The city of Worcester
Charities

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Victoria County History

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Author

William Page, J.W.Willis-Bund (editors)

Year published

1924

Pages

413-420

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'The city of Worcester: Charities', A History of the County of Worcester: volume 4 (1924), pp. 413-420. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42917 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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CHARITIES

Certain charities formerly under the administration of the corporation have been consolidated and are regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 5 May 1908, under the title of 'The Worcester Consolidated Municipal Charities and Hebb's and White's Charities,' the endowments thereof to be administered by the body of trustees thereby constituted, consisting of the mayor ex officio, twelve representative and four co-optative trustees.

In 1908 these charities and their endowments consisted of:— The almshouses of Robert Berkeley founded in 1692, and the subsidiary endowment by will of Christopher Henry Hebb, who died in 1861. The endowments consist of fourteen almshouses with chapel and residences for steward and chaplain in hand, 131 acres at Longmore in Chaddesley Corbett and 190 acres in Stanford Bishop (co. Hereford), gross rental £415 15s., and £1,374 1s. 4d. consols.

Charity of Edward Corles, will proved at Worcester 19 June 1866, trust fund, £529 16s. consols, for Christmas fare for the inmates of the almshouses.

Charity of Thomas Farley, will proved in the P.C.C. 25 August 1821, trust fund, £361 16s. 2d. consols for pensions for two poor freemen.

Charities of Charles Geary, founded by will 1789, Letitia Hackett, will 1804, and the subsidiary endowment of the above-mentioned Christopher Henry Hebb. Endowments three one hundred and seventieths of the Avenbury estates, amounting to £8 5s. yearly (see under the St. Thomas Day charities), also a rent-charge of £15 issuing out of the Angel Inn, Pershore, and adjoining properties. Also £279 16s. 1d. consols, and a repair fund of £347 16s. 6d. consols, held by the official trustees, who also hold a sum of £357 13s. 5d. consols derived under the will of the said Christopher Henry Hebb, which is being accumulated until a sum of £899 8s. 3d. stock shall have been replaced by payments of £26 a year in pursuance of an order of the Charity Commissioners, 1902.

The charities known as the General or St. Thomas Day charities, recorded in an old book belonging to the corporation, include the properties mentioned below:—32 a. I r. I p. at Longdon (co. Worcester), representing the charities of Laurence Palmer, gift in 1604, and John Chappell; house and property called The Stacking House at Hartlebury, belonging to the charities of George and Joice Sheriffe, 1616, Mary Warmsley and Edmund Simons; a yearly rent-charge of £4 issuing out of certain lands in Singleborough (Bucks.), being the charity of William Swaddon, D.D., and Elizabeth his wife; a yearly rent-charge of £25 issuing out of land in Powick known as 'The Great Hamme,' being the gift in 1657 of Thomas Lord Coventry; also a sum of £344 6s. 3d. consols, representing the charity of Maurice Hiller, otherwise Hillier. Also lands and rents purchased by Robert Youle with the gifts of Catherine Heywood and Thomas Prestwood, which include the following properties, namely: twenty-two houses, shops and premises in Worcester, including the Shades Inn and part of the Central Coffee Tavern, High Street, let at £640 a year for sixty years from Michaelmas, 1903 (see Inglethorps's charity below). Also feefarm rents of 8s. 8d., 5s. 4d. and 5s. 4d. on a house in High Street, 54 Broad Street, and the late Unicorn Hotel, Broad Street, respectively, and seventy-two one hundred and seventieths of the income of 438 acres known as the Avenbury Estates, Herefordshire, including the Avenbury Court Farm, the Burgess Farm, and the Grieve Farm and adjoining land known as Grieve Coppice (let at a gross rental of £467), purchased in or about 1878, with the funds of certain of the charities. Also a reserved rent of £5 a year on tenements in Friar Street, and a yearly rent-charge of £22 9s. 4d. for land taken by the Worcester and Birmingham Canal Company. Also 13 acres of land called Pike Hill in St. Martin's parish, and a farm in Stanford Bishop containing 57 a. 2 r. 13 p. and 2 r. 15 p. adjoining known as Hill Oak Farm, purchased out of surplus income in 1908–9.

The income from the real estate amounted in 1910 to £1,440 or thereabouts. Also £361 5s. 7d. consols with the official trustees, who also held a sum of £261 0s. 8d. consols on an investment account towards raising a sum of £500 as a repair fund for the coffee tavern.

The Municipal Widows' Asylum and Almshouse charity, founded by the above-mentioned Christopher Henry Hebb, by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 1 August 1899, were amalgamated. The trust properties consist of two houses in Hebb Street and four houses in South Street, Worcester, producing about £50 a year, which is applicable in pensions to widows of deceased aldermen and councillors, decayed aldermen and councillors or other persons specified in the scheme. These charities were also possessed in 1908 of £558 10s. 1d. consols and £697 6s. 7d India 3 per cent. stock, which (subject to replacement) were sold out in 1912 towards providing a sum of £6,000 lent by the trustees of the Consolidated Municipal Charities to the trustees of Laslett's almshouses (see Laslett's Almshouse charity below).

The Municipal Corporation Anniversary Day gifts, founded by the will of the said Christopher Henry Hebb, consist of twelve one hundred and seventieths of the income of the Avenbury estates mentioned above. The income of about £33 a year is directed to be applied on 9 November yearly in the distribution of tea and sugar among poor widows and married women with young families.

