Salisbury
Charities

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Victoria County History

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Elizabeth Crittal (editor)

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1962

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168-178

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'Salisbury: Charities', A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 6 (1962), pp. 168-178. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=41807 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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Contents

CHARITIES FOR THE POOR
ALMSHOUSES. Brickett's Almshouses. Culver Street Almshouses. Eyre's Almshouses. Blechynden's Almshouses. The College of Matrons. Taylor's Almshouses. Sutton's Almshouses. Frowd's Almshouses. Hussey's Almshouses. Thomas Brown's Almshouses. Brympton Almshouses. Other Charities. Municipal Charities. Sir Thomas White's Charity. Thomas Bee's Charity. Thomas Gardiner's Charity. Francis Swanton's Charity. Edward Baker's Charity. Edward Rodes's Charity. George Mervin's Charity. Christopher Willoughby's Charity. John Gauntlett's Charity. William Viner's Charity. Joseph Gifford's Charity. Robert Thorner's Charity. William Botly's Charity. Joan Popley's Charity. John Woodlands's Charity. Parish Charities for St. Martin's Parish Robert Sutton's Charity. Thomas Cooksey's Charity. Thomas Goman's Charity. Samuel Burch's Charity. Edward Windover's and Elizabeth Bath's Charities. Francis Newham's Charity. William Windover's Charity. Jeffry's and Fry's Bible Charity. Dr. Edmund Lambert's Charity. Parish Charities for St. Thomas's Parish Eyre's Charity. Dorothy Wotton's Charity. Dr. Edmund Lambert's Charity. Parish Charities for St. Edmund's Parish. Edward Frowd's Charities. Francis Kenton's Charity. Powell's Charity. Thomas Smith's Charity. William Harcourt's Charity. The Revd. James Cutler's Charity. Mrs. Ellary's Charity. Charities for The Close Lady Hyde's Charity. Other Charities for the Benefit of the City Richard Earlsman's Charities. Duke of Somerset's Charity. William Cole's Charity. Sir Stephen Fox's Charity. John Cottom Wheeler's Charity. John Fricker's Charity. William Ghost's Gift. Charities of Elizabeth Lake and Jane Lane. William Smith's Charity. Smith's Charity. Footnotes

CHARITIES FOR THE POOR

ALMSHOUSES. (fn. 1)

Salisbury's oldest and best known almshouse, St. Nicholas's Hospital, has been dealt with in another volume of the History, as has also Trinity Hospital, another medieval foundation. (fn. 2) Brief accounts of the city's other almshouses are given here.

Brickett's Almshouses.

In 1534 Thomas Brickett, a rich merchant and former mayor, built five almshouses in Exeter Street. These he devised for the benefit of five poor men and women. Repairs were to be paid from the rents of two adjoining houses, which were converted into one house in 1827. After 1780 the almspeople were widows and spinsters, who received a weekly allowance of 3s. 6d. By 1833 the endowment had been augmented by six benefactions, of which the most important was a legacy of £200 from James Burch by his will dated 1790. The almshouse also benefited by the will of Eleanor Walsh dated 1830. The almshouses were included in the Consolidated Almshouses and Other Charities Scheme of 1871. (fn. 3) They were rebuilt in 1780, and again, at a cost of £1,994 in 1893–4. In 1906 they were described as 'one of the most comfortable of the Salisbury almshouses'. There were then six widows in residence. Each had a sitting-room, bedroom and kitchen.

Culver Street Almshouses.

The six almshouses for women in Culver Street belong to the parish of St. Martin and are said to date from the reign of Elizabeth I. During the 18th and first half of the 19th century a number of legacies were made to provide small stipends for the almswomen. Robert Cooper by his will dated 1792 left £600, Mary Lake by her will dated 1824 left £520, and Eleanor Walsh by her will dated 1830 left £50. A bequest of £100 by Robert Sutton Marsh by his will dated 1765 was to buy bread for distribution every Sunday. The almswomen also had a share of Edward Baker's and Thomas Goman's Charities. There was, however, no endowment for the maintenance of the building and in 1833 it was in urgent need of repair. In 1842 it was pulled down and rebuilt, the cost being met partly by voluntary subscriptions, and partly by St. Martin's vestry. In 1881 John Woodlands, by his will dated 1881, left £300 to be invested to provide an additional allowance for the almswomen. In 1906 these women were receiving 4s. weekly and an extra sum at Christmas. This, however, could not be provided out of income and the balance was made up from the income of the St. Martin's Amalgamated Charities. In 1953 six almswomen received a weekly allowance of 3s. 6d. from the amalgamated charities and £7 10s. was distributed among them at Christmas. The rates were paid by the amalgamated charities, and the cost of repairs by the St Martin's Church fabric fund. (fn. 4)

Eyre's Almshouses.

Among the benefactions of Christopher Eyre was a bequest of £600 in his will dated 1617. Eyre intended that £400 of this should be invested in land and the remainder used to build six almshouses. No land was bought, but the almshouses were built in Winchester Street at a cost of £224 3s. 8d. In 1684 Thomas Gardiner bequeathed £60 to provide payments for the inmates, and in about 1798 Elizabeth Tatum bequeathed £200 to augment their stipends. In about 1789 Mrs. Barford bequeathed £40 to augment the endowment of the almshouse. In 1833 married couples in the almshouse received 3s. 6d. a week, and single people 3s. An additional sum of £21 11s. was distributed among the almspeople at different times in the year. The almshouse at this date was subsidized with grants from Popley's charity and the general funds of the corporation. It was included in the Consolidated Almshouses and Other Charities Scheme of 1871. (fn. 5) It was rebuilt in 1872 as a block of seven houses on the corner of Winchester Street and the London Road.

Blechynden's Almshouses.

These almshouses were founded by Margaret Blechynden, who, by her will dated 1682, bequeathed £566 1s. 3d. to build an almshouse for six poor widows. In 1684 Samuel Eyre, Margaret's nephew and executor, purchased a site in Winchester Street for £120 10s. and built the almshouse on it for £99 15s. 9d., but the residue of the bequest was not invested until 1752 when Robert Eyre, grandson of Samuel, conveyed to trustees the almshouses and lands in Laverstock and Temple Combe (Som.) worth £20 a year. Widows admitted to the almshouse were to be at least 50 years old, and they were to receive 12s. every twelfth week for the repair of their dwellings. The funds of the almshouse were augmented by a bequest of £300 by Elizabeth Lee in 1755, and bequests of £100 by Edward Smith, and £20 by Mrs. Barford made some time before 1778 and 1809 respectively. The charity was not confined to widows from any particular area, but Elizabeth Lee asked that, wherever possible, two of the widows should come from Whiteparish and Downton respectively.

In 1833 income from rents and dividends amounted to £80, and each widow received 5s. a week and 3s. at Christmas. In 1900 12 a. of land at Laverstock were sold, and in 1956 the only real property belonging to the charity were some 13 a. at Temple Combe then let for £30 a year. (fn. 6) At the end of 1956 the almswomen were still receiving a weekly pension of 5s. One of the houses was vacant. (fn. 7) The almshouses were rebuilt in 1857, and a legacy of £900 from Edward Wilkes Gawthorne was used for their renovation in 1950. (fn. 8) They comprise two blocks of single-story houses standing at right angles to each other facing a small garden at the corner of Greencroft and Winchester Streets.

