The borough of Reading
Charities

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Victoria County History

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P.H. Ditchfield and William Page (eds)

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1923

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378-384

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'The borough of Reading: Charities', A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 3 (1923), pp. 378-384. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43229 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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CHARITIES

Reading Borough.

—The municipal charities, formerly under the administration of the corporation, were by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners confirmed, reorganized and consolidated under the titles hereafter mentioned by an Act of Parliament. (fn. 1)

1. The consolidated general almshouse charities or the municipal (general) charities, which are regulated by the said Act and by a scheme of 27 August 1888, as varied by a further scheme of 28 February 1899, include the following charities:—

The charity of John Leche, otherwise A'Larder, founded in 1477 (formerly almshouses) and subsidiary endowments. The trust properties now consist of buildings known as John A'Larder's Buildings, producing £220 yearly, two messuages in the Market Place, a messuage in London Street and the 'Brewers' Arms' in Bridge Street, producing with certain small payments about £212 yearly, and £51 1s. 6d. 2½ per cent. annuities. Also £1,400 consols derived under the will of Thomas Cooke, proved in the P.C.C. 1811, which formed part of a sum of £6,177 11s. 11d. consols transferred to the official trustees in pursuance of the said Act as a general fund.

Bernard Harrison's charity, founded by will proved in the P.C.C. 1618, and subsidiary endowments. The trust properties now consist of eight tenements in Southampton Street (formerly almshouses), let to weekly tenants, producing £53 15s. 6d. yearly, 3 acres in Thatcham let at £10 a year, and a rent-charge of 4s. a year issuing out of No. 2 Butter Market and £239 9s. 8d. consols.

Also £112 8s. 8d. consols, representing a gift in 1751 by Mrs. Wimbleton.

Also £1,400 consols derived under the will of the above-mentioned Thomas Cooke.

Also £2,075 4s. 6d. consols, representing two thirds of a legacy bequeathed by codicil to will of Robert Hanson, proved in the P.C.C. 1821.

The several sums of stock also formed part of the general fund above referred to.

These almshouses appear to be also entitled to a moiety of an annual rent-charge of £4 purchased in the year 1643 with money given by Christian Smith, issuing out of land at Peasemore, and a yearly rent-charge of £1, issuing out of the Bear Inn, Reading, given by the will of Thomas Harrison in 1696.

Robert Boyer, will, 1576, proved in the P.C.C. 1610, endowment, 3 a. 2 r. 13 p. in Burghfield, let at £9 a year, and 10s. a year from allotment land at Trash Green, and £62 11s. 3d. consols, forming part of the general fund.

Charities of John Balle, will, 1608, and Richard Ironside, will, 1623, proved in the P.C.C., income £5 5s. yearly, being two-twelfths of the rent of an allotment in Burghfield, containing 9 a. 1 r. 18 p.

Augustine Knapp, will, 1602, proved in the P.C.C., about £9 12s. yearly, being four-fifths of the rents of the site of St. Giles's National Schools and of land adjoining, and three messuages thereon.

John Noyse, will, 1605, proved in the P.C.C., consisting of £40 consols, arising from the redemption in 1906 of a rent-charge of £1.

William Swaddon, D.D., will previous to 1624, being an annuity of £4, issuing out of lands in the hamlet of Singleborough and parish of Great Horwood, in the county of Buckingham.

Richard Turnor, will, proved in the P.C.C. 1616, consisting of site of tenements in St. Mary's Butts and Reform Court, let at £50 a year.

Rodolph Warcupp, will, 1608, yearly income about £55, arising from plots of land on the south side of West Hill and in Southampton Street.

Thomas Lane, in pursuance of the will of George Lane, his father, by deed, 1602, granted certain land in Whitchurch, county of Oxford, for the use of the poor people maintained in the hospital or almshouse of St. Lawrence, Reading. The land was sold and the proceeds invested in £1,293 16s. consols.

This hospital was formerly the church of Grey Friars, which by Letters Patent dated 24 April 1542 (fn. 2) was granted to the Mayor and burgesses of Reading and was used by them for the purposes of a gildhall.

Joseph Carter, will, proved in the P.C.C. 1610, being a rent-charge of £1, issuing formerly out of two messuages lying over against St. Edmund's Chapel, belonging to the church of St. Lawrence, and now part of the site of the workhouse of that parish.

Peter Wyboe, will, about 1620, legacy of £20.

