Trade to Africa ought to be free and open.

The 27th, the House in a grand Committee, went through the Bill to revive and continue the Act for taking the public Accompts, &c. and made some Progress in the Land-Tax-Bill. The next Day, they went through the Bill, and made several Amendments to it, which being on the 29th reported and agreed to by the House, the Bill was ordered to be engross'd; as was also the Bill relating to the public Accompts. The same Day, after the House had, in a grand Committee, consider'd farther of the Supply, it was ordered, 'That a select Committee be appointed to examine and consider the Estimate for the Ordinary of the Navy, for the Year 1713, and report their Opinion thereupon to the House:' Which Committee was accordingly appointed. On the last Day of April, upon reading of several Petitions of the High-Sheriffs, Grand-Jury, &c. of the Counties of Brecon, Glamorgan, and Radnor, a Bill was ordered to be brought in, for the more easy Compounding of Fine: and Post-Fines to be levied of Lands within the Principality of Wales: After which, Sir William Wyndham presented to the House, a Copy of the Queen's Orders and Rules, to be observed in the Establishment of Half-pay. Then the Commons, in a Committee of the whole House took into Consideration, the Trade to Africa, and read several Petitions relating to that Matter, and resolv'd, 'That it is the Opinion of this Committee, that the Trade to Africa ought to be free and open to all her Majesty's Subjects of Great-Britain and the Plantations under such proper Regulations, as shall subject the Trade to Duties for Maintaining the Forts and Settlements on the Coast of Africa: The Report of which Resolutions was put off to the Saturday following.

Bill to secure the Freedom of Parliament. ; Estimates call'd for. ; Dr. Sacheverel desired to preach before the Commons.

On the first of May, a Bill was ordered to be brought in, for securing the Freedom of Parliament, by limiting the Number of Officers in the House of Commons; after which, the LandTax Bill was read a third Time, pass'd, and sent up to the Lords. The next Day, the Commons resolv'd to present two Addresses to the Queen, that she would be pleased to give Order to the proper Officer to lay before the House, 1. An Estimate of the Charge of the Land-Forces in her Majesty's Pay, for the six Months for the Year 1713. 2. An Estimate of the Office of Ordnance for Land Service, for the Year 1713. This done it was order'd, 'That the Reverend Dr. Henry Sacheverel be desir'd to preach before this House, at St. Margaret's Westminister, the 29th Instant (being the Day on which the Nation commemorates the Restoration of the Royal Family:)' Which Vote occasion'd various Speculations and Reflections.

Estimate of the Clearings of the Troops in Spain and Portugal ; Bill to make effectual the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of ComMeets with great Opposition. ; Bill in favour of Officers and Soldiers.

The same day Mr. Brydges presented to the House an Estimate of what was due for the Clearings and Neat Off-Reckonings of her Majesty's Troops upon the Establishments of Spain and Portugal, and the Low-Countries, from the respective Times to which they were last paid, to the 25th of March 1713. The House being mov'd, That the third Section of the Act 7 and 8 Gulielmi, entituled, An Act for granting to his Majesty an additional Duty upon all French Goods and Merchandizes, might be read, the same was read accordingly; and the previous Question having been carried in the Affirmative, the main Question was put, and resolv'd, 'That a Bill being brought in, to suspend for two Months the Duties of 25 l. per Ton, on French Wines imported: And that Sir Robert Davers, Mr. Moor, and Mr. Manly do prepare and bring in the same.' It was confidently reported, that the Motion for bringing in this Bill was made chiefly upon the Solicitation of three Merchants who had bought great Quantities of French Wines, that lay on board the Ships in the River; but as the importing of such Wines Half Custom-free, would have been very prejudicial to other Merchants, who had by them French Wines, for which they had paid the full Duties, so the said Bill met with great Opposition; and even before the Motion for bringing it in was made, a Petition of several Merchants trading in Wines was presented to the House and read, praying, That they might be reliev'd against paying Interest upon the Bonds given by them for her Majesty's Customs. The same Day the engrossed Bill, to revive and continue An Act for Taking, Examining, and Stating the Public Accounts of the Kingdom, &c. was read the third time, pass'd, and sent up to the Lords; after which a Bill was ordered to be brought in, to enable such Officers and Soldiers as have been in her Majesty's Service during this War to exercise their Trades, and for Officers to account with their Soldiers. Mr. Wortley presented to the House the Bill for securing the Freedom of Parliaments, &c. which was read a first Time, and ordered a second reading; and then Mr. Farrer reported the Resolution taken, on the last Day of April, about the Trade to Africa: Which after a Debate was agreed to by the House, and a Bill order'd to be brought in thereupon.

Bill to regulate Elections in Scotland. ; Bill against Robberies in Houses. ; Petition of the Proprietors of the two Millions Adventure in 1711. ; Land-Tax pass'd

The 4th, a Bill was ordered to be brought in for regulating the Elections of Members to serve in Parliament, for that Part of Great-Britain call'd Scotland; and then Sir William Wyndham presented to the House, an Estimate of all her Majesty's Land-Forces, with the Charge thereof, for six Months, from the 22d of December 1712, to the 23d Day of June 1713, both inclusive, according to their present Establishment. After this a Bill was order'd to be brought in, for the more effectual preventing and punishing Robberies that shall be committed in Houses. And a Petition of the Proprietors of the two Million Adventure for the Year 1711, being presented to the House, and read, praying, 'That so much as was wanting to make up the Sum of 186,670 l. for the Year 1712, may be supplied and made good': The Consideration of the said Petition was referr'd to a Committee. The same Day, upon a Message from the Queen by the Usher of the Black Rod, the Commons with their Speaker attended her Majesty in the House of Peers, where the Speaker presented to her Majesty the Bill entituled, An Act for Granting an Aid to her Majesty to be raised by a Land Tax in Great-Britain, for the Service of the Year 1713; which her Majesty was pleased to accept, and to give the Royal Assent to it.

The New Barrier Treaty call'd for. ; Account of the unaccounted Part of 35 Millions call'd for.

The 5th, the House resolv'd to address the Queen, 'That the new Treaty made between her Majesty and the States-General of the United Provinces, concerning the Succession of the Crown of Great-Britain, and the Barrier of the States-General; and also the Instructions and Orders given to her Majesty's Plenipotentiaries for transacting the said Treaty, might be laid before the House.' On the 6th of May the Commons resolved to present another Address to her Majesty, that the proper, Officers should be directed to lay before the House, 'An Account how much of the 35,302,107 l. 18s. 9d. of the Money granted by Parliament, and issued for the public Service to Christmas 1710, which was humbly presented to her Majesty by this House in the first Session of this Parliament, to remain unaccounted for, by whom, and when, and what Obstructions had arisen in accounting for the same; and also the like Account of the Supplies since granted by Parliament.

The Bill to lessen the Duties on French Wines committed. ; Petition against it. ; Treaty with Portugal call'd for.

The same Day, after the second reading of the Bill to suspend for two Months the Duty of 25 l. per Ton on French Wines, a Debate arose, whether the said Bill should be committed? Sir Thomas Hanmer and some other Members represented how prejudicial this Bill might prove to a great many Wine-Merchants and Vintners; but a Motion being made, and the Question put, that the Debate be adjourn'd, it pass'd in the Negative; and then it was resolv'd, that the Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House. After this a Petition of the subscribed Merchants in the City of London, on behalf of themselves and others, trading to Spain and Portugal, was presented to the House and read, praying, 'That if any Alteration should be made in the Duties on French Wines, the Wines from Spain and Portugal might not exceed two Thirds of such Duties, and that the Petitioners might be heard by their Counsel, and have such reasonable time to dispose of the Wines in their Possession, and now coming home, as should be thought meet.' Whereupon it was ordered, That the said Petition be referr'd to the Consideration of the said Committee; and that the Petitioners be heard before the Committee by their Counsel, if they thought fit. This Petition being grounded on the Treaty made in the Year 1713, between Great-Britain and Portugal, the Commons resolv'd the next Day to address her Majesty, That she would be pleas'd to give Directions, That the (fn. 1) Treaty made with Portugal for taking off the Prohibition of the Woollen Manufactures of this Kingdom, might be laid before the House.

Proceedings on the Reports relating to the public Accompts. ; William Churchil Esq; censured.

The 7th, the House took into consideration the Reports from the Commissioners of the public Accompts, and Mr. Shippen, from the said Commissioners, presented to the House the Deposition of Mr. Robert Mitchel, proving, that William Churchil Esq; when one of the Commissioners for sick and wounded Seamen, reserved half the Profit arising on the Contracts made between the said Commissioners and the Deponent; and the Deposition of Mr. John Pearce, proving William Churchil Esq; when one of the Commissioners for sick and wounded Seamen, to be a Sharer in the Profit arising on the Contracts between the Commissioners and the Deponent: As also a Letter from Mr. John Pearce to the Commissioners, relating to his Deposition dated February 18, 1712, and brought in by Mr. John Pearce, March 7, 1712. These Papers being read, Mr. Mitchel was call'd in and examined at the Bar, and afterwards withdrew; Dr. Plumtree was also called in, and examined, and afterwards withdrew; Mr. Churchil was heard in his Place, and being withdrawn, it was Resolv'd, Nemine contradicente, 'That for any Commissioner, or other Person entrusted by her Majesty in making Contracts for public Services, to be a Partner in such Contract, or to reserve a Share for any other Person, is a high Breach of Trust, and a notorious Corruption. The House being mov'd, that one of the Exceptions in the Act of the 7th Year of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for the Queen's most gracious, general and free Pardon, relating to the public Money, might be read, the same was read accordingly. Then a Motion was made, and the Question put, that the House do now adjourn; which pass'd in the Negative; and then it was resolv'd, Nemine contradicente, 'That the Fact with which William Churchil Esq; stands charg'd in the Report of the Commissioners for taking, examining and stating the public Accompts of the Kingdom, being committed before the late Act for the Queen's most gracious, general and free Pardon, this House will proceed no farther in that Matter.'

Resolution on the Supply. ; Petition of the Royal African Company.

On the 8th, the House, in a grand Committee on the Supply, came to this Resolution, viz. 'That the Sum of 636,888 l. 14s. 10d. be granted to her Majesty for Defraying the Charge of the Land-Forces in her Majesty's Service, for six Months, from the 22d of December 1712, to the 23d Day of June 1713, both inclusive, according to their, present Establishment, and for reducing their Numbers:' Which Resolution was the next day reported and agreed to by the House. After this a Petition of the Royal African Company of England (who by the Encouragement of an Act passed the last Session of Parliament) were now united with all their Creditors, was presented to the House and read, praying, that they might be heard by their Council at the Bar of this House, against the Bill for establishing the Trade to Africa free and open to all her Majesty's Subjects of Great-Britain and the Plantations, before the second Reading thereof: Which Petition was ordered to lie upon the Table. After this, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer acquainted the House, That he had a Message from her Majesty, signed by her; and he presented the same to the House; and the same was read by Mr. Speaker as followeth:

The Queen's Message to the Commons about the Treaties of Peace and Commerce.

'ANNER.

'As it is the undoubted Prerogative of the Crown to make Peace and War, I have ratified the Treaties of Peace and Commerce with France, which had been signed by my Order, and have concluded a Treaty with Spain, which will be signed at Utrecht, as soon as the Spanish Ministers are arrived there.

'I determined, from the first, on this extraordinary Occasion, to communicate these Treaties to my Parliament, and have therefore now ordered them to be laid before this House.'

Which are communicated to them. ; Proceedings thereon.

And Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer presented to the House (pursuant to the said Message, by her Majesty's Command) several Treaties, with a List of them, viz. Copy of a Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Great-Britain and France; Copy of a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France; Copy of an Act: declaring the Particulars referr'd by the 9th Article of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, to the Discussion of Commissioners; Copy of an Act explaining the general Terms of the 9th Article of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, relating to the four Species excepted out of the Tariff of 1664; Copy of a Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Great-Britain and Spain; and Translations of the several Treaties and Acts above-mentioned: Which Translations having been read, it was resolved, that on Thursday the 14th of May the House should resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to take into Consideration the eighth and ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, between Great-Britain and France. Then it was ordered, 'That the Commissioners of the Customs do lay before this House, an Account of the Quantities of Wines and Brandies that have been imported annually, from the Year 1674 to this Time; distinguishing the French Wines and Brandy, and those of other Countries. 2. That the LordsCommissioners of Trade and Plantations do lay before this House, the Representations made to that Board, from the Merchants, and several Corporations of Great-Britain, in relation to Trade, while the Gertruydenberg Treaty was depending, and afterwards. And also, The Petitions and Memorials that have been lately laid before the said Commissioners relating to the Trade of this Kingdom, and what Directions and Commands they have received from her Majesty thereupon. The Orders of the Day being read, it was ordered, That the Bill for establishing the Trade to Africa free and open to all her Majesty's Subjects of Great-Britain and the Plantations; be read a second Time upon Tuesday Morning next; and that-the African Company be then heard upon their Petition, by their Council if they thought fit: and that the Company do then lay their Charter before the House.'

Report about the Ordinary of the Navy. ; Petition against the Bill to suspend the Duties on French Wines. ; Resolution on Ways and Means. ; The Malt-Tax continued. ; The Council of the African Company beard.

The 11th of May, Sir Thomas Hanmer, from the select Committee appointed to consider the Estimate for the Ordinary of the Navy, for the Year 1713, reported the Matter as it appeared to them; Which Report was referred to the Committee of the Supply. After this a Petition of the Merchants of London trading to Italy, and other Parts of the Mediterranean, and a Petition of the Bay-Makers, PerpetuanaMakers, and other Inhabitants of the Borough of Colchester, were presented to the House, and read, against the Bill to suspend for two Months the Duties of 25 l. per Ton on French Wines, and referred to the Committee of the whole House. Then the House, having resolved itself into a grand Committee on Ways and Means to raise the Supply, came to this Resolution, viz. That towards raising the Supply, the Duties on Malt, Mum, Cyder and Perry, be farther continued, and charged upon all Malt, Mum, Cyder and Perry, within the Kingdom of Great-Britain, from the 23d of June 1713, to the 24th of June 1714. Which Resolution was the next day reported, and agreed to by the House; and a Bill was ordered to be brought in thereupon. The same day, three Petitions were presented to the Commons, and read against the Bill for suspending the Duties on French Wines; and Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer presented to the House the Treaty with Portugal, of the 27th of December 1713, and a Translation of it, which was read; after which the Treaty was ordered to lie on the Table, and the Consideration of the Bill to suspend for two Months the Duties on French Wines, was put off to that day se'night. The Deputy-Governor of the Royal AfricanCompany, having the same day presented their Charter to the House, the Council of the said Company were afterwards called in to be heard, upon the Bill for establishing the Trade to Africa, free and open to all her Majesty's Subjects of GreatBritain, and the Plantations. The Bill being read a second Time, as also the Petition of the Royal African-Company, the Council for them were heard thereupon; and they praying, that the Charter, granting to the Company the Territories and Lands in Africa, and Trade thither, might be read; the Council of the other side admitted such Charter. Then the Council for the Company, producing the Deed of Union of the Company and their Creditors, pursuant to the Act of Parliament of the last Session, dated the 22d of July 1712, and praying the same might be read, which the Council of the other side opposing, the Council on both sides were heard touching the same, and being withdrawn, the House ordered, That the said Deed of Union be read, which was done accordingly. Then other Evidence was given, and the Council on both sides were farther heard, and being withdrawn, Mr. Speaker opened the Bill; after which it was resolved, that the same be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Report of the Commissioners in Spain and Portugal called for. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; Papers relating to Trade, &c. ; Debate in the House of Commons about the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of Commerce. ; Bill to make effectual the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of Commerce.

