Gloucester
Charities for the poor

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Victoria County History

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N.M. Herbert (editor)

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1988

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351-364

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'Gloucester: Charities for the poor ', A History of the County of Gloucester: Volume 4: The City of Gloucester (1988), pp. 351-364. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42318 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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CHARITIES FOR THE POOR

ALMSHOUSES AND ALMSHOUSE CHARITIES

Three ancient hospitals, St. Bartholomew, St. Margaret, and St. Mary Magdalen, (fn. 1) whose medieval history is given in another volume, (fn. 2) had all passed into the control of the corporation by the end of the 16th century, and were placed under a joint system of administration in 1636. A fourth hospital, St. Kyneburgh, founded in the 1560s, also passed to the corporation.

In 1636 statutes for the government of the three ancient hospitals were promulgated by the common council. (fn. 3) A board of governors, comprising a president, a treasurer, two surveyors, two almoners, and two scrutineers, was to be elected annually and was to hold monthly meetings at St. Bartholomew, the chief hospital; the board was to include the mayor, two aldermen, and other corporation members. Salaried officers — a minister, physician, surgeon, rent gatherer, and 'overseer of the manners of the poor' — were to be appointed and given residence at St. Bartholomew, while separate ministers and readers were to be appointed for the two smaller hospitals and paid at the same rate as the almspeople there. The three hospitals were to maintain a total of 77 almspeople aged at least 52 years, precedence being given to burgesses and their wives. Detailed regulations covering behaviour and religious observance were to be enforced. (fn. 4) By the early 18th century a single reader was usually appointed for all three hospitals (fn. 5) and the office of minister was by then usually held by the incumbent of St. Nicholas's church. (fn. 6) In 1779 an attempt to tighten up the administration was made by the common council, which ordered the statutes to be printed and the rules of behaviour to be posted up in the almspeople's rooms. (fn. 7) New statutes, differing little from those of 1636, were enacted by the council in 1830. (fn. 8) The hospitals continued to be financed for the most part by their medieval endowments, which were administered and leased under the same policy as the corporation property. Occasionally, however, the revenues were found insufficient: in 1641 because of debts it was decided that each new board of governors should collectively supply each year a loan of £40 to supplement the hospitals' finances, (fn. 9) and in 1719, when large sums had been borrowed at interest, the corporation decided to apply some of its own income to the hospitals. (fn. 10)

In 1836, under the provisions of the Municipal Corporations Act, the three ancient hospitals and St. Kyneburgh were placed under the management of the Gloucester municipal charity trustees. (fn. 11) In 1861 St. Margaret and St. Mary Magdalen were amalgamated as the United Hospitals and the following year moved to a new building at the St. Margaret's site on London Road. The Gothic-style brick building, designed by Fulljames and Waller, comprised two quadrangles, one occupied by the United Hospitals and the other by St. Kyneburgh's Hospital. (fn. 12) The United Hospitals were regulated by a Scheme of 1875, under which they were to house 21 almspeople aged at least 60, (fn. 13) and in 1882 they were amalgamated with St. Kyneburgh to form a single institution, supporting 31 almspeople. (fn. 14) In 1890 St. Bartholomew was also united with it, though the old St. Bartholomew's building in the Island remained in use. The united hospital was to have a total of 71 inmates, paid weekly stipends of 8–12s., and any surplus of income was to be paid to out-pensioners. Its revenues were still drawn largely from land, comprising house property in the city and farmland in various parishes in the county. (fn. 15) Much land, including most of the city property, was sold between 1917 and 1927. (fn. 16) A Scheme of 1934 fixed the number of inmates at 61, and in 1959 31 people were housed at each of the two sites and there were 81 out-pensioners. The annual income in 1959 comprised £3,508 drawn from stocks and shares and £1,867 rental of farmland. (fn. 17) Alice Poulton by will proved 1954 gave the residue of her personal estate, amounting to c. £5,000 in stock and bonds, to provide coal, clothing, and provisions for the almspeople, and a Scheme of 1971 applied that charity and three others administered by the municipal charity trustees to the general support of the almshouses. (fn. 18) In the mid 20th century the almspeople also received aid from parish charities of St. Nicholas and St. Catharine. (fn. 19) The St. Bartholomew's building was given up in 1971 and the hospital concentrated on the London Road site, where a new block of flats, behind the 19th-century almshouses, was opened in 1978. In 1982 the charity opened another new block of flats, in Philip Street in the upper Bristol Road area, and a third new block, in Sherborne Street west of London Road, was opened in 1984. In 1985 a total of 84 flats for old people was maintained at the three sites. (fn. 20)

St. Bartholomew's Hospital

St. Bartholomew's Hospital, the largest and wealthiest of the three ancient hospitals, stood in the Island between Westgate bridge and the Foreign bridge. In 1535 it supported a master, 5 priests, and 32 almspeople out of its extensive property in Gloucester and outlying parishes, which brought in an annual income of £95 7s. 1d. (fn. 21) The Crown appointed governors for the hospital in 1547 and 1549, (fn. 22) and in 1564 Queen Elizabeth granted the patronage and the reversion of the hospital at the death of the incumbent governor, John Mann, to the corporation; it was to maintain a priest, physician, surgeon, and 40 almspeople and was to be styled the Hospital of St. Bartholomew 'of the foundation of Queen Elizabeth'. (fn. 23) An Act of Parliament confirming the grant in 1566 made the bishop of Gloucester visitor to the hospital, and successive bishops exercised that right, notably Martin Benson who made some new regulations in 1745. (fn. 24) The corporation took possession of the hospital on the resignation of Mann (fn. 25) and in the years 1569–70 rebuilt 19 of the 40 almspeople's rooms and made considerable improvements to other parts of the building. (fn. 26)

Under the statutes of 1636 St. Bartholomew was to maintain 50 almspeople (20 men and 30 women) at the weekly pay of 2s. 6d. (fn. 27) William Capel then undertook to build six additional rooms for men, and the full complement was apparently made up in 1648 when the common council decided to place another four women in the hospital. The council planned to build four new rooms in 1655, (fn. 28) and at the start of the 18th century, the hospital housed 24 men and 30 women. (fn. 29) In 1767 Jane Punter gave £500 stock to endow rooms for six additional women, to be paid 1s. a week. In 1781 £500 came to the hospital under the will of Thomas Ratcliffe dated 1761 and it was decided to use it to add 6d. a week to the pay of Jane Punter's women and add two men. (fn. 30) In 1825, however, there were 23 men and the 36 women in the hospital. (fn. 31) The pay of the almspeople was increased by 1s. in 1805, that of the Punter women being apparently equalized with that of the others. (fn. 32) By 1830 the weekly pay had been increased to 5s. 6d. (fn. 33)

Apart from those of Punter and Ratcliffe, other grants supplemented the hospital's medieval endowments. A rent charge of 3s. 4d. a week was distributed to the almspeople under the Crypt school charity established by Joan Cooke in 1540, (fn. 34) and in 1859 £78 a year was assigned from that foundation. (fn. 35) A payment of 5s. a year was received under the charity established by Sir Thomas Bell in 1562, (fn. 36) and Henry Cugley by will dated 1594 gave £10 a year to buy provisions. William Goldstone by will dated 1569 gave the hospital houses and lands in St. Catherine's parish, Richard Pate in 1576 gave houses in St. Mary de Lode parish, and Henry Brown by will dated 1659 gave 8 a. in Walham. (fn. 37) The ancient endowments of the hospital included small farms in Uley, Brimpsfield, Coaley, Hardwicke, Longdon (Worcs.), Castle Moreton (Worcs.), and Minety (Glos., later Wilts.) with a total area of 431 a. in 1731, together with parcels of land in several other parishes and extensive property in the city; c. 62 houses belonged to the hospital in 1781 but the number was reduced to 48 by the 1820s as the result of sales for land-tax redemption and demolitions under city improvement Acts. The total rental of the hospital's lands was £504 in 1781, rising to £889 by 1822 when fines, timber sales, and a small income from stock brought its annual income up to c. £1,070. (fn. 38) Additional land, mainly in Awre, was bought for the hospital in the late 1870s and early 1880s. (fn. 39)

The hospital was regulated by a Scheme of 1872 under which the number of almspeople was to be allowed to fall to 40 people, aged at least 60, and any surplus income used to support nonresident pensioners. (fn. 40) In 1890 St. Bartholomew was amalgamated with the United Hospitals. (fn. 41)

The first buildings at the site of St. Bartholomew's Hospital apparently dated from Henry II's reign. (fn. 42) A chantry chapel was added c. 1230, (fn. 43) and in 1265 the Crown gave land for enlarging the chancel. (fn. 44) A 'great house' of the poor on the west part of the site was mentioned in 1380. (fn. 45) Andrew Whitmay, prior of the hospital from 1510 and suffragan bishop of Worcester diocese, (fn. 46) rebuilt the hospital on higher foundations to raise it above flood level, adding also a 'fair lodging' for his own use. (fn. 47) Presumably that work was carried out after 1528 when John Cooke bequeathed £9 to secure the hospital against winter floods. (fn. 48) The buildings were said to be ruinous at the time of the grant of 1564, (fn. 49) following which considerable work on them was undertaken by the corporation. (fn. 50) In the 18th century the chapel, evidently not included in Whitmay's rebuilding, remained a substantial building, mainly of the late 13th century or early 14th. (fn. 51) Between 1787 and 1790 the hospital was completely rebuilt by the corporation. The new building, designed in gothick style by William Price, had a road front with blind arcading, the central bays projecting, (fn. 52) and a semicircular bay at the rear which housed the chapel. (fn. 53) Following its sale by the municipal charity trustees, it was restored in the early 1980s as a shopping and craft centre.