The College of Matrons.

The College of Matrons was founded by Seth Ward, Bishop of Salisbury 1667–89, in 1685. At his own cost the bishop built an almshouse in the Close for ten widows of priests episcopally ordained in the diocese of Salisbury. To endow the college Seth Ward gave the former site of the Clun Chantry (fn. 9) and a small quantity of land in the Close, and Whaddon Farm lying in the parishes of Alderbury and West Grimstead. The matrons were to receive a weekly pension of 6s. each. Candidates for admission were to be at least 50 years old, and to possess an income of less than £10 a year. Should there be insufficient candidates from the diocese of Salisbury, widows of ministers in the diocese of Exeter were to be considered. Among the rules for the governance of the college it was stipulated that matrons should attend divine service in the Cathedral twice daily, and should not be absent from the Close for more than one month in the year. Matrons were to be chosen by Seth Ward during his life time, but after his death the right of appointment was to be exercised alternately by the bishop and the dean and chapter. The bishop was to be visitor of the college, and the dean and chapter its governors. The communar of the cathedral was to be treasurer and was to be assisted by an overseer.

The charity was augmented in 1693 by the conveyance by Robert King of certain rents. It is not known whence these particular rents came, but by 1833 the college had acquired rents, totalling about £28 a year, from lands mainly in Suffolk, but also in Berkshire, Cambridgeshire, and London and Middlesex. From the end of the 19th century onwards many of these rents were redeemed, but in 1958 the college was still receiving some £13 from fee farm rents. (fn. 10) In 1793 William Benson Earle bequeathed by his will, proved 1796, 2,000 guineas to increase the allowances paid to the matrons. Thomas Henry Allen Poynder gave 1,000 guineas in 1865, and by the will of Elizabeth Wickins, proved 1867, the college received £500. In 1905 Maria Cooke bequeathed to it just over £300. Benefactors in the 20th century were Helen Nevill (d. 1929), who bequeathed £1,000; Herbert Harding, who in 1929 devised certain real property in Salisbury, which in 1945 was sold for a little over £1,000, and Mary Fletcher, who bequeathed £1,500 in 1953. (fn. 11) Whaddon Farm has remained the most important endowment of the college. In 1921, when it comprised some 500 a., the possibility of selling it was considered, but rejected. (fn. 12) In 1955 extensive improvements to the property were undertaken, and the following year the rent was almost doubled. (fn. 13)

In 1833 each matron received an annual allowance of £40. The qualifying limit for personal income had by then been raised to £20 a year. Candidates for admission were at this time said to be 'not numerous'. In 1869 a scheme was established for the administration of the college. The number of matrons was reduced to eight, but could be raised to ten at the discretion of the governors. The qualifying limit for personal income was raised to £50, and the maximum annual allowance to be made to each matron was not to exceed £60. Should there be insufficient applications from widows of ministers in the dioceses of Salisbury and Exeter, applications were to be entertained from unmarried daughters of ministers in those two dioceses, preference being given to the diocese of Salisbury. In 1878 it was agreed that two non-resident matrons with pensions of £50 a year might be appointed, but this practice was discontinued shortly afterwards. In 1907 there were eight matrons, most of whom had some small means of their own and employed a servant. Efforts were made in the 1930's and 1940's to raise the qualifying limit for personal income, but all proposals were rejected by the Charity Commissioners on the ground that there was no lack of applicants within the £50 a year income limit. (fn. 14) In 1955, however, a new scheme for the administration of the college was established, and the limit for personal income was raised to £200. (fn. 15) In 1958 there were nine matrons in residence. (fn. 16)

It is popularly supposed that the college building was designed by Sir Christopher Wren, but there is no evidence for this. It is a red brick building with projecting wings and tiled roof surmounted by a cupola. The tympanum of the central pediment contains the royal arms. The building originally comprised 42 rooms, of which two of the matrons occupied five each, and the remaining eight occupied four apiece. In 1833 the widows were said to have two rooms each. In 1870 the building was enlarged and improved at a cost of over £2,000 and in 1907 each matron had a sitting-room, kitchen, pantry and scullery on the ground floor, and two bedrooms above. Repairs to the building in 1949 cost nearly £400 and in 1951 were estimated at over £1,000. (fn. 17)

Taylor's Almshouses.

Thomas Taylor bequeathed £1,000 by his will, dated 1695, to build an almshouse for six poor, single men. He also gave ten oaks from his estate at Bramshaw (Hants) for the building. The almshouse, comprising six rooms and garden plots, was built in Bedwin Street at the junction with St. Edmund's Church Street. An annual rent charge of £36, from the manor of Stratford Tony, was given by Thomas Jervoise of Herriard (Hants). In 1713 Francis Swanton directed that £5 should be paid to the hospital annually out of a rent charge of £21 from an estate in Southampton. Another annual rent charge devised by Matthew Best in 1733 was to provide stipends for the inmates and, every third year, a number of great coats of light blue cloth. In 1833 the income of the almshouse was £45 4s. and the almsmen, who were usually needy tradesmen, received 3s. 6d. a week. The almshouse was included in the Consolidated Almshouses and Other Charities Scheme of 1871. (fn. 18) In 1906 there were six widowers cared for by a nurse. In 1956 there were so few suitable applicants that permission was given for the admission of widows or spinsters. (fn. 19) In 1866 the almshouse was rebuilt at a cost of nearly £2,000, apparently to the old design, as an L-shaped, twostoried block facing into a small garden court. Entrance from Bedwin Street is through a wide central doorway.

Sutton's Almshouses.

By his will, dated 1699, Robert Sutton, a clothier, devised three messuages in Tanner (now St. Ann) Street as almshouses for three poor weavers and their wives. He also devised a fourth house in the same street, the rent of which was to pay for the maintenance of the almshouses. The almshouses came into the possession of St. Martin's parish in 1719. The rent of the fourth house was allowed to accumulate until 1787, when it amounted to about £148, and was then invested in stock. The income on this was spent on bread for the almspeople until 1833, but after that date it was reserved for repairs to the almshouses. In 1833 applications for admission from weavers were said to be numerous. Selection was made by St. Martin's vestry. A sum of £5 9s. 8d. was also distributed among the almspeople from Edward Baker's charity. The almshouses were closed and the property sold in 1876. Sums of £528, and £222 representing the purchase money for the almshouses and accumulated income were then invested in stock. In 1877 a scheme was established for the combined administration of the income from this investment, together with the income from Sutton's other charity for bread and the charities of Thomas Cooksey, Thomas Goman, and Samuel Burch. In 1926 the income from this charity amounted to £5 10s. 8d. (fn. 20)

Frowd's Almshouses.

