London debates
1793

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London Record Society

Publication

Author

Donna T. Andrew (compiled and introduced by)

Year published

1994

Pages

321-325

Citation Show another format:

'London debates: 1793', London debating societies 1776-1799 (1994), pp. 321-325. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=38857 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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Contents

1846. January 5, 1793 Select Association, Globe Tavern, Fleet Street 'Does NATURE or ART more contribute to form the perfect ORATOR?

Twelve Gentlemen Students of the Law, having announced their intention of establishing a Select Society for the discussion of Subjects that have a [claim] to public notice - the following Extracts from their Resolutions present the substance of a Plan, tending to combine Professional and Philanthropic Utility, and which is expected to obtain the concurrent support of those, whose liberal education and pleasures may induce them to assist in cultivating Oratory and the Belles Lettres.

2nd. That the number of persons to be admitted be limited to two hundred, paying one shilling each; and that those who may wish to secure admission, by sending for tickets previous to the evening of debate, shall be accommodated at the bar of the tavern.

3rd. That the Receipts which may arise from the encouragement given to this institution, be applied for the benefit of the Philanthropic Society.'

Morning Herald

1847. January 12, 1793 Select Association for Free Debate, Globe Tavern

'Is Imprisonment for Debt, consistent with the principles of a general Policy?'

Times January 11

1848. January 19, 1793 Select Association

'Is the London theatre, in its present state, conducive to the Interest of Morality?

It having been stated in a candid Manner, by the first Magistrate in the City, that a Number of Persons meeting for public Debate, cannot be prevented from making irrelevant Observations; the Society beg leave to inform the Public, that the discussion of Politics is not at this Time thought adviseable and that the President will restrain every improper digression.'

Times January 18

1849. January 26, 1793 Select Association

'Has Vanity or Interest a great Influence on the Conduct of Mankind?'

Times

1850. February 2, 1793 Select Association

'Would it not be for the commercial and political Advantage of Great Britain, if the Government would lay the Trade to India open, and take the territorial Possessions of the Company into their own Hands?'

Morning Herald

1851. February 9, 1793 Select Association

'Would it not be for the commercial and political Advantage of Great Britain, if the Government would lay the Trade to India open, and take the territorial Possessions of the Company into their own Hands?'

Morning Herald

1852. August 22, 1793 London Forum, Capel Court

'Does the Happiness of Mankind consist most in the Increase of Knowledge, Success in Trade, or the Enjoyment of social and domestic Felicity?

The Conductors of this Society . . . declar[e] that they shall ever be happy to receive and adopt such Questions as have a Tendency to polish the Manners and improve the Heart.'

Daily Advertiser August 21

1853. August 29, 1793 London Forum

'Does the Infelicity often attendant on the Marriage State most frequently arise from the Neglect of Husbands, the Misconduct of Wives, or the Flattery and Adulation usually paid to the fair Sex in Courtship? The Questions of this Society are regularly advertised in this Paper . . . and announced to the Publick by large bills posted throughout the principal Streets of the Metropolis.'

Daily Advertiser August 28

1854. September 5, 1793 London Forum

'Which is the strongest Obligation, Gratitude to our Friends, Duty to our Parents, or Love for our Country?'

Daily Advertiser September 4

1855. September 12, 1793 London Forum

'Which Passion has the most powerful Influence upon Mankind, Ambition, Pleasure or Interest?'

Daily Advertiser September 11

1856. September 19, 1793 London Forum

'Is it consistent with Female Delicacy, manly Dignity, or a rational Prospect of connubial Happiness, for either a Lady or a Gentleman to advertise for a Partner in the Marriage State?

The strange Scenes of Courtship which must arise between Lovers whimsically introduced to each other by publick Advertisement, must afford in the Discussion of the above Question a Theme of Ridicule for the Humourist, a Field of Wit for the Satyrist, and an ample Range of Reflection for the speculative Philosopher.'

Daily Advertiser September 18

1857. September 26, 1793 London Forum

'Is it consonant with Reason, Philosophy, or Revelation, to believe in supernatural Appearances, or to suppose that a departed Spirit ever was seen by or conversed with Mortals?'

Daily Advertiser September 25

1858. October 3, 1793 London Forum

'Is it consonant with Reason, Philosophy, or Revelation, to believe in supernatural Appearances, or to suppose that a departed Spirit ever was seen by or conversed with Mortals?'

Daily Advertiser October 2

1859. October 10, 1793 London Forum

'In this expensive and elegant Age, which stands the better Chance of Respectability and Happiness in the conjugal State, the Man of middling Circumstances, who from prudential Motives marries for Money, or he who governed by the Dictates of the Heart marries for Love alone?

