Durham
Charities

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Victoria County History

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William Page (editor)

Year published

1928

Pages

142-144

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'Durham: Charities', A History of the County of Durham: Volume 3 (1928), pp. 142-144. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42613 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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CHARITIES (fn. 1)

The Johnston Technical School (see V.C.H. Durham, i, p. 401). By a scheme of the Charity Commissioners, 20 February 1903, one-sixth of the net income of Henry Smith's charity (see post) was made applicable in scholarships tenable at this school. In 1911 nine scholarships of £2 2s. each, and sixteen scholarships of £1 10s. each, were so applied. In pursuance of a scheme, 7 May 1901, for Lord Crewe's charity (see post) nine exhibitions of £4 each, and six at £2 each, were awarded to this school.

Thomas Craddock's charity for Elementary Schools (see V.C.H. Durham, i, p. 403).

In 1848 James Barry, by will proved at Durham, bequeathed £1,000 consols, now represented by £241 16s. 8d. 4 per cent. Funding Stock, £158 9s. 5d. 5 per cent. War Stock, £100 5 per cent. National War Bonds, £829 London Midland and Scottish Railway 4 per cent. Guaranteed Stock, with the official trustees. The charity is regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners, 7 February 1893, whereby the annual dividends, amounting to £55 15s. 2d., are applicable in the maintenance of one or more scholarships, tenable for one year, in the University of Durham, by Divinity Students or Licentiates in Theology.

In 1598 Henry Smith by his will devised certain coal mines and bequeathed his residuary personal estate to the City of Durham for the setting out of youth to work, and for the relief of those past work. The endowments consisted of part of a carpet factory in the parish of St. Nicholas, the Town Hall and buildings, a farm known as Widehope Farm, a farm known as Hagar Leazes Farm, including a wayleave thereon, an allotment near West Auckland, a residence known as Glake Hall, producing an income of £400 a year, a ground rent of £ 14 on 14 houses in Gilesgate, belonging to Kirby and Messenger's Charities, mentioned in the parliamentary returns of 1786, and £2,835 7s. consols. The Town Hall, Hagar Leazes Farm, Glake Hall and seven of the houses in Gilesgate were sold in 1925 and the proceeds invested in £482 London and North Eastern Railway 4 per cent. First Preference Stock and £482 Second Guaranteed Stock of the same railway, £5,810 9s. 10d. 3½ per cent. Conversion Stock, £1,592 11s. 7d. 5 per cent. War Stock, producing £392 8s. 10d. The official trustees also hold stocks for the purpose of recoupment as the houses in Gilesgate were sold below their proper value.

The charity is regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners, 20 February 1903, whereby one-sixth of the net income is made applicable in scholarships tenable at the Johnston Technical School (see Educational Charities, ante), and the residue of the income in pensions.

Bishop Cosin's Almshouses, regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 24 February 1914, were founded and endowed by Bishop Cosin, as mentioned in his charter bearing date 31 August 1668. In pursuance of an Order in Council, 19 July 1837, the present almshouses were erected by the University of Durham, on a site in Queen Street, in lieu of the old almshouses situate on the east side of the Palace Green. Bishop Cosin endowed the almshouses with a yearly payment of £70, issuing out of lands at Chilton, County Durham (see V.C.H. Durham, i, p. 381). The yearly sum of £16 is also received from the Trustees of Lord Crewe's charity, in pursuance of the will, dated 1720, of Nathaniel, Lord Crewe, Bishop of Durham, and the yearly sum of £24 from the trustees of Bishop Barrington's Charity, who, by deed 22 February 1822, directed that £3 yearly should be paid to each of the inmates. The official trustees hold £250 5 per cent. War Stock, producing £12 10s. yearly. The almshouses are occupied by four men and four women, who are appointed by the Bishop, six from Durham and two from Brancepeth. Each inmate also receives a yearly bounty of £1 12s. 6d. and £2 0s. 10d. each quarter. The sum of £6 is expended yearly on coal, the nurse receives 2s. 6d. weekly and £1 13s. 1d. quarterly, and 13s. 4d. is paid yearly to the receiver for 'glove money.'

