House of Commons Journal Volume 11
7 March 1696

Sponsor

History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Year published

1803

Pages

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'House of Commons Journal Volume 11: 7 March 1696', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 11: 1693-1697 (1803), pp. 495-498. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=39262 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Sabbati, 7 die Martii;

8° Gulielmi Tertii.

Prayers.

Ryder's Estate.

AN ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled, An Act to confirm and establish an Exchange, made between Thomas Ryder Esquire, and Christopher Clitheroe, Esquire, of certain Messuages in London, for the Manors of Bilsington, and other Lands, in Kent, of the like Value, was read the Third time.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass.

Ordered, That Mr. Brewer do carry the Bill to the Lords, and acquaint them, That this House hath agreed to the same, without any Amendments.

Committees.

Ordered, That all Committees be revived.

Midford's Estate.

Mr. Farrer reported from the Committee, to whom the Bill for enabling Trustees to sell the Manors of Pespoole, in the County of Durham, Part of the Estate of William Midford, an Infant, for Payment of Debts and Incumbrances charged thereon; and for preserving the rest of the said Infant's Estate; was committed; That they had examined and considered the same; and had directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment: And he delivered the same in at the Clerk's Table.

The Bill was read the Third time.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass.

Ordered, That Mr. Farrer do carry the Bill to the Lords, and acquaint them, That this House hath agreed to the same, without any Amendments.

Jones', &c. Estates.

An ingrossed Bill, from the Lords, intituled, An Act for settling the personal Estates of Richard Jones Esquire, and Mary Gyfford Spinster, Minors, in Trustees, for the Purposes therein mentioned, was read a Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to Sir Sam. Barnardiston, Mr. Brotherton, Mr. Elwell, Mr. Burdet, Sir John Bolles, Mr. Phillips, Sir Gerv. Elwes, Mr. Newport, Mr. Monstevens, Mr. White, Sir Robert Cotton, Mr. Winington, Mr. Yates, Mr. Farrer, Mr. Lowther, Mr. Bromley, Mr. Paget, Sir Rob. Davers, Mr. Whitacre, Sir Wm. Cooper, Sir Edw. Ernley, Mr. Blofeild, Sir Richard Sandford, Mr. Pocklington, Mr. Bridges, Mr. Hedger, Mr. Rowney, Mr. Fuller, Mr. Barkley, Mr. Gardner, Mr. Price, Mr. Foley, Mr. Hunt, Mr. Bagnold, Mr. Robinson, Mr. Baldwyn; and all that serve for the Counties of Berks and Wilts: And they are to meet To-morrow at Four a Clock in the Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chambers.

Ordered, That Mr. Orme have Leave to withdraw his Petition touching the Election for the County of Sussex.

Vesting Tutbury in the Crown.

An ingrossed Bill for re-vesting in his Majesty the Honour of Tutbury, and Forest of Needwood, and several Parks, Manors, Lands, Offices, and other Profits, thereunto belonging; and for vacating certain Letters Patents therein mentioned; was read the Third time.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass: And that the Title be, An Act for re-vesting in his Majesty the Honour of Tutbury, Forest of Needwood, several Manors, Parks, Lands, and Offices, and other Profits, thereunto belonging; and for vacating certain Letters Patents therein mentioned.

Ordered, That Mr. Bromley do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their Concurrence thereunto.

Avon Navigation.

A Petition of the Gentlemen, Landholders, and others, of the Parish of Chippenham, and other adjacent Places, in the County of Wilts, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners are very sensible many Inconveniencies and Mischiefs will attend them, if the Bill, now before the House, for making the River Avon, in the Counties of Wilts, Somerset, and Gloucester, navigable, should pass into an Act; for that the same will, by degrees, supply the Markets in the said Counties, from remote Parts, with vast Quantities of Corn, Butter, Cheese, and other Commodities; so that the Price of the like Commodities, brought to such Markets by the Petitioners, will be much lessened thereby; which will be a Discouragement to Husbandry and Tillage; very considerable there; and, consequently, the Rents of Land must fall: That it will also lessen the Land-carriage in those Parts; whereby many Carriers, Innkeepers, and others, maintain their Families; and thereby discourage the Breeding of Horses; a great Strength of this Nation: That, by reason of these, and many other Inconveniencies, the Servants employed in Husbandry, the Carriers, and Innkeepers, who now comfortably subsist in their several Employments, will be utterly ruined, and inclinable to take ill Courses, if the said Bill should pass: And praying, That the said Bill may not pass this House, for the Reasons aforesaid, amongst many others.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee, to whom the said Bill is committed.

Prohibiting India Silks, Callicoes, &c.