St. Margaret's Hospital

St. Margaret's Hospital, which stood outside the city boundary on the south-east side of the London road, had passed into the control of the burgess community by the late Middle Ages and leading burgesses were appointed to the post of master. (fn. 54) In 1546 the hospital had an annual income of £8 12s., (fn. 55) and in 1563 the inmates were a reader and 10 poor men. (fn. 56) Under the statutes of 1636 it was to support a reader and 8 men at the weekly pay of 2s. a week each (fn. 57) and its complement of almspeople remained unchanged. In 1805 their pay was increased by 1s. a week, (fn. 58) and they were receiving 4s. a week in 1825. Those almsmen who were married at the time of their election were allowed to bring their wives into the hospital. (fn. 59)

The hospital's ancient endowments included houses in the city and parcels of land in the outlying hamlets and other parts of the county. The total rental was £58 in 1781 and £137 in 1822, when the number of houses owned, recently increased by new building, was 22. (fn. 60) Under the will of Thomas Horton, dated 1735 but not confirmed until 1763, St. Margaret's and St. Mary Magdalen's hospitals shared in a rent charge of £10, given for provisions and for a sermon and prayers, and in the proceeds of £100. (fn. 61) Alderman John Hayward (d. 1758) gave a rent charge of 40s. to be distributed among the almsmen of St. Margaret at Christmas, and they also received any residue of £15 which was to be paid every five years for repairing Hayward's tomb and part of the pavement in the hospital chapel. (fn. 62) In 1822 the total annual income of the hospital was £170. (fn. 63) St. Margaret's Hospital was united with St. Mary Magdalen in 1861. (fn. 64)

The hospital was founded before the mid 12th century (fn. 65) and the surviving two-celled chapel incorporates 12th-century masonry in its west wall. The chapel appears, however, to have been rebuilt in the early 14th century, and new windows were put into the nave in the 15th. The chapel was restored in 1846 and again in 1875; (fn. 66) a south vestry was added, the roof was renewed, and the interior was refitted. As well as serving the inmates of the hospital the chapel was used over the centuries by inhabitants of the neighbouring suburbs. That was possibly the reason why in the late Middle Ages the chantry priest maintained by Gloucester Abbey in the chapel was sometimes styled rector (fn. 67) and why in the mid 16th century the chapel was said to be parochial. (fn. 68) The registers, which survive from the 1790s, include baptisms and burials of residents of the neighbouring London road area. (fn. 69) Use of the chapel by outsiders was probably encouraged by the fact that parts of the area belonged to the extraparochial North and South Hamlets and other parts to St. Catherine's parish, (fn. 70) which had no church after 1655. The chapel remained in use by the almspeople in 1985.

In 1560 the domestic buildings included the former prior's lodging, then leased, and the almsmen's lodgings. (fn. 71) An old hall is said to have been converted to a barn c. 1589. (fn. 72) In the early 19th century the buildings comprised a single tall range, partly timber-framed and partly stone-built, fronting the main road east of the chapel. (fn. 73) It was demolished in 1862 when the new United Hospitals were opened on an adjoining site. (fn. 74)

St. Mary Magdalen's Hospital

St. Mary Magdalen's Hospital, known alternatively from 1617 as King James's Hospital, stood on the south side of the London road, further out than St. Margaret, near Wotton Pitch. In 1546 it had annual revenues of £3 6s. 8d. (fn. 75) and in 1563 maintained a reader and six poor men and women. (fn. 76) The Crown, which had assumed rights as patron exercised before the Dissolution by Llanthony Priory, (fn. 77) appointed governors of the hospital in the later 16th century. In 1573, when John Fenner (or Spring) was appointed, (fn. 78) the hospital and all its revenues were held by John Norris under a lease from an earlier governor and the almspeople were left unsupported. After an inquiry Norris was ordered to give up the hospital in 1576. (fn. 79) In 1598 the hospital was said to be in ruins and Elizabeth I granted the patronage to the corporation so that they could carry out repairs. (fn. 80) By 1614 an additional 13 almspeople were being maintained at St. Mary Magdalen by its governor, Alderman Thomas Machen, and at his death that year he left £100 to the corporation to support a payment of 6d. a quarter to each of them. (fn. 81) In 1617 James I granted the governorship of the hospital and its lands and revenues, including a pension of £13 from the Crown, to the corporation; the hospital was to continue to maintain 19 almspeople and was to be renamed the Hospital of King James (though the old name also remained in use). (fn. 82)

The statutes of 1636 provided for 10 men and 9 women to be maintained at the weekly pay of 1s. 6d., (fn. 83) and the number of almspeople remained unchanged. The weekly pay was increased by 6d. in 1805, (fn. 84) but in 1824, as an economy measure, the pay of newly elected inmates was set at 1s. 6d. (fn. 85) In 1827 the sum of £4 a year, an ancient bequest to the city poor by Leonard Tarne, was added to the weekly pay, (fn. 86) and from 1838 the almspeople at St. Mary Magdalen and St. Kyneburgh had an additional 6d. a week, the proceeds of £1,500 received under the will of John Garn (d. 1835). (fn. 87)

The ancient endowments comprised a farm at Hayden, in Cheltenham parish, which covered 58 a. in 1731, some parcels of land in the outlying hamlets of Gloucester, and a few houses in the city. In 1822 the total rental was £155 and the total annual income of the hospital c. £170. The hospital was by then in an impoverished state, a debt of £522 having accumulated. It was hoped that building then in progress on some of the hospital's land in the London road would eventually improve the finances, but it was still in debt and its buildings ruinous in 1833. (fn. 88) St. Mary Magdalen was united with St. Margaret's Hospital in 1861. (fn. 89)

St. Mary Magdalen's Hospital was probably founded in the early 12th century (fn. 90) and its small two-celled chapel dating from that period survived relatively unaltered until the mid 19th century. A lancet window was put into the north wall of the chancel in the 13th century, the east window was enlarged in the 15th, and the chancel roof was renewed and a new window put in the south side in the 16th. A west porch of brick was added in the late 18th century or the early 19th, and a small west bellcot contained a bell cast by John Rudhall in 1793. (fn. 91) By the 1840s the inmates of the hospital attended St. Margaret's chapel and St. Mary Magdalen's chapel became dilapidated. (fn. 92) In 1861 the nave was demolished but the richly ornamented south doorway was reset, facing east, in the chancel arch, and the north doorway was set in the south wall of chancel. (fn. 93) The east window was probably restored at that time. The chapel contains the recumbent effigy of a lady, said to have been brought from St. Kyneburgh's chapel. (fn. 94) The chapel was no longer used in 1985.

St. Mary Magdalen's chapel, like St. Margaret's, was said to serve a separate parish in the mid 16th century. (fn. 95) From at least the early 18th century inhabitants of Wotton, including members of the Blanch family, were buried in the chapel and its burial ground (fn. 96) and burials and baptisms of people from various neighbouring areas were being registered there in the 1790s. (fn. 97) John Blanch (d. 1756) of Barton Street devised £300 in reversion to maintain a minister to read service and preach in the chapel on Sundays; the gift was conditional on the inhabitants of Wotton raising another £100 (fn. 98) and was apparently never implemented.

The main London road formerly ran close to the north side of the chapel (fn. 99) but in 1821 it was diverted to the south side, (fn. 100) dividing the chapel from the domestic buildings of the hospital which formed a quadrangle some way to the south. (fn. 101) The buildings, which were wholly or partly timberframed, (fn. 102) were refronted following the road diversion, (fn. 103) and were demolished in or soon after 1862. (fn. 104)

St. Kyneburgh's Hospital

St. Kyneburgh's Hospital, commonly called the Kimbrose, was founded by Sir Thomas Bell, the wealthy Gloucester capper, on the site of St. Kyneburgh's chapel at the south gate. Bell had built an almshouse there by 1559 when he drew up his will leaving it, with endowments, to the city corporation. (fn. 105) In 1562, however, he settled it on a body of trustees, who took possession after the deaths of Bell and his wife Joan (fn. 106) in 1566 and 1567 respectively. (fn. 107) Under the terms of the trust deed the hospital was to maintain six poor people, one of them to be if possible a burgess. It gave the site of Whitefriars, Morin's Mill in Brook Street, six houses, and the rent of another house, having a total annual value of £16 0s. 4d., to support a quarterly payment of 13s. 4d. to each of the almspeople, and gave substantial endowments for other charitable purposes and to provide for property repairs. The trustees did not, as was intended, fill vacancies in their own number and only two remained in 1598 when they acquired licence to transfer the hospital and its endowments to the corporation. The transfer, which was prompted by the corporation's energetic management of St. Bartholomew's Hospital after 1564, was completed in 1603 (fn. 108) and the corporation retained St. Kyneburgh under its direct management until 1836.

The original endowment was supplemented by the gift of a house from Thomas Hobbs in 1608, (fn. 109) and Margaret Norton by will dated 1689 gave the interest on £30, (fn. 110) for which £1 a year was received in the 1820s. In 1763 Susanna Cooke gave £40 for provisions on St. Thomas's day, and £2 in cash was distributed for that gift in the 1820s. (fn. 111) In 1833 the annual income of the hospital was £42. The inmates, whose number remained at six, were then receiving 1s. 6d. a week each and an annual sum of £10 7s. divided amongst them. (fn. 112) A plan in 1835 to use surplus funds to buy stock and raise the weekly pay by 6d. a week (fn. 113) may not have been implemented but an increase at that rate was made in 1838 under John Garn's bequest. (fn. 114)

In the mid 19th century the almshouse remained as built by Bell, comprising a low range of building with five doorways to the almsrooms. (fn. 115) An older building, which survived adjoining the west end, housed the sixth almsman. (fn. 116) The almshouse was demolished after 1862 when the inmates were rehoused in the new building on London Road. (fn. 117) A Scheme of 1861 increased the number of almspeople to 10, who were to be aged at least 60 and receive between 7s. 6d. and 10s. a week. (fn. 118) St. Kyneburgh was amalgamated with the United Hospitals in 1882. (fn. 119)

Other Almshouses.

A number of other almshouses were established in Gloucester in the late 16th century and the 17th but some were short lived, probably as a result of lack of endowment.