The charity of Richard Inglethorpe was founded by will and codicil dated 4 July 1618. The endowments consist of house, shop and premises, being No. 2 The Cross, Worcester (formerly the 'White Hart'); house, shop, offices and warehouse being No. 1 St. Swithun Street; Nos. 2 and 3 St. Swithun Street; part of the Central Coffee Tavern in High Street (see under the General or St. Thomas Day charities above); a warehouse, brewery and other hereditaments in Sansome Street and warehouse and offices in the same street; 5 a. 1 r. in Henwick Road; a cottage and 9 acres, part of the Bull Ring Farm in Stanford Bishop, and 1 a. 3 r. 26 p. also in Stanford Bishop. Also fifty-eight one hundred and seventieths of the net income of the Avenbury estates mentioned above. The income from the real estate amounts to £1,150 or thereabouts; also £621 11s. 4d. consols.

The charities of John Nash, alderman, were founded by will, 1661. The endowments consist of fifteen almshouses and the site of a warehouse in Nash's Passage and nine almshouses in Croft Walk; a shop, brew-house, &c., in New Street, and Nos. 13 and 14 in the same street; a house, garden and premises at Powick, known as the Old Rectory House, containing 1 a. or. 15 p.; Lower House Farm in Stanford Bishop (co. Hereford), containing 106 a. 2 r.13 p.; a piece of land in the same parish called 'Jumper's Hole,' containing 4 a. 1 r. 22 p.; the whole producing a rental of £250 a year or thereabouts. Also a rent-charge in lieu of the great tithes of Powick, full apportioned amount £420, of which £295 10s. 9d. was received in 1910; also £500 consols as a repair fund. Under an order of the Charity Commissioners, 1904, a sum of £28 a year is applied towards raising a further sum of £500 consols as a repair fund, and under a like order, 1905, a sum of £140 a year is applied towards the replacement of £6,186 10s. 6d. consols, the amounts now held by the official trustees on the accounts being £303 16s. consols and £1,321 10s. 8d. consols respectively.

Charity of Benjamin Thorpe, founded by will 1716, whereby a rent-charge of £5 was devised for the purpose of buying ten coats for ten poor men. The annuity was redeemed in 1908 by the transfer to the official trustees of £200 consols, which was augmented by a further sum of £52 10s. consols, representing arrears of the rent-charge.

Charity of Joseph Henry Tyler (founded by deed 2 May 1894), trust fund, £86 1s. 3d. Birmingham Corporation 3½ per cent. stock, the interest, amounting to £3 0s. 2d., to be applied by the priest in charge of the Roman Catholic church of St. George and by the Roman Catholic bishop in the purchase of groceries for distribution among twenty poor and deserving members of the congregation of the Roman Catholic church of St. George.

Charity of Michael Wyatt, founded by will, 1725. The endowments consist of six almshouses in Friar Street, in hand, with right of way over a yard at £5 a year; a house and malt-house in Copenhagen Street let at £25 a year; and twenty-five one hundred and seventieths of the income of the Avenbury estates mentioned above, amounting to £68 14s. yearly; also £226 12s. 3d. consols and £248 8s. 11d. consols as a repair fund.

The charity of Sir Thomas White founded in 1566 consists of a sum of £104 payable by the corporation of Bristol once in every twenty-four years, the last payment of which was made in 1897. By the scheme any portion not applied by way of loans to young freemen is directed to be paid to the governing body of the educational foundations.

The several sums of stock, both on remittance and investment accounts, are held by the official trustees, who by the scheme were directed to transfer thereout the following sums of stock to the credit of the charities specified, namely: £80 consols to the grammar school, £100 consols to Queen Elizabeth's almshouses, £214 3s. 4d. consols to the consolidated charities of the parishes of St. Alban and St. Helen (see below) and £320 6s. 8d. consols to the consolidated charities of the parish of St. Andrew (see below). In the result of these and other adjustments (fn. 1) the sum of £2,328 13s. 9d. consols is held by the official trustees as a general fund, producing £58 4s. 4d. yearly, and sums of stock amounting to £1,096 5s. 5d. consols as repair funds, producing £27 8s. yearly.

The net yearly income of the charities is, in addition to the annual payments, amounting to £194, on the replacement account above mentioned, subject to the payment of a yearly sum of £252 to the governing body of the educational charities. The remaining income is by the scheme made applicable in the following order of priority: (1) towards the cost of maintenance of the almshouses and their inmates; (2) in the payment of a yearly sum of £60 to the chaplain, resident in a suitable tenement in the almshouses of Robert Berkeley, and of £52 a year for a nurse; (3) in the payment of pensions to persons of either sex, and (4) in payment for the general benefit of the poor.

The trustees are empowered to allow single almspeople from 6s to 8s. and married couples from 10s to 14s. a week, with an allowance for clothing and coal, and from 7s. 6d. to 12s. for each pensioner, a preference to be given to the kindred of John Nash, and in the case of male applicants to those who have been apprenticed in the city of Worcester.

The income applicable under the scheme for the general benefit of the poor is directed to be applied in making payments to deserving and necessitous poor in such way as the trustees should consider most advantageous to the recipients and most conducive to the formation of provident habits.