William A'Thorne (alias Legge), will, proved in the P.C.C. 1619, legacy of £50.

Mary Worsley, will, proved in the Archdeaconry Court of Berks. 1621, legacy of £40.

The three legacies were laid out in the purchase of a messuage in Castle Street, which was sold in 1760 for £200, and the proceeds laid out in £375 consols, forming part of the general fund.

Edward Kemys, will, 1609, consisting of five-twelfths of the rent of the allotment in Burghfield, referred to above under Balle's charity, amounting to £6 10s. yearly.

Edward Hamblin, deed, 1613, and will, 1619, being an annuity of £4, issuing out of a farm called Kirtons, in Burghfield.

William Brackstone, will, 1630, proved in the P.C.C., being an annuity of £4, issuing out of land called Moatlands at Burghfield.

John Eyre, deed, 1636, being an annuity of £5, issuing out of land at Hartley, in Shinfield.

William Joanes, will, 1669, proved in the P.C.C., being an annuity of £5, issuing out of lands in Whitley and Reading.

Thomas Deane, deed, 1610, gift of £160, and James Pocock, will, 1610, legacy of £25.

These sums with £25 added by the corporation were in 1633 invested in the purchase of certain messuages, which are now represented by two messuages in London Street and two tenements in Mount Pleasant, yearly rentals £140.

These charities are also possessed of £53 17s. 3d. consols purchased with a fine of £51 paid on the renewal of a lease of a portion of the property which formed part of the general fund.

William Iremonger, will, 1637, being an annuity of £2 issuing out of a house in Minister Street.

Mary Love, will, 1776, legacy of £300, represented by £377 7s. consols, which formed part of the general fund.

By the scheme confirmed by the said Act it was provided that the clear annual income of the abovementioned charities, instead of being distributed among the poor in small money doles and other gifts, should in future be appropriated to the augmentation of the endowment of the Reading General Almshouses as re-established in conformity therewith.

For effectuating this object the properties constituting the endowments of A'Larder's and Harrison's Almshouses were developed and made productive of increased income and new almshouses erected in Castle Street, in or about 1865, for sixteen inmates, either men or women.

In 1907 new trustees of these charities were appointed by the Charity Commissioners, and the charities next mentioned were placed under the management of the same trustees, namely:

Thomas Barkshire's charity, founded by will proved at London, 1880, trust fund, £81 13s. 7d. consols, forming part of the general fund.

Thomas Cooke's charity (see above) for the almshouses founded by John Webb (see below), trust fund, £700 consols.

Edward Simeon's trust for the obelisk in the Market Place, gift in or about 1805, trust fund, £1,000 consols.

Martin Hope Sutton's charity, will, proved at London, 1901, trust fund, £95 12s. 4d. consols; and William Vine's charity, trust fund, £1,078 2s. 3d. Reading Corporation 3 per cent. stock.

In 1862, in pursuance of the said Act, a sum of £6,095 18s. 4d. consols (comprising the several sums of stock above mentioned as carried to a general account) was transferred to the official trustees, to which the sum of £81 13s. 7d. like stock (Barkshire's charity) was added in 1893, making together £6,177 11s. 11d. consols to the credit of the general account.

In 1899 a sum of £2,496 5s. 7d. stock was sold out, and the proceeds applied in rebuilding dilapidated cottages in Bear Street, subject to replacement from time to time under the title of the depreciation fund.

The sums of stock held by the official trustees belonging to the municipal (general) charities consist of £3,238 1s. 4d. consols standing to the credit of the general account, £438 19s. 1d. to the credit of the depreciation fund, producing together £83 13s. 10d. yearly, and the sum of £247 6s. 9d. consols which is being accumulated on an investment account for replacement of stock sold out in 1906 for effecting certain improvements.

The several sums of stock other than those forming part of the general fund are likewise held by the official trustees to the credit of the charities respectively interested.

In 1910–11 a sum of £96 5s. 7d. was charged against the several charities, according to their respective net incomes, for payment of salaries and expenses of management. A sum of £443 17s. was paid to the almspeople weekly and at Christmas, and a sum of £196 15s. was similarly paid to the annuitants.

2. The consolidated church almshouse charities or the municipal (church) charities, which are considered to be Church of England foundations, include the following charities:—

The Kendrick Almshouses and subsidiary endowments, founded in 1634 by will of William Kendrick. The trust properties now consist of an annuity of £20 payable out of a farm in Shinfield, three-twelfths of the rent of the allotment in Burghfield mentioned under the charity of John Balle (see above), amounting to £3 18s. 8d., land at Noke, let at £6 10s. yearly, purchased in 1910 for £525, and £414 5s. 2d. consols.