The 13th, the Commons resolved to address her Majesty 'That she would be pleased to direct the Commissioners appointed by her Majesty, to enquire into the Number and Quality of the Forces in her Majesty's Pay in Spain and Portugal, and to examine the State of the Payments and Accompts relating to the said Forces and Garrisons, and Fortifications of Gibraltar and Port-Mahon; and also the Accompts of the Agent, Victuallers, and Commissioners of Stores in those Parts, to lay before the House an Account of their Proceedings. The Malt-Bill having been presented to the House, read the first time, and ordered a 2d Reading, the House, in a grand Committee on the Supply, resolved. 1. That 10,000 Men be allowed for the Sea-Service, for the last seven Months of the Year 1713. 2. That the Sum of four Pounds a Man per Month be allowed for maintaining the said 10,000 Men, for the said seven Months, including the Ordnance for Sea Service. 3. That 200,000 l. be allowed for the Ordinary of the Navy for the Year 1713 'Which Resolutions were the next day reported, and agreed to by the House. The same day the Commons resolved to address her Majesty, That an Estimate of the Half-Pay of the Officers and Chaplains that had served well by Sea in this War, and should not be employed in time of Peace, be laid before the House. After this Mr. Monkton from the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, presented to the House (according to Order) the Representations made to that Board from the Merchants, and several Corporations of Great-Britain, in relation to Trade, while the Gertruydenberg Treaty was depending, and afterwards; And also the Petitions and Memorials, that had been lately laid before the said Commissioners relating to the Trade of this Kingdom, and what Directions and Commands they had received from her Majesty thereupon; with a List of the said Papers; and also the Commissioners Answer to the said Order referring to the several Representations, Petitions and Memorials, Directions and Commands, and to the several Papers mentioned therein. Then the said Answer was read: And a Motion being made, and the Question put, That the Representations, Petitions, Memorials, and other Papers, be now read; it passed in the Negative, by a Majority of 303 Voices against III. After this it was ordered, That the said Answer, Representations, Petitions, Memorials, and other Papers, be referred to the Consideration of the Committee of the whole House, to whom it was referred to take into Consideration the eighth and ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France. Then the House resolved itself into a Committee, and a Motion was made, that the Committee, move the House, That leave be given to bring in a Bill to make effectual the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France. Which Motion occasioned a warm Debate, that lasted till about ten in the Evening. Arthur Moore Esq; one of the Commissioners of Trade, opened the Debate, and endeavoured to shew the Advantages that would accrue to the Nation from a Trade with France; and Sir James Bateman, Sir Thomas Hanmer, Sir William Wyndham, Mr. Benson, Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr. Sheppard, and some others, spoke on the same side. Mr. Lechmere, General Stanhope, John Smith Esq; Mr. Gould, an eminent Merchant, formerly Governor of the Bank of England, Sir Peter King, Sir Joseph Jekyl, Mr. Wortley Monntague, the Lord Castlecomer, Mr. Heysham, and some others, endeavoured, on the contrary, to prove, That the Trade with France would be very prejudicial to our Woollen and Silk-Manufactories, and Commerce with Portugal: But at last, the Motion beforementioned being framed into a Question, the same was carried in the Affirmative by a Majority of 252 Voices against 130. Mr. Speaker having resumed the Chair, Sir Gilbert Dolben, made his Report from the Committee, and after further Debate, a Bill was ordered to be brought in to make effectual the 8th and 9th Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France.'

Motion to tack the Officers Bill to the Malt-Bill rejected. ; Bill against Duels. ; Bill to ascertain Freeholds of 40s. per Ann. ; Petition of Leeds about the Duties on French, Spanish, and Portugal Wines. ; Censure past on the Earl of Wharton.

On the 15th, the Bill for securing the Freedom of Parliaments, by limiting the Number of Officers in the House of Commons was read a second time and committed; and it having been observed, that the like Bill had several times been lost in the House of Peers, some Members designed to have tacked it to a Money Bill. But a Motion being made and the Question put, that the said Bill be committed to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Malt-Bill was committed, it passed in the Negative by a Majority of 160 Voices against III ; several Members who were for the Bill, being at the same time against the Tacking. The next Day, Mr. Hungerford presented to the House A Bill to abolish Tryals by single Combat, and prevent the impious Practice of Duelling, which was read the first time, and ordered a second Reading. After this Mr. Cholmondley presented also A Bill to explain a Clause in the Act of the last Session of Parliament for the more effectual preventing fraudulent Conveyances, in order to multiply Votes for the electing Knights of the Shires to serve in Parliament, as far as the same relates to the ascertaining the Value of Freeholds of forty Shillings per Ann. Which was read the first time, and ordered a second reading. Then a Peition of the Merchants and others concerned in the Woollen Manufactures, in and about the Corporations of Leeds, was presented to the House and read, recommending to the Consideration of the House, That the Duties on Spanish and Portugal Wines be abated and lowered in such Proportions to those on Wines from France, as might set that Trade upon an equal Foot. The Order of the Day being read, for the House to proceed upon that Part of the Commissioners for taking, examining and stating the public Accompts of the Kingdom, which relates to Thomas Earl of Wharton; Mr. Campion, from the said Commissioners, presented to the House the Depositions of Mr. George Hutchinson, proving the Earl of Wharton received one thousand Pounds for obtaining the Office of Register of Seizures for the Deponent: And the same were read; after which that Part of the said Report which relates to the Earl of Wharton, being again read, it was resolved, 'That the giving or taking Money for procuring Offices relating to the Management of the public Revenue, is a scandalous Corruption, and highly detrimental to the Public; Secondly, That the giving one thousand Pounds by Mr. George Hutchinson to Thomas Earl of Wharton, and his receiving the same, for procuring the said Mr. Hutchinson the Office of Register of Seizures in her Majesty's Customs, as represented in the Report of the Commissioners for taking, examining and stating the public Accompts of the Kingdom, having been before the Act of her Majesty's most gracious, general, and free Pardon, this House will proceed no farther in that Matter

Account of the Exports of the Woollen Manufactures called for. ; Petitions about the home Distilling, and foreign Brandies. ; Petition of Baron de Walef. ; Amendments made to the Malt Bill. ; Reasons of the Scots against paying that Tax. ; The Amendment to reduce the said Tax recommitted.

The 18th, the Commons ordered the Commissioners of the Customs to lay before the House, an Account of the Exportation of the Woollen Manufactures for the four Years before the Year 1703, (when the Treaty with Portugal was made) distinguishing the Species and the Quantities of the several Years. A Petition of the Justices of Peace, and principal Inhabitants of the County of Worcester that have Fruit Trees planted for making Verjuice, Cyder and Perry for Distillation was presented and read, praying, 'That the Duty on French and other soreign Brandy might be continued; and the running of it to the Prejudice of her Majesty's Revenue prevented, and the HomeDistilling encouraged, in such manner as should be thought fit. Another Petition of the Merchants, Sugar-Bakers, and Distillers of the City of Bristol was also presented and read, praying; 'That if any of the Duties be taken off of foreign Brandies, the Duties on home-made Brandies might be proportionably abated, and the running of foreign Brandies prevented:' Both which Petitions were ordered to lie on the Table. Then a Petition of Major-General Henry de Cort Baron de Walef was presented to the House and read, praying, 'That his Services might be taken into Consideration, and that the Arrears due to him as Brigadier and MajorGeneral might be paid him, the Duke of Ormond and Lord Strafford having promised they should be made good to him:' Which Petition was referred to a Committee. After this the House ordered several Clauses to be inserted in the MaltBill, and having resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House upon the said Bill, made several Amendments to it. In this Committee, the Scots Members represented, 'That the Tax of six Pence per Bushel of Malt would be an insupportable Burden to their Country-men, by reason of the vast Disproportion between the English and Scots Malt, both in Goodness and Price; almost double the Quantity of Scots Malt, going to the making Drink of equal Strength with that made of English Malt; and the Bushel of Malt which in London was sold for two Shillings and three Pence, not bearing above the third Part of that Price in Scotland:' Upon this and other Considerations, the Committee were induced to reduce the Malt-Tax in Scotland to three Pence per Bushel; But when this Amendment was the next Day, together with the other Amendments, reported to the House, the Members of the Northern Counties of England, and the Principality of Wales, having for the same Reasons alledg'd by the Scots, insisted on the like Abatement of the Duty on Malt, it was ordered, that the Amendment, and the subsequent Amendments be recommitted.

Three Petitions against suspending the Duties on French Wines. ; Petition of Mr. Paterson.

The 19th Day, a Petition of the Clothiers in Whitney and other Places in the County of Oxford; another of the Clothiers of Westbury, Hytesbury, Frome, Warminster, and Parts adjacent; and a third of the Trade of Worsted-weaving in the City of Norwich and County of Norfolk, against the Bill to suspend for two Months the Duties of 25 l. per Ton on French Wines, were read, and order'd to lie on the Table. After this, Mr. Medlycot presented A Bill for the more effectual preventing and punishing Robberies that shall be committed in Houses: Which was read the first time, and order'd to be read a second time. A Petition of William Paterson Esq: setting forth, 'That he had been at great Pains and Expence, and had sustain'd very considerable Losses on account of the African and Indian Company of Scotland, for which the said Company was to have made him satisfaction out of their Stock and Profits, and praying, that this House would take his Case into Consideration, and give him Relief therein, was read, and referr'd to a Committee.'

The Tax on Malt laid equal in all Great Britain. ; Account of Brandies and Wines imported, and Woollen Manufactures exported.

The next day, the Commons in a grand Committee, considered farther of the Malt-Bill, made several Amendments to it; and, notwithstanding all the Opposition the Scots and their Friends could make, it was carried by one single Vote only, that the Tax on Malt should be laid equally in all Parts of Great-Britain. On the 21st of May those Amendments were reported to the House, and it was again proposed that the Scots Malt should pay but half the Duty, but it was again carried by a Majority of 139 Voices against 104 that the Bill, with the Amendments be engross'd. The same day the Commissioners of Customs presented to the Commons their several Returns to the Orders of the House of the 9th, 18th, and 20th, with Accounts of the Quantities of Brandies and Wines imported from France and other Countries, from Michalmas 1674 to Michaelmas 1696, and from 1696 to 1712, as also an Account of Woollen Manufactures exported for four Years before the Year 1703, the Species and Quantities of the several Years being distinguish'd.

Petition of those concern'd in the Linnen Manufactures. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; And about Guards and Garrisons. ; Estimates call'd for.

The 22d, the engross'd Bill for granting to her Majesty Duties upon Malt, was read the third time, and the Question being put that the Bill do pass, it was carried in the Affirmative, by a Majority of 197 Voices against 52, to the great Disappointment of the Scots: After this, the House adjourned to the 25th, when a Petition of divers Merchants, principal Traders, and others concerned in the Linnen Manufacture, within the Towns of Preston and Walton, &c. in the County Palatine of Lancaster was presented to the Commons and read, praying, 'That such Duties be laid and continued on foreign Linnen Cloth to be imported into this Kingdom, as might give due Encouragement to the British Linnen Manufactures, and place them, at least, upon an equal Ballance, that so the Petitioners, and many Thousands of poor Persons, whose entire Dependance was upon the said Trade, might be encouraged by their Industry to subsist themselves and their Families: Which Petition was order'd to lie on the Table. Then in a Committee of the whole House on the Supply, it was resolv'd, 'To grant first, the Sum of 17000 l. for allowing Half-Pay for the Year 1713, to such Officers who had serv'd well by Sea during the late War, and shall be out of Employment by Sea or Land, in time of Peace; Secondly, the Sum of 6000 l. to defray the the Salaries and incident Charges of the seven Commissioners of public Accompts, and the Sum of 4500 l. to defray the Salaries and incident Charges of the same Commissioners for stating and determining the Debts to the Army. Thirdly, that the Number of Men to be allow'd for Guards and Garrisons in Great-Britain, and for Guernsey and Jersey, for the last six Months of the Year 1713, be 8000 Men, Commission and Non-commission Officers included:' The Report of which Resolutions was put off to the 27th, and then they were agreed to by the House. On the 25th likewise, the Commons resolv'd to present two Addresses to the Queen, that she would be pleased to direct, 'That an Estimate of the Forces in the Plantations, the Island of Minorca, Gibralter, and Dunkirk, for the last six Months of this Year; Secondly an Estimation of the Charge of the Out-Pensioners of ChelseaHospital for the Year 1713, might be laid before the House. Which Addresses, as well as the former of the like Nature were readily complied with.

Petitions of the Clothiers. ; Bill to settle the Trade to Africa gone through. ; Several Papers laid before the House.