Bishop Cosin's Library, founded by charter 20 September 1669, is regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 2 December 1913. The property consists of the perpetual right of access to the library hall, Palace Green, for the purpose of safe custody of the books and other effects belonging to the library. It is endowed with an annuity of £20, payable out of the revenues of the see of Durham, and a sum of £229 6s. 8d. 2½ per cent. consols, with the official receivers, producing £5 14s. 8d. yearly.

In 1720 Lord Crewe, Bishop of Durham, by will directed that £100 a year should be applied for putting out apprentices in the city and suburbs. The annuity, together with the dividends on £870 11s. 4½d. War Stock, and on £1,118 London and North Eastern Railway 3 per cent. debenture stock, are applied in pursuance of a scheme of the Charity Commissioners, 7 May 1901, in apprenticeship premiums, in clothing, in binding apprentices and in exhibitions at the Johnston Technical School (see under Educational Charities).

In 1724 William Hartwell, D.D., by his will devised his landed estate at Fishburn, now known as the Elderberry Farm, containing 222 acres, for certain charitable purposes. The farm is let at £160 a year. In 1926 the official receivers held £246 Bombay, Baroda and Central India Railway 3½ per cent. debenture stock; £724 18s. 3d. 4 per cent. Funding Stock, and £2,966 13s. 2d. 5 per cent. War Stock, producing altogether £185 18s. 10d. In 1926 the net income was applied as follows:—£30 between two poor tradesmen commencing business; £20 in scholarships; two annuities of £10 each to two women, and £20 to Discharged Prisoners' Aid Society; £8 for the Hartwell Lectureship Charity for Stanhope (see V.C.H. Durham, i, p. 411).

Unknown Donor's Charity, known locally as 'The Mayor's Shilling Charity,' is endowed with £418 17s. 9d. consols, arising from the redemption, in 1884, of an annual payment of £14 11s. 4d. received from the Land Revenue Office, the origin of which was unknown. The annual dividends, now amounting to £10 9s. 4d., are divided by the Mayor among the ministers of all denominations for distribution among the poor, in sums of 1s. to each recipient.

In or about the year 1681 John Kirby, by his will, bequeathed £30 to the Merchants' Company of Durham towards the relief of decayed members of the company and their widows. A sum of 30s. a year is paid to a widow of a deceased member of the company in respect of this charity.

The Prison Charities:—The income of the following charities is paid to the treasurer of the Discharged Prisoners' Aid Society—namely, John Frankelyn's Charity, will 1572, being an annual payment of £2 12s. made by the Corporation of Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

William Wall's Charity, will 1679, an annuity of 15s. issuing out of lands and tenements in Bondgate and Escombe, which was redeemed in 1924 by transfer of £30 2½ per cent. consols to the official trustees.

Bishop Wood's Charity, founded in 1690, by will of Thomas Wood, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, proved in the P.C.C., endowed with an annuity of £20 issuing out of lands in Egglescliff, and £810 2s. 8d. 5 per cent. War Stock in the names of the official trustees and £165 1s. 10d. 5 per cent. War Stock in the names of Capt. N. W. Apperley and two others, producing together £48 15s. 2d. yearly. The official trustees also hold £51 17s. 1d. 2½ per cent. consols, representing accumulations of income of John Frankelyn's charity.

Dr. Hartwell's Charity (see ante), being a yearly payment of £20.

The present County Hospital or Infirmary, originally founded by public subscription in 1792, is comprised in an indenture, 22 May 1848, and was opened in 1853. Convalescent wards were added in 1867 as a memorial to the late Dean Waddington, who was a large benefactor to the institution. Additional wards and an operating theatre were subsequently erected from funds contributed by John Eden. The institution is supported mainly by voluntary subscriptions and donations.

The official trustees, however, hold in trust for the hospital a sum of £350 8s. 9d. 5 per cent. War Stock, derived under the will of Henry Ferdinand William Bolckow, proved at York 27 July 1878, and a sum of £360 15s. 11d. 5 per cent. War Stock bequeathed by the will of Richard Welch Hollon, proved at York 18 September 1890, producing together £35 11s. 4d. yearly. The official receivers also hold £1,999 London and North Eastern Railway 3 per cent. debenture stock; £400 4 per cent. First Guaranteed Stock; £3,094 4 per cent. Second Guaranteed Stock; and £3,094 4 per cent. First Preference Stock in the same railway; £3,751 London Midland and Scottish Railway 4 per cent. Preference Stock; £1,100 Great Western Railway 5 per cent. Consolidated Preference Stock; £16,778 12s. 7d. 5 per cent. War Stock and £1,481 9s. 8d. of the same stock. The total receipts for 1925 were £9,881 5s. 9d.