Sir Henry Hobart reported from the Committee, to whom the Consideration of the Petition of the Master, Wardens, and Assistants, of the Company of Weavers of Canterbury; and the Petition of the Wardens and Assistants of the Trade and Company of Worsted-weavers of the City of Norwich, and County of Norfolk; and the Petition of the Say-makers, and Worsted-yarn-makers, in the Counties of Suffolk and Cambridge; was referred; That they had examined and considered the said several Petitions accordingly; and had directed him to report the Matter, with the Resolutions of the Committee thereupon, to the House; which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read; and are as follow; viz.

That it was alledged by John Carter and others, That he had known the said Trade, at Canterbury, about Sixteen Years past; at which time the Manufacture in Wrought Silks, and Silk and Worsted Stuffs, was but small; the greatest Part of which Goods being then brought in from Holland, France, and Italy; but that, by the Industry of the English Manufacturers, they so improved their Art, that the Hollander, even before the War, was quite beat out of that Trade; and the French and Italians were much diminished in their Importation of those Goods; so that the Manufactory increased (fn. (a)) [at least] Three Parts in Four; and would have yearly increased further, but that, about Six or Seven Years past there was such prodigious Quantities of Wrought Silks and Bengals imported from India, that put a great Check to the Petitioners said Trade; and if the Company, and others trading to India, had continued the yearly Importation of such Goods, as they would have done, had they not met with those Losses of their Ships of late Years, the Petitioners must inevitably have lost their said Manufacture, so beneficial to this Kingdom; and, instead of employing our own Poor, and Consumption of our own Manufactures, we should have destroyed them, and sent out our ready Money to buy foreign Manufactures; to the great Damage of this Kingdom.

Mr. Metcalfe: That the Silk so wrought and manufactured in England is the Produce of our Woollen Manufacture abroad, by importing large Quantities of Raw Silk for the same:

That the Manufacture of Wrought Silk here is now brought to that Perfection, that we can cope with any Market in the World, save that of the East-Indies; where they are, and must always be, undersold, by the cheap and inconsiderable Wages of the Natives there; who yet are forced to work by the English Patterns sent them over by the Company:

That the said Manufactory of Silk at Canterbury has so increased there, that it employs, and has depending thereon, at least 10,000 Persons:

That besides the Persons actually concerned in the aforesaid Manufacture, the very Throwing the Raw Silk imported from Turkey, Spain, and Italy, employs between 20, and 30,000 Persons more.

Upon the Petition of the Worsted-weavers in the City of Norwich, and County of Norfolk:

It was alleged by Mr. Lomb, and several others, That he has known the said Trade for Thirty Years past; and that it has very much increased lately, by reason of the Discouragement the East-India Trade hath met with since the War:

That the Returns from Norwich, being formerly about 8,000 l. per Week, are now got up to at least 14,000 l. one Week with another:

That, by a modest Computation, there are at least 100,000 Persons have their Dependence on the said Norwich Manufactory:

That, about Fifteen Years ago, the East-India Goods being much in Use in England, the Petitioners Markets fell, and their Stocks were much diminished; but that, upon such Discouragement of the East-India Trade, their Manufactory is revived, and has increased above One Third more than before; by reason whereof, and the Multiplicity of Work, the Wages usually given is increased from 6d. to 10d. upon the Poor who are employed therein:

That the said Manufactory is become so very considerable, that it consumes above 200,000 l. Value of Wood yearly; whereby it is risen from 16s. to 40s. per Todd; which Price might be very well afforded, if the said Trade be not interrupted by the East-India Company's importing those Commodities; the Consequence whereof will lessen the said Trade, discourage the Manufactory, and reduce many Families to their former Poverty, who now maintain themselves chearfully by their Labour:

That it is not the City of Norwich, or the County of Norfolk, that has had the sole Advantage of this Manufacture, but it has spread itself into many, and some remote, Counties of this Kingdom, where it was never, before lately, set up; and whereby they have felt a sensible Advantage in the Employment of their Poor, and preserving them from Want, or becoming, as before, perpetual Burdens to their Parishes; all which must again sink into, and be restrained in, the narrow Compass of an inconsiderable Manufactory, if the Indian Silks, printed and painted Callicoes, be permitted to be worn in England; that Company being always able to undersell our Manufactory; and their Consumption is the greater, as their Commodity is the slighter, and less sit for a durable Service:

That within these Three Years past, there has been above 2,000 Looms employed in this Manufactory more than before; which, by Computation, spend 3,900 Packs of Wool in their Service yearly: And

That it has and may prove a certain Observation, That the East-India Trade has so much Influence over Wool in England, that the Price thereof rises and falls, with the Scarcity or Glut of that Company's said Commodities; and not only the Wool, but the Manufactory thereof; and that not only in England, but in the Markets abroad; whither our Merchants had sent very great Quantities, but, upon the Arrival of the Dutch East-India Fleet to Holland last Year, the Markets abroad for our Manufactures fell; and most of the Goods lie upon the Hands of the Owners, and their Correspondents.

