The hundred of Elmbridge
Introduction and map

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Victoria County History

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H.E. Malden (editor)

Year published

1911

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441

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'The hundred of Elmbridge: Introduction and map', A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3 (1911), pp. 441. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43003 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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THE HUNDRED OF ELMBRIDGE (Or EMLEYBRIDGE)

CONTAINING THE PARISHES OF

COBHAMSTOKE D'ABERNONWALTON UPON THAMES
ESHERTHAMES DITTON (Manors of Imber Court and Waston)WEYBRIDGE
EAST AND WEST MOLESEY

The boundaries of this hundred have remained practically unchanged since 1086, when, however, Ember Court in Thames Ditton was part of the hundred of Kingston, (fn. 1) and the holding of Chertsey in Weybridge was attributed to Copthorne. It is not certain at what date the hundred passed into the hands of the men of Kingston, but it seems later to have been regarded as one of the liberties granted to them by King John in 1200, and was held at fee farm. (fn. 2) In 1280 it was said to be in the hands of their tenant Reginald de Imworth, (fn. 3) with whose manor of Imworth it descended until 1499, when Richard Ardern died seised of the manor of Imworth and half the hundred of Elmbridge, held of the men of Kingston. (fn. 4) Within the hundred there were several exempt jurisdictions. In 1253 John D'Abernon was successful in his claim to view of frankpledge in Stoke, (fn. 5) and Avelina, daughter of Geoffrey de Cruce and wife of Roger de Legh, also claimed the right in Walton. (fn. 6) At a later date Sir Thomas Henneage obtained a grant of Molesey Prior with view of frankpledge from Henry VIII, (fn. 7) and John Druell also had a view on his manor here. (fn. 8)


INDEX MAP TO THE HUNDRED OF ELMBRIDGE

INDEX MAP TO THE HUNDRED OF ELMBRIDGE

In a Subsidy Roll of about 1334 the hundred was valued at £24 0s. 6d., (fn. 9) and it was assessed for ship-money at £346 in 1636. (fn. 10) The name by which it is known is derived from the bridge by which the road from London to Chertsey crosses the Mole or Emlyn on its way west, and here probably the hundred court was held.

Footnotes

1 V.C.H. Surr. i, 305a.
2 Assize R. 898, m. 5.
3 Chan. Inq. p.m. 8 Edw. I, no. 23.
4 Ibid. 15 Hen. VII (Ser. 2), xiv, 101.
5 Plac. de Quo Warr. (Rec. Com.), 747.
6 Ibid. 747.
7 L. and P. Hen. VIII, ii, 1104.
8 Chan. Inq. p.m. (Ser. 2), xi, 51.
9 V.C.H. Surr. i, 443.
10 S.P. Dom. Chas. I, cccxlviii, 82.


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