London debates
1792

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London Record Society

Publication

Author

Donna T. Andrew (compiled and introduced by)

Year published

1994

Pages

318-321

Citation Show another format:

'London debates: 1792', London debating societies 1776-1799 (1994), pp. 318-321. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=38856 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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Contents

1826. January 5, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it not the duty of the people of Great Britain, from a principle of moral obligation and regard to their national character, to abstain from the consumption of West India produce till the Slave Trade is abolished and measures are taken for the abolition of Slavery?

In addition to much sound reasoning and interesting narrative, a gentleman . . . exhibited to the audience the same iron mask that was produced in Court upon the memorable trial respecting Somerset the negro, and explained the manner in which it was used as an instrument to punish the unfortunate African Slave.

N.B. A pamphlet on the subject will, by desire of several respectable characters belonging to the Committee of the African Society be distributed (gratis) to the public by the door-keeper at the Hall.'

Daily Advertiser January 4/Times

1827. January 12, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it not the duty of the people of Great Britain, from a principle of moral obligation and regard to their national character, to abstain from the consumption of West India produce till the Slave Trade is abolished and measures are taken for the abolition of Slavery?

Almost unanimous vote of near six hundred persons in favour of our African brethren.'

Daily Advertiser January 11

1828. January 19, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'To which of the two causes is to be attributed the present unequal representation of the people in the Commons House of Parliament, to a disinclination for any reform on their part, or to the influence of the executive government, as well as the present mode of Election as on the Elected?

Several Gentlemen . . . pointed out, with great zeal and ability, the defects in the present state of our Parliamentary Representation, and the undue influence exercised in the mode of Election.'

Times

1829. January 26, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the present unequal representation of the people in the Commons House of Parliament to be attributed to a disinclination for any reform on their part; to the influence of the Executive Government, as well as the present mode of Election as on the elected; or to the impracticability of procuring any reform whatever?'

Times

1830. February 2, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Would it reflect honour upon the people of Europe to withdraw their allegiance from those Princes, who shall attempt to oppose the liberties of France?

The character of this popular institution is to cherish genius, cultivate eloquence, and discover important truths.'

Times

1831. February 9, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Does the eulogium lately bestowed by Mr. Fox in the House of Commons on the character of Dr. Priestley, exonerate that celebrated character from the charges of holding principles hostile to the British Constitution?'

Daily Advertiser February 8

1832. February 16, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Which might be considered the most Criminal, the Merchants and Planters who carry on the Slave Trade; the British House of Commons, who have refused to abolish it, or the People who encourage it by the Consumption of Sugar and Rum?

To the Judgment, as well as the compassionate Feeling of the Fair Sex, an Appeal from the suffering Negroes will be made, in order to dissuade them from any longer consuming an Article of Luxury that is polluted with the Blood of innocent Fathers, Mothers and Children.'

Times

1833. February 23, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Which might be considered the most Criminal, the Merchants and Planters who carry on the Slave Trade; the British House of Commons, who have refused to abolish it, or the People who encourage it by the Consumption of Sugar and Rum?'

Times

1834. March 1, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Which ought to be considered the most Criminal, the Merchants and Planters who carry on the Slave Trade; the British House of Commons, who have refused to Abolish it, or the People who encourage it by the Consumption of Sugar and Rum?'

Times

1835. March 8, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Which might be considered the most Criminal, the Merchants and Planters who carry on the Slave Trade; the British House of Commons, who have refused to abolish it, or the People who encourage it by the Consumption of Sugar and Rum?'

Times

1836. March 15, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Has the conduct of Mr. Pitt in the late Negotiation with Russia, or that of Mr. Fox in opposing the Measure, and its Consequences, been more consistent with the true Policy and intitled to the Approbation of this Country?'

Times

1837. March 22, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it not a Dishonour to the British Nation to withhold from the Protestant Dissenters and English Catholics an equal Participation of Civil and Religious Liberties with the Members of the Established Church?'

Times

1838. March 29, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it not a Disgrace to the British Nation to withhold from the Protestant Dissenters and English Catholics an equal participation of Civil and Religious Liberties with the Members of the Established Church?'

Times

1839. April 5, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Has not the conduct both of Administration and Opposition been such, as to convince the people of this country, that they have no foundation for placing any confidence in either?'

Times

1840. April 12, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it justifiable in Creditors to detain their Debtors in prison after their whole property is surrendered, and would it be a measure of wisdom in the Legislature at the present period to pass a general Act of Insolvency?

The asserted impolicy of the laws between Debtor and Creditor, the crowded state of our prisons, and the exertions of Mr. Grey, and other public characters to procure a Reform in the Measure of Imprisonment for Debt, are circumstances which render the above question of great and immediate importance, in a commercial City its discussion must be peculiarly interesting, and will doubtless be conducted with that willingness to communicate and receive information, which distinguishes the liberal and enlightened manners of the age.'

Times

1841. April 26, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Have the Societies for Constitutional Information acted consistently with the character of wise and good Citizens, in publicly bestowing their approbation of the political conduct of Mr. Paine and John Horne Tooke?'

Times

1842. May 3, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Do those Members of the House of Commons who supported on Monday last the necessity of a Parliamentary Reform at the present crisis, merit the applause or censure of the people of this country?'

Times

1843. May 10, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Do those Members of the House of Commons who asserted the necessity of a Parliamentary Reform at the present juncture, merit the applause or censure of the people of England?'

Times

1844. May 17, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Do those Members of the House of Commons, who asserted the necessity of a Parliamentary Reform at the present juncture, merit the applause or censure of the people of England?'

Times

1845. May 24, 1792 Coachmakers Hall

'Are Associations for Political Purposes likely to promote the happiness of the people, by informing their minds, or to make them discontented without redressing their grievances?'

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