Hospitals
Wigton, Bewcastle, Caldbeck and Keswick

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Victoria County History

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J. Wilson (editor)

Year published

1905

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204

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'Hospitals: Wigton, Bewcastle, Caldbeck and Keswick', A History of the County of Cumberland: Volume 2 (1905), pp. 204. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=39966 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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14. THE HOSPITAL OF ST. LEONARD, WIGTON (fn. 1)

This house had property in Waverton at an early date, for it is mentioned in a charter of Lambert son of Gillestephen of Waverton that the land of the hospital was situated on the east side of the vill. (fn. 2) When the chantries were dissolved in 1546, George Lancaster was incumbent of the hospital of St. Leonard, Wigton. (fn. 3)

15. THE HOSPITAL OF LENNH', BEWCASTLE

The collectors of the tenth, given by the clergy of the diocese of Carlisle in 1294 to Edward I. for the Holy Land, refer to this house and reported that the hospital of Lennh' in Bewcastle (Hospitale de Lennh' in Bothecaster) was unable to pay the assessment as the land belonging to it lay uncultivated. (fn. 4)

16. THE HOSPITAL HOUSE OF CALDBECK

Gospatric son of Orm gave this hospital (hospitalem domum de Caldebech) with the church of that place to the priory of Carlisle (fn. 5) some time before 1170.

17. THE HOUSE OF ST. JOHN, KESWICK

The house of St. John (domus sancti Johannis) existed either as a hospital or hermitage in the early years of the thirteenth century (fn. 6) and has bequeathed its name t the vale of St. John near Keswick.

Footnotes

1 At one time hospitals such as this and those following must have been numerous in Cumberland, for near to many villages the name of Spittal, the usual term in the vernacular for hospital, still survives to remind us that some such institution once occupied that site though all record of it has been lost. Nothing has been discovered to show the nature of these institutions, but it may be taken that in them some provision was made to isolate cases of endemic disease or to supply the wants of the poor or to afford shelter to the destitute.
2 Reg. of Holmcultram, MS. f. 73.
3 Aug. Off. Chant. Cert. No. 12.
4 Reg. of Holmcultram, MS. f. 278.
5 Dugdale, Mon. vi. 144.
6 Reg. of Fountains Abbey (Cott. MS. Tib. C, xii.), f. 78b.