The Conductors of the London Forum respectfully inform the Publick, that in Consequence of the crowded Audience of the last Evening they have determined to reserve the elevated Seats for the Accommodation of Ladies.'

Daily Advertiser October 9

1860. October 17, 1793 London Forum

'Which has the greatest Influence on the Actions of Mankind, the Love of Life, the Love of Liberty, or the Love of the Fair Sex?'

Daily Advertiser October 16

1861. October 24, 1793 London Forum

'Which has the greatest Influence on the Actions of Mankind, the Love of Life, the Love of Liberty, or the Love of the Fair Sex?

It is with sensible Regret that the Conductors of this Society have to announce to the Publick, that the above Question, obviously calculated to afford and instructive and argumentative Debate, was adjourned on the last Evening in Consequence of the inflammatory and unconstitutional Principles which were avowed by an enthusiastick Individual, totally unconnected with the London Forum. Though the natural bias of an English Audience to the constitutional Rights of Liberty of Speech prevented that determinate Opposition which was made by the Chairman from procuring at first its usual and expected Effect, it affords the Managers peculiar Pleasure to declare, that the good Sense and Penetration of the Audience induced them at least to repel with Contempt Insinuations equally unsound and illiberal. When an Individual by a daring Obstinacy, as disrespectful as licentious, in Defiance of the established Order of the Society, will drag in by a studied Deviation from the Subject Opinions evidently hostile to the Happiness of Mankind, he may rest assured that neither an unblushing Front, nor a silly Affectation of Singularity, shall screen him from that publick Censure which such Conduct deserves. The Managers trust they shall receive the Support of every liberal and impartial Mind, when they declare, that, without Timidity on the one Side, or Temerity on the other, they are determined to support the Principles of the British Constitution, and never to countenance any Attempt to weaken that becoming Reverence for our holy Religion, which alone can secure the present and future Felicity of Man.'

Daily Advertiser October 23

1862. October 31, 1793 London Forum

'Ought the Man who submits to be governed by his Wife to receive Censure for his Weakness, or Praise for his Love of Peace?

The Reins of domestick Government, though apparently adapted by Nature for the Lords of the Creation, are frequently in Female Hands, guided with a Discernment and Propriety which evinces considerable Strength of Understanding, and great natural Goodness of Heart; on the contrary, various Misfortunes, and accumulated Distress, have been the result of a tame Submission in the Husband, and an unwarrantable Desire of Power in the Wife.'

Daily Advertiser October 30

1863. November 7, 1793 London Forum

'Is it from the Depravity of human Nature, or the wise Dispensations of an over-ruling Providence, that mutual Affection is so seldom found in the matrimonial State?'

Daily Advertiser November 6

1864. November 14, 1793 London Forum

'Which is the greater Trial of human Virtue, Prosperity or Adversity?'

Daily Advertiser

1865. November 21, 1793 London Forum

'Which is the more disagreeable Companion, a crusty old Bachelor, or a peevish old Maid?

Daily Advertiser November 20

1866. November 28, 1793 London Forum

'Which is the more blameable Character, the Seducer, who ruins unsuspecting Virgin Innocence, or the Father who abandons his Daughter in Consequence of such Seduction?

To one or other of the Causes mentioned in the above Question may justly be attributed the alarming Number of those unhappy Victims of Infamy who nightly parade the Streets of the Metropolis; it cannot therefore be uninteresting to the Woman of Sensibility, and the Man of Feeling; for however justly Censure may be merited there is a Sentiment of Compassion which pleads for the Unfortunate, and which it has long been the peculiar Boast of Britons to cherish and promote.'

Daily Advertiser November 27

1867. December 5, 1793 London Forum

'Is the Assertion of Socrates true, that Women in Mischief are wiser than Men?'

Daily Advertiser December 4

1868. December 12, 1793 London Forum

'Which is the greater Trial of human Fortitude: Treachery in a Friendship or Perfidy in Love?'

Daily Advertiser December 11

1869. December 19, 1793 London Forum

'Which is the greater Trial of human Fortitude: Treachery in a Friendship or Perfidy in Love?'

The audience decided 'that human Fortitude is put to a greater Trial by Perfidy in Love than by Treachery in Friendship'.

Daily Advertiser December 18

1870. December 26, 1793 London Forum

'Is the Assertion of Mr. Pope true, "Every Woman is at Heart a Rake"?'

Daily Advertiser December 25