Some time before 1750 some £4,000 were allotted from the bequest of Edward Frowd (see below) for the endowment of an almshouse. Land at the corner of Bedwin and Rollestone Streets was bought in 1749, and here the almshouse was built. Six ground-floor rooms housed six unmarried men, and six spinsters had rooms above. In 1822 Ann Fort bequeathed £100 for the benefit of the almspeople. In 1833 applications for admission were numerous, but vacancies were not always filled immediately so that a fund accumulated for repairs. At that date almspeople, unless they were relatives of the founder, had to be parishioners of St. Edmund's. A weekly allowance of 4s. 6d. was paid to each inmate, and an extra sum was distributed at Christmas. In 1863 another Edward Frowd bequeathed £250 to augment the weekly allowance of the two most infirm almspeople. In 1906 the annual income was about £321, and only eight almspeople could be supported, although there was no lack of applications for admission. The requirement of the founder that all almspeople should attend regularly at St. Edmund's Church was not insisted upon, and no religious preference was shown when selecting candidates for admission. A bequest from Edward Wilkes Gawthorne was used in 1950 to restore and improve the building. (fn. 21) In 1957 the income of this charity was £473, and there were two almspeople receiving weekly pensions of 5s. (fn. 22)

The almshouse, built in 1750, is a two-storied brick building with central doorway upon Bedwin Street. Inscribed above the door are the words 'Built and endowed by the liberality of Mr. Frowd Merchant late of this city 1750'. On either side of the doorway are four windows on both ground- and first-floor levels. Along the back of the building an open corridor gives access to a small inclosed garden. The corridor is formed by a brick arcade, and above each arch of this is a circular panel, of which seven contain leaded lights. The roof is surmounted by a central octagonal turret with arched lights.

Hussey's Almshouses.

By an indenture dated 1794 William Hussey gave fifteen houses in Castle Street to found an almshouse. Ten of these were to be allotted to the aged and infirm poor, preferably married couples, and these were to be maintained by the rents from the remaining five. In 1809 Hussey also gave the income on an investment of £3,500 to provide weekly pensions for the almspeople. By 1833 the original ten houses had been reconstructed to provide thirteen homes, but the rent from the five houses was insufficient to keep the almshouses in repair. At this time the thirteen almspeople received weekly pensions which had been increased in 1824 from 2s. 10d. to 3s. 6d. and any deficiency was supplied from Popley's charity. The almshouse was included in the Consolidated Almshouses and Other Charities Scheme of 1871. (fn. 23) A further scheme of 1895 provided that the almshouse should accommodate seven married couples, six unmarried persons, and a nurse. The almshouse was rebuilt in 1874, and some of the larger houses then contained a workshop.

Thomas Brown's Almshouses.

In 1852 Thomas Brown gave seven houses in Castle Street for conversion into an almshouse. By 1861 the houses had been converted into homes for six married couples, and by his death in 1872 Brown had given a total of £4,150 to provide weekly pensions of 7s. 6d. for the almspeople and for the maintenance of the houses. Brown stipulated that his almspeople should be over 50 years old, and that either the wife or the husband, or both, should have been born in Salisbury. He also required them to attend St. Edmund's Church twice every Sunday, but by the beginning of the 20th century this rule had lapsed. At that time the income of the charity was only sufficient to provide five couples with the weekly pension of 7s. 6d. In 1931 there were only three couples in the almshouses. (fn. 24) Income in 1955 amounted to £188 and £26 5s. was divided among the pensioners. (fn. 25) The almshouses consist of six brick-built cottages of which three face Castle Street and the others stand at right angles to the street. Each cottage has one room above and one below.

Brympton Almshouses.

In 1949 the executors of Edward Wilkes Gawthorne handed over to the trustees of the Salisbury Municipal Charities for use as an almshouse a property in East Harnham called Brympton. (fn. 26) In 1956 seven single women and a salaried matron were appointed to live in this house. The almswomen paid 10s. a week. In 1958 the foundations for ten new almshouses to be built in the grounds of Brympton were laid.

Other Charities. (fn. 27)

In 1836 a single body of trustees was appointed for twelve of the Salisbury charities, (fn. 28) and in 1871 a scheme was established for the joint administration of five almshouses together with Joan Popley's charity. (fn. 29) These two groups of charities, together with John Woodlands's charity, which had been created in 1881, were brought under a joint scheme in 1892. By this all property belonging to the charities concerned, with the exception of the real estate belonging to Trinity Hospital, (fn. 30) was vested in the Official Trustees for Charitable Lands, and eighteen trustees were appointed to administer the income. Three years later, in 1895, a full scheme for the joint administration of the Salisbury Municipal Charities was drawn up, including for the first time a scheme for the application of income. This, after providing for the expenses of administration and maintenance of property and for meeting the requirements of certain special commitments, allotted a third of the remaining income to a Loan and Apprenticeship Branch, and two thirds to an Eleemosynary Branch. At this date the gross annual income from property belonging to the Municipal Charities amounted to some £3,250. Most of the property lay in Salisbury and much of it was sold during the 20th century. (fn. 31) The most important sales were in 1955 and 1956 when the houses in Basinghall Street, London, belonging to Joan Popley's charity were sold for some £90,000. In 1949 there was an addition to the property held by the trustees when a house was purchased in East Harnham, which later became Brympton Almshouse. At the end of 1957 rents and rent charges brought in nearly £4,000 and income from investments amounted to just over £5,500.

In 1909 the scheme of 1895 was superseded by another, and Robert Thorner's apprenticing charity was added to those administered by the trustees. The scheme of 1909 raised the number of trustees to nineteen. The total sum to be spent on apprenticing was determined at £110 and apprenticeship premiums were to be not less than £12 10s. and not more than £30. The sum of £400 was allotted to eleemosynary purposes. Two classes of pensioners were established. Second-class pensioners and almspeople had to have lived in Salisbury for at least ten years, and there were to be not more than fifteen first-class pensioners, who had lived in the city for at least 25 years. Pensions of up to 6s. a week for single people and up to 9s. a week for married couples were payable to almspeople. Second-class pensioners were to receive between 5s. and 6s., and first-class pensioners between 6s. and 11s. a week. The scheme of 1909 also created an Educational Branch called the Municipal Charities Educational Foundation. The income on an investment of £800 was to be applied annually under this head, and the foundation was to be administered by a scheme prepared by the Board of Education.

Details of the scheme of 1909 were amended by schemes of 1920, 1928, and 1951. The scheme of 1928 raised the maximum stipends for almspeople to 10s. a week for single people, and 15s. for married couples. Stipends for pensioners were to be varied from time to time at the request of the trustees. In 1921 the number of charities administered by the scheme of 1909 was increased by the inclusion of William Botly's charity, and after 1949 the new almshouse at East Harnham, called Brympton, also came under the administration of the trustees of the Municipal Charities. The following year another amending scheme permitted the admission of widows or spinsters to Taylor's Almshouses and Trinity Hospital, since there were not enough suitable male candidates. The scheme of 1909 was amended again in 1958 when the maximum sum to be devoted to eleemosynary purposes was raised to £900. Among the ways suggested of spending this were weekly allowances of not more than 10s. 6d.; gifts of bedding, furniture, and other comforts; grants for tools or books for people entering a trade; payments for domestic help, seaside holidays, or chiropodical treatment, and subscriptions to hospitals, homes, and other institutions.

Municipal Charities.

Sir Thomas White's Charity.

