House of Commons Journal Volume 11
25 February 1696

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History of Parliament Trust

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1803

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 11: 25 February 1696', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 11: 1693-1697 (1803), pp. 467-468. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=39252 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Martis, 25 die Februarii;

8° Gulielmi Tertii.

Prayers.

Quartering Soldiers.

A PETITION of several Innholders, and other Publick-house-keepers, in Kingston upon Hull, in behalf of themselves, and the rest of the Publick-house-keepers there, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That, in 1691, Eight Companies of the Duke of Bolton's Regiment came to keep the Garison, and were settled in Quarters, at their own Charge, for about Two Years; but, in 1693, Alderman Ellis did billet on the Petitioners great Numbers of the said Soldiers, on Pretence they wanted Subsistence; but promised, That if the Petitioners would raise a Week's Subsistance, which was about 119£. he would take the Soldiers off, and repay the Petitioners as soon as Money came: That since, viz. in January 1694, they paid 80£. more to Alderman Maister, then Mayor, upon the same Account of keeping off the Soldiers from being quartered upon them: So that the Petitioners have disbursed about 199£.; besides about 50£. more in coming up to London, and attending last Session of Parliament upon their Petition, which was referred to a Committee; but, before they made their Report, the Parliament was prorogued: And praying such Relief in the Premises as the House shall think fit.

Resolved, That the said Petition be rejected.

Wool Trade.

A Petition of the Mayor of the Borough of Plimouth, for and on the behalf of the Merchants, Weavers, Fullers, and other Inhabitants, of the said Borough, trading, or being concerned, in the Woollen Manufactures, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the said Town had formerly a considerable Trade in the Woollen Manufactures, and employed Hundreds of the Inhabitants therein; but that, since a Prohibition to import Wool thither from Ireland, they have lost their Trade in a great measure, and great Numbers of their Workmen are become very necessitous: And praying Liberty to import Wool from Ireland to the said Town.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the Bill for preventing the Exportation of Wool is committed: And that the Committee do fit de die in diem.

Wool Trade.

A Petition of the Merchants, Sergemakers, Fullers, Tallow-chandlers, and others, concerned in the Woollen Manufacture within the City and County of Exon, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the said City was anciently a staple Port, and imported yearly, in Wool, and other Commodities, from Ireland, above 40,000£.; but, since a Prohibition to import Wool from Ireland, the Petitioners have been extremely damnified in their Trades for want of Wool, being wholly employed in the Woollen Manufactures; and their vast Number of Poor, which used to be employed, cannot subsist: That Wool is now brought into none but the Northern Ports; which are so far from the Petitioners, that it is bought up, and conveyed to other Markets, before the Petitioners know of its Arrival; which has advanced the Price above 20£ per Cent.: And praying Liberty to import Wool from Ireland, as they did before the said Prohibition.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee, to whom the Bill for preventing the Exportation of Wool is committed.

Ditto.

A Petition of the Clothiers, and other Inhabitants, in and about the Town of Shepton-Mallet, in the County of Somerset, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That Bridgewater is an ancient Port, lying Six Miles within the Land; and therefore not so liable to ship off Wool for France, as other Ports that lie more open to the Sea; and is most commodious for the Petitioners to trade at: And praying, That a Clause may be brought into the Bill, now depending in the House, for preventing the Exportation of Wool, to make Bridgewater a free Port for the Importation of the same.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee, to whom the said Bill is committed.

Ditto.

A Petition of the Clothiers, and other Inhabitants, in and about the Town of Ilminster, in the County of Somerset, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the Port of Bridgewater lies Six Miles within the Land; is not so liable to ship off Wool for France, as other Ports that lie more open to the Sea; but is also most convenient for the Petitioners Trades: And praying, That Bridgewater may be the Staple Port for the Importation of Wool from Ireland.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee, to whom the Bill for preventing the Exportation of Wool is committed.

Ditto.

A Petition of the Clothiers, and other Inhabitants, in and about the Town and Borough of Chard, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That there is a Bill now depending in the House, for preventing the Exportation of Wool; and to encourage the Importation thereof from Ireland: That the Petitioners conceive Bridgewater the fittest Port for that Purpose, because it lies Six Miles within the Land; and therefore is not so liable to export Wool to France, as other Ports that lie more open to the Sea: And praying, That Bridgewater may be made the Staple Port; it being also most commodious for the Petitioners Trades.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee, to whom the said Bill is committed.

Habeas Corpus Suspension.

Mr. Polteny, according to Order, presented to the House a Bill for impowering his Majesty to apprehend, and detain, such Persons as he shall find Cause to suspect are conspiring against his Royal Person, or Government.

The Bill was read the First time.

Resolved, That the Bill be read a Second time Tomorrow Morning.

Call of the House.

The Order of the Day for the Call of the House was read:

And also the Order for the signing the Association was read:

Then the ingrossed Association was read.

Resolved, That the House will immediately proceed to the Call of the House.

The House was, accordingly, called over:

And some of the Members were excused from appearing, upon Account of present Sickness, and Leave to be absent.

Ordered, That such Members who did not appear this Day, upon the Call of the House, do, as they come to the House, come up to the Table, and sign the Association; or, in their Places, declare their Refusal so to do.

Answer to Address.

Mr. Speaker reported, That both Houses did, Yesterday, attend his Majesty with their Address: And that his Majesty was pleased to give a gracious Answer, to the Effect following; viz.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I thank you heartily for this kind Address: On my Part you may be assured, That I will do all that is within my Power for the Conservation of this Kingdom, to which I have so many Obligations: I will readily adventure my Life for the Preservation of it; and recommend myself to the Continuance of your Loyalty and good Affections.

Committees.

Ordered, That all Committees be adjourned.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Nine a Clock.