Upon the Petition of the Say-makers and Worstedyarn-makers, in the Counties of Suffolk and Cambridge:

Mr. Grove and others: That there are at least 40,000 Persons concerned in the making their said Manufactures, which heretofore lay under the Discouragement of the East-India Trade, in the great Use of their Silks and Callicoes: But that, since the Disappointments of that Company, in the Importation of the vast Quantities of those Sorts of Commodities they used to import, Trade is revived, and Wool risen to 40 s. a Todd; the Call for their Manufacture, in the room of those from the Indies, being so great, they can scarce find Hands sufficient to work up their Commodities:

That, from this Encouragement, the poor People take in their Children from the Highways, and their Infant Idleness; and bring them to the Wool, and the Wheel, whereat One of Five Years of Age will earn 4 d. a Day, and prove the better Worker by having had so early an Experience thereof:

That the Country are not only sensible of this great Advantage, in the Employment of their Poor, by the great Ease the Parishes lie under, from their perpetual Contributions to which they did belong; but that now the Petitioners, and their Dependents, in the making the said Yarn, and, thereof, the Woollen Manufactures, do use and work up the Growth of every Year's Wool; which heretofore, when the East-India Trade flourished, and they were discouraged, it was not very unusual to a Gentleman to have Six or Seven Years Wool by him; and when he could sell the same, it was at a very poor Price; and sometimes the Wool, by lying, scarce worth carrying away: So considerable are the Advantages that accidental Disappointments to the East-India Company have given to the Improvement, and Propagation, of so great and advantageous a Manufacture, not only to the many Thousand Families employed, therein, but consequently, to the Kingdom in general; which if the Trade of that Company, upon their new Establishment, is not restrained from selling their said Silks and Callicoes here, the said Manufacture must dwindle down again, labouring under its first Difficulties of meeting that Company's Commodities in any Markets at home or abroad: So great is the Disproportion of the prime Costs of theirs, and the Manufacture of England, when fit to be exposed to Sale.

That, upon the whole Matter, the Committee came to the Resolutions following; viz.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Petitioners have fully proved the Suggestions of their several Petitions.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Wearing of the East-India and Persia Wrought Silks, Bengals, and dyed, printed, or stained, Callicoes, within this Kingdom of England, and the Plantations belonging thereunto, is very destructive to the Woollen Manufacture; and tends to the Ruin of many Thousands of Manufacturers, and their Families.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the House be moved for Leave to bring in a Bill for restraining the Wearing of all Wrought Silks, Bengals, and dyed, painted, or stained Callicoes, imported into this Kingdom of England, and the Plantations belonging thereunto, of the Product and Manufacture of Persia, and the East Indies.

The Second Resolution being read a Second time;

The same was, upon the Question put thereupon, agreed unto by the House.

Ordered, That a Bill be brought in upon the said Resolution: And that Sir Henry Hobart do prepare, and bring in, the Bill.

A Message from the Lords, by Sir Miles Cook and Sir Robert Legard:

Mr. Speaker,

Supply Bill; Duties on Wine, &c.

The Lords have agreed to the Bill, intituled, An Act for continuing several Duties, granted by former Acts, upon Wine and Vinegar, and upon Tobacco, and EastIndia Goods, and other Merchandize, imported, for carrying on the War against France, without any Amendments: And also,

Wye and Lugg Navigation.

To the Bill, intituled, An Act for making navigable the Rivers of Wye and Lugg, in the County of Hereford, without any Amendments.

And then the Messengers withdrew.

Eyme's, &c. Nat.

A Message from the Lords, by Sir Miles Cook and Sir Robert Legard:

Mr. Speaker,

The Lords have agreed to the Amendments, made by this House, to the Bill, intituled, An Act for naturalizing Solomon Eyme, and others.

And then the Messengers withdrew.

Habeas Corpus Suspension.

A Message from the Lords, by Sir Miles Cooke and Sir Robert Legard:

Mr. Speaker,

The Lords have agreed to the Bill, intituled, An Act for impowering his Majesty to apprehend, and detain, such Persons as he shall find Cause to suspect are conspiring against his Royal Person, or Government, without any Amendments.

And then the Messengers withdrew.

Encouraging Seamen.

An ingrossed Bill for the Increase and Encouragement of Seamen was read the Third time.

And some small Amendments, of Mistakes, were made at the Table.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass: And that the Title be, An Act for the Increase and Encouragement of Seamen.

Ordered, That Sir Richard Onslow do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their Concurrence thereunto.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Major-General Trelawny have Leave to go into the Country, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Ordered, That Mr. Machell have Leave to go into the Country for Three Weeks, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Ordered, That Mr. Price have Leave to go into the Country for Three Weeks, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Royal Assent to Bills.