The 26th, a Petition of the Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses, together with the Serge-makers, Fullers, and other Inhabitants of the Borough and Town of Taunton, was presented to the House and read, praying, 'That such reasonable Encouragement might be given to the Trade of GreatBritain, with the Kingdom of Portugal, as should be thought most expedient;' which Petition was ordered to lie upon the Table. After this, a Petition of the Clothiers, &c. in the County of Gloucester, was presented to the House and read, representing, 'That if, by any Alteration of the Laws of this Nation, which have been made from time to time for the Advancement of the Woollen Manufactures, and under which they have now flourished for many Years, any Stop or Interruption, should be given to their Exportation to foreign Markets, a great Addition to the Riches and Revenues of this Kingdom would be immediately lost, many Thousands of the Poor, for want of Employment, become a Burden to their Parishes, and the Value of all the Lands of England must of Necessity sink to a very great Degree, and praying, That the same might be taken into Consideration, that the ill Consequences of it might be prevented.' This Petition was order'd to lie upon the Table; and then the Orders of Day being read, the House resolv'd itself into a Committee of the whole House, upon the Bill for establishing the Trade to Africa free and open to all her Majesty's Subjects of GreatBritain and the Plantations; And after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resum'd the Chair, and Mr. Ferrier reported from the Committee, that they had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto, which they had directed him to report when the House would please to receive the same; Whereupon it was order'd, 'That the Report be received upon the Thursday following in a full House. After this Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer presented to the House (pursuant to their Address to her Majesty) the Report made to her Majesty, by the Commissioners appointed to enquire into the Number and Quality of the Forces in her Majesty's Pay in Spain and Portugal, and to examine the State of the Payments and Accounts relating to the said Forces, and to the Garrisons and Fortifications of Gibraltar, and Port-Mahon; and also the Accounts of the Agent-Victuallers, and Commissioners of Stores in those Parts; and several Papers belonging thereunto. As also a Copy of the New BarrierTreaty between her Majesty and the States-General, and Treaty for the Succession, with Instructions and Observations relating thereto, with a List of them. And the Title of the said Report being read, it was order'd, That the said Report and Papers belonging thereunto do lie upon the Table to be perused by the Members of the House. The List of the Treaties, Instructions and Observations, and of the other Papers relating thereto, being read, they were likewise order'd to lie upon the Table.

Petitions of the London Weavers.

The 27th Day the humble Representation and (fn. 2) Petition tition of the Bailiffs, Wardens, Assistants, &c. of the Weavers of London, was presented to the House and read, praying, That the said Trade might be so consider'd, that the Silk and Woollen Manufactures of this Kingdom might not lie under too great Discouragements, by Reason of the Commerce with France: Which was ordered to lie on the Table.

Acts to be revived or coutinued.

On the 28th, Mr. Shakerly reported to the House the Resolutions taken in the Committee to whom it was referred to consider what Laws were expired or near expiring, and which of them were fit to be revived and continued; which Resolutions, with Amendments to some of them, were agreed to as follows, viz.

1. That the Act made in the 13th and 14th Year of the Reign of the late King Charles the Second, intitled, An Act for the better Relief of the Poor of this Kingdom, which, except what related to the Corporation therein mention'd, and thereby constituted, was enacted to have continuance until the 29th of May 1665, and from thence to the End of the first Session of the next Parliament; which Act, (except as aforesaid) hath been by several subsequent Acts continued to several limited Times, and is near expiring, and being found to be a very useful and necessary Law, be made perpetual. II. That the Act made in the sixth Year of her present Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for Importation of Cochineal from any Ports in Spain, during the present War, and six Months longer, be made perpetual. III That the Act made in the 13th and 14th Year of the Reign of the late King Charles II. entitled, An Act for preventing of Thest and Rapine upon the Northern Borders of England; and the several subsequent Acts for continuing the same, having been found very useful and necessary, and being near expiring, be continued. IV. That an Act made in the 3d and 4th Years of the Reign of her present Majesty, entitled, An Act for encouraging the Importation of Naval Stores from her Majesty's Plantations in America, which is near expiring, be continued. V. That an Act be made in the Seventh and Eight Years of the Reign of the late King William the Third, entitled, An Act that the solemn Affirmation and Declaration of the People called Quakers, shall be accepted, instead of an Oath in the usual Form, which was enacted to have continuance for the space of seven Years, and from thence to the End of the next Session of Parliament; and was, by an Act made in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Years of the Reign of the said late King William continued to be in force, for, and during the Term of Eleven Years after the Determination of the said recited Act, and from thence to the End of the next Session of Parliament, which said Act is near expiring, be continued. VI. That a Clause in an Act made in the 9th and 10th Years of the Reign of the late King William, entitled, An Act to settle the Trade to Africa, in the Words following viz. And whereas, by an Act of Parliament made in the Fifth and Sixth Years of the Reign of his present Majesty, and the late Queen Mary, amongst other Things it was enacted, That no other Copper than what is made of English Ore only, should be exported, which proving very prejudicial to the Trade of England, by enabling Foreigners to export Copper much cheaper than it can be carried from England; be it enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful, to, and for any of his Majesty's Subjects to export from England all such Copper-Bars as hath or shall be imported into England from foreign Parts, and upon Exportation, shall draw back all Duties, or vacate the Securities, saving the one half of the Old Subsidy, as is usual in other Commodities, being expir'd, be revived: After which it was ordered, That a Bill or Bills be brought in upon the said Resolutions. A Motion being made, and the Question being put, That it be an Instruction to the Members who are appointed to bring in the said Bill, or Bills, That they do provide, that the Solemn Affirmation and Declaration of the People called Quakers, shall not extend to the Election of Members to serve in Parliament; it pass'd in the Negative. Then it was order'd, That it be an Instruction to the Members appointed to bring in the said Bill or Bills, That they do provide that an Encouragement be given for the Importation of Naval Stores from North-Britain, as well as from her Majesty's Plantations in America. And upon a Motion made by Mr. Moore, the House resolved to resolve itself that Day se'night into a Committee, to consider of that Part of her Majesty's Speech which relates to the improving and encouraging the Fishery.

Petition of the Canterbury Weavers. ; Three other Petitions against the Trade with France. ; Bill to make the Treaty of Commerce offectual, read the first Time. ; Motion to print it rejected. ; Petition of the Turkey Compaany gainst it.

The 29th, a Petition of the Master, Wardens, and Assistants of the Corporation of Silk-Weavers in the City of Canterbury, was presented to the House, and read, representing, 'That the advantageous settling the Commerce to and from France, in relation to Silk and Woollen Manufactures, is of the utmost Importance to the Well-being of the Petitioners, and Preservation of the said Manufactures; and praying, That a Trade, so useful and beneficial to this Kingdom in general, and to the said City, and the Petitioners in particular, might receive all due Encouragement, and be no Ways prejudic'd by the Importation of wrought Silks from France, by such effectual Provisions as should be thought meet.' Which Petition was ordered to lie on the Table. A Petition of the Makers of English Brandy and Vinegar from malted Corn; and also of the Makers of Brandy from Sugar and Molasses, the Produce of her Majesty's Plantations, in and about the Cities of London and Westminster, was presented to the House, and read, praying, 'That proper Methods might be taken into Consideration for preventing the Running of foreign Brandies, and lessening the Duties of our own Materials answerable to the Duty on such foreign Brandies: As also a third Petition of the Mayor, Capital Burgesses and Assistants, together with the Gentlemen Freeholders, Clothiers, Sergemakers, Fullers, and other La bourers in the Woollen Manufactures of the Borough of Tiverton in the County of Devon, was presented to the House, and read, praying, 'That such Encouragement might be given to the Trade of Great-Britain with the Kingdom of Portugal, as should be thought sitting and convenient.' Then Mr. Lowndes presented to the House, according to Order, A Bill to make effectual the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, which was received; and a Motion for putting off the Reading of it to the Tuesday following having pass'd in the Negative, the said Bill was read the first time, and ordered to be read a second time, on Tuesday the 4th of June. After this a Motion being made, and the Question put, That the Bill to make effectual the eighth and ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, be printed; it pass'd in the Negative. Then a Petition of the Governour and Company of Merchants of England trading to the Levant Seas was presented to the House, and read, praying, 'That the Silk Manufactures of this Kingdom might receive such Encouragement, as might enable the Petitioners to support the Trade to Turkey, in Opposition to the French, who are become great Rivals in the Woollen Manufactures; and that the Privileges which were formerly enjoy'd by those who imported Turkey Goods into France should be again restored upon paying no higher Duties than according to the Tariff of 1664.' Whereupon it was ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table, till the Bill to make effectual the eighth and ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, be read a second time.

Contract of the Assiento called for. ; Estimate of the Guards and Garrisons. ; Petitions of the Surgeons of the Navy not read. ; Bill for settling the Trade to Africa ordered to be engrossed. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; Estimate of the Debt to the Marines called for.

On the 1st of June, there was a great Debate about some Amendments made to the Bill for establishing the Trade to Africa free and open, &c. After which, upon a Motion made by Mr. Annesly, the House resolved to address her Majesty, that the Contract of the Assiento made and concluded at Madrid the 26th of March last past, be laid before the House. Sir William Wyndham having presented an Estimate of the Guards and Garrisons in Great-Britain, with the Charge thereof for the last six Months of the Year 1713, to the 24th of November both inclusive; the said Estimate was referred to the grand Committee of the Supply. The next Day a Petition of the Surgeons of her Majesty's Royal Navy, during the late War, was offered in relation to their having Half-pay allowed; and the Question being put, That the Petition be brought up, it passed in the Negative. After this a Bill was ordered to be brought in, for raising the Militia for the Year 1713; and then the House resumed the adjourn'd Debate upon the Clause offered the Day before to the Bill for establishing the Trade to Africa free and open; and the Clause being read a second Time, and agreed to be made Part of the Bill; another Amendment was made to the said Bill, which was ordered to be engrossed. Then a Motion being made, and the Question proposed, 'That the exclusive Right of Trading to Africa mentioned and intended to be granted by the Letters-Patent of King Charles II. to the Royal African Company, is an Invasion of the Freedom of Trade, and of dangerous Consequence to the Commerce of this Kingdom.' The previous Question was put, That the Question be now put, and pass'd in the Negative. After this, upon a Motion made by Sir Robert Davers, it was resolved, to take into Consideration the Charter of the Royal African Company upon that day se'night. Then the House having resolved itself into a grand Committee to consider further of the Supply, came to the following Resolutions: 1. That the Sum of 183,281 l. 1s. 6d. be granted for the Charge of the Guards and Garrisons in Great-Britain, from the 24th of June 1713, to the 24th of December following, including General-Officers and Contingencies. 2. That the Sum of 29,093 l. 9s. 4d. be granted for the Charge of the Forces in the Island of Minorca, from the 24th of June 1713, to the 24th of December following. 3. That the Sum of 18,731 l. 4s. be granted to her Majesty for the Charge of her Forces in Gibraltar, from the 24th of June 1713, to the 24th of December following. 4. That the Sum of 38,967 l. 16s. be granted to her Majesty for the Charge of her Forces at Dunkirk for five Months, from the 24th of June 1713. 5. That the Sum of 9300 l. 12s. 6d. be granted to her Majesty to defray her Part of the Charge of the Pay of Saxe-Gotha Troops from the 22d of December 1712, to the Time of their Dismission, with one Month's Pay from that Time, according to the Treaty in that Behalf. Mr. Speaker having resumed the Chair, it was resolved to address her Majesty, That an Estimate of the Debt to the Marine Regiments to Lady-Day last, might be laid before the House.

Addresses about the Equivalent for Dunkirk, and the Trade in Flanders. ; Accounts of the Exports and Imports between France and England, and of the Woollen Mannfactures exported to Portugal, called for.

The 3d, Mr. Conyers reported to the House, the preceding Day's Resolutions about the Supply, which were agreed to; after which it was resolved to address her Majesty, 1. That an Account be laid before this House, what Equivalent was to be given to the most Christian King for the Demolition of Dunkirk; And what was stipulated relating to Dunkirk, in case the Equivalent should not be comply'd with. 2. That an Account be laid before this House, what her Majesty had stipulated for the Trade of Great-Britain in Flanders, and how the same was secured. Whether the Ministry were puzzled how to answer these Addresses, or no, 'tis certain that they lay dormant for some time. The same day the House ordered the Commissioners of the Customs, to lay before them, 1. An Account of the Exports from the Port of London to France, between Michaelmas 1668, and Michaelmas 1669; also the Imports from France to the Port of London, for the same time, according to the Entries in the Custom-House Books. 2dly, An Account of the Woollen Manufactures exported to Portugal for four Years before the Year 1703, distinguishing the Species and Quantities in several Years, 3dly, An Account of the Exports from England to France, for the Years 1686, 1687, 1688, and of the Imports from France, during the same Time, distinguishing the Species and Quantities in the several Years. After which, the Commons, in a Committee of the whole House, considered further of Ways and Means to raise the Supply.

Thirteen Petitions presented against the Trade with France. ; Accounts of Exports and Imports laid before the House. ; Mr. Gould. ; The Bill to make effectual the Treaty of Commerce committed. ; Estimate of the Half-pay of Land-Officers called for.

The 4th, no less than thirteen Petitions were presented against the Trade with France, which were severally ordered to lie on the Table until the said Bill be read a second Time. Then the Commissioners of the Customs, presented to the House several Accounts of the Exports to, and Imports from France, which were also ordered to lie on the Table; After which the Bill before mentioned was read a second Time, and (notwithstanding the Opposition made by Mr. Gould, formerly Governor of the Bank of England, who, in a fine Speech, endeavoured to shew how prejudicial a Trade with France would be to our Woollen and Silk-Manufactures) committed to a Committee of the whole House. At the same time it was ordered, That the several Petitions presented to the House, relating to the said Bill, be referred to the Consideration of the said Committee; and that the Petitioners be heard before the Committee, if they thought fit; and that no more than two Persons be heard upon any Petition. After which it was resolved to address her Majesty, That an Estimate be laid before the House, of the Half-Pay to be given to the Officers, who had served well, by Land during the War.

Resolution on Ways and Means. ; The Proposal of the Bank accepted. ; Petitions of the Woollon Manufactures in London, and Bristol, against the Treaty of Commerce.

The 5th, the House ordered the Bill for the better regulating the Elections of Members to serve in Parliament for Scotland, with the Amendments made to it, both by the Committee of the whole House, and by the House, to be engrossed. After, which, in a Committee of the whole House, on Ways and Means, it was resolved, that, towards raising the Supply, the Proposition of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England for raising the Sum of one million two hundred thousand Pounds, upon such Terms and Conditions as were therein mentioned, be accepted, which Resolution being reported, and agreed to the next Day, a Bill was ordered to be brought in thereupon: The same Day, a Petition of the Dyers, Clothworkers, Packers, Calenders, Setters, and others, concerned in the Woollen Manufactures, in behalf of themselves and many others, living in and about the City of London; as also a Petition of the Stuff-makers, and Clothiers, within the City of Bristol, being severally presented to the House and read, relating to the Bill to make effectual the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, were referred to the Consideration of the Committee of the whole House; and the Petitioners were ordered to be heard thereupon before the said Committee, if they thought fit.