Charities under the administration of the Six Masters:—

1. Queen Elizabeth's almshouses, founded by Letters Patent 23 February 1561–2, and other benefactions. In 1910 the endowments consisted of twenty almshouses for women situated in the tithing of Whistones in hand, a public-house called the 'Lamb and Flag' and shop adjoining; lands at Merriman's Hill, containing 16 acres or thereabouts, producing together a gross yearly rental of £141 10s. 6d.; also an annuity of £190 issuing out of property in the Butts and Old Waterworks, Pitchcroft, paid by the Great Western Railway Company. The personal estate consists of £3,269 10s. 7d. consols and £731 15s. 10d. India 3 per cent. stock with the official trustees, producing £103 13s. 4d. yearly.

2. The almshouses founded in 1613 by will of Thomas Fleet alias Waldegrave, (fn. 2) consisting of four almshouses in Northfield Street, one of which is let at £13 7s. 9d. a year, and an annuity of £16s. 8d. issuing out of premises in Frog Lane, otherwise Severn Street. The twenty inmates receive 5s. a week each, nursing and an allowance for coal, and a sum of £2 10s. a year in respect of 'Steward's Gift,' and £34 a year is paid to the clerk.

3. The Free School is dealt with elsewhere. (fn. 3)

St. Oswald's Hospital. (fn. 4) —This foundation is regulated by a scheme of the High Court of Justice of 31 July 1878. The endowments consist of lands and houses, producing a gross rental of £1,646 yearly, the tithes of Smite Farm, Claines, amounting to £16 5s., and £4 from St. Lawrence, Evesham. The official trustees also hold £9,473 14s. 9d. consols, £3,604 7s. 11d. India 3 per cent. stock and £4,456 15s. 5d. London County 3 per cent. stock, arising from sales of land from time to time, and accumulations of income, producing in annual dividends £478 13s. 4d. Out of the net income £20 is paid yearly to the master, the Dean of Worcester, £150 and 10 tons of coal to the chaplain, £120 to the steward and £60 to the medical attendant. There are thirtyseven almspeople, to each of whom 8s. is paid weekly; also a coat is given yearly to each man and a dress to each woman.

In 1640 John Haselock, alderman, by his will, devised £10 yearly to be applied in warm clothing for ten poor men or women of the city of Worcester and £2 yearly for two poor men and women of Martin Hussingtree. The annuities are paid out of land in the said parish.

Goulding's Hospital, founded by deed 6 October 1814, consists of six almshouses for the accommodation of three poor men and three poor women, built on a piece of ground, part of the Churchyard Close, belonging to St. Oswald's Hospital. The founder endowed the hospital with a sum of £2,800, which is now represented by £2,030 8s. 2d. consols and £582 Great Western Railway 4½ per cent. stock, producing together £76 18s. 8d. yearly. The sum of £15 is paid yearly to St. Oswald's Hospital, and the balance applied in monthly payments to the inmates of Goulding's Hospital.

The hospital founded and endowed by Thomas Shewring, by deed 14 October 1702, for the accommodation of six poor widows or ancient maidens, to be selected from certain parishes. The trust property consists of a carriage manufactory and premises situate in the Tything, Worcester, and a piece of land adjoining; a farm called the Malt House estate with two cottages thereon situate at Welland, containing 54 acres; also 45a. 3 r. of land in the same parish and a rent-charge of £2 4s. in respect of land formerly part of Welland Common, the income from real estate amounting to £375 yearly. The official trustees also hold £3,931 5s. 8d. consols and £477 Great Western Railway 5 per cent. stock, representing accumulations of income, producing together £122 2s. 8d. yearly. Each inmate receives 9s. weekly, with medical attendance and an allowance for coals.

The Prison Charities.—In or about 1723 William Norton gave £200, the interest to be given to poor prisoners, and in 1734 Thomas Shepheard by deed gave £100 for releasing poor prisoners for debt. These gifts were represented by £482 15s. 2d. consols, of which £179 6s. 8d. consols was by an order of the Charity Commissioners, 1907, set aside to form the endowment of the Worcester Educational Foundation, producing £4 9s. 6d. yearly. The residue, augmented by accumulations to £349 6s. consols, producing £8 14s. 8d. yearly, was by a scheme of 16 May 1890 made applicable in assisting discharged prisoners from Worcester prison. The sums of stock are held by the official trustees.

The General Infirmary, established in 1745 by public subscription, is possessed of the following permanent funds, namely: the Bonaker Trust Fund, arising under the will of the Rev. William Bonaker, proved in 1869; trust fund, £8,762 14s. 3d. consols, a preference to be given to patients nominated by the vicar and churchwardens of Evesham St. Lawrence;

The Ganderton Trust Fund, under will of Charles Ganderton, proved in 1893; trust fund, £12,100 17s. 6d. consols, preference to be given to patients nominated by the vicar and churchwardens of Pershore;

Charity of William Withering, will proved in 1833, trust fund, £299 9s. 4d. consols;

William Henry Ricketts's charity, will proved in 1858, trust fund, £200 consols;

Miss Harriet Ricketts's charity, will proved in 1864, trust fund, £100 consols;

William Morton's charity, will proved in 1869, trust fund, £100 consols;

Thomas William Hill's charity, will proved in 1874, trust fund, £180 consols; and charity of William Aston, will 1903, trust fund, £49 7s. 4d. consols.

The funds of the six last-mentioned charities are held by the official trustees, and the aggregate income of the several trust funds amounts to £544 16s.

In 1779 Henry Deykin by his will proved in the P.C.C. bequeathed £600, the interest to be applied towards the salary of the pastor of the Baptist church in Worcester. The legacy, with a further legacy of £100 by the same testator to another Baptist church, which has been discontinued, is advanced on mortgage at 4 per cent. to the trustees of the Baptist chapel and schools in Sansome Walk. The income of £28 a year is paid to the minister of the Baptist church.