In 1566 Sir Thomas White gave by indenture £2,000 to the corporation of Bristol to pay out of the interest each year £104 in turn to 24 specified towns, (fn. 32) of which Salisbury was one. The money was to be used by the various towns to provide loans of £25 for periods of ten years to four poor young men, preferably clothiers. In Salisbury each loan was secured by a bond. In 1832 it was agreed that sixteen such loans should always be available, exclusive of any money received from Bristol. The next year it was reported that 'divers' sums of £25 had been lent, but that there were then only fourteen bonds in hand. This was because certain fees had wrongly been charged against the charity, but this was rectified and the number of loans was made up to sixteen. At this date there were more applicants than loans available, but in 1891 there was some lack of satisfactory applicants. The charity was included in the schemes of 1892 and 1895 for the administration of the municipal charities (see above).

Thomas Bee's Charity.

Thomas Bee, by his will dated 1586, left two sums of £50 and £30 to be invested in land. The income on the first was to be used to apprentice poor children, and that on the second to provide clothes for the poor every year for nineteen years, and to repair St. Thomas's Church every 20th year. In 1624 the property of this charity comprised a messuage, three gardens, and two orchards in Culver Street. These were conveyed to the corporation in 1661. The income was recorded after 1715, but the charity was said to be forgotten in 1833. In 1871 some of the property was sold, and in 1894 a site was bought in Guilder Lane on which nine cottages were built. The money for this was drawn from Joan Popley's Charity. Bee's Charity was included in the Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above), but special provision had to be made for the payments to the churchwardens of St. Thomas's for the fabric of the church. Under the scheme of 1909 a sum of £51 10s. was set aside to form the endowment of a distinct charity to be called Thomas Bee's Charity in the parish of St. Thomas. (fn. 33) In 1931 £6 8s. 4d. from this fund was paid into the church repair fund. (fn. 34) In 1948 part of the property in Guilder Lane was sold. (fn. 35)

Thomas Gardiner's Charity.

At an unknown date Thomas Gardiner, of the Close, gave £400 to set up poor tradesmen in business and place apprentices. In 1681 the corporation agreed to pay £20 a year for seven years after Gardiner's death, and to distribute the money equally to two tradesmen and two apprentices. Every eighth year only £8 was to be paid. Preference was to be given to tradesmen who had been apprenticed by the charity. After 1743 no regular accounts were kept and the money was paid out of the corporation funds. In 1833 £155 was owing to the charity by the corporation and it was decided to keep a separate account. By this time it had become difficult to find masters prepared to accept apprentices for the premium of only £5. This charity was included in the Salisbury Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above).

Francis Swanton's Charity.

In 1713 Francis Swanton, of the Close, conveyed a meadow at Clatford (Hants) to the corporation. This was to provide annual rent charges of £10 and £5 to Trinity and Taylor's Hospitals respectively. Any surplus amounting to £10 was to be used to apprentice a poor boy of Salisbury. In 1823 the meadow was leased for £23 13s. 4d. and the annual rent charges to the two hospitals had been paid regularly. Boys were occasionally apprenticed with the accumulated surplus income, although it was sometimes necessary to give them premiums of £15. This charity was placed under the trustees of the Municipal Charities by the schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above). The meadow at Clatford was sold in 1896 and the money invested in stock producing dividends of £30 a year.

Edward Baker's Charity.

By his will, dated 1796, Edward Baker left 300 guineas to be invested for the benefit of Trinity Hospital, Sutton's Almshouse, and the almshouse in Culver Street. The sum of £296 was shortly afterwards invested in stock and the annual income was distributed among the three almshouses. In 1833 this amounted to £16 9s. 8d. The charity was included in the Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above). After the closing of Sutton's almshouse in 1877 the share in this bequest intended for its occupants was applied as an annual gift to the three out-pensioners supported by the amalgamated charities of St. Martin's parish.

Edward Rodes's Charity.

Edward Rodes by his will, dated 1611, bequeathed six tenements and gardens in New Street to provide 40 poor, aged persons with 1s. each every Good Friday. The property in New Street was exchanged some time before 1833 for a site elsewhere. This charity was included in the Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above).

George Mervin's Charity.

In 1662 the corporation acknowledged by indenture the receipt at some earlier date of £100 given by George Mervin for a number of charitable purposes. To give effect to this gift the corporation granted an annual rent charge of £4 10s. from three houses in Castle Street. Out of this £1 10s. was to be distributed every year among the poor of St. Edmund's parish, and £1 among the poor of the other two ancient parishes. The balance of £1 was to pay for an annual sermon on the anniversary of Mervin's death. This charity was brought into the Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above). In 1908 £1 a year was being paid to the Rector of St. Edmund's for his founder's day sermon.

Christopher Willoughby's Charity.

Out of a gift of £400, made by Christopher Willoughby in 1678, £4 was to be distributed every year to the poor of the city, and £16 was to be given to the churchwardens of West Knoyle. This charity was included in the Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above).

John Gauntlett's Charity.

By his will, dated shortly before 1721, John Gauntlett gave £100 to be invested for the benefit of ten poor persons. After 1740 the annual interest was distributed in ten annual pensions of 6s. This charity became one of those administered by the Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above).

William Viner's Charity.

William Viner bequeathed £50 by his will, dated 1677, to provide 25 yds. of cloth every year for distribution among the poor. In 1833 the corporation was distributing annually five coats each costing £1 1s. to five poor men selected by the mayor. Different recipients were chosen every year. This charity was included in the Municipal Charities Schemes of 1892 and 1895 (see above).

Joseph Gifford's Charity.

By a codicil to his will, dated 1780, Joseph Gifford bequeathed £50 to provide twelve penny-loaves on Good Friday for distribution among the poor of the three ancient parishes in rotation. The charity was first distributed in 1781. In 1833 40 loaves worth 1s. each were distributed on Good Friday. Under the schemes of 1892 and 1895 this became one of the Municipal Charities (see above).

Robert Thorner's Charity.

A small part of the income from Robert Thorner's charity (fn. 36) established in Southampton in 1690 was set aside for purposes of education or apprenticing in Southampton, Dorchester, Salisbury, and the parish of Litton Cheyney (Dors.). In 1835 a scheme was established for the administration of this part of the charity. By this £25 was to be applied annually to placing apprentices in the mechanical labouring trades in Salisbury. The premium for each boy was then £5, and £5 was given to set him up at the end of his apprenticeship. In 1857 the premium was increased to £10. In 1907 Salisbury received in addition to the £25, £29 16s. income from an investment of just over £1,000. Between 1875 and 1907 no boys were apprenticed. In 1909 a scheme was established whereby that part of Thorner's charity applicable for apprenticing in Salisbury was constituted a separate charity called Robert Thorner's Apprenticing Charity. It was then placed under the administration of the Salisbury Municipal Charities (see above).

William Botly's Charity.

By a declaration of trust, dated 1890, William Botly directed that £1,500 should be held in trust for charitable purposes. The income from this charity was to be distributed in weekly pensions among six widows of any religious denomination resident in Salisbury. Any accumulated surplus of over £5 was also to be devoted to the pensioners. Shortly after creating the trust Botly tried to obtain an alteration in it limiting it to nonconformists, but the Charity Commissioners would not sanction this. The first beneficiaries were chosen by the founder in 1891 and were all nonconformists. Subsequently, however, members of the Church of England were also selected as pensioners. In 1907 the income from this charity was about £78 a year. In 1921 when the last surviving trustee of the first administering trustees died, (fn. 37) the charity was placed under the administration of the trustees of the Municipal Charities (see above).