The Durham County Penitentiary, comprised in an indenture dated 20 September 1851, is supported entirely by voluntary contributions.

In 1840 Mrs. Ann Lampson, by her will proved with a codicil in the P.C.C. 23 January, bequeathed £250, the interest to be applied annually for the ministers of the chapels of Claypath and Framwellgate, in moieties. The same testatrix likewise gave £250 for the use of the said chapel. These legacies are now represented by £500 consols in the names of the trustees; the annual dividends, amounting to £12 10s., are now applied towards the salary of the minister of Claypath Chapel, with which the Framwellgate Chapel was amalgamated on the sale of the latter in 1842. The several sums of stock above mentioned are, except where otherwise stated, held by the official trustees.

The Lying Charity, founded in or about 1806, is regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners dated 26 March 1915. The charity was wound up owing to the Insurance Act and restarted by scheme. The endowment consists of £275 2½ per cent. consols, with the official receivers, producing £6 17s. 4d. yearly. The trustees are the committee of the Durham City Charity Organisation Society, and the income is applicable in giving help at the time of confinement to poor women.

The Mayoress of Durham Fund, founded by declaration of trust 21 December 1918, consists of a sum of £100 5 per cent. National War Bonds, 1928, with the official trustees. The income is distributed among the poor of the city by the mayoress.

The parish of ST. NICHOLAS is possessed of endowments known as Church Estates— namely, 3 acres at Witton Gilbert, derived under an Inclosure Award 12 May 1809, 1a. 2 r. known as Whitesmocks and two tenement houses in Durham, producing together in 1926 £35 10s. 10d. The official trustees also hold a sum of £1,630 4s. 7d. consols, arising from the sale in 1901 of four houses in Claypath, and from sales of other lands, £201 India 3 per cent. stock and £971 2s. 10d. India 3½ per cent. stock. The income, amounting to £80 15s. yearly, is applied for general church purposes. The charity is regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners dated 9 May 1902.

In 1572 John Frankelyn, by his will, gave 7s. 4d. yearly, to be paid by the Corporation of Newcastle for the benefit of the poor of this parish.

In 1617 Robert Surtees, by his will, gave out of his house in the market place 6s. 8d. yearly to the poor, which is received from the National Provincial Bank, the present owners of the premises charged.

In 1675 Francis Callaghan charged his property in the market place with the following annuities:—20s. for distribution to the poor; £1 to the vicar; £4 to the lecturer or preaching minister, for a sermon on the anniversary of testator's burial, and 5s. to the bellringers for ringing the bells on that day. The yearly sum of £6 5s. is now received out of premises in Sadler Street, Durham, and duly applied.

In 1702 Thomas Cooper, by his will, gave an annuity of £5 4s. to be distributed in bread, 2s. every Sunday, among the poor attending divine service. The annuity is paid out of lands at Fishburn and distributed in bread.

The parish of ST. MARY-LE-BOW is possessed of two houses and a garden, situate in Sadler Street, Durham, and an allotment of 1a. 2r. in Witton Lane, Sniperley, the income of which, amounting to £73 yearly, is applied in the insurance and repair of the fabric of the parish church.

In 1703 John Spearman, by his will, devised 3 a. situate at East or North Bow, Sheraton, to the rector and his successors for ever, upon trust that the rector should perform divine service and administer the Sacrament to prisoners in Durham Gaol, which then stood upon a site adjoining the parish. The rector receives the rents of the land so devised, a salaried chaplain being attached to the gaol.

The Church Estate in the parish of ST. MARY THE LESS originally consisted of ancient burgage tenements, held from time immemorial. The endowments now consist of allotments in Framwellgate Moor, containing 3a. o r. 31 p., producing £34 a year; £564 London and North Eastern Railway 3 per cent. debenture stock, and £60 consols, with the official trustees, arising respectively from a sale in 1911 of a house in South Bailey, and of a stable in 1884, producing in yearly dividends £18 8s. 6d. The net income is applied in aid of general church expenses.

Footnotes

1 For the Educational Institutions for the County and City of Durham, see the General Article on Durham Schools, V.C.H. Durham, i, p. 365 et seq.