The East-India Company resolves to Petition the Commons against the Treaty of Comerce. ; A Vote in their favour to prevent their Petition. ; Bill to prevent the Exporation

And here it is to the observed, That two Days before the East-India Company, held a general Court, where, after a warm Debate, notwithstanding the Opposition of some Tory Members, it was carried by a great Majority, That they should Petition the House of Commons, against the IXth Article of the Treaty of Commerce, by which the East-India Goods belonging to the Subjects of Great-Britain seemed tacitly to be excluded. To prevent the presenting of this Petition, which, coming from so considerable a Body, would undoubtedly have very much increased the present Clamour, against the Treaty of Commerce, the Commons, on the sixth, ordered, That it be an Instruction to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill to make effectual the eighth and ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, was committed, to receive a Clause, declaring, That the Goods and Merchandizes of Great-Britain, mentioned in the ninth Article of the said Treaty, are and shall be intended to extend, as well to the Goods and Merchandizes of the Growth, Product, and Manufacture of any other Country whatsoever, imported into France by the Subjects of Great-Britain, as to the Goods, and Merchandizes of the Growth, Product, and Manufactures of Great-Britain. And appointed a Committee to enquire into the Proceedings in the Year 1674, in relation to the Treaty of Commerce then depending between England and France, and to report the same to the House; and that they be directed to search the Journals of both Houses of Parliament; and that they have Power to send for Persons, Papers, and Records, and to sit de die in diem; and have leave to sit in a Morning. After this, it was ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill to make the Laws more effectual for preventing the Exportation of Wool from Great-Britain and Ireland to foreign Parts. And then a Motion being made, and the Question proposed, That an Address be presented to her Majesty, that she would be pleased to direct an Account to be laid before the House, of the Rule mentioned in the 9th Article of the Treaty of Commerce between Great-Britain and France, for the paying of Duties in the Provinces not contain'd in the Tariff of 1664: The previous Question being put, That that Question be now put; it passed in the Negative.

A Petition against the Treaty of Commerce. ; The Bill for an open Trade to Africa read the 3d time and pass'd. ; Resolutions on Ways and Means.

The 8th, a Petition of the Clothiers of New-Sarum, against the Treaty of Commerce, was read, and referred to the Committee of the whole House. After which the engross'd Bill for establishing the Trade to Africa free and open, &c. was read the third Time, and the Petition of the Planters who have Sugar Plantations in her Majesty's Colonies in America, being read, and their Counsel heard, the Bill was opened by Mr. Speaker; pass'd by a Majority of 136 Votes against 102, and sent to the Lords. Then, in a Committee of the whole House, the Commons, considered of Ways and Means to raise the Supply, and came to the following Resolutions: viz. 'That, towards making the Duties for Goods and Merchandizes brought from France, equal to the Duties payable for Goods and Merchandizes of the like Nature, imported from any other Country in Europe, such, and the like additional Impositions upon several sorts of Goods and Merchandizes, which were granted by an Act of Parliament, in the fourth Year of the Reign of their late Majesties King William and Queen Mary (of blessed Memory) and are continued by several Acts of Parliament, since made for the Uses and Purposes therein expressed (other than a particular Rate of five and twenty Pounds per Cent. on French Goods, and the particular Duty on every Ton of French Wines thereby imposed) be charged and chargeable for the like Uses and Purposes upon all such of the said Goods and Merchandizes which shall be brought from France to GreatBritain, as by the said Acts they are charged or chargeable upon Goods and Merchandizes of the like Nature, imported from other Countries in Europe. II. That the said Rate of twenty five Pounds per Cent. imposed by the said Acts on French Goods be taken off, and be no longer payable. III. That four Pounds per Ton (Part of the Duty of eight Pound per Ton, chargeable by the said Acts on French Wines) be abated, and that four Pounds per Ton Remainder of the said Duty of eight Pounds per Ton, be continued for the Uses and Purposes expressed in the said Acts, or such of them as are now in Force, IV. That in all Cases, where, by general Words in any Act or Acts of Parliament, made or passed during the Prohibitions of Trade and Commerce with France in the time of the late Wars, or any of them, any Duties, of Customs or Excise, or any other Duties whatsoever, were imposed upon any Foreign Goods or Merchandizes imported into Great-Britain, for any Uses or Purposes whatsoever, the like Duties shall be understood to be due and payable, and shall be charged, and chargeable for the same Uses and Purposes upon Goods and Merchandizes of the like Nature, which shall be brought from France into Great-Britain, as fully as the said Goods and Merchandizes from France would have been charged, and chargeable with those Duties by the General Words of the said Acts, if there had been no such Prohibition of Trade or Commerce with France.

These Resolutions being the next Day reported, were agreed to by the House, and order'd, that they be referr'd to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill to make Effectual the Eighth and Ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France is committed, and that they do receive Clauses pursuant to the said Resolutions. The same Day several Petitions, viz. of the Linnen Weavers, Spinners, Dressers, and others concerned in the Linnen Manufactures within the several Towns, Parishes and Precincts of Yeovil, Wincaunton, Milbourn-Port, South-Petherton, QueenCamel, Cadbury, Gallington, Castle-Cary, Brewton, Harsington, Temple-Comb, Maperton and several other Places within the County of Somerset; and also of Shafton, Gallingham, Motsombe, Boorton, Stower, Marnhull, and several other Places in the County of Dorset; and also of Meer and Deverels, and several other Places in the County of Wilts; and also of Fording-Bridge and Ring-Wood, and several other Places in the County of Southampton, in behalf of themselves, and several other Persons belonging to the said Linnen Trade. 2. Of the Inhabitants of the Town and Borough of Cirencester in the County of Gloucester, concerned in the Woollen Manufactory, on behalf of themselves, and many Thousand others in the Parts adjacent. 3. And of the Merchants Trading to the Plantations, and to Spain, and Portugal, and of the Masters and Owners of Ships employ'd in the said Trades, in and about Whitehaven. 4. Of the Merchants and Traders of the City of Bristol. And 5. Of several Merchants, principal Traders, Masters, and great Number of Workmen, belonging to the Trade and Manufacture of Stocking Frame-work Knitting, in Behalf of themselves, and several Thousands in the Town of Nottingham, and Places adjacent, were severally presented to the House and read, relating to the Bill to make Effectual the Eighth and Ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce between Great-Britain and France; and were referr'd to the Consideration of the Committee of the whole House, to whom the said Bill was committed. Then another (fn. 3) Petition of the Minister, Church Wardens, Overseers of the Poor, and Vestry Men of the Parish of St. Giles's Cripplegate, with several of the Freeholders, on Behalf of themselves and others, was presented to the House and read, praying the Consideration of the House of the Duties laid upon the Gold and Silver Manufacture, (by which many of the said Parish were empoverished) and that Encouragement might be given to the said Manufacture: Which Petition was ordered to lie on the Table.

The same Day Mr. Medlicot reported from the Committee appointed to enquire into the Proceedings in the Year 1674, in relation to the Treaty of Commerce then depending between England and France, and empowered to search the Journals of both Houses of Parliament, that they having examined into the Journals of this House, did find, that on the 24th of February, 1674, the Parliament was prorogued to the 10th Day of November 1674; and from the said 10th of November 1674, the Parliament was farther prorogued until the 13th Day of April 1675, so that there was no Proceedings in the Year 1674: and he delivered the Report in at the Table, where the same was read. Then a Motion being made, and the Question put, That the Report be recommitted, it passed in the Negative. After this, the Order being read for the House to resolve into a Committee of the whole House, on the Bill to make effectual the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France: it was Ordered, That the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, be referred to the said Committee, with the Act explaining the general Terms of the Ninth Article of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, relating to the four Species excepted out of the Tariff of 1664; and the Act declaring the Particulars referred to by the Ninth Article of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, to the Discussion of Commissioners. Secondly, That the Representations from the Merchants, and several Corporations of Great-Britain, in relation to Trade, made to the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, while the Gertruydenbergh Treaty was depending, and afterwards: And also the Petitions and Memorials that had been lately laid before the said Commission, relating to the Trade of this Kingdom, and what Directions and Commands they had received from her Majesty thereupon: and Thirdly, the Accounts from the Commissioners of the Customs, of Wines and Brandies imported, and Woollen Manufactures exported, be referred to the Consideration of the said Committee.

The Turkey Company heard before the Grand Committee of the Commons against the Commerce with France. ; General Stanhope. ; Act passed 13 Car. II. quoted by General Stanhope. ; A Mistake of the Speaker. ; The Assiento Contract laid before the House.

Then the House resolved itself into a Committee upon the said Bill, Sir Robert Davers being in the Chair; and heard Mr. Cook, Merchant, who, in behalf of the Levant Company, made a long Speech, wherein, with great Solidity of Reason and Argument, he shewed how detrimental the opening a Trade with France, on the Foot of the late Treaty of Commerce, would be to the British Woollen and Silk Manufactures, and to all the Branches of our Trade. The Merchants being withdrawn, the Commons took their Allegations into Consideration; and among the rest, General Stanhope, to corroborate what Mr. Cook had said, quoted the Preamble of an Act of Parliament made in the thirteenth Year of King Charles the Second's Reign, that runs thus: 'Forasmuch as it has been by long Experience found, that the importing of French Wines, Brandy, Linnen, Silks, Salt, and Paper, and other Commodities of the Growth, Product, or Manufactures of the Territories and Dominions of the French King, has much exhausted the Treasure of this Nation, lessened the Value of the native Commodities, and Manufactures thereof, and caused great Detriment to this Kingdom in general: Be it enacted, &c.' Hereupon, the Speaker supposing that Mr. Stanhope had made a Mistake, said, There was no such thing in that Act: But Mr. Stanhope insisted, that the Clerk of the House should read the said Act, and his Quotation appearing to be right, he and some other Members animadverted with some Vehemence on the Speaker's Mistake. At last, the Debate cool'd, and was put off to the next Day; and resolved, that the Petitioners, who had not yet been heard, be then heard; after which, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer presented to the House the Translation of the Assiento Contract, which was ordered to lie on the Table.

Estimate of the Half-Pay to Land Officers. ; Acts passed by Commission.

The 10th, Sir William Wyndham presented to the Commons, an Estimate of the Half-pay in the Year 1713, to the Officers who had served well by Land during the late War; which was referred to the Grand Committee of the Supply. After this, according to the Desire of the Lords authorized by her Majesty's Commission, Mr. Speaker, with the House, went up to the House of Peers, and heard the Commission read, which was for declaring and notifying in her Majesty's Absence, the Royal Assent to several public and private Bills; and the Royal Assent was accordingly declared and notified by the Lord Chancellor, the Duke of Ormond, and Lord Steward of her Majesty's Houshold, to the public Bills following, viz.

1. An Act for granting to her Majesty Duties upon Malt, Mum, Cyder and Perry, for the Service of the Year 1713; and for making forth Duplicates of Lottery Tickets, lost, burnt or destroyed; and for enlarging the Time for adjusting Claims in several Lottery Acts; and to punish the counterfeiting or forging of Lottery Orders; and for explaining a late Act, in relation to Stamp Duties on Customary Estates, which pass by Deed and Copy.

2. An Act to revive and continue the Act for taking, examining, and slating the public Accounts of the Kingdom; and also to continue the Act for appointing the Commissioners to take, examine, and determine the Debts due to the Army, TransportService, and Sick and Wounded.

3. An Act for making certain Inclosures.

4. An Act for repairing certain Highways. And to eight private Bills.

Bill for the better regulating the Forces. ; The Italian, Spanish and Portugal Merchants, and the Weavers of London, heard against the Bill for making effectual the Treaty of Commerce. ; Mr. Jennings, Gen. Stanhope, Mr. Lechmere.

The Commons being returned to their House, ordered a Bill to be brought in for the better regulating the Forces, and of their Quarters. And then a Petition of the Mayor and Burgesses of the Borough of Wilton, relating to the Bill to make effectual the Eighth and Ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, was presented, and read, and referred to the Grand Committee. After this, the House resolved itself into that Committee, Sir Robert Davers being in the Chair, and heard the Spanish, Italian, and Portugal Merchants, and the Weavers of London, upon their Petitions. Mr. Torriano, who spoke in behalf of the two first, having, in the Heat of his Discourse, reflected on the late Measures, suggesting, That France had over-reached us in the Treaty of Commerce; and asking, Is this your boasted Peace? some Court-Members were offended at it, and required that the Commons would set some Mark of their Displeasure upon him. General Stanhope, Mr. Lechmere, and others, excused what he had said, on account of his Zeal for the Good of the Nation; adding, That unless they give the Merchants full Liberty of Speech, the House would never be able to form a right Judgment of that important Affair; as likewise, That no Man should be reprimanded for standing up for the Trade of the Nation. Mr. Torriano was then permitted to make an end of his Discourse; after which, Mr. Milner was heard in behalf of the Portugal Merchants, and Mr. — for the London Weavers. The Merchants being withdrawn, the Speaker resumed the Chair, and it was resolved, That the Grand Committee should the next Day consider farther of the Bill to make the Eighth and Ninth Articles effectual; and that the Petitioners who had not been heard, be then heard. It was also ordered, First, That the Minutes of the LevantCompany, of a Court held the 28th of May 1713, relating to their Petition to this House, be laid before this House. 2. That the Memorial of Robert Meeres, presented to the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, be laid before this House. 3. That all Memorials, Petitions, Representations, Schemes of Trade, and Papers relating thereto, that are before the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, concerning the Trade of England and France, between the Year 1664, and 1676: and also the Representation presented to the late King by the Lords Commissioners, in the Year 1697, in relation to the Commerce with France, be laid before this House. 4. That the Commissioners of the Customs do lay before this House the Scheme of Trade between England and France, as entered in the Custom House Books, in the Year 1674. And in the 5th place, that the Commissioners of the Customs do lay before this House the Schemes and Computations they have in their Office of the Trade between England and France, from Michaelmas 1668, to Michaelmas 1669.

A standing Order about Petitions for Sums relating to public Service. ; Several Traders heard about the Treaty of Commerce. ; A farther Account of 35 Millions, &c. ordered to lie on the Table.