A Message from his Majesty, by Sir Fleetwood Shepherd, Gentleman-Usher of the Black Rod:

Mr. Speaker,

The King commands this Honourable House to attend his Majesty, in the House of Peers, immediately.

Accordingly, Mr. Speaker, with the House, went up to attend his Majesty.

And, being returned;

Mr. Speaker reported, That his Majesty had been pleased to give the Royal Assent to the several publick and private Bills following; viz.

An Act for continuing several Duties, granted by former Acts, upon Wine and Vinegar, and upon Tobacco, and East-India Goods, and other Merchandize, imported, for carrying on the War against France:

An Act for impowering his Majesty to apprehend, and detain, such Persons as he shall find Cause to suspect are conspiring against his Royal Person, or Government:

An Act for taking off the Obligation and Encouragement for coining Guineas, for a certain time therein mentioned:

An Act for Relief of poor Prisoners for Debt or Damages:

An Act for making navigable the Rivers of Wye and Lugg, in the County of Hereford:

An Act to enable Trustees to exchange Lands of Sir James Chamberlaine Baronet, an Infant, lying in the common Hill or Field of Salford, in the County of Oxon, for like Quantities of Lands there, in order to the making an Inclosure:

An Act for naturalizing James Stanhope Esquire, and others:

An Act to enable the Parish of St. James, within the Liberties of the City of Westminster, to raise upon themselves so much Money as will discharge their Debt for building their Parish-Church, Rector's House, Vestry, and other publick Works there:

An Act to ascertain and settle the Payment of the Impropriate Tythes of St. Laurence, Old Jewry, in London, to the Master and Scholars of Baliol College in Oxford; and for confirming an Award made concerning the same:

An Act to enable Trustees to make, and fill up, Leases of the respective Estates of Bluet Wallop Esquire, and John Wallop Gentleman, during their Minorities; and to purchase other Lands, by the Fines thereby to be received, to the same Uses as the Estates so to be leased are already settled:

An Act for naturalizing Solomon Eyme, and others:

An Act for enabling Trustees to sell the Manor of Pespoole, in the County of Durham, Part of the Estate of William Midford, an Infant, for Payment of Debts, and Incumbrances charged thereon: and for preserving the rest of the said Infant's Estate:

An Act to confirm and establish an Exchange made between Thomas Ryder Esquire, and Christopher Clithero Esquire, of certain Messuages in London, for the Manors of Bilsington, and other Lands, in Kent, of the like Value.

Colchester Election.

Ordered, That the Matter, upon the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Borough of Colchester, touching the Election for the said Borough, do come on before the Committee of Privileges, and Elections, the Day it would have been heard, in case other Petitions had not been withdrawn.

Morpeth, &c. Elections.

Ordered, That the Reports from the Committee of Privileges and Elections, touching the Elections for the Borough of Morpeth, and the Town of Berwick upon Tweed, be made upon Monday Morning next.

State of the Nation—African Trade.

Colonel Granville reported, from the Committee of the whole House, who were to consider further of the State of the Nation, in relation to Trade; and particularly, the African Trade; the Resolutions of the said Committee; which they had directed him to report to the House; and which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read; and are as follow; viz.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Trade to Africa be settled, and regulated, by Act of Parliament.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the said Trade to Africa be carried on by a joint Stock, exclusive of all others.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That for the better Supply of the Plantations with Negroes, all the Subjects of this Realm have Liberty to trade to Africa for Negroes only, within such Limits as shall be prescribed by Act of Parliament.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the said joint Stock, for carrying on the Trade to Africa, shall not exceed 200,000 l. to be raised by new Subscriptions; regard being had to the real Value of the Stock of the present Royal African Company.

The said several Resolutions, being severally read a Second time, were, upon the Question severally put thereupon, agreed unto by the House.

Ordered, That a Bill be brought in upon the said Resolutions: And that Mr. Attorney-General, Mr. Solicitor-General, and Mr. Conyers, do prepare, and bring in, the Bill.

Hawkers and Pedlars.

Ordered, That the Report from the Committee, to whom the Bill for suppressing Hawkers and Pedlars was committed, be made upon Wednesday Morning next.

Supply Bill; House Duty.

The House, according to the Order of the Day, resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider further of the Bill for granting several Rates, or Duties, upon Houses, for making good the Deficiency of the clipped Money.

Mr. Speaker left the Chair.

Sir Thomas Littleton took the Chair of the Committee.

Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair.

Sir Thomas Littleton reported from the Committee, That they had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments; which they had directed him to report, when the House will please to receive the same.

Ordered, That the said Report be made upon Wednesday Morning next.

And then the House adjourned till Monday Morning, Nine a Clock.

Footnotes

(a) Supplied from the original Report.