Joan Popley's Charity.

In 1570 Joan Popley gave 20 messuages in Basinghall Street, London, for the relief of the poor of Salisbury. The houses were destroyed in the fire of 1666, and the site was leased to Sir Thomas Clarges, who undertook the rebuilding. In 1768 the property was let in eight lots to different tenants on 21-year leases. Another house was bought for £500 in 1806 to make the property more compact. In 1833 the charity estate consisted of nine houses on the west side of Basinghall St., and the annual rent from them was £421 10s. During Sir Thomas Clarges's lease the charity contributed 6s. a week to Brickett's Hospital and allotted the remainder to the poor. About 1780 the allowance to the hospital was doubled, £140 a year was given to the Salisbury workhouse, and £55 a year was distributed to the poor. Other Salisbury charities were assisted out of Popley's charity when the need arose. In 1829 £300 was set apart for weekly allowances of 3s. 6d. to seven poor aged widows. The charity was included in the Salisbury Consolidated Almshouses and Other Charities Scheme of 1871 (see above), and its income was used to rebuild Eyre's hospital. The Basinghall Street property was sold in 1954 and 1955. (fn. 38)

John Woodlands's Charity.

John Woodlands, by his will dated 1881, gave the trustees of the Salisbury Municipal Charities £3,331. The income on this was to be distributed at Christmas every year among the deserving poor of the city. In 1892 this charity was included in the new scheme for the joint administration of the other Salisbury Municipal charities (see above).

Parish Charities for St. Martin's Parish

In 1877 a scheme was established for the combined administration of the two charities of Robert Sutton, and the charities of Thomas Cooksey, Thomas Goman, and Samuel Burch. The income on Cooksey's and Goman's charities was to be used primarily to make up the weekly allowance paid to the occupants of the Culver Street almshouses. Any surplus was to be added to the income from Sutton's and Burch's charities to provide out-pensions of 5s. for single people and 7s. 6d. for a married couple for three poor persons nominated by St. Martin's vestry. The accounts of the amalgamated charities are presented in the same statement as the accounts of those charities, or shares of charities, which form the endowments of the Culver Street almshouses, namely the charities of Robert Sutton Marsh, Robert Cooper, Eleanor Walsh, Edward Baker, Mary Lake, and John Woodlands. The income from these six charities together with the St. Martin's amalgamated charities amounted to about £124 in 1952. (fn. 39)

Robert Sutton's Charity.

Besides the property in St. Ann Street which he devised for almshouses, Robert Sutton by his will, dated 1699, bequeathed £200 to be invested in land for the benefit of the poor of St. Martin's parish. His intention was that the income should be spent on bread for poor householders in midwinter. Some time in or before 1716 an annual rent charge of £8 from land in Shapwick (Dors.) was purchased with the £200. Between that date and 1833 the rent charge was paid in full, but not always regularly. Consequently the distribution of bread was only spasmodic. In 1877 a scheme was established for the combined administration of this charity, together with the income on the investment made after the sale of Sutton's almshouses, and the charities of Cooksey, Goman, and Burch. In 1926 the income from this charity, including the rent charge from Shapwick Farm, amounted to about £20. (fn. 40)

Thomas Cooksey's Charity.

By his will, proved in 1793, Thomas Cooksey devised four houses in Gigant Street with the intention of providing almshouses for the poor of St. Martin's parish. He also bequeathed £2,000, the interest on which was to provide pensions of 5s. a week to the occupants of the houses, £2 2s. a year to the Sunday School, 15s. to the Rector of St. Edmund's for an annual sermon, and small sums to the clerk, sexton, and churchwarden keeping the accounts. Any surplus was to be paid to the poor. The bequest for the provision of pensions was contested in 1797 by the testator's next of kin, and as a result the bequest was reduced to £700, with the accumulated interest, for application to the other purposes specified in the will. In 1832 the annual income was £24 10s. out of which payments as stipulated in the will were made to the rector, clerk, sexton, churchwarden, and Sunday School. About £20 was contributed to the general bread fund formed by money from this charity and those of Robert Sutton and Thomas Goman. In 1832 850 gallon-loaves, and 371 half- and quarter-gallon loaves of best-quality bread, baked by all bakers in the parish, were distributed to 850 adults and 900 children. In 1877 this charity was included in the scheme for the joint administration of the charities of Cooksey, Sutton, Goman, and Burch, known henceforth as the St. Martin's amalgamated charities. Special provision was made for the payments to the rector, clerk, sexton, and churchwarden of St. Martin's.

In 1904 a separate endowment was made with £84 out of the original bequest of £700 to provide for the annual payments to the Sunday School. This separate account was to be entitled Cooksey's Education Foundation. In 1926 the income from the £700 belonging to this charity was about £17. (fn. 41)

Thomas Goman's Charity.

By his will, dated 1611, Thomas Goman devised all his property to the parish of St. Martin for the benefit of the poor of the parish. The property stood on the corner of Milford Street and Culver Street. Between 1730 and 1823 the fines received on the renewal of leases were paid into the general account of the churchwardens, and the rent was thought to form part of Fricker's charity, and was spent either on providing small gifts of money or on the purchase of bread. In 1824 Goman's charity began to be administered as a separate charity for the purchase of bread, and both fines and rents were paid into the account of the charity. In 1877 this charity was included in the scheme for the united administration of the charities of Goman, Sutton, Cooksey, and Burch, known henceforth as the St. Martin's amalgamated charities. The property was sold in 1888 for about £447 and the money invested in stock. In 1926 the income on this was £13 10s. (fn. 42)

Samuel Burch's Charity.

By his will, proved 1857, Samuel Burch gave £300 to provide monthly pensions to the occupants of Sutton's almshouses. In 1877, after the closing of these almshouses, this charity was included in the scheme for the joint regulation of the charities of Burch, Sutton, Cooksey, and Goman, known henceforth as the St. Martin's amalgamated charities.

Edward Windover's and Elizabeth Bath's Charities.

Edward Windover by his will, dated 1605, devised a rent charge of £1 13s. 4d. to be paid annually by the dean and chapter to the churchwardens of St. Martin's for apprenticing poor boys. Nearly a hundred years later Elizabeth Bath by her will dated 1701 gave £100 for apprenticing girls. Between the dates of the two bequests and 1833 a number of boys and girls were apprenticed, but only intermittently. For some time in the 19th century Elizabeth Bath's charity was misapplied towards repairing St. Martin's Church. In 1833 the premiums paid from the two charities were £12 or £15, but it was said to be difficult to find masters or mistresses willing to accept these sums because the corporation was offering premiums of £25. After 1833 the accumulated interest on Elizabeth Bath's charity was invested from time to time to augment the fund. A scheme of 1877 appointed one body of trustees for the two charities and directed that Windover's charity could be applied to both boys and girls. Elizabeth Bath's charity was restricted to girls who could, however, be apprenticed as pupil teachers or domestic workers. It could also be used to enable girls to remain longer at school. In 1935 the rent charge forming Windover's charity was redeemed and about £66 was invested in stock. (fn. 43)

Francis Newham's Charity.