Also £875 consols derived under the will of the aforesaid Thomas Cooke.

Also £1,037 12s. 3d. consols under the will of Robert Hanson. See under Bernard Harrison's charity (above).

The Vachell Almshouses and subsidiary endowment, founded in 1634 by Sir Thomas Vachell, kt., are endowed with a rent-charge of £40 issuing out of land called Great and Little Garstons at Shinfield.

Also with £1,050 consols by the will of the aforesaid Thomas Cooke.

The charity of John Hall for almshouses founded by will of John Hall, proved in the P.C.C. 1697. The non-educational branch of the charity is endowed with £1,414 13s. 3d. consols.

Also with £875 consols derived under the will of the aforesaid Thomas Cooke.

In 1630 Richard Johnson by his will proved in the P.C.C. (inter alia) devised certain lands and tenements in Reading for the poor, which were sold and the proceeds invested in the purchase of £536 5s. 1d. consols. A sum of £5 a year is also received under a lease of No. 43 Market Place for sixty years from Michaelmas 1867.

In pursuance of the scheme a sum of £20 consols was carried to the account of the consolidated gifts to parish officers of St. Lawrence, leaving a sum of £5,651 18s. 8d. consols, which is held by the official trustees as the general fund of these charities, who also hold the sum of £536 5s. 1d. consols in trust for Richard Johnson's charity.

Under the Parliamentary scheme provision was made for the erection of new almshouses out of the funds of these charities, which are also situated in Castle Street, and are available for sixteen inmates, either men or women, who are required to be members of the Church of England.

In 1905 new trustees of these charities were appointed by the Charity Commissioners. In 1910 the income from the realty amounted to £75 8s. 8d., and the dividends on the stock to £154 14s. Payments were made to the almspeople amounting to £198 10s., and considerable repairs were made to the almshouses out of an accumulated balance in hand.

By an order of the Charity Commissioners of 7 July 1905 the following additional charities were placed under the same body of trustees as the municipal (church) charities, namely:—

Richard Aldworth's non-educational charity, founded by will, 1646, trust fund, £533 6s. 8d. consols, the annual dividends of which, amounting to £13 6s. 8d., are received by the vicar of St. Lawrence as a lectureship fund.

Edward Hungerford's charity, founded by will, date unknown, but prior to 1740, trust fund, £188 15s. consols, the annual dividends of £4 14s. 4d. being also received by the vicar of St. Lawrence for afternoon prayers.

Archbishop Laud's non-educational charity, founded by deed, 1640, the endowments of which consist of a rent-charge of £10 issuing out of Nos. 33 and 35 Russell Street, and of £200 out of premises in Friar Street and Queen Victoria Street, Reading, also of £559 2s. 7d. consols and £2,550 4s. 2½ per cent. annuities, producing in dividends £77 14s. 4d. yearly. In 1910 the sum of £115 was expended in apprenticeship premiums and £68 was paid to the vicar of St. Lawrence.

Charity of John Webb, founded by will, 1653, the endowments of which consist of ground rents on Nos. 114 and 115 Broad Street, Reading, amounting to £56 17s. 8d., and £1,190 12s. 9d. consols, producing £29 15s. yearly. The charity is regulated by a scheme of 22 February 1887. In 1910 the sum of £65, was paid in weekly pensions to five poor widows of St. Lawrence's parish, and there was a balance in hand of £157 2s.

Charity of John West for a sermon, founded by codicil to will, 1719, being an annuity of £1 received from the trustees of the Blue Coat School Foundation. The sums of stock are held by the official trustees, who also hold a sum of £156 17s. 5d. consols, representing a legacy of £150 for poor prisoners by will of Mrs. Elizabeth Deane, 1787, producing £3 18s. 4d. yearly.

3. The consolidated charities for female servants include the following:—

John Blagrave, will, 1611, being an annuity of £10, issuing out of lands in Swallowfield, for the encouragement of maidservants, the selection to be by lot.

The charity of William Boundry and John Richards, founded by deed, 1755. The endowments consist of ground rents on properties in Southampton Street, amounting to £5 15s. yearly; £290 18s. 8d. consols and £2,911 18s. 3d. consols, representing proceeds of sale in 1879 of land in St. Giles's parish.