Alderman William Hill (d. 1636) left £80 to build a house outside the south gate in which six poor people of the south ward were to be placed by the corporation. (fn. 120) The house was built and almspeople were regularly maintained there by the corporation, (fn. 121) though there was apparently no endowment for repairs or weekly pay. Sarah Wright by will dated 1667 gave 6s. a year to buy coal for the almspeople. (fn. 122) The house was demolished at the same time as the south gate in 1781 and the existing almspeople were found other lodgings. They were not, however, replaced when they died and only two remained c. 1811. (fn. 123)

Alderman John Baugh (d. 1621) devised the remainder of his 300-year lease of the former St. Thomas's chapel, by the river Twyver in the later Dean's Walk, for an almshouse and devised an adjoining orchard to provide for maintenance of the building, which was divided into four tenements; the master and four almsmen of St. Bartholomew's Hospital were to settle poor burgesses there. In 1631, however, the administrator of Baugh's will assigned the lease to a Gloucester mercer, (fn. 124) and following a Chancery suit brought by the corporation it was conveyed in 1633 to a group of common councillors who were to implement the will. (fn. 125) It is not known whether almsmen were ever settled in the building, which was demolished before 1692, probably at the siege of 1643. (fn. 126)

Alderman John Hayward (d. 1640) built two almshouses near St. John's church and left other property to St. John's parish as an endowment. (fn. 127) Two widows were housed there in 1738 when Alderman Samuel Browne left a rent charge of 10s. to help support them. (fn. 128) The houses were pulled down in 1804 and the widows were moved to two new houses built on parish property adjoining lower Northgate Street. The widows each received an annual pension of 50s. in the early 19th century (fn. 129) and £16 in the 1890s. (fn. 130) The houses were apparently sold c. 1934, and by the early 1960s the proceeds of the endowment were being applied for general charitable purposes in the parish. (fn. 131)

Almshouses founded by Mr. Pate, presumably Richard Pate (d. 1588), and by Alderman Thomas Semys (d. 1603) were said to have existed in 1643, and Richard Keylock, presumably the man who served as sheriff in 1627, was said to have provided houses for two men in St. John's parish. Nothing was known of those three foundations in the mid 18th century. (fn. 132) Almshouses recorded in Holy Trinity parish between 1614 and 1645 (fn. 133) were apparently four houses in Bull Lane given by a Mr. Peach, (fn. 134) and John Cromwell by will dated 1679 left two houses in Hare Lane to be used, after the deaths of the tenants, to house poor people of St. John's parish; (fn. 135) no later record has been found of those almshouses in use. John Harvey Ollney (d. 1836) left £8,000 to the city corporation to found an almshouse for 18 poor people and provide them with a weekly allowance. (fn. 136) The corporation obtained a site for the house, apparently as a gift, in 1846 (fn. 137) but Chancery proceedings begun in 1848 to secure the legacy and similar gifts to Tewkesbury, Cheltenham, and Winchcombe were unsuccessful. (fn. 138)

OTHER CHARITIES

CITY CHARITIES MANAGED BY THE OLD CORPORATION. (fn. 139)

The minor charities controlled by the city corporation before 1835 were mainly tradesmen's loan charities and apprenticeship charities, most of them given in the later 16th century or the earlier 17th. The funds given for tradesmen, which were lent, usually free of interest, on bond and surety for periods of a few years, were much underused c. 1695 when only £302 of a total of £1,095 were out. Later most of the loan funds were lost, either not recovered from borrowers or absorbed into the general corporation funds; by 1825 only the charity of Sir Thomas White, which was periodically augmented, survived. It, Sir Thomas Rich's, and three apprenticeship charities, were transferred to the municipal charity trustees in 1836 and applied to educational purposes in 1882.

Hugh Atwell, rector of St. Tew (Cornw.), c. 1601 gave £3 11s. 7d. a year to keep the poor at work. About 1695, when the proceeds were said to be £3 6s. 8d., it was regarded as a loan charity. It had been lost by 1825.

Sir Thomas Bell, alderman, by his trust deed of 1562, endowing St. Kyneburgh's Hospital, gave annual rent charges totalling £6 10s. for the poor of the four wards of the city and the prisoners in the county and city gaols. The charity became the corporation's responsibility in 1603. (fn. 140) The sums were distributed regularly up to 1825 but have not been found recorded later.

Abraham Blackleech (d. 1639) (fn. 141) gave £50 for apprenticeships. The capital was probably distributed as a principal sum. (fn. 142)

Sarah Browne, widow of Alderman John Browne, (fn. 143) by will dated 1643 gave her lease of property held under the corporation, part of the Bell charity estate; the profits were to be used for paying the chief rent, renewing the lease, and apprenticing three boys each year. The property was producing a rent of £25 in 1825. From 1836 the charity was administered by the municipal charity trustees. (fn. 144) It was apparently discontinued c. 1851 in the course of a Chancery suit over the arrangements for leasing the Bell charity property. (fn. 145)

Jasper Clutterbuck, alderman, by will dated 1658 gave leasehold land, £10 of the profits to be used for apprenticing two boys each year. The charity, if ever applied, (fn. 146) presumably lapsed on expiry of the lease.

Giles Cox, of Abloads Court, Sandhurst, by will dated 1620 gave £100 for loans to five impoverished clothiers. (fn. 147) The charity was in operation c. 1695 but had been lost by 1825.

Henry Ellis by will dated 1647 gave £500 from his share of the cargo of a ship, if it returned safely from its voyage, to provide loans to citizens involved in overseas trade. About 1695 £50 in the chamberlain's hands was said to represent the charity but no record has been found of it in operation.

Dame Eleanor Fettiplace in 1625 gave £40 to set the poor to work. (fn. 148) It was used for loans to tradesmen (fn. 149) until c. 1695 or later and had been lost by 1825.

Helpe Foxe, incumbent of St. Nicholas, (fn. 150) in 1669 offered £100 for apprenticeships. Attempts to acquire the sum were made in 1678, after Foxe's death, (fn. 151) but no record has been found of the charity in operation.

Thomas Gloucester of London, presumably a native of Gloucester, by codicil to his will proved 1447 gave 500 marks for loans to young tradesmen of the town or the county. (fn. 152) By 1503 keepers of the fund were being appointed annually and had £108 3s. 4d. in their hands; £80 was lent in 1529 for rebuilding the Boothall, to be repaid out of the profits of the weighing beams kept there. No record of the fund has been found after 1539, when £95 6s. 4d. was in hand. (fn. 153)

Joan Goldstone by will dated 1578 gave £20 to provide wood and coal for the poor. In 1612 the corporation assigned the principal sum together with a lease of its storehouse near the Foreign bridge, the lessee being required to sell fuel to the poor at fixed prices, (fn. 154) and in 1825 the charity was considered to be met in the subsidized coal supply. (fn. 155)

Thomas Gunter of Massachusetts, a native of Gloucester, by will dated 1760 gave £1,000 for loans to tradesmen. Only £333 was received, all but £83 of which was used in 1766 to buy additional land for the Bluecoat school endowment. In 1780 the corporation agreed to pay interest on the £333 to Gunter's poverty-stricken residuary legatees during their lives. (fn. 156) The eventual use of the residue of the principal received has not been discovered.

William Halliday, alderman of London, by will dated 1623 and modified by his later spoken wishes, (fn. 157) gave £500 for apprenticeships; it was to be laid out on land so as to produce a rent of £30, and the corporation later decided that six boys should benefit each year. The principal was not laid out but kept in hand by the corporation until 1835 when part of its property was charged with a payment of £30 for it. (fn. 158) From 1792 the charity was applied with Sarah Browne's, providing a total premium of £9 for each boy. (fn. 159) From 1836 the charity was administered by the municipal charity trustees, (fn. 160) and in 1882 it was annexed to the United Schools foundation to provide scholarships at Sir Thomas Rich's school. (fn. 161)

John Heydon, a London mercer, by will dated 1580 gave £100 for loans to young Gloucester merchants trading overseas; interest was to be charged at £3 6s. 8d. a year and distributed among the prisoners in the city gaol. (fn. 162) Loans were made at least once, in 1585, but c. 1695 the principal, though still accounted for, was not in use. The loan charity had lapsed altogether by 1825 but a payment was still made to the prisoners in respect of it.

William Huntley gave £10 for loans to set poor men to work. The sum was received by the corporation in 1632 (fn. 163) but had apparently been lost by c. 1695.

John Langley by will proved c. 1657 gave £20 for loans to young tradesmen. The charity was in operation in 1673 but has not been found recorded later.

Thomas Machen, alderman, by will dated 1614 gave £100 for loans at interest to mercers. The charity was in operation c. 1695 but had been lost by 1825.

John Morris by will dated 1626 gave £10 for loans to poor burgesses; interest at 13s. 4d. a year was to be charged and given to the poor at Christmas. (fn. 164) The principal was accounted for but not in use c. 1695. It had been lost by 1825 but 12s. was paid to the poor each year in respect of the interest.

Richard Pate, recorder of the city, by will dated 1588 gave a rent charge of £1 to the poor for a term of 20 years after his death.

Robert Pettifer by will dated 1612 gave the herbage of a piece of land for the use of the poor during the remainder of his lease.

Thomas Poulton of Tewkesbury by will dated 1607 (fn. 165) gave £60 for loans to young tradesmen. The charity was in operation at least until 1787 (fn. 166) but had been lost by 1825.

John Powell (d. 1666), (fn. 167) alderman, gave £100, the proceeds to be used to apprentice two or more boys each year. The charity was in operation in 1682 (fn. 168) but has not been found recorded later.