By his will, dated 1807, Francis Newham bequeathed £1,000 for the benefit of the poor of the parish of St. Martin. In 1833 between 30 and 40 applicants were said to apply annually for the charity, and from these the eight most deserving were selected by the rector, churchwardens, and overseer. In 1904–5 the income of the charity was £25 and this was distributed equally among the eight persons in two instalments, one on Britford Fair Day and the other in January. In 1952 the income was about £27 and was distributed as above. (fn. 44)

William Windover's Charity.

William Windover by his will, dated 1632, bequeathed £50 to provide loans for deserving cases in the parish of St. Martin and for the repair of the church when need arose. In 1906 no capital was known to exist for this charity and it was presumed that it had all been spent on repairs.

Jeffry's and Fry's Bible Charity.

The origin of this charity is unknown, but from time to time during the 18th century a sum of money was spent on the purchase of two Bibles. By 1806 it had become known as Jeffry's and Fry's charity, and by 1833 about £11 was invested in stock to provide for the purchase of the Bibles. In 1893 about £3 was spent on Bibles and New Testaments as prizes for the children in Milford Street Schools, and in 1898 nearly £2 was spent on Bibles for the children in the St. Martin's Schools.

Dr. Edmund Lambert's Charity.

Edmund Lambert by his will, proved 1878, bequeathed £200 for the provision of coal, bread, and other necessities for the poor of St. Martin's parish. By 1906 this charity was represented by £345 stock yielding £9 12s. a year. The income was then spent on tickets worth 5s. for groceries, and in a subscription to the parish blanket club. In 1952 the annual income from this charity was about £7, which was distributed among poor parishioners in the form of 5s. food vouchers. (fn. 45)

Parish Charities for St. Thomas's Parish

Eyre's Charity.

By his will, dated 1599, John Eyre devised all his property in Alderbury for the benefit of the poor of St. Thomas's parish where he lived. Under the Alderbury Inclosure Award of 1809 the land in Alderbury was exchanged for about 5 a. in East Harnham. Between 1784 and 1809 the rent of the property at Alderbury amounted to about £10 a year. From 1809 until 1833 the annual rent of the land in Harnham was about £15. This was spent on the distribution of 48 3d. loaves on alternate Sundays among the poor attending St. Thomas's Church. In 1833 it was recommended that distribution should be restricted to the poor of St. Thomas's parish. It was also suggested that four bakers should provide loaves of a fixed weight, since there was a suspicion that the bread then supplied by one baker was of insufficient weight. In 1887 it was decided to substitute for the distribution of loaves a weekly pension of 5s. to two poor persons. In 1952 the annual income of this charity came from the rent of the land at East Harnham and amounted to £82 4s. There were usually five or six recipients receiving weekly pensions of 5s. (fn. 46)

Dorothy Wotton's Charity.

By her will, dated 1608, Dorothy Wotton bequeathed a sum of money for the purchase of bread for the poor of the city. She stipulated that 20 1d. loaves should be distributed every Sunday from St. Thomas's Church. A sum of £61 eventually formed the endowment of this charity and in 1833 the income of £4 10s. was spent on distributing 20 2d. loaves once a fortnight. In 1828 there was apparently some irregularity in the distribution of the bread. After 1868 it was delivered to the homes of the recipients. At the beginning of the 20th century many of the beneficiaries, who were selected by the churchwardens of St. Thomas's, were widows, resident in the parishes of St. Martin and St. Edmund. In 1931 the income of this charity was just over £4, and between £2 and £3 was spent on providing bread for six beneficiaries. (fn. 47)

Dr. Edmund Lambert's Charity.

Dr. Edmund Lambert, who bequeathed £200 to the poor of St. Martin's parish also, by his will, proved 1878, gave £200 for the poor of St. Thomas's parish. In 1905 the income on this amounted to some £10 and was spent on providing coal for 32 poor people. In 1952 the income was about £3 and 14 beneficiaries received small grants of money. (fn. 48)

Parish Charities for St. Edmund's Parish.

Edward Frowd's Charities.

By his will, dated 1719–20, Edward Frowd directed that a sum of money from his estate should be used for certain charitable purposes within the parish of St. Edmund. The sum of £7,500 was to be used to build 24 almshouses as close as possible to St. Edmund's Church, and support 24 almspeople. The sum of £1,000 was to be allotted for apprenticing poor children. The sum of £500 was to pay for a monthly sermon and prayers in St. Edmund's Church, and £50 was to be devoted to the maintenance of the Frowd family grave in St. Edmund's churchyard.

The execution of the will led to a suit in Chancery which was begun in 1722 and not finally settled until 1773. It was then shown that as a result of the malversation of the testator's executors the funds available for the several charities were all reduced to about half the amount originally intended. Definite sums were apportioned for the four purposes set out in Frowd's will, but until the end of the 19th century the income was apparently applied somewhat indiscriminately between the four charities so formed.

In 1735 £503 and £38 were allotted for the apprenticing charity, but by 1745 this had been reduced to about £524 and then included the £25 which was the sum apportioned in 1735 for the family grave fund. A fresh apportionment was made in 1892 when £585 was allotted to the apprenticing fund, and £26 to the family grave fund. Between 1800 and 1824 some 30 children from the parish were apprenticed, at first for premiums of £10, but after 1815 for premiums of £9 15s. After 1824 apprenticing took place at irregular intervals, and for a time between 1843 and 1860 the practice was entirely discontinued. During this period surplus income was either used to augment the endowment of the almshouses, which had been built in 1750, or allowed to accumulate. (fn. 49) The number of apprentices put out in a year varied. Between 1900 and 1906 seven boys and girls were apprenticed at premiums of £20 or £25. In 1929 the apprenticing and family grave fund together amounted to some £612. In 1930 the maximum premium was raised to £30, and it was agreed that if the money could not be used for apprenticing it might be used to assist needy young persons in other ways. (fn. 50)

Francis Kenton's Charity.

By his will, dated 1718, Francis Kenton devised a rent charge from a house in Castle Street to supply provisions for 20 poor persons in the parish of St. Edmund. At the beginning of the 20th century the rent charge amounted to £2 10s. and was spent once a year upon tickets entitling about 20 recipients to a loaf of bread and 2s. worth of groceries. In 1953 20 poor persons received a gift in cash of 2s. 6d. (fn. 51)

Powell's Charity.

By his will, dated 1759, John Powell bequeathed a sum of money for the benefit of the poor of St. Edmund's parish. This was to enable the churchwardens to distribute once a year 6d. loaves of bread to poor families of the 'Four Chequers', beginning at St. Edmund's Church and continuing along Church Street as far as Winchester Street. The corporation received £50 from this legacy in 1769. In 1833 the income of this charity was £1 10s. In 1856 the charity was in abeyance, and no dividends had been received since 1837. These were subsequently recovered and invested. It was reported, in 1908, that the interest was carried to the credit of St. Edmund's Sick and Needy Fund. In 1952 £22 15s. was paid into this fund. (fn. 52)

Thomas Smith's Charity.