The 11th Mr. Oglethorp delivered his Report, from the Committee to whom the Petition of Major-General Henry de Gort, Baron de Walef, was referred, which was read, and ordered to lie on the Table: and the Resolution of the 11th of December, in the fifth Year of the Queen, being read, viz. 'That this House will receive no Petition for any Sum of Money relating to public Service, but what is recommended from the Crown;' it was ordered, 'That the said Resolution be declared to be a standing Order of the House.' Then the Commons, in a Committee of the whole House, considered farther of the Bill to make effectual the Eighth and Ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce; and heard the Makers of English Brandy and Vinegar, in and about the Cities of London and Westminster, and the Companies of SilkThrowers, and Gold and Silver Wire-Drawers of London, upon their Petitions; and no other Petitioners appearing, or attending to be heard, the Committee read all the other Petitions referred to the Committee: and the Accounts of Wines and Brandies imported, and of the Woollen Manufactures exported. The Speaker having resumed the Chair, and Sir Robert Davers made his Report from the Committee, the farther Consideration of that Bill was put off to the Saturday following. The same Day Mr. Auditor Harley presented to the House, An Account, shewing how much of the thirty-five Millions three hundred and two thousand one hundred and seventy Pounds, eighteen Shillings, and nine Pence, granted for the public Service to Christmas 1710; as likewise, of the Supplies granted since Christmas 1710, had been accounted for; as also, The Auditor's Report touching the Earl of Ranelagh's Debt. Which Accounts were ordered to lie on the Table.

Petitions of Plymouth against the Treaty of Commerce. ; Petition of Sir J. Lambert, and Mr. Shepheard. ; Resolutions about the Supply.

The next Day, the Secretary of the Levant Company presented to the House, Minutes of a General Court of that Company, the 28th of May 1713. After which, a Petition of the Mayor and Commonalty of the Borough of Plymouth, in the County of Devon, and of the Clothiers, Weavers, and others, concerned in the working up the Woollen Manufactures, living in that Town, and Places adjacent, relating to the Bill to make effectual the Eighth and Ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, was presented to the House, read, and referred to the Grand Committee. Then a Petition of Sir John Lambert, Bart. Samuel Shepheard, and the Executors of the late John James David, was also presented to the House and read, praying, That they might be admitted to import as many French Wines Custom-free, as would amount to the Duties of such as were by them bought, which were taken in the Year 1708, by the Success, (a Privateer of Guernsey) and were shipped in the New Topsham, retaken by the French off Beachy-Head: the Consideration of which Petition was referred to a Committee. Then the House having resolved itself into a Grand Committee to consider farther of the Supply, came to the following Resolutions. '1. That 3428 l. 6 s. be granted for the Pay of the Officers of the Train in Flanders, from the 16th of April to the 23d of June 1713, and for the Charge of bringing home the Stores. 2. That 28273 l. 13 s. 9 d. be granted for the Charge of the Ordinary of the Office of Ordnance for the Year 1713. 3. That 9000 l. be granted for purchasing two hundred Tons of Salt-Petre, for Supply of the Stores. 4. That 228 l. 5 s. be granted for the Charge of an Engineer and Store-keeper at Jamaica, from the 1st of April to the 30th of September 1713. 5. That 182 l. 10s. for the Charge of an Engineer at New-York for the Year 1713. 6. That 5220 l. 1 s. 6 d. for the Charge of the Officers of the Train in Spain, from the 1st of April to the 30th of September 1713. 7. 4544 l. 5s. for the Charge of the Office of Ordnance at Port-Mahon for one Year. 8. 3631 l. 15 s. be granted to her Majesty for the Charge of the Office of Ordnance at Gibraltar for one Year. 9. 2162 l. 12s. 6d. for the Charge of the Office of Ordnance at Annapolis-Royal for one Year. 10. 5473 l. 10 s. 11 d. for the Charge of Stores sent to Placentia. 11. 1076 l. 15 s. for the Charge of an Engineer, Store keeper, and Gunners for Placentia for one Year. 12. 1475 l. 18 s. 9 d. for the Charge of the Officers belonging to the Artillery in North Britain for one Year. 13. 62000 l. for making good the Deficiency of the Fund granted for the Payment of Principal and Interest of the Class Lottery in 1711, for the Year ending at Michaelmas 1712. It was also resolved, That such Merchants who have paid, or before the first of September next shall pay, the Principal Monies due upon Bonds, entered into by them and their Sureties, for Customs or Duties upon Wines and Tobacco, shall thereupon be discharged of the Interest due for such Principal Money.'

Petition of Chester against the Treaty of Commerce. ; Clause order'd to be inserted in the Bill to make effectual the Treaty of Commerce. ; The Bill to prevent Duelling dropt.

The 13th the House read a Petition of the Mayor, Aldermen, Merchants, Sugar-Bakers, Distillers, and other Tradesmen of the City of Chester, relating to the Treaty of Commerce, which was referred to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill to make the Eighth and Ninth Articles of that Treaty effectual, was committed. After this, it was ordered, 'That it be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they do receive a Clause, declaring, That the Privileges, Liberties and Immunities, as to all Duties, Impositions, or Customs that relate to Commerce, or any other Right whatsoever, that have been, or may be granted by France, with respect to the Subjects, Goods or Merchandizes of any Foreign Nation, are, and shall be intended and understood to extend as well to the four Speecies of Goods excepted in the IXth Article from the Tariff of 1664, as to all other Goods and Merchandizes whatsoever imported into France by the Subjects of Great Britain.' Then the House resolv'd itself into that Committee, and made a further Progress in it. The same Day the Commons read a second time, the Bill to abolish Tryals by single Combat, and to prevent the impious Practice of Duelling: And committed the same to a Committee of the whole House; but that Bill was afterwards dropt.

The 15th the Commissioners of the Customs laid before the Commons, their Returns to the Orders of the 10th of the same Month, and the Answer of their Secretary about the Accounts from 1668 to 1669: Which were referr'd to the Consideration of the Grand Committee, to whom the Bill to make effectual the Treaty of Commerce was committed: After which Mr. Conyers reported the Resolutions taken the Friday before, about the Supply, which were read and agreed to by the House. Then the Commons in a Committee of the whole House, went thro' the Bill to make effectual the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, and made several Amendments thereto, the Report of which was put off to the Thursday following.

Petition of the Hamburgh and Bremen Merchants against the Treaty of Commerce. ; Papers relating to Trade laid before the Commons. ; Resolutions on Ways and Means.

The next Day the House took into Consideration the Report from the Committee to whom the Bill for the Ease of Sheriffs, was committed, made an Amendment to it, and order'd the Bill, with the Amendments, to be engross'd: After which, a Petition of the Merchants of London, Exporters of the Woollen Manufactures to Hamburgh and Bremen, and Importers of Linnen from thence, relating to the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, was read, and order'd to lie on the Table. On the 17th, the Commons resolv'd to address her Majesty, for An Estimate of Half Pay for Military Officers and Chaplains that had serv'd well in the Trains of Artillery in Flanders, Spain, and on several Expeditions, &c. After which, Mr. Foley, from the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, presented to the House their Answer to the Order of the 10th of the same Month, relating to Robert Meere's Memorial; and the Memorials, Petitions, Representations, Schemes of Trade, and Papers relating thereto, and the Representation to his late Majesty in 1697: Which Papers were order'd to lie on the Table. Then the House in a grand Committee, consider'd of Ways and Means to raise the Supply; and of the Report from the Committee to whom the Petition of the Merchants in London and Bristol trading in Tobacco, in behalf of them selves, and the Planters of Virginia and Maryland; and came to several Resolutions, which being reported on the 19th, were (with an Amendment to one of them) agreed to by the House, as follows: 1. That a farther Duty be laid upon Canvas imported, to be made use of for making of Sails for navigating Ships and Vessels, 2. That the said farther Duty on such Canvas imported, be two Pence per Ell. 3. That the said farther Duty be granted to her Majesty for the Term of seven Years, and from thence to the End of the then next Session of Parliament. 4. That one Penny per Ell be allow'd upon the Exportation of British Sail Cloth out of the said Duty of two pence per Ell on Canvas imported. 5. That the said Draw-back upon Exportation be allow'd for seven Years, and from thence to the End of the next Session of Parliament. 6. That there be the same Allowance on Tobacco for Waste and Shrinkage in the Cellars on all the other Duties, as by the Act of the 7th and 8th of King William the Third, is to be allow'd on the Impost Duty. 7. That all the Bondable Duties payable for Tobacco hereafter to be imported, be made payable at the End of 18 Months, to commence from 30 Days after the Master's Report of the Ship, or from the Merchant's Entry of the Goods within the said 30 Days, which shall first happen; and as to all Tobacco already imported and not enter'd, to commence from the 24th of June, 1713, and that all the said Duties be put into one Bond for that Purpose. And a Bill was order'd to be brought in upon the said Resolutions.

Address for the disbanding the Six Marine Regiments.

Sir Roger Mostyn having, on the 17th, presented to the House, pursuant to their Address to the Queen, an Estimate of the Arrears due to clear the Six Marine Regiments to the 25th of March 1713. The same was referr'd to the Grand House of the Supply; and resolv'd to address her Majesty, That she would be pleased to direct the Marine Regiments to be disbanded, and that what was due to the Non-Commission Officers and Soldiers might be paid to the Persons that were actually in Service, or to their Assigns.

Petition against the Exportation of Wooll. ; Mr. Meeres examin'd. ; Warm and long Debate in the House of Commons, about the Bill to make the Treaty of Commerce effectual. ; Sir Thomas Hanner's Speech.

The next Day a Petition of the Clothiers, Combers, Weavers, and many Thousands concern'd in the Woollen Manufactures in and about the Town of Tavistock in the County of Devon, praying, That Consideration might be had of the great Grievance of exporting Wooll from this Kingdom and Ireland into France, was presented to the House, read, and order'd to lie on the Table. Mr. Robert Meeres having, at the Bar, been examin'd, touching the Memorial, which the House had been acquainted he had presented to the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, Sir Robert Davers reported from the Committee of the whole House, the Amendments they had made to the Bill to make effectual the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, which, with Amendments to some of them, were agreed to by the House. Then a Motion being made, that the Bill with the Amendments be engross'd, the same occasion'd a warm Debate, that lasted from Three a Clock in the Afternoon, till near Eleven at Night. General Stanhope, Sir Peter King, Mr. Gould, Mr. Hampden, and some others, made fine Speeches, wherein they shew'd the Disadvantages of an open Trade with France, particularly upon the Foot of the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commeree. The Member who spoke most in favour of the Bill, was the same who was said to have been the Person chiefly employ'd in that Treaty, viz. Mr. Arthur Moore, one of the Commissioners of Trade: But some of his Arguments being thought strain'd and precarious by many of his own Party, the Majority adher'd to the Opinion of Sir Thomas Hanmer. This Gentleman made a long and fine Speech, wherein, among other Things, he said, 'That before he had examin'd the Affair in Question to the Bottom, he had given his Vote for the bringing in the Bill to make the VIIIth and IXth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce effectual; but, that having afterwards maturely weigh'd and consider'd the Allegations of the Merchants, Traders, and Manufacturers, in their several Petitions and Representations, he was convinc'd, that the passing of this Bill would be of great Prejudice to the Woollen and Silk Manufacturers of this Kingdom; consequently encrease the Number of the Poor, and so, in the End, affect the Land. That, while he had the Honour to fit in that House, he would never be blindly led by any Ministry; neither, on the other Hand, was he byass'd by what might weigh with some Men, viz. the fear of losing their Elections: But that the Principles upon which he acted, were the Interest of his Country, and the Conviction of his Judgment, and upon those two Considerations alone, he was against the Bill.' This Speech made a great Impression on many of the Members; and Mr. Aislaiby, one of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, and Mr. Francis Annesley, one of the Commissioners of the Public Accounts, having spoke also against the Bill, the Question whether it should be engross'd, was at last, carried in the Negative (fn. 4) by a Majority of 194 Voices against 185.

A List of the Persons who spoke for and against the Bill was handed about as follows:

For the Bill.
1 Sir Robert Vyvan.
2 Mr. Campion.
3 Sir Richard How.
4 Mr. Eversfield.
5 Mr. Adleworth.
6 Sir Joseph Martyn.
7 Sir W. Whitlocke
8 Mr. Gore.
9 Mr. Baldwin.
10 Mr. Tho. Foley.
11 Mr. Manley.
12 Mr. Ed. Harley.
12 Mr. Ja. Murray.
14 Sir Alex. Cuming.
15 Col. Byerley.
16 Mr. Ar. Moore.
17 Mr. Cesar.
Against the Bill.
1 Mr. Rob. Heisham.
2 Mr. Cholmondley.
3 Gen. Stanhope.
4 Mr. Docminique.
5 Sir Arthur Key.
6 Mr. Gould.
7 Mr. Pulteney.
8 Sir Peter King.
9 Mr. Hampden.
10 Mr. Baily.
11 Mr. Lawson.
12 Mr. Smith.
13 Sir D. Dalrymple.
14 Mr. Tho. Smyth of Glasgow.
15 Sir Tho. Hanmer.
16 Mr. Aislabie.
17 Mr. Wortley.
18 Mr. Francis Annesley.

The Queen's Answer about the Equivalent for Dunkirk.

The next Day, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer acquainted the House, That their Address having been presented to the Queen for an Account to be laid before the House, what Equivalent was given to the most Christian King for the Demolition of Dunkirk, and in Case the Equivalent was not complied with, what was stipulated relating to Dunkirk: Her Majesty had been pleased to command him to acquaint this House, That, in Pursuance of the Treaties, as well between her Majesty and the most Christian King, as between that King and the States General, the Equivalent which was to be given for the Demolition of Dunkirk, was already in the Hands of his most Christian Majesty.

Address relating to the Towns held by the Dutch Troops in Flanders.

The 22d the House resolv'd to address her Majesty, 'That she would be pleased to Direct the Commissioners of her Navy to make Tryals of Pitch and Tar made of Roch and Roofstone, that they might be able to report the Nature and Usefulness of them.' After this, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer acquainted them, That pursuant to their Address for an Account, 'What her Majesty had stipulated for the Trade of Great Britain in Flanders, and how the same was to be secured, her Majesty had commanded the Report of her Commissioners of Trade, about that matter, to be said before this House.' And he presented the same accordingly; which being read, it was resolved to address her Majesty, 'That she would be pleased to take care, That the Towns in Flanders in her Majesty's Possession, be not evacuated till those who are to have the Sovereignty of the Spanish Netherlands, agree to such Articles for regulating of Trade, as may put the Subjects of Great Britain upon an equal Foot with those of any other Nation. To which Address the Queen made a very gracious An swer, agreeable to the Desire of the House.

An unexpected Motion of Sir T. Hanmer's, for an Address of Thanks, &c.