Martin Annesley, who died in 1822, in his lifetime gave £500 consols in augmentation of these charities.

The above-mentioned sums of stock are included in the general fund next mentioned.

In pursuance of the scheme a sum of £27 16s. consols was carried to the account of the consolidated gifts to parish officers of St. Lawrence, leaving a sum of £3,675 os. 11d. consols, which is held by the official trustees as the general fund of these charities, producing £91 17s. 4d. early.

In 1910 the sum of £100 was applied in gifts to ten female servants, being members of the Church of England, who had served for a period of not less than five years in the same family.

4. The consolidated municipal educational charities include the following:—

Thomas Lydall, founded by will, 1606, proved in the P.C.C., endowment consisting of ground rent of £38 on No. 98 Friar Street. (See also under parish of St. Lawrence.)

Edward Simeon, for bread, founded by will, 1810, proved in the P.C.C., being a legacy of £1,000 represented by £1,617 19s. 7d. consols, which is included in the general fund mentioned below.

Sir John Simeon, who died in 1824, left a legacy of £100 consols in trust to keep testator's vault in St. Giles's in repair and the surplus to be applied in distribution of bread. The sum of £40 consols has been set apart with the official trustees for the repair of the vault, and the balance of the legacy, with accumulations, forms part of the general fund.

Sir Thomas White's loan charity, founded by deed, 1560, consisting of £1,013 12s. 3d. consols, representing moneys received from time to time from the corporation of Bristol, which is included in the general fund.

In pursuance of the scheme a sum of £33 6s. 8d. consols was carried to the account of the consolidated gifts to parish officers of St. Lawrence, leaving a sum of £2,658 5s. 2d. consols, which is held by the official trustees as the general fund of these charities.

By the said scheme it was provided that in lieu of the distribution of bread or in loans the income of these charities should be carried (cl. 21) into one fund and divided into three parts, and one of such third parts should be applied towards the support of the National schools in connexion with the three parish churches and with other churches in communion with the Church of England, and the remaining two-thirds in equal shares towards the support of the Green girls' school and the Blue Coat school.

In 1910 the income from endowments amounted to £110, whereof the sums of £31 16s. 5d. were paid to the National schools, the Green girls' school and the Blue Coat school respectively.

Schools.

—The Grammar School has already been dealt with. (fn. 3) The foundation is now regulated by a scheme of the Board of Education of 29 February 1908, whereby the school is constituted a public secondary school for boys. The trust property affected by the scheme consists of the school buildings at Redlands and 13 acres of land in hand; an annual payment of £10 by the corporation; £1,278 13s. 4d. 2½ per cent. annuities, producing £31 19s. 4d. yearly, being Archbishop Laud's educational foundation, and £1,164 12s. 2d. consols, producing £29 2s. 4d. yearly, constituting the Appleton Scholarship Fund. The sums of stock are held by the official trustees.

The Blue Coat school was founded in 1646, by will of Richard Aldworth, and subsidiary endowments. (fn. 4) The present endowments are as follows:—

Richard Aldworth's foundation, £6,929 14s. 8d. consols, rents from No. 172 Friar Street and other properties amounting to £420 10s.

John Pottinger's charity, being a rent-charge of £15 issuing out of Blossom's End, Tilehurst.

Sir Thomas Rich's charity, £1,000 10s. consols, rent of Townsend Farm, Streatley, containing 109 acres, and of other premises in Streatley, also ground rents on other properties at Streatley, amounting together to £398, of which £366 3s. was in 1910 carried to the credit of the school.

John Hall's educational foundation and augmentation by Mrs. Ann Norwood, consisting of £3,925 14s. 2d. consols, a rent-charge of £25 issuing out of lands at Caversham, and £38 a year from the rent of Silchester Laundry Company, and a rent-charge of £60 issuing out of No. 90 Broad Street, Reading (Norwood's augmentation), and £126 8s. 3d. consols. In 1910 the sum of £193 18s. 2d. was carried to the credit of the school.

William Malthus's foundation. (fn. 5)

—The endowment consists of the Manor Farm and Lower Farm at Noke of the annual rental value of £485. In 1910 £249 3s. 4d. was carried to the Blue Coat school and £49 16s. 8d. to the parish of Blewbury.