The Worcester Hop Market Charity.—Under an Act of 1792 (fn. 5) the hop market held in the workhouse was vested in the guardians of the poor, the profits to be divided among the respective churchwardens and overseers of the several parishes of the city and other places towards providing for the maintenance of the poor in proportion to the respective quotas of the poor rates by them severally raised and paid towards building the said workhouse. For the year ended 25 March 1909 a sum of £1,723 was received in rents, £528 for weighing and £870 for warehousing.

The almshouses founded by William Laslett by indenture dated 19 September 1868 for the accommodation of thirty-three inmates (men and women) were endowed by him under an indenture 9 April 1875, whereby a farm known as Newton Court Farm, containing 350 acres or thereabouts, was settled in trust for the almshouses. The land is let at £380 a year. A chapel was also built for the use of the public, as well as of the inmates, the chaplain receiving £60 a year out of the rents. Each of the inmates, who number fifteen on the average, receives 5s. a week, with an allowance for coals. Under an order of the Charity Commissioners of 9 May 1911 a sum of £6,000 was borrowed from the trustees of the Municipal Consolidated Charities for providing the cost of rebuilding the almshouses, to be repaid by instalments of £200 a year.

The Royal Albert Asylum, founded in 1868–9, to which the 'Wheeler Wing' was added in 1885, has accommodation for fifty boys and forty girls. The grounds of 15 acres in extent are cultivated by the boys. The official trustees hold a sum of £149 4s. Local Loans stock as a permanent fund, producing £4 9s. 4d yearly, derived under the will of Martin Curtler. proved at Worcester 24 December 1901.

The almshouses founded and endowed by John Wheeley Lea, by deed 27 January 1869, consist of six almshouses, situate in the Infirmary Walk, in the parish of St. Nicholas, for the accommodation of poor women of sixty years of age and upwards. The endowments consist of a house, an orchard containing 4 a. 3 r., and 5 a. 1 r. called Upper Cow Pasture, all situated in the parish of Kempsey, and let at £42 a year; also a sum of £1,900 consols, producing £47 10s. yearly, standing in the corporate name of 'The Governors and Supervisors of the Royal Free Grammar School and Almshouses of the City of Worcester.' The inmates are entitled to 4s. a week each with an allowance of coal.

The Worcester Visiting Society Trust, which originated in 1821 with the deposit of a sum of £50 in the savings bank, is regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 3 April 1891. The fund now consists of £312 1s. 10d. consols with the official trustees, producing £7 16s. yearly, which by the scheme is made applicable in aid of the funds of the Worcester Benevolent Institution for visiting the sick poor at their own homes.

The Worcester Special Reserve Battalions Charity is regulated by schemes of the Charity Commissioners of 1891 and 1910. The trust fund consists of a sum of £375 13s. 6d. consols with the official trustees, the annual dividend of which, amounting to £9 7s. 8d. yearly, was made applicable by the officers and adjutants of the 5th and 6th special reserve battalions of the Worcestershire Regiment and the Mayor of Worcester for the benefit of deserving and necessitous wives and families of non-commissioned officers and men of the said battalions, bona fide resident in the city.

The Worcester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is possessed of £200, representing two legacies of £100 each, bequeathed by the wills of William Woodward, M.D., and Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, proved at Worcester respectively on 30 September 1905 and 20 March 1906. The principal sum has been advanced upon a mortgage of two freehold houses, Nos. 6 and 7, Britannia Square, Worcester, at 4 per cent.

An account of the educational foundations, including Bishop Lloyd's School, the Cathedral Grammar School and others, is given elsewhere. (fn. 6)

Parish of All Saints.—Several of the charities of this parish, consisting of donations of sums of money, which were recorded on the church table, were expended in the rebuilding of the church in 1736, or on other parochial purposes. The charities at present subsisting in the parish are as follows, namely:—

In 1636 William Solley, by his will, gave a ton of coal yearly charged upon a house in Quay Street for distribution among five poor men and five poor women.

In 1640 Thomas Chetle, by his will, devised certain property at Colwall (co. Hereford), which was subsequently augmented by Jane Baker, the rents and profits to be applied in the distribution of clothing. The trust property consists of a house and buildings, and about 12 acres at Colwall, producing £40 yearly.

In 1670 Anthony Carless, by his will, gave 12s. yearly for coats for two poor men, payable out of certain houses in Newport Street.

In 1676 Robert Kinnersley by his will gave £100, the interest to be applied in coats for poor men and £1 in Bibles for the poor. The legacy was in 1690 invested in land, the endowment now consisting of 1 a. 2 r. and 3 r. 25 p. with buildings thereon, in St. Clement's parish, producing £34 yearly.

Samuel Matthews, who died in 1684, by his will devised certain lands at Alfrick, in the parish of Suckley, for charitable purposes. The trust property consists of 6 acres, or therea bouts, producing £20 yearly.

In 1776 Sarah Hall, by her will, bequeathed £200, the interest to be applied in providing gowns for six poor women.

In 1815 Robert Vellers, by his will, bequeathed £100 for the poor.

These legacies are now represented by £280 consols and £93 18s. 8d. consols respectively. The sums of stock are registered in the names of administering trustees, producing £9 6s. 8d. yearly.

In 1868 Colonel John Isaiah Meredith, by his will, proved at Worcester, bequeathed £500, the interest to be distributed in coal on St. Thomas's Day.