Jane Punter by will dated 1767 gave the residue of her personal estate to apprentice as many boys at £10 each as the interest on the sum would allow; £2,523 was received and invested in stock. Later the stock was sold and the principal merged in the general funds of the corporation, which made itself liable to interest of £79 a year. By 1825 there was an accumulation of £715, few apprenticeships having been made since 1805, and it was planned to use the fund in conjunction with other apprenticing charities. From 1836 the charity was administered by the municipal charity trustees, (fn. 169) and in 1882 it was annexed to the United Schools foundation to provide scholarships at Sir Thomas Rich's school. (fn. 170)

Sir Thomas Rich by will dated 1666 charged his Bluecoat school endowment (fn. 171) with £30 a year to provide clothes for 10 poor men and 10 poor women; he also gave the residual income of the endowment for distribution to young tradesmen and to poor maidservants when they married or, failing suitable recipients, to poor and sick householders. The clothing charity was distributed in blue gowns, the recipients being required to attend the mayor to church on Sundays and festivals. (fn. 172) The other charities were being distributed irregularly in the early 19th century, whenever there was a surplus of funds. (fn. 173) As part of the school foundation, the charities were administered from 1836 by the municipal charity trustees. (fn. 174) Under a Scheme of 1851 the payments to tradesmen, maidservants, and householders were placed on a regular basis, at a fixed rate every five years, while the clothing charity was to continue annually, the recipients to be known as Blue Gowns. (fn. 175) The Scheme for the United Schools in 1882 provided only for the continuance of the clothing charity, at £40 a year, (fn. 176) and it was made a separate foundation in 1906. (fn. 177) The charity operated until 1971 when the proceeds were assigned to the general fund of the United Hospitals. (fn. 178)

Miles Smith (d. 1624), bishop of Gloucester, gave £20 for setting the poor to work. It was on loan to a tradesman in 1629, (fn. 179) but has not been found recorded later.

Leonard Tarne, alderman, by will dated 1641 gave a rent charge of £4 a year to be distributed among 40 poor people. (fn. 180) In 1827 it was assigned to the inmates of St. Mary Magdalen's Hospital (fn. 181) and later remained part of the endowments of the almshouses. (fn. 182)

Sir Thomas White, a London clothier, by will dated 1566 (fn. 183) included Gloucester among the 23 towns which (with the London merchant tailors' company) were in turn to receive from Bristol corporation an annual payment of £104; after the deduction of £4 for management expenses, the sum was to be used for loans to young tradesmen, with preference to clothiers. Gloucester took its first turn in 1581. About 1695, when it had received the charity five times, £62 of the fund had been lost, and in 1825 only £400 remained of the £1,100 received. Part of the fund was used on litigation between 1816 and 1818 when Gloucester joined other towns in an unsuccessful attempt to get Bristol corporation to share out a large surplus of rents from the endowment; the city declined to join another attempt in 1831. (fn. 184) From 1836 the charity was administered by the municipal charity trustees, (fn. 185) and in 1882 it was annexed to the United Schools foundation. (fn. 186)

Gregory Wilshire by will dated 1585 gave £100 for loans to clothiers. At least £20 remained and was out on loan in 1746 but the whole sum had been lost by 1825.

Sarah Wright by will dated 1669 and codicil dated 1670 gave £10 for loans to young tradesmen, with preference to saddlers. The charity was still in operation in 1765; no later record could be found in 1825 but the corporation admitted liability for the charity. The same donor, by an earlier will dated 1667 and ratified by that of 1669, charged two houses with 3s. a year for the sick or poor of the city, with doles in bread for the prisoners in the city and county gaols, and with various parish charities. The corporation were named as trustees (fn. 187) but in 1674, finding that the property would not support the full value of the bequests, it transferred the trust to St. Mary de Crypt parish. (fn. 188) In 1825 the bread was being distributed but not the 3s., which it was planned to restore. (fn. 189)

Isabel Wytherston gave £20 to support a distribution of 40s. among 40 poor people. The corporation was trying to secure payment of the interest in 1676, (fn. 190) but the charity has not been found recorded later.

OTHER CITY CHARITIES.

A. E. Allen (d. 1946) gave £1,000 to be invested and the proceeds used to provide pensions or grants for poor freemen of the city or their relatives; an additional £214 was also received by lapse of other legacies under his will. The charity was placed under the management of the freemen's committee, (fn. 191) and in 1971 had an annual income of £100. (fn. 192)

F. H. Collins by declaration of trust of 1926 gave £1,000 stock to the city corporation, the proceeds to be distributed to the blind or aged poor in December in food, clothing, fuel, or other necessaries. In 1972 the charity became part of the Charity of John Ward and Others. (fn. 193)

William Johnston-Vaughan by will proved 1928 gave the residue of his personal estate, after the death of his wife, to the municipal charity trustees to support annual payments of £1 each to poor people of the city aged over 60. In 1962 the charity had an endowment of £18,815 in stock and bonds, producing an annual income of £588. In 1971 it was applied to the support of the United Hospitals. (fn. 194)

Ann Lysons of Hempsted (fn. 195) by will dated 1705 gave £120 to produce £6 a year for clothing six poor widows; the sum was charged on land in 1707. The charity was managed by private trustees (fn. 196) until 1890 when it was transferred to the municipal charity trustees, (fn. 197) and in 1971 it was applied to the support of the United Hospitals. (fn. 198)

John Ward, who died in 1895 while mayor of the city, left £6,000 to the city corporation to support annual payments, totalling £170, for dinners for the poor, a tea for schoolchildren, and an outing for the paupers of Gloucester union; the residual income was to be distributed to the poor at Christmas in the form of clothing vouchers. In 1972 the charity became part of the Charity of John Ward and Others. (fn. 199)

The Freemen's Compensation Fund.

By a trust deed of 1903 £7,095, awarded in compensation for the extinction of common rights of the freemen in the city's meadows, was invested for the benefit of poor, aged, or sick freemen. (fn. 200) A Scheme of 1906, placed the fund under the management of a body formed of appointees of the freemen's committee, the municipal charity trustees, and the city corporation, and applied it to provide pensions for freemen and their widows. (fn. 201) Additional endowments were received in 1930, 1940, and 1942 in compensation for the remaining common rights. (fn. 202) In 1971 the fund had an annual income of £394. (fn. 203)

PAROCHIAL CHARITIES. (fn. 204)

All Saints.

Richard Hoare by deed of 1607 gave a rent charge of 53s. for the poor, church repairs, and the incumbent. After 1648 it was used for general church repairs and other expenses by St. Mary de Crypt, into which All Saints was absorbed. Reduced to 50s. by 1815, it was included as one of the United Charities for the Poor in 1923. (fn. 205)

All Saints (the new parish created in 1876).

W. R. Voller in 1935 gave a bequest for the poor, (fn. 206) which in 1971 had an income of £5 a year, derived from stock. (fn. 207)

Holy Trinity.

Mary Broad by will dated 1682 gave from her personal estate a sum sufficient to buy land to produce 40s. a year for the poor. In 1825 it was distributed with other parish charities in cash and bread.

Elizabeth Gregory by will dated 1742 gave £10 to provide 10s. a year for the poor. In 1746 her executor George Worrall added another £5 and invested the whole £15 with the city corporation. In 1825 the 12s. interest paid by the corporation was distributed with other parish charities in cash and bread. The charity has not been found recorded later.

Daniel Lysons by will dated 1678 and codicil dated 1681 charged lands with sums, totalling £16, to provide bread for the poor of nine city parishes, for the poor of Barton Street, and for the prisoners in the city gaol. (fn. 208) The charity was regulated by a Scheme of 1894, which appointed the town clerk and chamberlain of the city as trustees. (fn. 209) Holy Trinity received 20s. from the charity, which was apparently later included in the sum of £4 10s. received by St. Mary de Crypt parish as part of its United Charities for the Poor of 1923.

A Mrs. Norton (fn. 210) gave a bequest for the poor, in respect of which the corporation was paying the parish 18s. a year in 1825. It has not been found recorded later.

Alice Whitfield by will dated 1693 gave a rent charge of 20s. a year for the poor. (fn. 211)

Samuel Willetts (d. c. 1673) left £10 to the corporation in trust for the poor of the parish. (fn. 212) In 1825 the corporation paid 8s. for that charity, which was distributed in cash and bread. The charity has not been found recorded later.

In 1957 the Broad and Whitfield charities were formed into the Holy Trinity Poor Charities and applied to the general benefit of the city poor, with preference to those living within the area of the ancient parish of Holy Trinity. In 1972 the charity was amalgamated with the city charities of F. H. Collins and John Ward to form the Charity of John Ward and Others, applied to the general relief in need of residents of the city.

St. Aldate.

George Cooke, before 1825, gave a house, the rent to be distributed in bread to the poor. (fn. 213)

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish received 30s. for bread.

William Miles by will proved 1842 gave £110, the proceeds to be distributed among six poor men aged over 70. (fn. 214)

St. Aldate's ecclesiastical parish having ceased to exist in 1931, the Cooke and Miles charities were transferred in 1955 to the municipal charity trustees and applied to the general benefit of the city poor. (fn. 215) The Lysons charity was administered by St. John's parish after 1931 and included in 1972 in the United Charity of Palling, Burgess, and Others.

St. Catherine.

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish received 40s. for bread.

Thomas Machen by will dated 1614 gave part of the interest on his city loan charity to provide 12 poor people of the parish with 6d. a quarter each. The corporation continued the payment to the parish after the principal was lost. (fn. 216)

Timothy Nourse by will dated 1698 gave a rent charge of £12 10s. to St. Catherine and St. Mary de Lode parishes: £10 was to be used to place five apprentices and £2 10s. to provide gowns for three poor people. (fn. 217) The charity came into operation c. 1732, (fn. 218) and in 1825 the parishes were taking equal shares and using the whole to provide clothing.

The three charities were amalgamated in 1969 as the Charities of Thomas Machen and Others and applied to the relief of residents of the ecclesiastical parish in cash or kind. In 1971 part of the income was being distributed to the inmates of the United Hospitals. (fn. 219)

St. James.

Mary Comley by will proved 1883 gave £200, the proceeds to be distributed to the poor on Christmas Eve.