The 23d, Sir Thomas Hanmer made a Motion, 'That an Address be presented to her Majesty, returning her Majesty the humble Thanks of this House, for the great Care she has taken of the Security and Honour of her Kingdoms in the Treaty of Peace; and also for what she has done in the Treaty of Commerce with France, by laying so good a Foundation for the Interests of her People in Trade; and humbly to desire her Majesty, that she would be pleased to appoint Cemmissaries to treat with Commissaries on the Part of France, for adjusting such Matters as shall be necessary to be settled in the Treaty of Commerce between her Majesty and France, that the Treaty may be so explained and perfected, that an entire Scheme of Trade may be settled, for the making effectual her Majesty's gracious Intentions for the Good and Welfare of her People.' The House being very thin, and many of the Members who voted against the Bill abovemention'd, and who, did not expect such a Motion, being absent, the Question was carried in the Affirmative by a Majority of 156 Voices against 72. After a Committee for drawing up the Address had been appointed, General Stanhope made a Motion, and the Question was put, 'That it be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they do represent in the said Address, the Sense of this House, That her Majesty's Commissaries, who are to treat of the Commerce between Great Britain and France, shall insist, That Liberty be given to her Majesty's Subjects to trade to all the Ports in the French King's Dominions:' But the previous Question being put, that that Question be now put, it pass'd in the Negative. Then the Commons, in a Grand Committee, consider'd further of the Supply. The next Day Sir Thomas Hanmer reported the Address of Thanks, which was agreed to, and resolved, That the said Address be presented to her Majesty by the whole House. Accordingly on Friday, the 20th of June, about six o'Clock in the Afternoon, the Commons, with their Speaker, did, by her Majesty's Appointment, attend her at her Palace at Kensington with the following Address.

The Address.

Most Gracious Sovereign,

'We Your Majesty's most Dutiful and Loyal Subjects, the Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, having, at the opening this Session, congratulated your Majesty upon the Conclusion of a Peace, find ourselves now under equal Obligations of Duty, to express our Thankfulness to your Majesty, since we have been acquainted with the Conditions and Terms of it; which by your great Wisdom have been procured, and by your gracious Condescention have been communicated to us; your Majesty's extensive Care hath not only provided for the Security, but the Honour of your Kingdoms; and we should be wanting in Concern for both, if we should omit our just Acknowledgments for the particular Regards which your Majesty in this, as well as in other Instances, hath shewn to them.

The good Foundation your Majesty hath laid for the Interest of your People in Trade, by what you have done in the Treaty of Navigation and Commerce with France, gives us Hopes of seeing it yet further improved to the Advantage of your Kingdoms; and we make it our humble Request to your Majesty, that you will be pleased to appoint Commissaries to treat with those of France, for the adjusting such Matters as are still necessary to be settled; and that you will give such Orders for the perfecting the said Treaty, and explaining the several Parts of it, that an entire Scheme of Trade may be framed between Great Britain and France, which may fully answer, and make effectual your Majesty's gracious Intentions for the Good and Welfare of your People.

To which the Queen was pleased to give this Answer.

Queen's Answer.

'Gentlemen,

'I thank you most heartily for this Address, which so fully expresses your Approbation of the Treaties of Peace and Commerce with France.

'It was with no small Difficulty that so great Advantages in Trade were obtain'd for my Subjects, and I will readily comply with your Desires, in continuing my utmost Care to secure the Benefits I have stipulated for my People.

This Answer surpriz'd many of the Members, such especially who readily went into the Address with no other Intention, than to shew their Approbation of the Treaty of Peace, abstracted from the Treaty of Commerce. However, the Speaker having early the next Day reported the said Answer to a very thin House, it was resolv'd, Nemine Contradicente, That the humble Thanks of the House be return'd to her Majesty, for her Majesty's most gracious Answer to the Address of this House.

Accounts of some extraordinary Charges laid before the Commons. ; Resolutions on the Supply. ; Estimate of Half Pay for the Marine Officers call'd for.

On the 24th Sir William Wyndham presented to the House, by her Majesty's Command, Two Accounts of some extraordinary Charges which attended the late War in the se veral Parts of the Service, and for which no Provision had been made by Parliament, mark'd Numb. 1. and Numb 2. the first of which was referr'd to the Grand Committee of the Supply, and the other order'd to lie upon the Table. Then the House resolv'd itself into that Committee, and came to these Resolutions; 1. That Ninety-nine thousand twenty eight Pounds six Shillings and eleven Pence, be granted for defraying the Charge of Half Pay to the Land Officers disbanded, or to be disbanded, to the 25th of December, 1713. 2. Sixty-one thousand four hundred sixty-four Pounds five Shillings and seven Pence, for the Charge of the Out Pensioners of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea, to the 24th of December, 1713. 3. Twenty-one thousand three hundred forty-five Pounds thirteen Shillings and four Pence, to defray the Charge of the Forces in the Plantations for six Months, from the 24th of June, 1713, to the 24th of December following: Which Resolutions being the next Day reported, were agreed to by the House. On the 24th likewise General Hill presented to the House, pursuant to their Address, an Account of Half Pay for Military Officers and Chaplains that had serv'd in the Trains of Artillery of Flanders, Spain, and on several Expeditions, &c. which was referr'd to the Grand Committee of the Supply; after which it was resolv'd to address her Majesty for an Estimate of Half Pay for the Officers in the Marine Regiments that should be disbanded.

Bill to encourage the Tobacco Trade.

The 25th, Mr. Lowndes presented to the House, A Bill for encouraging the Tobacco Trede, and for Ease of the Merchants upon Payment of the Duties upon Wine Bonds, and Tobacco Bonds: Which was read the first time, and order'd a second Reading. After Mr. Conyers had made the Report of the Resolutions of the Supply, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer presented to the House the following Message from her Majesty.

The Queen's Message about the Debts of Civil List.

'Her Majesty thinks fit to acquaint her Loyal House of Commons with the Difficulties, which in a particular Manner she lies under by the Debts contracted in her Civil Government, occasion'd by several extraordinary Expences formerly incurr'd; so that her Majesty thinks herself oblig'd in Justice to many Creditors, to order an Estimate to be laid before this House of what was owing on the Civil List in the Year 1710.

'Her Majesty hath used unexampled Parsimony to remove, if possible, this Burden from herself; but the granting away, and lessening some Part of her Revenne by Parliament has made that impracticable; therefore her Majesty hopes that this House of Commons, which on all Occasions have shewn themselves so well affected to her, will not be unwilling to empower her to raise such a Sum of Money on the Civil List Funds, as may enable her to discharge the Debts, and settle the Expence, to be regularly paid for the future.

Kensington, June the 25th, 1713.

Exceptions to the Estimate of the Debts of the Civil List. ; Mr. Smith's Motion for an Account of those Debts rejected. ; Address about the Improving of the Fishery.

This Message having been read by the Speaker, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer presented to the House an Estimate of the Debts which were owing to the several Heads of Expence for her Majesty's Civil Government at or about Midsummer, 1710, which being read, it was resolv'd to consider of the said Message the next Day, in a Committee of the whole House, and order'd that the said Message and Estimate be referr'd to the said Committee. An eminent Member, Mr. J. Smith, formerly Speaker of the House, and one of the Tellers of the Exchequer, having rais'd some Objections against that Estimate, saying, in Vindication of the late Ministry, That, to his certain Knowledge, the Debts of the Civil List in the Month of August, 1710, did not amount to above 150000l. for the Payment of Part of which Sum there were some Moneys standing out, besides great Quantities of Tin, whereas, by the Estimate now laid before the Commons, the said Debts, to Midsummer, 1710, that is, about two Months before, were made to amount to 400000 l. A Motion was thereupon made, and the Question put, That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, that she would please to direct an Account to be laid &efore this House of the Arrears of the Civil List Funds standing out at Midsummer, 1710, And also an Account of the Debts of the Civil List as they are at this Time, and of the Arrears of the Civil List Funds to pay the same; but the same pass'd in the Negative, to the great Surprize of many. After this the Commons, in a Committee of the whole House, consider'd of that Part of her Majesty's Speech to both Houses at the opening this Session of Parliament, which relates to the Improving and Encouraging the Fishery; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resum'd the Chair, and Mr. Conyers reported from the Committee, that they had directed him to move, That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, that she will be pleased to direct the Commissioners of Trade to enquire how, and in what manner the Fishery of Great Britain may be improv'd and carry'd on for the best Profit and Advantage to the Nation; whereupon it was resolv'd, that the said Address be presented to her Majesty.

Vote to impower the Queen to raise 500,000 l. to pay the Civil List. ; Petition of the Weavers. ; Petitions of the Booksellers Importers of Books. ; Debt of the Marines, &c. referr'd to the Commissioners of Accounts.

The next Day the Commons, in a Committee of the whole House, consider'd of the Message from her Majesty the Day before, and after some Debate, came to this Resolution, That her Majesty be impower'd by Letters Patents under the Great Seal of Great Britain, to set apart and appropriate a Sum not exceeding 35000 l. per Annum, for any Term not exceeding thirty-two Years, to be made a Fund or Security to raise, by such Means and Methods, and in such Manner and Form as her Majesty by such Letters Patents shall appoint, any Sum not exceeding Five hundred thousand Pounds, to dis charge Arrears and Debts owing to her Servants and others, payable out of the Branches settled for defraying the Expence of her Civil Government, and that the said yearly Sum be charged upon all the said Branches, whether they be hereditary or temporary, and be issued and paid at the Exchequer, out of the Moneys from time to time arising by those Branches, with Preference to all other Payments to be hereafter charged thereupon at the said Receipt. Which Resolution was the next Day reported, and agreed to by the House; and a Bill was order'd to be brought in thereupon. On Monday the 29th of June, Mr. Conyers presented to the House the said Bill, which was read the first Time, and order'd a second Reading. After which a Petition of the Bailiffs, Wardens, Assistants, and Commonalty of the Trade, Art and Mystery of Weavers, London, on behalf of themselves and Trade, was presented to the House and read, praying, that Leave might be given to bring in a Bill, or Clause, to supply the Defects of several Acts of Parliament relating to the sealing and marking of Silks: Whereupon it was order'd, That the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for encouraging the Tobacco Trade, and Ease of the Merchants upon Payment of the Duties upon Wine Bonds, and Tobacco Bonds, was committed, have Power to receive a Clause for repealing the Clauses in the several Acts of Parliament of the 6th and 8th Years of the Reign of his late Majesty King William, which relate to sealing and marking Alamodes, Lustrings, and Renforces, made in Great Britain by the Royal Lustring Company. Then the Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider farther of the Supply granted to her Majesty: A Petition of Henry Mortlock, John Churchill, Timothy Childe, Robert Knaplock, William Innis, Henry Clemens, and others, in behalf of themselves, and all Importers of Books, was presented to the House and read, praying, That the Duty of Thirty per Cent. ad Valorem, upon Books, Prints, and Maps, imported from Foreign Parts, might be altered to twelve Shillings per Hundred Weight: This Petition was referr'd to the Consideration of the said Committee, into which the House resolv'd itself immediately, and came to several Resolutions, the Report of which was put put off to the 1st of July. The same Day (the twenty-ninth) it was order'd, That the Estimate of the Arrears due to clear the fix Marine Regiments to the 25th of March, 1713. And also the Account of some extraordinary Charges which attended the late War, in the several Parts of the Service, and for which no Provision had been yet made by Parliament, Numb. 2. be referred to the Commissioners for Examining, Stating, and Determining the Debts due to the Army, and that they do examine the same, and report their Opinion thereupon.

The Bills to raise 500,000 l. for the Civil List, and 1200,000 l. by Exchequer Bills consolidated or tack'd. ; Accounts of the Debts on the Civil List, and of the Produce of the Civil List Funds call'd for.

On the last Day of June, a Bill for enabling her Majesty to raise a Sum not exceeding 500,000 l. on the Revenues ap pointed for Uses of her Civil Government, to be applied for, or towards Payment of such Debts and Arrears owing to her Servants, Tradesmen, and others, was read a second Time, and committed to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill to raise 1200,000 l. for her Majesty's Supply, by circulating a farther Sum in Exchequer Bills, was committed; and, notwithstanding the Opposition made by some Members, it was order'd, That it be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they do alter the said Bills, and make them into one. After this, the Motion some Days before made and laid aside, being again propos'd with better Success, it was resolv'd to address her Majesty, first, For an Account of the Debts on the Civil List to Midsummer, 1713. And secondly, For a yearly Account of the neat Produce of the Civil List Funds, since her Majesty's Accession to the Throne. This last Address was made upon a Suggestion, that the Civil List Funds, which at first were given only for about 700,000 l. per Annum, yielded now above 850,000 l. But whether there were any Ground for that Report or no, 'tis certain that no Answer was return'd to that Address.

Address for removing the Pretender. ; Unanimous Resolution for it.

July 1. General Stanhope made a Motion for an Address for the Queen to use her most pressing Instances with the Duke of Lorrain to remove the Pretender out of Lorrain. Which was seconded by Mr. Lechmere. The only Objection raised against it, was started by Sir William Whitlocke, who said, He remembered, that the like Address was formerly made to the Protector, for having Charles Stuart removed out of France: Notwithstanding which that Prince was, some time after, restored to his Father's Throne; but nevertheless, those few Members who might have any Affection for the present Royal Exile, being shy to shew it on so critical a Juncture, when the Parliament being so near expiring, a new Election was coming on, it was, according to Mr. Stanhope's Motion, Resolved, Nemine Contradicente, That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, acknowledging the great Care her Majesty has always taken, particularly in the late Treaties of Peace and Guaranty, to prevent the Pretender to her Throne being in a Condition to disturb these Realms; and to beseech her Majesty, that she will use the most speedy and pressing Instances with the Duke of Lorrain, and with all other Princes and States in Amity or Correspondence with her Majesty, that they will not, under any Pretext whatsoever, receive or suffer to continue within any of their Dominions the Person, who, in Defiance of her Majesty's most undoubted Title to the Crown, and the Settlement thereof in the illustrious House of Hanover, has assumed the Title of King of these Realms; and to assure her Majesty, that the Commons of Great Britain will, on all Occasions, to the utmost of their Power, support her Majesty in such Steps, as shall be necessary towards rendering those Instances effectual. After this a Committee was appointed to draw up the said Address, which Mr. Stanhope, Chairman of the Committee, reported to the House on the 3d of July; and the same being unanimously approved, was five Days after presented, by the Speaker with the whole House, to her Majesty, as follows.

Address on that Occasion.