In 1909 Mrs. Frances Leonard, by her will, proved at London, bequeathed £200, the income to be applied in food or clothing for poor widows.

The two legacies, less duty, are represented by £455 13s. 11d. consols and £212 14s. consols respectively with the official trustees, producing £16 14s. yearly. In 1909 the sum of £113 was expended in the distribution of grocery, bread, coal and clothing, £4 4s. being paid to the hospital.

Parishes of St. Alban and St. Helen.—The charities for the poor of these parishes have by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 24 February 1903 been consolidated. They comprise the following charities, namely:—

1. Martha Butler, gift before 1786, trust fund, £133 6s. 8d. consols;

2. George Frankcombe, will 1756, trust fund, £9 18s. consols, which charities were recorded on the church table of St. Albanls.

3. Robert Vellers, will 1815, trust fund, £107 1s. consols and £102 12s. 5d. on deposit in the Post Office Savings Bank;

4. Ann Dennis, will 1798, trust fund, £50 on deposit in the Post Office Savings Bank;

5. Duckworth Meadow, otherwise Mrs. Aubrey's charity, date of foundation unknown, endowed with 2 acres at Upton upon Severn, producing £2 10s. yearly;

6. Roger Clarke, will 1691, being an annuity of £2 10s. issuing out of No. 13 High Street;

7. John Haselock, will 1640, trust fund, £228 6s. 4d. India 3½ per cent. stock, arising from the sale in 1903 of a tenement and shop in Sidbury;

8. John Hughes, will 1636, being an annuity of £2 charged on a house in Friar Street.

9. Alexander Kidson, will, being an annuity of 5s. 8d. charged on a shop in the High Street;

10 Thomas Waldegrave (Walsgrove), gift in 1613, consisting of a warehouse in Fish Street, producing £5 yearly;

11. Roger Whitbrooke, will 1535, the trust property of which consists of 1 a. 3 r. 30 p. known as Tybridge Meadow in Worcester, producing £12 yearly;

12. Robert Youle, will, date not stated, being an annuity of 18s. 8d. issuing out of the model dwellings, Copenhagen Street (fn. 7) ;

13. The Bread Money, consisting of £214 3s. 4d. consols, transferred to these charities under the scheme of 1908 (see under City of Worcester Consolidated Charities above).

The several sums of stock are with the official trustees, who also hold a sum of £192 13s. 6d. India 3½ per cent. stock, representing accumulations of income. The gross income of the consolidated charities amounts to £55. In 1911 the sum of £5 5s. was paid to the Worcester Infirmary, £2 2s. to the Dispensary, £2 2s. to the Benevolent Society, and £40 was applied for the benefit of the sick and poor.

In 1905 Miss Caroline Louisa Kerr, by her will, proved at Worcester 15 August, bequeathed her residuary estate to be applied from time to time for the benefit of the poor, and for such purposes for or in connexion with the church of St. Helen as the rector and churchwardens should deem desirable. In respect of this legacy a sum of £816 5s. 6d. India 3½ per cent. stock was transferred to the official trustees, of which a sum of £103 6s. 1d. stock has already been sold out and the proceeds applied in accordance with the terms of the donor's will.

Parish of St. Andrew.—The charities for the poor of this parish were by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners, 27 October 1893, consolidated. They include the following charities, namely:—

1. John Waldegrave (Walsgrove), otherwise Fleet (recorded on the church table), founded by will, 1567, the endowment consisting of almshouses in Powick Lane for four almspeople, who receive 5s. a week each, and four dwelling-houses, a warehouse and yard in Powick Lane;

2. Thomas Waldegrave (Walsgrove), will 1590, trust fund, £55 14s. 11d. consols, arising from the sale in 1895 of a piece of land in Birdport;

3. John Waldegrave (Walsgrove), jun., gift in 1613, trust fund, £320 6s. 8d. consols, transferred to these charities under scheme of 1908 in satisfaction of certain annual payments (see under City of Worcester Consolidated Charities above).

4. William Jarvis, will 1722. Endowment consisting of four almshouses for three men and one woman who receive 6s. each weekly, thirteen tenements in Copenhagen Street, a schoolroom, three shops and a dwelling-house;

5. Lewis Randolph, founded in 1613, originally an annuity of 13s. 4d., but redeemed by the transfer of the stock above mentioned under charity No. 3;

6. John Street (recorded on the church table), will 1622, being an annuity of 16s. charged on a messuage in Quay Street;

7. George Street, mayor and alderman, will 1643. Endowment, a dwelling-house, shop and cottage in Friar Street.

8. Jane and Ann Higgens, deed 1693, being a rent-charge of £3 issuing out of seven dwelling-houses in Powick Lane;

9. George Frankcombe, will 1756, trust fund, £4 17s. 8d. consols;

10. Robert Vellers, will 1815, trust fund, £99 0s. 2d. consols;

11. Ann Robins Lingham, will 1868, trust fund, £49 9s. 10d. consols;

12. William Stephens, will 1886, trust fund, £19 9s. 9d. consols;

13. Hugh Bouchier (recorded on church table), being an annuity of £1 10s. issuing out of a messuage in Powick Lane;

14. Elizabeth Barry, gift, date not stated, trust fund, £115 9s. 4d. consols;

15. William Solley, will 1636, consisting of 1 ton of coal provided out of rent of a messuage in Quay Street;

16. John Chappel (recorded on the church table), consisting of twelve quartern loaves provided annually by the Clothiers' Company of Worcester.