Thomas Hart by will dated 1963 gave £70, the proceeds to be distributed among the aged and poor. (fn. 220)

James King by will proved 1855 gave the residue of his real and personal estate to be invested in stock and the proceeds distributed among 30 poor people; £208 was received under the bequest. By 1971 the proceeds of the Comley and King charities, c. £15 a year, were jointly distributed in particular cases of need. (fn. 221)

St. John The Baptist.

Samuel Browne, alderman, by will dated 1738 gave a rent charge of 10s. for bread. The charity had been lost by 1825 and may never have operated.

John Burgess by will proved 1882 gave £1,000 to be invested in stock and the proceeds distributed to the poor in bread and coal. (fn. 222)

Elizabeth Clarke by will dated 1752 gave £80, the proceeds to be distributed among poor householders. The principal was a debt owed by the parish to her brother Thomas Webley (d. 1751), (fn. 223) to whom the bequest was later attributed. (fn. 224)

John Cromwell by will dated 1679 gave land, the rent to be distributed in coal to six poor people in the winter months. (fn. 225) In 1825 the rent was 5 guineas.

Samuel Flower by will dated 1777 gave £20, the proceeds to be distributed in bread to poor people attending church at Christmas. The charity lapsed c. 1815 when the principal was lost.

A charity for almshouses given by John Hayward was applied as an eleemosynary charity from the mid 20th century. (fn. 226)

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish received 30s. for bread.

Samuel Palling by will dated 1734 gave a house, the rent to provide cloth gowns for the poor.

Thomas Semys, alderman, by will dated 1602 gave the rent of a stable and garden, to be distributed, after payment of a sermon charity, to the poor. (fn. 227) The charity had been lost by 1825.

Sarah Wright, see above, city charities. By her will of 1667 she gave a rent charge of 16s. for clothing widows and orphans in St. John's and St. Mary de Crypt parishes, another of 10s. for bread for the poor of St. John, and another of 10s. for bread for the poor of St. Mary de Crypt. In 1714, when each parish took the 16s. in alternate years, it was being used in St. John for bread. (fn. 228) In 1825 it had not been paid for many years and was to be restored, but it has not been found recorded later. The rent charges for bread in the two parishes were redeemed and replaced by stock in 1892. (fn. 229)

Francis Yate by will dated 1733 gave £20, the proceeds to be distributed in bread for the poor; (fn. 230) the charity was later met by a rent charge of £1.

In 1972 the eight charities still active were amalgamated, together with the charities of St. Mary de Crypt and St. Michael, to form the United Charity of Palling, Burgess, and Others. The income was to be applied in cases of need in cash, goods, or services to residents of the city, with preference to inhabitants of the three ancient parishes.

St. Luke.

By a Scheme of 1889 part of the annual income of a charity of Mary Harris for Hempsted was applied to St. Luke's parish, £6 for apprenticing and educational purposes and £4 for clothing elderly men. A Scheme of 1972 assigned part of the endowment of the Harris charity to Christ Church parish, which had absorbed St. Luke: £114 stock was to support a charity for the poor and £171 stock a charity for educational purposes. (fn. 231)

St. Mark.

Hartley K. Butt by will proved 1933 gave £2,000, from after his wife's death, to be invested and the proceeds used to provide food, fuel, and clothing for the poor. In 1971 the charity had an annual income of £60. (fn. 232)

St. Mary De Crypt.

Sir Thomas Bell (d. 1566) gave £10 for the poor. The principal was invested with the corporation, and in 1825 the interest was distributed by the parish in bread.

Samuel Burroughs, the elder, gave £40, the interest to be distributed among eight poor householders. The principal was invested in stock in 1808.

Samuel Burroughs, the younger, by will dated 1753 gave £60 for the same purpose. (fn. 233) It was apparently never received.

Charles Glanville gave £50, the interest to be distributed to the poor in bread. The principal was invested with the corporation.

Thomas Gosling by will dated 1721, as interpreted by a trust deed of 1752, gave land, the annual rent, after payment of £1 for a sermon charity, to be given to poor householders attending church to hear the sermon. (fn. 234) In 1825, when the rent was £8, the rector was taking £3 for the sermon.

Sarah Harris by will dated 1811 gave £10, the interest to be distributed to the poor in bread. In 1825 the charity was not in operation through a misunderstanding and, though intended to be restored, it has not been found recorded later.

John Hill before 1683 (fn. 235) gave £10 for the poor. The principal was invested with the corporation, and in 1825 the parish was distributing the interest in bread.

Phyllis Lewis before 1683 (fn. 236) gave £40, the interest to be distributed to the poor of St. Mary de Crypt and St. Owen's parishes, and £10, the interest to be distributed among four poor householders of St. Mary de Crypt. Both principal sums were invested with the corporation, and in 1825 part of the interest was being used to buy coal for the almspeople of St. Kyneburgh's Hospital and the remainder distributed by the rector of St. Mary de Crypt to the poor of the two parishes.

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish received 40s. in bread.

Margaret Norton by will dated 1689 gave £80, the interest to be distributed among poor householders. (fn. 237) The principal was invested with the corporation. (fn. 238)

Robert Payne (d.1713), alderman, gave 23s. 4d. a year, apparently in the form of a rent charge, to be distributed in bread to the poor of St. Mary de Crypt and St. Owen's parishes. In 1825 the churchwardens of St. Mary de Crypt distributed it in the two parishes.

William Henry Phelps by will proved 1914 gave £150, the interest to be distributed to the poor at Easter in bread and other necessaries. (fn. 239)

Thomas Pury, alderman, by deed of 1647 gave £8 a year to be distributed in bread to the poor of St. Mary de Crypt and St. Owen's parishes and the prisoners in the city gaol. It was charged on Vineyard hill at Over, a forfeited estate of the bishop of Gloucester. It and another charge on the estate, made by Pury in 1650 for bread for prisoners in the county gaol, (fn. 240) presumably lapsed at the Restoration.

Walter Pury by his will gave a house to support a distribution of 10s. a year among 10 aged poor people; his son Thomas Pury, the alderman, settled the property for that use by a trust deed of 1629 and was later credited as founder of the charity. The payment ceased in 1763 and all the profits of the house applied to church repairs. Payment of the 10s. to the poor was restored in 1825, (fn. 241) but by 1910 and until 1923 it was again misappropriated to church repairs. (fn. 242)

Josias Randall by will dated 1708 (fn. 243) gave £50 for loans to five tradesmen and also gave houses, after the deaths of his wife and nephew, to be sold and the proceeds invested for the benefit of the poor. Only the loan charity apparently ever operated. Loans ceased c. 1878 when £30 had been lost; the remaining £20 was invested and from 1907, when the sum had accumulated to £54, the interest was distributed to the poor. (fn. 244)

Mary Shaile by will dated 1734 gave £50 each to St. Mary de Crypt, St. Michael's, and St. Nicholas's parishes, the proceeds to be distributed in each among 10 or 12 poor householders. (fn. 245) The St. Mary's principal was invested in stock in 1808.

John Tunks before 1683 (fn. 246) gave £10 for the poor. The principal was invested with the corporation, and in 1825 the parish was distributing the interest in bread.

Eleanor (or ? Anne) Weaver before 1705 gave £100, the interest to be distributed among five poor women at Christmas. (fn. 247) The principal was invested with the corporation.

Alice Whitfield by will dated 1693 gave a rent charge of £3 to be distributed to the poor during the remainder of a lease. (fn. 248)

Sarah Wright, see above, St. John the Baptist.

The Revd. Matthew Yate by will dated 1713 gave £100, the interest to be distributed among five poor householders. (fn. 249) The principal was invested with the corporation.

In 1923 the 17 charities still active (including those parts originally assigned for St. Owen's parish) and the Richard Hoare charity for All Saints were amalgamated as the United Charities for the Poor, with an annual income of £62, to be used for the general benefit of the poor of St. Mary's parish in subscriptions to hospitals or provident clubs, grants for medical aid, or goods. In 1972 the United Charities became part of the United Charity of Palling, Burgess, and Others (see above, St. John the Baptist). The same year the city corporation redeemed the annual payments with which it was charged in respect of interest for various parish charities, including eight of St. Mary de Crypt.

St. Mary de Grace.

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish was assigned 20s. in bread, which, failing suitable recipients, was to be given to the poor of Littleworth hamlet. It was included in 1972 in the endowments of the United Charity of Palling, Burgess, and Others, having earlier been distributed with the sum for St. John's parish. (fn. 250)

St. Mary de Lode. (fn. 251)

George Coulstance by will dated 1626 gave a rent charge of 20s. for the poor.

John Dupree by will dated 1744 gave £30, the interest to be distributed to the poor at Christmas. (fn. 252) The principal was later used to build a gallery in the church and the rent of the sittings, c. 2 guineas a year in 1825, was distributed. The charity lapsed later, presumably when pew rents were ended.

Mary Jones by will proved 1871 gave £100 to be invested and the proceeds used to provide blankets for the poor.

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish received 40s. in bread.

Edward Nourse by will dated 1674 gave £100 to be laid out on land, the rent, after payments for sermons, to be distributed among the poor of St. Mary de Lode and St. Michael's parishes. Land was bought in 1678, and in 1823, when St. Michael was taking the bulk of the rent, it was agreed to divide it equally between the two parishes.

Timothy Nourse, see above, St. Catherine.

James Sayer by will dated 1713 gave a rent charge of 40s. to be distributed among 40 poor widows. (fn. 253) No record has been found of the charity in operation.

Thomas Singleton of London, a native of Gloucester, (fn. 254) by will dated 1656 gave £150 to support payments of £3 each for the poor of St. Mary de Lode and St. Nicholas's parishes. The principal was invested with the corporation.