By his will dated 1782, Thomas Smith bequeathed £2,000 to provide weekly pensions for four poor men and four poor women of St. Edmund's parish. In 1833 an investment of £3,600 produced an annual income of £108. The eight poor persons received 5s. a week with an extra sum at Christmas. At the beginning of the 20th century the annual income was only £90 and the number of pensioners was reduced to six, but was later raised to seven. In 1952 the number was again eight and £103 was distributed in weekly allowances. (fn. 53)

William Harcourt's Charity.

William Harcourt by his will, dated 1818, bequeathed such a sum of money as would yield £60 a year for distribution among six poor men and six poor women of St. Edmund's parish. Harcourt's estate proved insufficient to provide such an endowment and £444 was eventually invested. In 1855 it was decided that as the annual income of this charity was only about £13 it should henceforth be applied to one, or possibly two, deserving persons. In 1902 the charity had been in abeyance for some time to allow the interest to accumulate. In 1952 no payments were made and the balance in hand was nearly £30. (fn. 54)

The Revd. James Cutler's Charity.

James Cutler by his will, proved 1840, gave the residue of his estate for the relief of poor persons of St. Edmund's parish, who should have suffered accidental loss or misfortune through no fault of their own. A scheme for the administration of this charity was established in 1855. In 1876 the endowment amounted to £4,110. At the beginning of the 20th century the income of about £102 was applied mainly in weekly pensions of 5s. Gratuities were also sometimes granted. There were usually seven or eight applicants for the charity. Cutler's wishes were as far as possible observed, and the recipients were said to be of a rather higher class than those receiving pensions from other parish charities. In 1953 eight recipients received weekly pensions of 5s. (fn. 55)

Mrs. Ellary's Charity.

Arabella Elizabeth Ray Ellary by her will, proved 1845, bequeathed £100 to provide bread for the poor of St. Edmund's parish. A sum of £88 18s. 4d. was invested, and the annual income, which in 1905 amounted to £2 5s. 8d., was applied in the same way as the income from John Powell's charity. In 1952 the income was about £30 and was paid into St. Edmund's Sick and Needy Fund. (fn. 56)

Charities for The Close

Lady Hyde's Charity.

By her will, dated 1687, Ann Hyde gave in memory of her husband, Sir Frederick Hyde, an annual rent charge of £10 from her farm at Tisbury (fn. 57) to be distributed equally among nine poor persons of the Close and the dispenser of the charity. The recipients were chosen by the chapter, and once chosen received the pension for life. In 1833 the money was disbursed by the overseer of the poor of the Close. In 1906 it was being paid by the waywardens of the Close to nine poor persons resident in the Close, or connected with it by employment or former residence there. In 1931 ten persons chosen by the chapter were receiving the charity annually, (fn. 58) and it was similarly disbursed in 1960.

Other Charities for the Benefit of the City

Richard Earlsman's Charities.

Richard Earlsman, stonemason, made a number of gifts and bequests to the poor and certain nonconformist bodies in the city. In 1829 he gave £1,000, the interest on which was to provide pensions of 5s. a week for six poor men of St. Thomas's parish selected by the trustees, who were all to be members of the vestry. In 1905 there were six pensioners receiving 5s. each, and an additional sum at Whitsun according to the balance available. By a scheme of 1940 it was stipulated that the minimum weekly pension should be 5s. and the maximum 8s. The residue of income, after the expenses of administration had been paid, was to be divided among the pensioners on Whit Monday. (fn. 59) In 1957 six pensioners received weekly pensions of 8s. each and a gift of £6 at Whitsun. (fn. 60)

In 1830 Earlsman gave £6,200, the interest on which was to provide six widows from the three ancient parishes with pensions of 5s. a week. The surplus income was to be used to apprentice three boys. Both boys and widows were to be selected by the incumbents and churchwardens of the three parishes. In 1905 the incumbents received £26 each from this charity and out of this they paid the pensions. The charity was not restricted to members of the Church of England. Between 1901 and 1905 eleven boys were apprenticed, usually at a premium of £28. In 1952 the incumbents received £26 for pensions, and that year £26 was spent on apprenticing. (fn. 61)

Earlsman also bequeathed by his will, dated 1830, the residue of his estate to be invested for the benefit of the poor of the three ancient parishes. In 1907 from £2,600 invested there was an annual income of £65. This was disbursed in sums of £22 15s. to the incumbents of St. Martin's and St. Edmund's, and £19 10s. to the incumbent of St. Thomas's for distribution among the poor of their parishes. Some time before 1830 Earlsman had made a gift of £500, the interest on which was also to be divided between the three incumbents for the poor of their parishes, and the income of these two charities was administered together in all three parishes. The money was usually distributed in the form of small weekly pensions, often to the widows already benefiting under Earlsman's special charity for them, and in small donations to the Sick and Needy Funds.

Duke of Somerset's Charity.

By his will, proved 1676, (fn. 62) the Duke of Somerset left £3,000 to purchase land, the income from which was to be used for apprenticing Salisbury children. Laverstock Farm, Stoke Abbott (Dors.), was bought for this purpose in 1685. In 1774 the property was valued at £145 a year. The annual rent in 1833 was nearly £100, and the money was spent on apprenticing both boys and girls, preference being given to orphans. A premium of £15 was paid for each child. In 1898 a scheme was established for the administration of the charity by thirteen trustees. In 1906 the annual rent of the farm had risen to £180, but because heavy expenditure on repairs was necessary, the funds available for apprenticing were much reduced. No children were apprenticed between 1902 and 1904, but two boys and two girls received premiums of £30 and £25 respectively in 1905. In 1921 Laverstock Farm was sold. (fn. 63) In 1940 another scheme was established for this charity. Premiums paid for apprenticing children were to be not less than £10 and not more than £50. Preference was to be given to children born in one of the three ancient parishes of the city, or in the Close. (fn. 64)

William Cole's Charity.

By his will, dated 1673, William Cole left £100 to clothe ten poor men in the 'customary coarse cloth'. In 1833 ten coats were distributed to different persons every year. Between 1856 and 1908 the annual sum spent on the purchase of coats varied from £3 12s. to £6 5s. In 1906 the income of this charity was administered with those of Fox and Cottom Wheeler. In 1931 £12 10s. from the charities of Cole and Fox was paid to the city magistrates for the purchase of great coats. (fn. 65)

Sir Stephen Fox's Charity.

An entry in the corporation ledger under the year 1678 records the bequest of £200 by Sir Stephen Fox for the purchase of warm-clothing for the poor every year before Christmas. For many years before 1833 the corporation distributed clothes to the poor without knowing whence the funds came. In 1893 £7 10s. was spent on clothing, and between 1896 and 1903 the sum was £5 except in 1900 and 1902 when it was rather more. Selection of candidates was made, as in the case of John Cottom Wheeler's Charity, by the city magistrates. In 1906 the income of this charity was administered with those of Cole and Cottom Wheeler.

John Cottom Wheeler's Charity.