The several sums of stock are with the official trustees, who also hold a sum of £2,442 18s. 6d. consols as the almshouse repair fund, producing together £77 13s. 4d. yearly, and the gross income from the real estate amounts to £240 yearly. The scheme directs that, after providing for the distribution of coal and loaves in respect of the charities of Solley and Chappel and of the allowances to the almspeople above mentioned, one moiety of the net income shall be applicable for the benefit of the poor and the other moiety in apprenticing and in providing technical education by means of evening classes.

The following charities are also administered by the trustees of the consolidated charities, namely:— The charity of John Coucher, founded by deed 1633, the endowment of which consists of part of the Glovers' Arms Inn and a dwelling-house adjoining, producing £18 yearly. A moiety of the income is applicable in the repair of the parish church and in the maintenance of the services and furniture, and the remaining moiety in augmentation of the income of the consolidated charities.

The charity of Miss Anna Farrell, founded by will proved at London, 10 March 1894, trust fund, £88 2s. 5d. consols, the annual dividends, amounting to £2 4s., being applicable for the general benefit of the poor, and the charity of Selina Lingham, founded by will proved at London, 25 September 1902, in memory of testatrix's husband, trust fund, £698 1s. 3d. consols, the annual dividends, amounting to £17 9s., being applicable under the title of the Lingham gifts in the payment on 13 February of 2s. 6d. to each of the inmates of the almshouses in Powick Lane, and twenty-one persons to receive a clothing ticket of 3s. on St. Thomas's Day, the residue to be divided among the same recipients.

Lost Charities.—The charities of Thomas Shewring and others, by whom benefactions amounting to £458 were made for the poor, are no longer in existence. The principal sums are supposed to have been expended for parochial purposes.

Parish of St. Clement.—The following charities are regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 2 October 1883, namely:—

1. Charity of Thomas Whitley, will proved on the feast of St. Hilary, 1466, trust property, originally two meadows in St. John in Bedwardine for the repair of a wooden bridge at the end of 'Tyebrugge,' built by the said donor, and in repairing the highway called 'Hylton Street,' exchanged in 1813 for land called Little Whitmores. This property was sold in 1882 and the proceeds invested in £2,002 10s. 1d. consols.

2. Charity of Agnes or Anna Cleeve, will recited in deed 10 October 1650; the trust property originally consisted of the Bear Inn in Hylton Road and five houses adjoining the inn, and several houses in Tybridge Street, the rents and profits thereof to be applied for similar purposes as the Whitley charity and for the reparation of the parish church and for the relief of the poor. The Bear Inn and houses adjoining were sold in 1901 and 1902 and the proceeds invested in £2,326 0s. 6d. consols and £1,857 7s. 4d. India 3 per cent. stock. The property in Tybridge Street is let at £127 6s. yearly.

3. Charity of Henry Giles (recorded on the church table), will 1745, legacy of £20, the interest to buy two coats for two poor men on 1 November yearly. The principal sum was expended in the purchase of the yard to the Bear Inn, and is included in the preceding charity.

The sums of stock above mentioned are held by the official trustees, who also hold a sum of £77 0s. 5d. India 3 per cent. stock derived from the sale in 1910 of three tenements situate in the Pinch belonging to the parish.

Under the provisions of the scheme two-fifths of the income of the charities is made applicable for the maintenance of the church and of the services and furniture thereof, one-fifth for the benefit of the poor, the remaining two-fifths to form the educational foundation of Whitley and others. The sums of stock have been allocated as to £2,496 19s. 6d. consols and £30 16s. 2d. India 3 per cent. stock to the educational foundation, producing together £63 6s. 8d. yearly, and as to £1,423 16s. 6d. consols and £1,903 11s. 7d. India 3 per cent. stock to the church and poor branches of the charity, producing together £93 13s. 8d. yearly. The official trustees also hold a sum of stock on an investment account to replace a sum of £407 14s. 7d. consols recently sold out for repairs.

In 1815 Robert Vellers by his will bequeathed £100 for the poor. The legacy is now represented by £105 consols with the official trustees, the annual dividends of which, amounting to £2 12s. 4d., are applied in the purchase of gowns for poor widows.

Jane Williams, who died in 1903, by her will bequeathed £100, the interest to be applied for the benefit of poor widows and spinsters. The legacy was invested in £104 0s. 7d. London County 3 per cent. stock, producing £3 2s. 4d. yearly.

Lost Charities.—The charities of Clement Wrighton alias Wrighter and others, by whom benefactions amounting to £225, as recorded on the church table, were made for the poor, have ceased to be paid, the principal sums having been spent on parochial objects.

Parish of St. Nicholas.—The eleemosynary charities consist of the following, namely:—Charity of Mr. Steynor (as appeared from an old book of donations), who founded almshouses adjoining the churchyard, which in 1736 were pulled down for the enlargement of the churchyard. The inmates received the rents of a house in Birdport (subsequently exchanged for a house in Cookeng Street) and of two houses in Warmystry's Slip. The properties were sold in 1884 for £71, which with a legacy of £21 for the poor, bequeathed in 1794 by will of John Goodman, is now represented by £100 consols.

The following charities were recorded on the benefaction tables in the church, namely:—William Solley's charity, consisting of a ton of coal charged on a messuage in Quay Street, in respect of which a yearly sum of £1 is now paid.

Edward Elvine, being an annuity of £1 6s. issuing out of No. 25, The Cross, Worcester.