Alice Whitfield by will dated 1693 gave a rent charge of 20s. to be distributed to the poor during the remainder of a lease. (fn. 255)

By 1971 the six charities still active were being jointly administered. In that year they were amalgamated with the charities of St. Nicholas's parish to form the St. Mary de Lode and St. Nicholas Relief in Need Charity and applied to the general relief of inhabitants of the area of the two ancient parishes.

St. Michael.

Elizabeth Austin c. 1731 gave £5 for the poor; in 1820 it could not be traced and was thought to have been disposed of as principal. (fn. 256)

Thomas Barnes of London, a native of Gloucester, (fn. 257) by will dated 1700 gave £100 to support payments of 20s. a year each to four poor people. In 1706 the charity was charged on land, bought with the principal and £30 principal of the charities of Phyllis Lewis and Margaret Cartwright. In 1858 an annual surplus of rent from the land, remaining after the three charities had been met, was applied in aid of the parish's National school. (fn. 258)

John Blanch by will dated 1756 gave £50, the interest to be distributed among 10 poor householders. (fn. 259) Part of the principal was lost through the insolvency of a tradesman to whom it was lent; the remainder was later used with other parish money to buy stock, and 50s. of the annual dividends was applied to the charity.

Margaret Cartwright gave £10, the interest, after providing a bible for a poor person, to be distributed at 12d. each among six poor people. The charity was charged on land in 1706 (see above, Thos. Barnes).

George Coulstance by will dated 1626 gave a rent charge of 20s. for the poor.

John Falconer, alderman, by will dated 1545 gave £40 to the weavers' company to be used for loans to poor tradesmen and others of the parish. It was being used for loans in the early 18th century, when it was administered by trustees for the parish, (fn. 260) but later, that form of application being thought too risky, the principal was invested in stock and the proceeds distributed to the poor.

Samuel Flower by will dated 1777 gave £20, the interest to be distributed in bread to poor people attending church at Christmas; the principal was invested in stock in 1797. Later regarded as an ecclesiastical charity, (fn. 261) it was included in 1973 in a Scheme for the ecclesiastical charities of the old city parishes. (fn. 262)

Joseph Horner by will dated 1683 gave a rent charge of £4 to be distributed among eight poor householders. (fn. 263)

Job Jefferies by will dated 1824 gave £300 stock, the proceeds to be distributed in coal among 30 poor householders.

Phyllis Lewis before 1683 (fn. 264) gave £20, the interest to be distributed to the poor. It was lent out until 1706 when it was charged on land at 20s. a year (fn. 265) (see above, Thos. Barnes).

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish received 40s. a year in bread.

Frances Mann by will dated 1769 gave £20, the interest to be distributed to the poor in bread.

Edward Nourse, see above, St. Mary de Lode.

Richard Seyer by will dated 1815 gave the interest on £500 for three poor men and two poor women. (fn. 266) His estate proved inadequate to support his legacies, and, following a Chancery suit, the parish received only £23 12s. 10d. for the charity; it was invested in stock in 1830. (fn. 267)

Mary Shaile, see above, St. Mary de Crypt. In 1825 the principal was held by the rector who distributed interest for it.

John Spillman by will dated 1809 gave £100 stock, the proceeds to be distributed among 12 poor people.

John Webb, alderman, by will dated 1686 gave a rent charge of 20s. to be distributed among 10 poor men and 10 poor women. (fn. 268)

Nicholas Webb by will dated 1691 gave a rent charge of 30s. for the poor. (fn. 269) The house on which it was charged was demolished in the late 18th century and the payment charged on stock, bought with the compensation and other charity money. In 1825 half the sum was distributed in bread.

Nicholas Webb by will dated 1769 gave £50 stock, the proceeds to be distributed among six poor householders.

Thomas Webb, alderman, by will dated 1734 gave £20, the interest to be distributed among four poor householders. The corporation, the intended trustees, declined to accept it, and his son, the last-mentioned Nicholas Webb, gave by his will £25 stock to the parish in its place.

Thomas Webb by will dated 1751 gave £20, the interest to be distributed among the poor. (fn. 270)

John Wintle by will proved 1847 gave £300 stock, the proceeds to be given to two blind men and two blind women; failing suitable recipients in the parish they were to be found in the city as a whole or in the county. (fn. 271)

In 1915 the 20 charities still active were amalgamated under the title of the Consolidated Charities; of the total annual income of £55, £34 was assigned in fixed payments for specific chari table purposes, £16 5s. in weekly allowances to 10 poor people during the first 13 weeks of the year, and the residue to be distributed in goods or, in bad weather, in coal. In 1972 the Consolidated Charities became part of the United Charity of Palling, Burgess, and Others (see above, St. John the Baptist).

St. Nicholas.

Jasper Clutterbuck, alderman, by will dated 1658 gave the poor a portion of the rent (fn. 272) from leasehold land. The charity, if ever applied, probably lapsed on expiry of the lease. (fn. 273)

Sarah Clutterbuck by will dated 1748 gave £50, the interest, after payments for a sermon and to the parish clerk, to be distributed to the poor in bread. (fn. 274) The principal was invested in stock.

The Revd. Richard Green (d. 1711) (fn. 275) gave £50 to support a payment of 12d. a week to the poor. The charity was at first distributed in bread by the donor's father, Alderman Richard Green; (fn. 276) after the alderman's death it was distributed by the parish, which put the principal out on mortgage and later invested it in stock.

William Lisle of Longford by will dated 1723 gave a portion of the rent of land to provide bread for the poor. (fn. 277) A trust deed of 1726, following a Chancery suit, set the uses as providing clothes and fuel, but in 1825 the £38 a year received was being used with other charity money on bread, beef, and coal.

Daniel Lysons, see above, Holy Trinity. The parish received 40s. in bread.

Samuel Mee by will dated 1744 gave a rent charge of £4 to be distributed among 10 poor people. The payment, charged on leasehold property, was discontinued c. 1820.

Thomas Mee in 1722 (fn. 278) gave £50, the interest to be distributed among 10 poor householders. The parish abandoned a suit for obtaining the principal c. 1785 and the charity apparently never operated.

Elizabeth Morris by will dated 1679 gave £50, the proceeds to be distributed among 20 poor householders. Of that sum £40 was used in 1701 to renew a lease of property held by the parish; in 1808 the lease was sold and the profits invested in stock. The remaining £10 was out at interest in 1705. (fn. 279) In 1825 the parish was distributing £2 10s. a year in respect of the charity.

Joseph Reeve by will dated 1716 gave £85, the interest to be distributed in bread, beef, and coal to 20 poor householders. The principal was invested with the governor and guardians of the poor until 1787 when it was placed in stock.

Mary Shaile, see above, St. Mary de Crypt. The principal was invested in stock in 1813.

Thomas Singleton, see above, St. Mary de Lode.

Mary Smith by trust deed of 1805 gave £333 stock to support a distribution of £10 in coal among 40 poor people.

John Thorne, alderman, by will dated 1618 gave a rent charge of 6s. 8d. to be distributed among 20 poor people. (fn. 280)

Thomas Wadley by will dated 1770 gave a rent charge of 20s. to be distributed to the poor in bread. The charity was discontinued in 1797.

Eleanor (or ? Anne) Weaver gave £100, the interest to be distributed among five poor women at Christmas. In 1705 the principal was invested with the corporation. (fn. 281)

Henry (or ? John) Windowe before 1705 gave a rent charge of 50s. to be distributed in coal (fn. 282) among 12 poor people who attended church. In 1825 it was being used with other charity money on bread, beef, and coal.

William Windowe before 1705 (fn. 283) gave a rent charge of £5 4s. to be distributed in bread among 12 poor people who attended church.

Thomas Withenbury by will dated 1720 gave a rent charge of 40s. to be distributed to the poor in bread.

For some years before 1971 the charities of Sarah Clutterbuck, Green, Morris, and Reeve were jointly administered and much of the income distributed among the inmates of St. Bartholomew's Hospital who by then formed a large proportion of the parish's population. In 1971 all 14 charities still active were included in the St. Mary de Lode and St. Nicholas Relief in Need Charity (see above, St. Mary de Lode).

St. Owen.

See above, St. Mary de Crypt: Phyllis Lewis, Rob. Payne, Thos. Pury.

Outlying Hamlets.

A trust deed of 1633, settling lands purchased under the will of Giles Cox, of Abloads Court, Sandhurst, to support annual rent charges for the various parishes of Dudstone and King's Barton hundred, assigned any surplus of rents to be distributed from time to time to the poor of the hamlets of Kingsholm, Longford, Twigworth, Wotton, and Tuffley (and Woolstrop in Quedgeley). From 1821 the hamlets each received a regular annual sum from the charity, initially £2 10s. for Longford, £2 for Wotton, and £1 10s. each for Kingsholm, Twigworth, and Tuffley. (fn. 284) A Scheme of 1892 applied the income of the charity at the trustees' discretion to a wide range of charitable purposes in the 29 places benefiting, and in 1957 the foundation was divided to form separate charities for each place, each being given an endowment of £256 stock and a small sum in cash. (fn. 285)

J. T. Dorrington by will proved 1921 gave £1,000, from after his wife's death, to be invested and the proceeds used to buy goods for poor inhabitants of Twigworth and Longford. (fn. 286) In 1971 the charity had an annual income of £34.

NONCONFORMIST CHARITIES.

William Bird (d. 1871) left £50 for poor members of the Southgate Independent church; £45 of it was put out on mortgage and the proceeds used with John Garn's charity. (fn. 287)

John Garn by will proved 1836 gave £500 to be invested in stock and the proceeds distributed among poor members of the same church. Only £375 was received for the charity. (fn. 288) In 1971 the charity had an annual income of £16. (fn. 289)

Edwin Harris by will proved 1882 gave £100 to be invested in stock and the proceeds distributed among aged members of the Baptist church in Gloucester. (fn. 290) In 1971 the charity had an annual income of £2. (fn. 291)

For charities for the prisoners in the city and county gaols, see above, city charities: Sir Thos. Bell, John Heydon, and Sarah Wright; parochial charities, Holy Trinity: Dan. Lysons; St. Mary de Crypt: Thos. Pury. Sermon charities are included above, in the account of churches and chapels.