By his will, proved in 1870, John Cottom Wheeler left £200 to be invested to provide for the purchase of great-coats. Applicants were to be labourers living in one of the three ancient parishes of the city, and were to apply for the charity in person. In 1905 there were said to be always a considerable number of candidates, and selection was made by the city magistrates. In 1903 and 1904 fourteen coats were distributed. In 1906 the income of this charity was administered with those of Cole and Fox. In 1957 one great-coat was distributed by the magistrates. (fn. 66)

Another charity for the supply of great-coats was that endowed with a bequest of £200 by George Fulford by his will, proved in 1919. Between 1950 and 1955 £6 10s. was spent annually on the purchase of a great coat. (fn. 67)

John Fricker's Charity.

By his will, proved in 1701, John Fricker bequeathed the rents of premises in Three Lion Chequer (later Queen) Street for certain charitable purposes. Twelve inmates of Trinity Hospital were to receive 5s. weekly, and the residue was to be paid to the Rectors of St. Martin's and St. Edmund's to buy cloth for coats for the poor in their parishes. In 1833 the rent of the premises produced £11 for the charity. The sum of £3 was paid to Trinity Hospital and the remainder divided between the two rectors. Between 1889 and 1904 the rent, which was £65, was allowed to accumulate to provide a fund for repairs. In 1905 £3 was paid to Trinity Hospital and £15 to the rectors. Both rectors used the money to buy tickets entitling the beneficiaries to warm clothing. There were about 65 recipients in St. Edmund's parish, 50 in St. Martin's, and 16 in St. Mark's, which had a share in the money granted to the Rector of St. Martin's. In 1957 the rent was £480 a year, and £3 was paid to Trinity Hospital and £125 to the two rectors. Until that year the rectors had been receiving about £35 each. (fn. 68)

William Ghost's Gift.

William Ghost by his will, dated 1823, bequeathed £1,000 to provide weekly pensions for six poor weavers. The first recipients of the charity were all former employees of Ghost, a cloth manufacturer, who died in 1831, but they were not all weavers. Each received 1s. 10d. a week and an additional sum at Christmas. At the end of the 19th century the same amount was being paid to six pensioners, but it was no longer possible to restrict the charity to weavers. At the beginning of the 20th century the number of pensioners was reduced and a larger pension was awarded. The charity was not in fact restricted to any one parish, but in practice it has become limited to parishioners of St. Edmund's. In 1952 a total of £23 was distributed in weekly allowances to two pensioners. (fn. 69)

Charities of Elizabeth Lake and Jane Lane.

Both these charities were for the benefit of aged women. For this purpose Elizabeth Lake by her will, dated 1826, bequeathed £790, and Jane Lane by her will, dated 1836, bequeathed almost £958. The first was to provide pensions for three women, the second for two women, and in both cases preference was to be given to relatives of the testators. Selection of candidates was made by the vestry of St. Martin's parish, although neither charity was expressly limited to that parish. In 1907 Jane Lane's pensioners were receiving 5s. each and Elizabeth Lake's rather smaller sums. In both cases this was in excess of income and reductions were proposed. In 1931 £18 was distributed among Elizabeth Lake's three pensioners, and in 1952 Jane Lane's two pensioners received £12 each. (fn. 70)

William Smith's Charity.

William Smith left by his will, proved 1856, £333 to provide prizes at the annual sheep fair. He stipulated that preference should be given to persons called Smith or Harwood, and that should the fairs be discontinued the money should be given to the poor. (fn. 71) In 1954 two prizes of £5 each were awarded at each of the two sheep fairs held by the corporation. (fn. 72)

Smith's Charity.

In December 1774 the corporation ordered that the bequest by Mr. Smith, whose identity is uncertain, of £25 should be invested in stock. In 1833 the annual dividends of 16s. 10d. were regularly spent on cakes which were distributed amongst the workhouse children about Eastertime. Trustees were appointed for the charity in 1837. No information regarding the endowment was available in 1906 and the charity was accordingly regarded as lost.

Footnotes

1 Unless otherwise stated all information about the almshouses before 1908 comes from Endowed Char. Wilts. H.C. 273–1, pp. 370–592 (1908), lxxxi.
2 V.C.H. Wilts. iii. 343–56, 357–61.
3 See p. 171.
4 Char. Com. Correspondence File 31.
5 See p. 171.
6 Char. Com. Accts. File.
7 Ibid.
8 Ibid. File 6695.
9 Jnl. Brit. Arch. Assoc. (3rd ser.), iv. 86.
10 Char. Com. Files 52130, 123357 and Accts. File.
11 Char. Com. Files 11601, 109852.
12 Ibid. File 25993.
13 Ibid. File 11601.
14 Ibid.
15 Ibid.
16 Ibid.
17 Ibid. Accts. File.
18 See p. 171.
19 Char. Com. Correspondence File 30.
20 Ibid. Accts. File.
21 Inscription within almshouse.
22 Char. Com. Accts. File.
23 See below.
24 Char. Com. Accts. File.
25 Ibid.
26 All information about this almshouse from Char. Com. File 137141.
27 Unless otherwise stated all information about charities before 1908 comes from Endowed Char. Wilts. H.C. 273–1, pp. 370–592 (1908), lxxxi.
28 The 12 were Eyre's Gift for a lecture; Sir Thomas White's; Thomas Gardiner's; Francis Swanton's; Edward Baker's; Edward Rodes's; George Mervin's; Christopher Willoughby's; John Gauntlett's; William Viner's; Joseph Gifford's; Thomas Bee's.
29 The 5 almshouses were Christopher Eyre's Hospital; William Hussey's Almshouse; Thomas Brickett's Hospital; Thomas Taylor's Almshouse and Trinity Hospital.
30 For Trinity Hospital see V.C.H. Wilts. iii. 357–61.
31 This and subsequent information about the municipal charities generally in the 20th century from Char. Com. Files.
32 Cf. V.C.H. City of York, 438; V.C.H. Worcs. iv. 414.
33 Char. Com. File 87917.
34 Ibid. Accts. File.
35 Ibid. File 60312.
36 See V.C.H. Hants iii. 536, and 13th Rep. Char. Com. H.C. 349, p. 181 (1825), xi.
37 Char. Com. File 58044.
38 See p. 171.
39 Char. Com. Correspondence File 31.
40 Ibid, Accts. File.
41 Ibid.
42 Ibid.
43 Ibid.
44 Ibid.
45 Ibid.
46 Ibid.
47 Ibid.
48 Ibid.
49 See p. 170.
50 Char. Com. Correspondence File 31.
51 Ibid. Accts. File.
52 Ibid.
53 Ibid.
54 Ibid.
55 Ibid.
56 Ibid.
57 Called Sembline or Solomon's Place at Hatch.
58 Char. Com. Accts. File.
59 Ibid. Correspondence File 31.
60 Ibid. Accts. File.
61 Ibid.
62 Complete Peerage.
63 Char. Com. Correspondence File 31.
64 Ibid.
65 Ibid. Accts. File.
66 Ibid.
67 Ibid. File 98031.
68 Ibid. Accts. File.
69 Char. Com. Accts. File.
70 Ibid.
71 Ibid. File 101795.
72 Ibid. Accts. File.