Thomas Eaton, being an annuity of £1 6s. issuing out of Foregate Hall.

Richard Blurton, being an annuity of 10s. out of a meadow called White Ladies' Close.

Harry Philips and Jane his wife, who gave £50, one moiety of the interest to be paid to the minister and the other moiety for poor housekeepers. The legacy was laid out in the purchase of a house and garden in St. John in Bedwardine, which has been sold and the proceeds invested in the ground-rents of Nos. 4, 6 and 8, Cleveland Terrace, and of the Presbyterian church, Foxley Road, Kensington, producing £60 10s. yearly.

Aaron Lilley and certain members of his family made benefactions amounting together to £153 3s. for the poor in bread, for schooling and clothing children, for clothing poor men and for the distribution of coal. The principal sums were laid out in 1724 in the purchase of 5 acres in Pitchcroft. The land was sold in 1891 and the proceeds invested in £486 8s. 4d. consols.

It further appeared that William Ballard and others enumerated on the benefaction table made gifts for the poor, amounting in the aggregate to £199, to be applied in various ways, which in pursuance of a resolution at a parish meeting held in 1728 were employed with other moneys towards the rebuilding of the church. The amounts so advanced appear to have been repaid and a sum of £341 3s. 8d. consols is held by the official trustees in respect thereof.

Charity of Alderman Edward Solley, will, being an annuity of £2 12s. for bread, issuing out of Nos. 4 and 5, Broad Street, Worcester.

Charities of George Bagnall and others.—In 1680 George Bagnall, by his will, gave £40 for the poor, which, augmented by members of his family and others to the sum of £143, as recited in the deed of conveyance dated 31 July 1684, was laid out in the purchase of 30 acres or thereabouts in the parish of Cradley. The land was sold in 1875 and the proceeds invested in £615 16s. consols, producing £15 7s. 8d. yearly. A piece of land at Rainbow Hill, with two cottages thereon, purchased in 1812 with the proceeds of sale of timber in 1812, and containing 2,264 sq. yds., is still retained in trust for these charities, producing £33 6s. yearly.

In 1776 Mrs. Sarah Hall by her will bequeathed £200 for providing warm gowns for six poor maids or widows.

In 1791–2 the Rev. George Cornwall (in his lifetime) gave £200 for bread for the poor on New Year's Day.

These charities are now represented by £200 consols

In or about 1814 George Wingfield and his widow by their respective wills bequeathed the amount of £100, the interest to be applied in buying gowns for poor women on St. Thomas's Day, and in 1815 Robert Vellers by his will bequeathed £100 for the poor of this parish.

The two legacies are now represented by £310 consols.

Charity of Mary Berwick, will, proved 8 November 1822, trust fund, £94 6s. 6d. consols, the dividends to be distributed in coal in November yearly.

Charity of John Dent, will, proved in the P.C.C. 18 March 1856, trust fund, £529 16s. consols, the annual dividends to be applied in clothes and coal for poor women of fifty years of age and upwards.

Charity of Thomas Hyde, will, proved 12 February 1859, trust fund, £186 15s. 4d. consols, the annual dividends to be applied in food, clothing, or other comforts among not less than ten or more than twenty-four persons.

Charity of Thomas Nicholls Stratford, will, proved at Worcester 8 March 1883, trust fund, £396 10s. 7d. consols, the dividends to be applied in relief of poor.

Charity of Mrs. S. Williams, will, proved at Worcester 4 January 1895, trust fund, £19 0s. 5d. consols, the dividends to be given on St. Thomas's Day to some poor widow.

The several sums of stock, with the exception of that belonging to the charities of George Bagnall and others, are held by the official trustees, producing annually £69 a year. The net income of the charities is expended by the rector and churchwardens in sundry gifts on St. Thomas's Day—drapery, coal, sheets and bread—and in money gifts.

The above-mentioned Mary Berwick, by her said will, left a legacy now represented by £268 18s. 2d. consols, the annual dividends, amounting to £6 14s. 4d., to be applied in relieving such poor persons of the Roman Catholic Church as should stand in need of assistance. The distribution is made in small sums of money. The stock is held by the official trustees, who also hold a sum of £85 12s. 8d. consols, arising from the investment of accumulations of income of William Bagnall and other charities producing £2 2s. 8d. yearly.

Apprenticeship Fund Charities.—In 1681 (as appeared from the book of donations) John Stirrop, by his will, gave an annuity of 20s. issuing out of two messuages in Angell Street for placing out an apprentice every other year.

William Bagnall (as appeared from the benefaction table) gave £4 every other year out of a meadow near St. Martin's Gate (adjoining the Pheasant Inn) for placing out a poor fatherless child as an apprentice.

This parish is in possession of 190 sq. yds. in Infirmary Walk, comprised in deed of trust, 20 June 1855, purchased with a sum of £175, of which £100 belonged to the benefaction fund and £75 to the apprenticing fund. The land, known as the Carless Rent charity, is let at £2 a year, which is applicable for the poor fund and apprenticeship fund in the proportions of four-sevenths and three-sevenths.

St. Swithun.—The charities subsisting in this parish, which were for the most part recorded on the church tables, are regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 30 November 1909, as varied by a scheme of 30 June 1911, whereby the charities were divided into the church branch and the poor's branch.

The church branch includes the following charities, namely:—

The charity of Katherine Benson and others, founded by deed 1723, trust fund, £258 16s. 11d. consols, arising from the sale in 1899 of a meadow in the parish of Hallow.