Footnotes

1 This article was written in 1985.
2 V.C.H. Glos. ii. 118–22; cf. above, Medieval Glouc., Glouc. 1066–1327; town and religious communities.
3 G.B.R., B 3/2, pp. 51–3, records that they were drawn up by a cttee. appointed by the council, but they were later attributed to Abp. Laud: 14th Rep. Com. Char. 7.
4 Glos. Colln. NQ 12.1.
5 G.B.R., B 3/9, ff. 159, 380v.; 10, ff. 157v., 164v., 175.
6 G.D.R. vol. 381A, f. 42.
7 G.B.R., B 3/11, f. 259.
8 Ibid. 14, ff. 41, 130; Glos. Colln. NQ 12.2.
9 G.B.R., B 3/2, p. 203.
10 Ibid. 9, ff. 65v.–66, 71v.
11 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19677, pp. 1, 373.
12 Ibid. 19679, pp. 121–2, 129, 150, 172, 208, 235, 262; Glouc. Jnl. 8 Sept. 1860.
13 Glos. Colln. N 12.39 (4).
14 Ibid. N 12.35 (1).
15 Ibid. N 12.257.
16 Glos. R.O., D 3269, Schemes and orders 1865– 1934.
17 T. Hannam-Clark, Glouc. Municipal Char. Handbk. (1959), 12–13, 24, 35–6.
18 Glos. R.O., D 3469/5/67, file marked 'almshouses and general'.
19 Ibid. file marked 'Edw. Nourse and others'; CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. pp. 19, 30.
20 Inf. from Mr. A. G. Keddie, clerk to the trustees of Glouc. municipal char.
21 Valor Eccl. (Rec. Com.), ii. 488–9.
22 Cal. Pat. 1547–8, 193; 1548–9, 244.
23 Ibid. 1563–6, pp. 71–2; the full title does not seem to have been used later.
24 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii, 1669; 14th Rep. Com. Char. 6–7. The new statutes made for the three hospitals in 1830 were submitted to the bp. for his approval, presumably in acknowledgement of that right: G.B.R., B 3/14, f. 130.
25 Rudder, Glos. 161, 202.
26 G.B.R., K 1/14; cf. ibid. J 3/16, f. 61v.
27 Glos. Colln. NQ 12.1.
28 G.B.R., B 3/2, pp. 53, 479, 853.
29 Atkyns, Glos. 192.
30 G.B.R., B 3/11, ff. 81v.–82, 291v., 296.
31 14th Rep. Com. Char. 12; the commissioners were at Glouc. in Mar. 1825: G.B.R., B 3/14, ff. 24–25.
32 14th Rep. Com. Char. 11; G.B.R., B 3/13, f. 8v.
33 Glos. Colln. NQ 12.2.
34 Austin, Crypt Sch. 153–4.
35 Glos. Colln. NQ 17.2.
36 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii.
37 14th Rep. Com. Char. 9–10; G.B.R., J 3/16, f. 36 and v.
38 14th Rep. Com. Char. 7–9.
39 Glos. R.O., D 3269, Schemes and orders 1865–1934.
40 Glos. Colln. N 12.35 (2).
41 Above.
42 Cal. Inq. Misc. iii, p. 80.
43 Hist. & Cart. Mon. Glouc. (Rolls. Ser.), i. 245.
44 Cal. Pat. 1258–66, 450.
45 Ibid. 1377–81, 578.
46 V.C.H. Glos. ii. 121.
47 Leland, Itin. ed. Toulmin Smith, ii. 59.
48 Austin, Crypt Sch. 138.
49 Cal. Pat. 1563–6, p. 72.
50 Above.
51 Glos. Colln. prints GL 45.8.
52 G.B.R., B 3/12, ff. 78v., 84v.–85, 119, 133v.; above, Plate 57.
53 Cf. Glos. R.O., D 3269, bk. of plans of hosp. property 1826, no. 14.
54 Above, Medieval Glouc., town and religious communities.
55 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii.
56 Ibid. xlii, 1563 dioc. surv., f. 15.
57 Glos. Colln. NQ 12.1.
58 G.B.R., B 3/13, f. 8v.
59 14th Rep. Com. Char. 15.
60 Ibid. 12–13.
61 Ibid. 13–14; cf. below, Outlying Hamlets, man.
62 14th Rep. Com. Char. 14. Hayward's tomb was removed from the chap. in 1846, and in 1857 the municipal char. trustees bought the est. on which the payments were charged: Glos. R.O., D 3270/19678, pp. 430, 471, 475–6.
63 14th Rep. Com. Char. 13.
64 Above.
65 V.C.H. Glos. ii. 121.
66 Glouc. Jnl. 15 Aug. 1846; Verey, Glos. ii. 232.
67 Worc. Episc. Reg., Reg. Lynn, f. 5v.; Reg. Alcock, ff. 119v., 143v.
68 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii, 1546, 1558.
69 Glos. R.O., D 3269.
70 Cf. Causton, Map of Glouc. (1843).
71 G.B.R., B 2/2, ff. 118v.–119v.
72 Rudder, Glos. 186.
73 Clarke, Archit. Hist. of Glouc. plate facing p. 55; Glos. Colln. prints GL 15.5, reproduced above, Plate 55; cf. G.B.R., J 4/1, no. 20, which shows other bldgs. E. of that range in 1731.
74 Glouc. Jnl. 21 June 1862; above.
75 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii.
76 Ibid. xlii, 1563 dioc. surv., f. 15.
77 Glouc. Corp. Rec. p. 119; P.R.O., C 115/K 2/6684, f. 90v.
78 Cal. Pat. 1553–4, 406; 1572–5, p. 162.
79 Acts of P.C. 1571–5, 391, 399; 1575–7, 126–7.
80 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii.
81 G.B.R., G 12/1, f. 275 and v.; cf. ibid. B 3/1, f. 198 and v.
82 14th Rep. Com. Char. 15–16. The new name was sometimes given incorrectly as St. James's Hosp.: Atkyns, Glos. 186; G.D.R. vol. 381A, f. 43.
83 Glos. Colln. NQ 12.1.
84 G.B.R., B 3/13, f. 8v.
85 Ibid. 14, f. 213.
86 Ibid. B 4/1/4, f. 14 and v.
87 He left £2,000 but only £1, 500 was received: Glouc. Jnl. 12 Dec. 1835; G.B.R., B 3/15, mins. 10 Apr., 10 July 1837, 26, 30 Apr., 5 Dec. 1838; Char. Com. file 249996. The char. was transferred from the corp. to the char. trustees in 1878 and merged in the general funds of the United Hospitals in 1882: Glos. R.O., D 3269, Schemes and orders 1865–1934.
88 14th Rep. Com. Char. 16–17; G.B.R., B 3/14, ff. 25v., 212v.–213.
89 Above.
90 E. J. Kealey, Medieval Medicus (1981), 112.
91 Glos. Colln. prints GL 15.25–7, 37, one reproduced above, Plate 56; H. T. Ellacombe, Ch. Bells of Glos. (Exeter, 1881), 48.
92 Glouc. Jnl. 15 Aug. 1846; 6 July 1850; Glos. R.O., D 3270/19678, p. 359.
93 Glos. Colln. prints GL 15.21; cf. ibid. GL 15.25, 37.
94 Roper, Glos. Effigies, 316–17.
95 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii, 1546, 1565; cf. P.R.O., E 134/6 & 7 Geo. I Trin./1, referring to a deed of 1623 mentioning St. Mary Magdalen's par.
96 Fosbrooke, Glouc. 154–5.
97 Glos. R.O., D 3269.
98 P.R.O., PROB 11/830 (P.C.C. 182 Herring), f. 327v.; Glouc. Jnl. 21 Dec. 1756.
99 G.B.R., J 4/1, no. 14.
100 Glos. R.O., D 204/3/3.
101 Ibid. D 3269, bk. of plans of hosp. property 1824, no. 33.
102 Glos. Colln. prints GL 45. 10A-B.
103 G.B.R., F 4/15, p. 579.
104 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19679, p. 262.
105 G.D.R. wills 1566/150.
106 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii.
107 Fosbrooke, Glouc. 165–6.
108 Hockaday Abs. ccxxiii, which gives full transcripts of the trust deeds.
109 Ibid.
110 P.R.O., PROB 11/397 (P.C.C. 180 Ent), f. 330 and v.
111 14th Rep. Com. Char. 21; G.B.R., B 3/11, f. 34.
112 G.B.R., B 3/14, f. 213.
113 Ibid. f. 258v.
114 Above, St. Mary Magdalen's Hosp.
115 Drawing (reproduced above, Plate 54) in copy of Fosbrooke, Glouc., in Glos. Colln. 10675.
116 G.D.R. wills 1566/150; cf. Rudder, Glos. 204.
117 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19679, pp. 249, 262.
118 Glos. Colln. N 12.37.
119 Above.
120 G.D.R. wills 1636/120.
121 G.B.R., G 12/1, f. 200; Rudder, Glos. 204.
122 16th Rep. Com. Char. 11–12.
123 Rudge, Glouc. 141.
124 G.D.R. wills 1621/53; G.B.R., J 1/1958B.
125 G.B.R., J 1/1959.
126 Below, Churches and Chapels, non-par. chap.
127 G.D.R. wills 1640/113.
128 Ibid. 1738/159.
129 16th Rep. Com. Char. 7.
130 Glos. R.O., P 154/9/CH 1/1.
131 Ibid. 2; cf. ibid. CH 10/1, Scheme 1972.
132 Glos. R.O., D 327, p. 374; and for those three men, Fosbrooke, Glouc. 136, 209, 211; below, Aldermen of Glouc. 1483–1835.
133 G.D.R. wills 1614/21; Glouc. Cath. Libr. MS. 26.
134 Bodl. MS. Top. Glouc. c. 3, f. 50.