Most Gracious Sovereign,

'We your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, having nothing so justly at our Hearts as the Honour and Safety of your most sacred Person and Government, and the Security of the Protestant Succession, do crave Leave most thankfully to acknowledge the great Care which your Majesty, in Tenderness to your People, hath always taken to prevent the Pretender to your Crown from being in a Condition to disturb these Realms; and particularly by the late Treaty of Guaranty with the States General, and the Treaty of Peace between your Majesty and the French King; wherein, amongst other just and necessary Provisions for the Security of the Protestant Succession, it is stipulated, that the Pretender to your Majesty's Crown shall not be suffered to reside in any of that King's Dominions. Your Majesty wisely insisted upon his Removal from that neighbouring Kingdom, and your faithful Commons are so fully convinced of the Necessity there is to remove him so far as possible, that they cannot but express to your Majesty their Apprehensions of the many Dangers which may accrue to your Majesty, and to your Kingdoms, from his residing in the Territories of the Duke of Lorrain.

'We do therefore, out of the highest Duty and Concern for the Preservation of your Royal Person, and the Quiet of your People, most humbly beseech your Majesty, that you will be pleased to use the most speedy and pressing Instances with the Duke of Lorrain, and with all other Princes and States in Amity, or Correspondence with your Majesty, that they will not, under any Pretext whatsoever, receive, or suffer to continue within any of their Dominions, that Person, who, in Defiance of your Majesty's most undoubted Title to the Crown, and the Settlement thereof on the Illustrious House of Hanover, has assumed the Title of King of these Realms. And we further beg Leave to assure your Majesty, that the Commons of Great-Britain will, on all Occasions, to the utmost of their Power, support your Majesty in such Steps as shall be necessary towards rendering those Instances ineffectual, and your Majesty safe and easy upon your Throne.

To this Address her Majesty was pleased to answer:

Queen's Answer.

Gentlemen,

'I thank you heartily for your Address, and I will give Directions according as you Desire.

This Answer being the next Day reported to the House by the Speakers it was unanimously resolved to return her Majesty the Thanks of the House for the same.

Bill to continue the Act to prevent double Returns of Members.

Two Days, before Mr. Shackerly presented to the House a Bill for continuing an Act made in the seventh Year of the late King William, entitled, An Act to prevent, false and double Returns of Members to serve in Parliament, which was read the first time, and order'd a second Reading. After some other Business of less Importance, Mr. Conyers reported to the House the Resolutions taken two Days before, in a grand Committee on the Supply, which were as follows.

Resolutions on the Supply.

1. That a Sum not exceeding Four thousand eight hundred seventy nine Pounds six Shillings be granted to her Majesty, for defraying the Charge of Half Pay to the Officers of the four Marine Regiments to be disbanded, from the first of July, 1713, to the 24th of December following. 2. Two thousand seventy three Pounds, for the extraordinary Allowance of one Penny per Diem to each Dragoon in North Britain, in lieu of green and dry Forage, between the 23d of December, 1711, and the 31st of May, 1713. 3. Two thousand one hundred sixtyone Pounds, six Shillings and seven Pence, for the Pay of the Commission Officers of seven Companies of Invalids form'd out of the Out-Pensioners of Chelsea Hospital, from the Dates of their Commissions to the Times of their Discontinuance. 4. Two thousand two hundred sixty-nine Pounds, nine Shillings, for the Bounty Money allow'd to the Men disbanded out of the Horse, Foot and Dragoons in Britain in the Year 1712. 5. Three hundred eighty-eight Pounds, six Shillings, for the Pay of an additional Major to the Coldstream Regiment of Foot-Guards, from the 25th of April, 1711, to the 21st of December, 1713. 6. Two thousand one hundred eighty Pounds, six Shillings, for the Pay of the Garrison of Anapolis Royal, from the 25th of August, 1712, to the 21st of December following, according to the Establishment. 7. One thousand nine hundred forty Pounds, for ninety seven Horses of the Regiment, late Lieutenant-General Palms's, which were killed and taken by the Enemy near Doway, in the Campaign 1711. 8. Eight thousand eight hundred fifty one Pounds, eight Shillings and six Pence three Farthings, for Forage Money for five Battalious of Foot that serv'd in the Low Countries in the Year 1712, over and above the forty thousand Men; and for extraordinary Charge of Forage for sixteen Squadrons of Dragoons in their Winter Quarters in Bruges, 1712-13, and for Waggon Money for the said five Battalions. 9. Eight thousand three hundred Pounds, for the Pay and Forage Money of the General Officers, their Aids de Camp, and Majors of Brigade, who serv'd in Flanders in the Year 1712, over and above what is born upon the Establishment for that Year. 10. Nine hundred Pounds to make good the Loss of a Quantity of Cloathing of Colonel Edward Jones's Regiment, which was cast away, with part of the Regiment, in their Passage from Ireland towards Portugal. 11. One thousand four hundred sixty-three Pounds, sixteen Shillings, to supply the Subsistence Money of the Regiments of Major-General Elliot and Sir Robert Rich in Gibraltar, which was taken by the Enemy on board one of her Majesty's Ships. 12. Two thousand seven hundred forty-nine Pounds, thirteen Shillings, for the Allowances to the Commissioners appointed to examine the Affairs of the Army and War in Spain and Portugal, and to their Secretary, and for Contingencies, from the 21st of December, 1712, to the 10th of April following. 13. Two thousand one hundred thirty-six Pounds, for the Pay of the Officers of the Garrison of Dunkirk from the 27th of June, 1712, to the 21st of December following, according to the Establishment. 14. Two thousand six hundred ninety-eight Pounds, fourteen Shillings and five Pence, for the Pay of the Garrisons of Gibraltar and Port Mahon, for three Quarters of the Year 1712, according to their old Establishment. 15. Two thousand Pounds, to defray the Charge of covering the Fortifications already begun in North Britain.

The Queen's Answer about the Towns in Flanders. ; Address thereon. ; The Speaker indispos'd.

These Resolutions being severally read a second Time, the 5th, 8th, and 9th, were disagreed to, some Members having suggested, that there was no Reason to pay any Extraordinaries for Generals who had done nothing; but the other Resolutions were agreed to by the House. After this Mr. Lowndes presented to the House (pursuant to their Address to her Majesty) an Estimate of Civil List Debts on the 24th of June, 1713, and acquainted the House, that the Account of neat Produce of the Civil List Funds since her Majesty's Accession to the Throne was preparing, and would be ready in a Day or two; Hereupon the said Estimate was order'd to lie upon the Table. Then Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer acquainted the House, that their Address having been presented to her Majesty, re lating to the evacuating the Towns in Flanders, her Majesty had been pleased to command him to acquaint this House, 'That she would takeCare that the Towns in Flanders in her Majesty's Possession, be not evacuated till those who were to have the Possession of the Spanish Netherlands agreed to such Articles for regulating Trade, as might put the Subjects of 'Great Britain upon an equal Foot with those of any other Nation.' Upon which it was resolved to address her Majesty, that an Estimate be laid before this House of the Number of Troops necessary in the said Towns in Flanders, till such time as the Trade there be so settled, as might put the Subjects of GreatBritain upon an equal Foot with those of any other Nation; and also an Account of the Charge for maintaining the same. After this it was order'd, that the Officers of the Ordnance do lay before the House an Account of the Effects in their Office for purchasing Lands for erecting Fortifications for Security of the Docks at Portsmouth, Chatham, and Harwich, and of the Proceedings that had been in relation thereunto: And then the House adjourn'd to the Friday following, by reason of the Speaker's Indisposition.

The Queen's Message to the Commons inviting them to go to St. Paul's on the Thanksgiving Day. ; Money Bills consolidated, amended, and order'd to be engross'd.

When the House met again, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, by her Majesty's Commands, acquainted the House, 'That her Majesty has appointed Tuesday the seventh of this Instant July, to be observ'd as a Day of Public Thanksgiving to Almighty God, on Occasion of the safe and honourable Peace concluded lately at Utrecht; and for the greater Solemnity of that Day, her Majesty will be pleased to go to St. Paul's Chuch, as has been accustomed in former Times in this Kingdom, to return Thanks to Almighty God for the Blessings of Peace, in which not only her Majesty, but all her Subjects, are so highly concerned. And that her Majesty hath been pleased to give necessary Orders for providing convenient Places in the said Cathedral for the Members of this House.' Whereupon it was Resolv'd, First, That the humble Thanks of this House be returned to her Majesty, for her gracious Favour in communicating to this House her Intention of going to St. Paul's Church upon the Day of Thanksgiving appointed by her Majesty, and for having been pleased to give Orders for providing convenient Places in the said Cathedral for the Members of this House. Secondly, That this House will attend her Majesty as an House to St. Paul's Church, upon the Day appointed for a Public Thanksgiving. Upon the Reading of the Order of the Day for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House on the Bill to raise 1200,000 l. by circulating Exchequer Bills, and on the Bill for enabling her Majesty to raise 500,000 l. it was order'd, That the said Committee be instructed to receive two Clauses, one to prevent the Forging or Counterfeiting Exchequer Bills, to be issued by virtue of the said Bills; the other for appropriating the Monies granted this Session of Parliament. Then the House resolv'd itself into a Committee upon the said Bills, consolidated them, and made several Amendments to them, which were reported to the House on the sixth of July, to which Day the House adjourn'd; and, with other Amendments to some of them, agreed to by the House, and the Bill order'd to be engross'd.

Her Majesty's Message to the Commons about her not going to St. Paul's. ; Acts pass'd by Commission. ; Accounts of neat Money arisen for the Uses of the Civil Government.

The 6th Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, by her Majesty's Command, acquainted the Commons, 'That her Majesty not having entirely recovered her Strength since her last Fit of the Gout, and being apprehensive that the Fatigue of going to St. Paul's Church, as she intended, may be too great, chuses rather to return her Thanks to Almighty God for the Blessings of Peace in her Chapel at St. James's; but desires that this Honse would proceed to St. Paul's Church with as much Solemnity as if her Majesty was to be in Person there.' Hereupon it was resolv'd, That this House will go from the House to St Paul's Church To-morrow to the Solemnity of the Public Thanksgiving. 2dly, That this House will be going to their Places prepared for them in the Choir of St. Paul's Church, To-morrow by Nine, of the Cleck in the Morning. After this it was order'd, That no Member do go into the Place of the Choir in St. Paul's Church, provided for this House, before Mr. Speaker and the House come thither. 3dly, That the Serjeant at Arms attending this House do take into Custody all and every Person and Persons (other than the Members and Officers of this House) that shall presume to press or come in the Place in the Choir in St. Paul's Church, provided for the Members of this House. 4thly, That Mr. Speaker do appoint the several Door-Keepers to keep the Passages to the Places provided for the Members of this House in the Choir of St. Paul's Church, and that they do not presume to let any Persons but such as are Members and Officers of the House, into the Places provided for this House. 5thly, That the Members do go to St. Paul's in their own Coaches, with a Pair of Horses only in each Coach. 6thly, That no HackneyCoaches, Carts, or Drays, be permitted to go on Tuesday the 7th Instant, between the Palace Yard Westminster and Temple Bar, between the Hours of Nine and Two of the Clock; and that Mr. Speaker do issue his Warrant to the Justices of the Peace, the Bailiff of Westminster, and other proper Officers, to prevent the same, 7thly, That for the more orderly proceeding to the said Solemnity, and for preventing any Disorder therein upon this Occasion, Mr. Speaker's Coach do go first, and the Members Coaches follow his one by one. 8thly, That no Member's Coach do go out of the Palace Yard before Mr. Speaker's Coach. The same Day, upon the Desire of the Lords authorized by virtue of her Majesty's Commission, the Speaker with the House went up to the House of Peers, and heard the Commission read, authorizing several Lords therein named, to notify and declare, in her Majesty's Absence, the Royal As sent to several Bills therein mention'd. Accordingly, the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, the Lord President of her Majesty's Houshold, did notify and declare the Royal Assent to the public Bills following, viz. 1. An Act to explain a Clause in an Act of the last Session of Parliament, entitled, An Act for the more effectual preventing fraudulent Conveyances, in order to multiply Votes for the electing Knights of Shires to serve in Parliament, as far as the same relates to the ascertaining the Value of Freeholders of Forty Shillings per Annum. 2. An Act for the more effectual preventing and punishing Robberies that shall be committed in Houses. 3. An Act for the better regulating the Elections of Members to serve in Parliament for that Part of Great Britain called Scotland. 4. An Act for raising the Militia for the Year 1713, although the Month's Pay formerly advanced be not paid. 5. An Act for continuing an Act made in the third and fourth Years of the Reign of her present Majesty, entitled, An Act for encouraging the Importation of Naval Stores from her Majesty's Plantations in America, and for encouraging the Importation of Naval Stores from that Part of Great Britain called Scotland to that Part of Great Britain called England. 6. An Act for continuing the Acts therein mentioned for preventing Theft and Rapine upon the Northern Borders of England, and to nine private Bills. The Commons being returned to their House, Mr. Lowndes presented to them, pursuant to their Address to her Majesty, an Abstract of the Accompts of neat Money arisen for Uses of the Civil Government, between the eighth of March, 1701, and Michaelmas, 1712. And the Title thereof being read, it was order'd, That the said Abstract do lie upon the Table.

Proceedings on the conolidating Bill, &c.

The 8th, the Commons read the consolidated Bill to raise 1,200,000 l. and 500,000 l. &c. made some Amendments to it, passed it, and sent it up to the Lords. After this they took into Consideration the Report of the Committee, to whom the Bill for encouraging the Tobacco Trade was committed; and a Debate arising upon a Clause relating to damaged Tobacco, the same was adjourned to the next Day. when several new Amendments were made by the House to the Bill, which so amended, was ordered to be engrossed.

Resolutions in favour of Mr. Paterson.

The 10th the Commons read the third time, passed, and and sent to the Lords, A Bill for building a Church in the Strand, &c. and a Bill for making perpetual the Act to prevent false and double Returns of Members to serve in Parliament. After which, they read twice, and approved, the Resolutions of the Committee to whom the Petition of William Paterson, Esquire, was referred, viz.

1. That the Petitioner William Paterson, Esq; hath been at great Expence and Pains, and sustained very considerable Losses in the Service of the late African and Indian Company of Scotland, and ought to be re-imbursed, and have a Recompence for the same

2. That the Sum of 18,241 l. 10 s. 10 d. two thirds of a Penny, ought to be answered and made good to the Petitioner.

The Bill to encourage the Tobacco Trade sent up by the Lords. ; Rejected by their Lordships.