Josias Underhill's charity, will 1699, trust fund, £150 1s. 4d. consols arising from the redemption of a rent-charge of £3 formerly issuing out of a house in Goose Green.

The sums of stock are held by the official trustees, the dividends, amounting together to £10 4s., being payable to the rector for reading prayers at 5 p.m. every day except Sundays and holy days.

Charity of Sophia Laslett the elder, gift before 1836, trust fund, £225 17s. 3d. consols with the official trustees, the annual dividends, amounting to £5 12s. 8d., being payable to the rector for augmenting the Sunday evening lecturer's stipend, or other charitable purposes. The rector also receives £1 out of the income of Hugh Bouchier's charity (see below) for a sermon on Maundy Thursday and on 17 November, and a yearly sum of 10s. from the charity of William Swift (see below) for a sermon on Good Friday. Also a moiety of the church and parish funds, the particulars of the origin of which are unknown, is by the scheme appropriated for ecclesiastical purposes. The real estate consists of six houses in the High Street, a house and seven tenements in Lowesmoor, three houses and gardens, a cottage, warehouse, and stable in the Trinity, four houses in the Shambles, and two cellars in Church Street, the whole being let at £778 yearly. The official trustees also hold a sum of £192 13s. 10d. consols, producing £4 16s. 4d. yearly. A sum of £1,600 has recently been expended in repairs of the church, which will be replaced in due course. The moiety of the income is directed to be applied in the payment of £200 a year in augmentation of the rector's stipend; also of £100 a year to the official trustees to form a 'fabric fund,' also in payments towards the support of the services of the church and stipends of church officers; any residue to be paid to the official trustees for investment in augmentation of the fabric fund.

The poor's branch includes the following charities, namely:—

Charity of Hugh Bouchier, M.D., consisting of an annuity of £3 10s. issuing out of a messuage in the High Street, applicable, subject to the payment of 20s. for sermons, for the benefit of the poor.

Charity of William Swift, gifts in 1668 and 1671, consisting of an annuity of £4 14s. issuing out of warehouses facing Bank Street, which, subject to the payment of 10s. for a sermon, was applicable in the distribution of bread and coal.

Charity of Sir Charles Trubshaw Withers, will 1741, trust fund, £170 18s. 9d. consols.

Charity of Robert Vellers, will 1815, trust fund, £92 7s. 4d consols.

Charity of Sophia Laslett the younger, gift before 1851, trust fund, £100 consols. The several sums of stock are held by the official trustees, producing £9 1s. 4d. yearly.

Also a moiety of the church and parish lands (see above).

The income of the poor's branch is made applicable as to a sum not exceeding four-tenths in the provision and maintenance of an institute, and the remainder for the general benefit of the poor. In 1911 the net income of the poor's branch amounted to £340 6s. 5d., of which £120 was applied for the institute, £49 12s. in weekly pensions, £31 to the nurse's fund, £14 14s. to the infirmary, £90 or thereabouts in distribution in articles in kind, and the remainder in gifts to hospitals and sanatoria, &c.

Lost Charities.—The charities of Launcelot Stonehall and others, by whom benefactions to the amount of £274 (as recorded on the church tables) were made for the poor, have ceased to be paid, the principal sums having been made use of by the parish.

Parish of Barbourne St. Stephen.—The charity founded by the Rev. James Oldham, by deed of trust 8 December 1891, is endowed with £628 5s. 5d. consols with the official trustees, the annual dividends, amounting to £15 14s., being applicable as to one moiety in the current yearly expenses of maintaining the National schools, and the other moiety in keeping the school buildings in repair.

Tything of Whistones.—In 1849 Christopher Henry Hebb, by a codicil to his will, bequeathed £200 consols with the official trustees, the dividends, amounting to £5 a year, to be given at Christmas in bread to the poor residing in the tything of Whistones and within the district assigned to St. George's, South Claines.

Parish of Holy Trinity.—In 1897 James Andrews, by his will proved at London 14 July, bequeathed £200, the interest to be applied for the benefit of the deserving poor.

In 1899 Mary Harris Pugh, by her will proved at Worcester 18 February, bequeathed £150, the interest to be applied in the distribution of bread and coal among the aged poor and widows on St. Thomas's Day.

The legacies were respectively invested in £209 16s. 4d. consols and in £157 7s. 3d. consols, in the names of the then vicar and churchwardens. The annual dividends, amounting to £8 13s. 4d., are distributed in grocery and coal to about ninety recipients.

Accounts of the charities in the parishes of St. John in Bedwardine, St. Martin and St. Peter will be found under those parishes. (fn. 8)

Footnotes

1 Under an order of the Charity Commissioners of 9 May 1911 the trustees were authorized to lend a sum of £6,000 to the trustees of Laslett's almshouses for providing the cost of the rebuilding of the said almshouses, to be replaced by instalments of £200 a year (see under Laslett's almshouses). The first instalment of £200 has been received and invested in £248 15s. 5d. India 3 per cent. stock.
2 P.C.C. 24 Lawe.
3 a See below p. 491.
4 For the early history of this foundation see the recitals contained in Private Act, 15 Chas. II, cap. 5, and V.C.H. Worcs. ii, 177.
5 Priv. Act, 32 Geo. III, cap. 99.
6 See below, p. 473.
7 The charities from no. 9 to no. 12 (both inclusive) were recorded on the church tables of St. Helen's, dated in 1797, which were accidentally destroyed when the church was under repair.
8 See V.C.H. Worcs. iii, 510, 513, 518.