135 G.D.R. wills 1680/75.
136 Glos. Chron. 30 Jan. 1836; 24 Nov. 1838.
137 Glouc. Jnl. 17 Jan. 1846; G.B.R., B 4/1/6, p. 231.
138 G.B.R., B 4/1/6, pp. 343, 359, 389; B 3/17, f. 378.
139 This section is based on 14th Rep. Com. Char. 21–2, 30–41 (compiled in 1825); G.B.R., G 12/1 (a reg. of early gifts and bequests to the corp.); and ibid. B 3/7, ff. 254–5 (a rep. on the loan charities, c. 1695).
140 Cf. above, almshouses.
141 Fosbrooke, Glouc. 138.
142 As were probably small sums given for the poor of the city parishes by Blackleech: P.R.O., PROB 11/181 (P.C.C. 194 Harvey), ff. 451v.–452.
143 Cf. V.C.H. Glos. x. 17.
144 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19677, pp. 76, 127.
145 Ibid. D 3269, legal papers 1853–6.
146 G.B.R., B 3/3, p. 162; P.R.O., PROB 11/300 (P.C.C. 180 Nabbs), f. 160 and v.
147 G.D.R. wills 1621/23.
148 G.B.R., B 3/1, ff. 509v.–510.
149 Cf. ibid. 3, p. 146.
150 Fosbrooke, Glouc. 182.
151 G.B.R., B 3/3, pp. 405, 717.
152 Ibid. J 1/1134.
153 Ibid. B 2/1, ff. 14, 208v.–224.
154 Ibid. B 3/1, f. 240v.
155 Cf. above, Glouc. 1720–1835, city govt.
156 G.B.R., B 3/11, ff. 276v.–277Av., 301–2.
157 Cf. ibid. J 1/1701 A–B.
158 Ibid. B 3/14, f. 260v.
159 Ibid. 12, ff. 168v., 331v.
160 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19677, p. 76; 19679, p. 36.
161 Glos. Colln. NF 17. 18.
162 G.B.R., J 1/1931.
163 Ibid. B 3/1, f. 559.
164 G.D.R. wills 1626/111.
165 Cf. 21st Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 349, p. 196 (1829), vii (1).
166 G.B.R., B 3/3, p. 265; F 4/13, p. 329.
167 Below, Aldermen of Glouc. 1483–1835.
168 G.B.R., B 3/3, p. 819.
169 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19677, pp. 76, 127.
170 Glos. Colln. NF 17.18.
171 Cf. above, Educ., Sir Thos. Rich's sch.
172 G.B.R., B 3/3, pp. 378, 464.
173 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19659, mins. 22 Feb. 1805, 4 Aug. 1806, 18 Dec. 1809, 14 Dec. 1820.
174 Ibid. 19677, pp. 212, 405.
175 Glos. Colln. N 17.82.
176 Ibid. NF 17.18.
177 Glos. R.O., D 3269, Schemes and orders 1875–1927.
178 Ibid. D 3469/5/67, file marked 'almshouses and general'.
179 G.B.R., B 3/1, f. 531v.
180 G.D.R. wills 1642/67.
181 G.B.R., B 4/1/4, f. 14 and v.
182 Glos. R.O., D 3269, Schemes and orders 1865–1934.
183 D.N.B.
184 G.B.R., B 3/13, ff. 97v.–98v., 186, 197v., 237v.–238; 14, f. 183v.; Glouc. Jnl. 16 Nov. 1818.
185 Glos. R.O., D 3270/19677, pp. 76, 370–1.
186 Glos. Colln. NF 17.18.
187 Glos. R.O., P 154/11/CH 3/3; cf. G.D.R. wills 1673/ 137.
188 G.B.R., B 3/3, p. 600.
189 16th Rep. Com. Char. 11–12.
190 G.B.R., B 3/3, p. 646.
191 Freemen of Glouc. (1950), 14: copy in Glos. R.O., GMS 110.
192 Glos. R.O., CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 9.
193 Ibid. D 3469/5/67, file marked 'city general'; below, par. char., Holy Trinity.
194 Glos. R.O., D 3469/5/67, file marked 'almshouses and general'; p 154/8/CH 1.
195 She was the widow of Dan. (d. 1681), donor of the bread char.: Trans. B.G.A.S. vi. 323; Glos. R.O., D 750.
196 20th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 19, pp. 7–8 (1829), viii (1).
197 Glos. R.O., D 3269, Schemes and orders 1875–1927.
198 Ibid. D 3469/5/67, file marked 'almshouses and general'.
199 Ibid. files marked 'city general', 'almshouses and general'; below, par. char., Holy Trinity.
200 Glos. R.O., D 4430/12/11.
201 Ibid. D 3269, Schemes and orders 1875–1927.
202 Freemen of Glouc. 13.
203 Glos. R.O., CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 10.
204 This section is based on 14th Rep. Com. Char. 41–54; 16th Rep. Com. Char. 5–26; and Glos. R.O., D 3469/5/67 (files of char. review organizer for Glos.).
205 Above, Churches and Chapels, ancient par. ch., St. Mary de Crypt.
206 No governing instrument exists: Char. Com. file 231102.
207 Glos. R.O., CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 14.
208 P.R.O., PROB 11/372 (P.C.C. 22 Drax), ff. 169–72.
209 Glos. R.O., P 154/15/CH 11.
210 Possibly the donor to St. Mary de Crypt, but her will makes no mention of the char. for Holy Trinity.
211 G.D.R. wills 1695/75.
212 G.B.R., B 3/3, p. 561.
213 Cf. Hannam-Clark, Char. Handbk. 14; Glos. R.O., P 154/6/CW 2/8.
214 Hannam-Clark, Char. Handbk. 14.
215 Ibid.
216 14th Rep. Com. Char. 32–3.
217 G.D.R. wills 1700/57.
218 Fosbrooke, Glouc. 138.
219 Glos. R.O., CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 19.
220 Ibid. P 154/8/CH 1.
221 Ibid. CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 20.
222 Ibid. P 154/9/CH 2/1.
223 G.D.R. wills 1753/79; cf. ibid. 1751/29.
224 Cf. Glos. R.O., P 154/9/CH 4/1.
225 G.D.R. wills 1680/75.
226 Above, almshouses, other almshouses.
227 G.B.R., G 12/1, f. 82v.
228 Bodl. MS. Top. Glouc. c. 3, f. 53v.
229 Glos. R.O., P 154/11/CH 3/14.
230 G.D.R. wills 1734/259.
231 Glos. R.O., D 3469/5/76.
232 Ibid. CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 28.
233 P.R.O., PROB 11/893 (P.C.C. 497 Caesar), f. 66.
234 Glos. R.O., Q/RNc 4/17.
235 Ibid. P 154/11/CH 3/4.
236 Ibid.
237 P.R.O., PROB 11/397 (P.C.C. 180 Ent), f. 330 and v.
238 G.B.R., B 3/6, f. 269v.
239 Glos. R.O., P 154/11/CH 2/8.
240 Glouc. Corp. Rec. pp. 453–4.
241 Cf. Glos. R.O., P 154/11/CW 2/5.
242 Above, Churches and Chapels.
243 Cf. G.D.R. wills 1709/36.
244 Glos. R.O., P 154/11/CH 2/1.
245 G.D.R. wills 1735/94.
246 Glos. R.O., P 154/11/CH 3/4.
247 Bodl. MS. Top. Glouc. c. 3, ff. 51v., 60; cf. G.D.R., V 5/GT 31.
248 G.D.R. wills 1695/75.
249 Ibid. 1717/166.
250 Glos. R.O., CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 20.
251 16th Rep. Com. Char. lists the charities for St. Mary de Lode under St. Mary de Grace.
252 G.D.R. wills 1747/199.
253 Ibid. 1713/24.
254 Ibid. V 5/GT 21.
255 Ibid. wills 1695/75.
256 Glos. R.O., P 154/14/CH 9.
257 Ibid.
258 Ibid. CH 10.
259 P.R.O., PROB 11/830 (P.C.C. 182 Herring), ff. 327–9.
260 Cf. G.D.R., V 5/GT 27A.
261 Glos. R.O., P 154/14/CH 11/3.
262 Ibid. 11/CH 3/16.
263 G.D.R. wills 1684/178.
264 Glos. R.O., P 154/11/CH 3/4.
265 Cf. ibid. 14/CH 10.
266 G.D.R. wills, 31 Jan. 1817.
267 Glos. R.O., P 154/14/CH 10.
268 G.D.R. wills 1686/361.
269 Ibid. 1691/160.
270 Ibid. 1751/29.
271 P.R.O., PROB 11/2049 (P.C.C. 84), ff. 263v.–266v.
272 Ibid. PROB 11/300 (P.C.C. 180 Nabbs), f. 160 and v.
273 Cf. G.B.R., B 3/3, p. 162.
274 G.D.R. wills 1750/54.
275 Fosbrooke, Glouc. 182.
276 Cf. G.B.R., B 3/8, p. 564.
277 G.D.R. wills 1724/84.
278 Glos. R.O., D 327, p. 440.
279 G.D.R., V 5/GT 31.
280 Glos. R.O., P 154/15/CH 15; cf. P.R.O., C 142/377, no. 96.
281 G.D.R., V 5/GT 31.
282 Ibid.
283 Ibid.
284 16th Rep. Com. Char. 38–41.
285 Glos. R.O., D 2695/3–4; in 1957 Wotton was omitted.
286 Ibid. D 3469/5/160; his bequest of another £1,000 to assist women in childbirth in the two hamlets was revoked by his wife.
287 Southgate ch. rec. (in possession of United Reformed Ch. provincial archives, Leamington Spa), letter to Char. Com. 11 Apr. 1893.
288 Char. Com. file 249996.
289 Glos. R.O., CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 8.
290 Char. Com. file 241831.
291 Glos. R.O., CH 21, Glouc. co. boro. p. 9.