The next Day, an engrossed Bill for encouraging the Tobacco Trade, and for Ease of Merchants, as to Wine Bonds and Tobacco Bonds; and for disposing of Goods lying long in her Majesty's Warehouses for the Duties; and for explaining a former Act, as to a Duty of 15 per Cent. on certain Linnens and for allowing the making of Quarter Pieces of Linnen in Scotland, and for discharging the Lustring Company from sealing Lustrings and Alamodes to be made in Great-Britain, and for continuing the Deputations of Custom-house Officers, notwithstanding the Death or Removal of any Commissioners of the Customs; and for Relief of Sir John Lambert, and others, in relation to the Duties of certain Wines taken as Prize; and for better enabling the Bank of England to lend Money on Stock of the South-Sea-Company, and for the more effectual taking, stating, and determining several Accounts relating to the Forces and Marines, was read the third time, amended by the House, passed, and sent up to the Lords, by whom it was rejected.

Bill to prevent too frequent Excommunications.

The same Day the Commons read a second time an engrossed Bill from the Lords, entitled, An Act to prevent the too frequent Denunciation of Excommunication in the Exercise of Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, and having committed it to the Committee of the whole House, ordered, that the said Committee have Power to receive two Clauses, one to prevent Extortion in the taking of Fees for Proceedings in the Ecclesiastical Courts; the other for the better qualifying ecclesiastical Judges.

The Bill stopt in the Lords House.

The 14th, the House resolved itself into that Committee, and made several Amendments to the Bill; which were the next Day reported, and agreed to by the House; after which the Bill was read the third time, passed, and sent back to the Lords, where it stopped, either for want of Time, or for some other Reason.

Address about Lands for the Fortifications of Portsmouth, &c. ; And against the Exportation of Wool.

The same Day the Commons resolved to address the Queen, That she would be pleased to direct a new Survey to be made of such of the Lands and Tenements as are necessary for the Fortifications at Portsmouth, Chatham, and Harwich, that are now in being, or for the Service of the Navy, or for the Victualling thereof, that they may be paid for; and also, to enquire what Damages have been suffered by the Owners of other Lands, that are not so necessary for the said Uses and Services, that Satisfaction may be made for the same: and, that her Majesty would be pleased to direct her Commissioners to proceed in the Execution of their Commission for the Purposes aforesaid. It was also resolved, upon Mr. Pitt's Motion, That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, that she will be pleased to issue her royal Proclamation, requiring a due and strict Execution of the Laws against Exportation of Wool from Great-Britain and Ireland to foreign Parts; and humbly to desire her Majesty, that she will be pleased to give such Reward, as her Majesty in her Wisdom shall think fit, to such Persons as shall discover any Exportation thereof. With the first Part of which Address her Majesty readily complied.

The 16th the Queen went to the House of Peers with the usual State; and the Commons being sent for up, and attending, their Speaker made a Speech to her Majesty upon the presenting of the Money-Bills; after which, her Majesty gave the Royal Assent to the following Bills, viz.

Acts pass'd, July 10.

1. An Act to raise Twelve hundred thousand Pounds, for public Uses, by circulating a farther Sum in Exchequer-Bills, and for enabling her Majesty to raise Five hundred thousand Pounds on the Revenues appointed for Uses of her Civil Government, to be applied for or towards Payment of such Debts and Arrears owing to her Servants, Tradesmen, and others, as are therein mentioned.

2. An Act to enable such Officers and Soldiers as have been in her Majesty's Service during the late War, to exercise Trades, and for Officers to account with their Soldiers.

3. An Act for explaining the Acts for licensing Hackney Chairs.

4. An Act for the better Encouragement of the making Sail-Cloth in Great-Britain.

5. An Act for making perpetual an Act made in the seventh Year of the Reign of the late King William, entituled, An Act to prevent false and double Returns of Members to serve in Parliament.

6. An Act for making perpetual the Act made in the 13th and 14th Years of the Reign of the late King Charles the Second, entitled, An Act for the better Relief of the Poor of this Kingdom; And that Persons bound Apprentices to, or being hired Servants with Persons coming with Certificates, shall not gain Settlements by such Services or Apprenticeships; And for making perpetual the Act made in the sixth Year of her present Majesty's Reign, entituled, An Act for the Importation of Cochineal from any Ports in Spain, during the present War, and six Months longer; and for reviving a Clause in an Act made in the ninth and tenth Years of the Reign of the late King William, entituled, An Act for settling the Trade to Africa, for allowing foreign Copper Bars imported to be exported.

7. An Act to vest in the Commissioners for building fifty new Churches in and about London and Westminster, and Suburbs thereof, as much near the Street near the May-pole in the Strand, in the County of Middlesex, as shall be sufficient to build one of the said Churches upon; And for restoring to the Principal and Scholars of King's-Hall and College of Brazen-nose, in the University of Oxon, their Right of Presentations to Churches and Chapels in Stepney Parish.

And to six private Bills.

After this, the Queen was pleased to make the following Speech to both Houses:

The Queen's Speech to both Houses of Parliament.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I Come now to put an end to this Session with great Satisfaction, and return you all my hearty Thanks for the good Service you have done to the Public.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

I must particularly thank you for the Supplies you have now given; I will take Care to apply them, as far as they will reach, to satisfy the Services you have voted.

I hope, at the next Meeting, the Affair of Commerce will be so well understood, that the advantageous Conditions I have obtained from France, will be made effectual for the Benefit of our Trade.

I cannot part with so good and so loyal an House of Commons, without expressing how sensible I am of the Affection, Zeal and Duty, with which you have behaved yourselves; and I think myself therefore obliged to take notice of those remarkable Services you have performed.

At your first Meeting you found a Method, without farther Charge to my People, to ease them of the heavy Load of more than Nine Millions; and the way of doing it may bring great Advantage to the Nation.

In this Session, you have enabled me to be just in paying the Debts to my Servants.

'And as you furnished Supplies for carrying on the War, so you have strengthened my Hands in obtaining a Peace.

Thus you have shewed yourselves the true Representatives of my loyal Commons, by the just Regard you have paid to the Good of your Country, and my Honour: these Proceedings will, I doubt not, preserve the Memory of this Parliament to Posterity.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

'At my coming to the Crown, I found a War prepared for me. God has blessed my Arms with many Victories, and at last has enabled me to make them useful by a safe and honourable Peace.

I heartily thank you for the Assistance you have given me therein, and I promise myself, that with your Concurrence. it will be lasting.

To this End, I recommend it to you all, to make my Subjects truly sensible what they gain by the Peace, and that you will endeavour to dissipate those groundless Jealousies, which have been so industriously fomented amongst us, that our unhappy Divisions may not weaken, and, in some sort, endanger the Advantages I have obtained for my Kingdoms.

There are some (very few, I hope) who will never be satisfied with any Government; it is necessary, therefore, that you shew your Love to your Country, by exerting yourselves to obviate the Malice of the Ill-minded, and to undeceive the Deluded.

Nothing can establish Peace at Home, nothing can recover the Disorders that have happened during so long a War, but a steady adhering to the Constitution in Church and State.

Such as are true to these Principles are only to be relied on; and as they have the best Title to my Favour, so you may depend upon my having no Interest nor Aim, but your Advantage, and the securing of our Religion and Liberty.

'I hope, for the Quiet of these Nations, and the universal Good, that I shall, next Winter, meet my Parliament, resolved to act upon the same Principles, with the same Prudence, and with such Vigour, as may enable me to support the Liberties of Europe abroad, and reduce the Sprit of Faction at home.'

And afterwards, the Lord High-Chancellor of Great-Britain, by her Majesty's Command, said,

The Parliament prorogued.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

'It is her Majesty's Royal Will and Pleasure, that this Parliament be prorogued to Friday the 2d Day of August next: and this Parliament is accordingly prorogued to Friday the 28th Day of August next.' Before which Time it was dissolved (fn. 5) .

Footnotes

1 It is observable that Monsieur de Bruciado, the Portugueze Envoy Extraordinary at the British Court, did about thes time, present a Memorial importing, 'That, in Case any Breach should be made here in the said Treaty, the King his Master would renew the Prohibition of the Woollen Manufactures of Great Britain. Which alarm'd not only the London Marchants, trading to Portugal, but also all Persons concerned in the Wollen Manufacture, and all Well-wishers to their Country; it being most certain that that Branch of our Trade, had of late been the most ben ficial; since, by a modest Computation, we gain'd by it, upon a Ballance 600,000 l. yearly.
2 At the same Time the Silk-Weavers caused the following Paper to be printed and dispers'd.
'The Case of the Silk-Weavers, hambly offer'd to the Consideration of both Houses of Parliament.
'That the Silk Manufacture of this Kingdom, by the Encouragement it hath receiv'd from the Crown, and divers Acts of Parliament, is above twenty-times as great as it was in the Year 1664, and all sorts of as good Black and Colour'd Silks, Gold and Silver Stuffs and Ribbons, are now made here as in France, or any other foreign Country.
'That the Manufacture of Black Silks for Hoods and Scarves not known in England above Twenty-five Years ago, is now so increas'd, that above 300,000 l. worth of that Commodity alone hath been Yearly, for several Years last, made here, which before were used to be bought with our ready Money from France.
'That as the Silk Manufacture hath increase'd here, the Exportation of our Cloth Serges, and other our Woollen Manufactures to Turkey and Italy have also increas'd, and the Returns from those Parts have been, and are made in Raw and Thrown Silk for the Employment of our Manufactures, and the vast Numbers depending on them.
That by the eight and ninth Articles of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great-Britain and France, it is agreed, That the Commodities from France may be imported here, paying as other Countries do, that are most favour'd, for the like Commodities.
'The Italian Wrought Silk are most favoured and pay 10s. 6 d. the pound weight Custom.
'That French Silks, notwithstanding they should be obliged to pay that Duty, will come to our Markets 20 d. in the pound weight cheaper than our own (as appears by a modest Calculation herein after mentioned) occasioned partly from the small Duty paid for the Silk imported from Italy into France, and the small Charge of Carriage by being so near; but chiesly from the Cheapness of manufacturing, principally occasioned from their Money being raised.
'The Costs of one pound weight of Italian Thrown Silk manufactured in Colour'd Plain Silk, being reduced to eleven Ounces.
In France.                                                             In England,
                                                                  lsdlsd.
For Custom                                               0 00 8 0 03 4
Freight and Insurance                              0 01 0 0 01 6
Dying                                                       0 00 6 0 01 0
Winding and Warping                              0 01 0 0 02 0
Weaving                                                   0 04 0 0 08 0
The Italian Duty as above to be laid on
the French at 10s. 6d. a. lb. for 11. Own.  0 07 0 0 00 0
                                                                 0 14 2 0 15 10
The French cheaper than the English by   0 01 8
                                                                 0 15 10
'Besides which, French Silks, in the Opinion of most of our Nation, having a preference to our own (tho' better than theirs) the Fashions are, or likely to be taken from France: So that our English cannot make Provisions for a Spring Trade, for fear a New Fashion should come from France and render ours despicable: And in case we should imitate them, we must come at the latter End of the Market, and by that Time another Fashion comes in from France; whereby France will always have the first of the Market, and the English the Fag-end, which is above 15 l. per Cent. in the Sale of those Goods.
N. B. That a Rich Flower'd Silk is made with Two Thirds of Silk of the Growth of France, which will cost 4 or 5 s. a pound cheaper to them than the Turkey Silk we use for the same.
3 At the same time the Case of the Parish of St. Giles's Cripplegate, was printed and disperss'd as follows:
There are in the said Parish, Eighty Five Sheds
for the Spinning Gilt and Silver Thread, in which
are 255 Pair of Wheels: The Masters, with their
Families, amount to                                                                          181
'These employ poor Boy and Girls to the Number of                        1275
There are 118 Master Wire-Drawers, who with
their Wives and Apprentices, make                                                   826
'Master Weavers of Gold and Silver Fringes,                                    106
'Their Wives, Children, Apprentices, and Journey-Men, amount to  2120
'Silver and Gold Bone-Lace Makers, and Silver
and Gold Button-Makers, with their Families                                  1000
'Windsters, Flatters of Gold and Silver, Engine
Spinners, with their Families                                                            300
                                                                                             Total 6208
'The Poor's Rate of the Parish, amounts to near Four Thousand Pounds per Annum, and the Parish did Assess 36 Quarters the last Year.
'The Parish had taken up at Interest in Five Years last past, Twelve Hundred Pounds.
'At this present are Indebted One Thousand Six Hundred and Fifty Pounds.
'Persons are Daily Removing out of the Parish, by reason of this heavy Burthen; empty Houses increasing, and the Poor must necessarily be increased.
Samuel Burge, Curate, Church-Wardens. Thomas Horton, Overseers.
Samuel Carr,                                            John Crakeford,
Robert Gascoyn,                                       William Lawrence,
Thomas Boucher,                                     Benjamin Parker,
Charles Robinson,                                   John Cash.
'To the preceding Case of the Minister, Church-Wardens, Overseers, Vestry-Men, and other the Inhabitants of the said Parish of St. Giles's Cripplegate, we do crave leave humbly to represent to the Honourable House of Commons,
'That there are 3913 Houses in the said Parish; that there are 2620 Houses that pay nothing to the Poor's Rate, the Inhabitants being, by reason of their Poverty, excused.
'That this last Year, since the Duty hath been laid on Gilt and Silver-Wire, they have been forced to assess 40 Quarters, which is 4 Quarters more than they did assess in the preceding Year, and the Debt of the Parish is encreased to 1800 l. and upwards.
'That, should Liberty be given for the Importation of Foreign Gold, and Silver-Lace, Thread, and other Manufactures made thereof, which are now prohibited by an Act passed the last Sessions of Parliament, it would inevitably be the Ruin of this Great (and sometime since Populous) Parish, unless this Honourable House commiserate and relieve them in this their lamentable State and Condition.
4 It was observ'd, That of the four Members for the City of London, one only, Sir William Withers, voted for the Bill; and that Sir Richard Hoare, the Lord Mayor, Sir George Newland, and Sir John Cass voted against it; as did also the two Members for Westminster, Mr. Medlicot, and Mr. Thomas Cross, the last of whom was since Knighted. On the other Hand it was confidently given out, that the Lord Treasurer, foreseeing the ill Effects of passing such a Bill at this Juncture, wrote, the Night before, a Letter to the Speaker of the House of Commons, desiring him to use his Interest to make it drop; which Step be might probably be induc'd to take from the Opposition the said Bill was like to meet with in the House of Lords.
5 Thus ended the third and last Session of the third British Parliament, which some have distinguished by the Epithet of Pacifick; and whose Proceedings, as they are variously censured by the present Age, so will they bear a various Character with Posterity. It may be observed, in general, that this House of Commons was mostly made up of Country-Gentlemen, who, having born a great Part of the Burthen of the War, were easily preposessed against them, who were suggested to have prolonged it for their own private Interest; and so, on many Occasions, voted blindly with their designing and corrupt Leaders.