John West's Trust, consisting of the fee-farm rent of £6 8s. 9d. on premises at Northampton, and interest at 3¾ per cent. on £1,691 14s. 11d. Cloth-workers' Company stock, producing £63 8s. 10d. yearly. (fn. 6)

The several sums of stock are held by the official trustees, producing in dividends £299 10s. 4d. yearly.

A sum of £31 16s. 5d. also was in 1910 received as the share of the consolidated municipal educational charities (see above), making the income for that year £1,571 9s. 11d.

Among the items of expenditure a sum of £771 6s. 9d. was applied in maintenance and incidental expenses, £355 14s. 8d. in salaries and allowances for servants, and £6 13s. 4d. was paid to the vicar of St. Lawrence in respect of Aldworth's weekly lecture, and there was a balance in hand of £172 16s.

Edward Simeon's charity for providing clothing for children attending Sunday schools in Reading, founded by will, 1810, is endowed with a sum of £4,044 19s. consols, held by the official trustees, the annual dividends of which, amounting to £101 2s. 4d., are duly applied.

The Girls' Green school was originally founded by public subscriptions for girls bona fide resident in the three parishes of St. Giles, St. Lawrence and St. Mary. A sum of £3,394 18s. 8d. consols is held by the official trustees in trust for this school, arising from certain benefactions, producing £84 17s. 4d. yearly. This school also benefits from one-third share of the municipal educational charities, which in 1910 amounted to £31 16s. 5d.

The Hon. Mrs. Cadogan's educational fund consists of £1,241 6s. 8d. consols with the official trustees, arising under deeds of gift 1844 and 1871. The annual dividends, amounting to £31 0s. 8d. yearly, are, under a scheme of 14 May 1897, applicable in helping girls in connexion with the Church of England.

The Kendrick schools, established out of certain charities founded in 1624 by John Kendrick and Mary Kendrick, now consist of a boys' school erected in Queen's Road and a girls' school in Watlington Street, which was made a separate foundation by a scheme made under the Endowed Schools Acts of 2 March 1909.

The schools are constituted public secondary schools, and are regulated by the said scheme as varied by schemes of the Board of Education dated 7 November 1910 and 10 May 1910 respectively.

The trust funds are under the control of the corporation of Reading. The official trustees, however, still hold a sum of £1,160 2s. 10d. consols, the dividends of which are being accumulated until a sum of £1,265 0s. 4d. stock shall have been attained, which sum will thereupon be transferred to the corporation in trust for the boys' school. This sum of stock represents the amount expended in the erection of laboratories, &c., to the school.

The Reading and District Church Missionary Society Lay Workers' Union is entitled, under a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 8 September 1905, to the annual dividends on £105 19s. 2d. India 3 per cent. stock, amounting to £3 3s. 4d., arising from moneys received in consideration of the surrender of a lease of No. 8 St. Mary's Butts, formerly belonging to the Church of England Young Men's Christian Association.

Under the same scheme a sum of £113 2s. 3d. India 3 per cent. stock was set aside as an educational foundation for the support of the Sunday schools in connexion with Greyfriars Church.

A sum of £113 2s. 3d. like stock was also set aside as an educational foundation for the Sunday schools in connexion with St. Mary's Episcopal Chapel, producing £3 7s. 8d. yearly.

The several sums of stock are held by the official trustees.

Nonconformist Charities.

—The Reading Monthly Meeting of Society of Friends. The charity of Abraham and Sarah Bonifield for poor Friends consists of £133 6s. 8d. consols, producing £3 6s. 8d. yearly.

John Sargood's charity, founded by will proved in the P.C.C. 26 August 1826, is endowed with £105 consols, producing £2 12s. 4d. yearly, which, subject to the repair of the mounds and fences of the burialground near Hermitage, is applicable for the benefit of poor members of the Monthly Meeting at Reading and Warborough.

The sums of stock are held by the official trustees, who also hold a further sum of £29 5s. 4d. consols arising from the sale in 1880 of the 'Meeting House Land' at Oare, the dividends being applicable for the use of the society.

In 1883 Philip Davies, by his will proved at Oxford, bequeathed £1,000 Reading Corporation 3½ per cent. stock (with the official trustees), the income of £35 a year to be paid to the pastor of the Baptist chapel, Carey Street.

The Royal Berkshire Hospital was opened in 1839, to which large additions were subsequently made; in 1908 the court of governors adopted a large scheme of building involving an outlay of £20,000, which has recently been completed. In 1909 the ordinary income amounted to £9,500, of which £2,300 arose from the income of invested funds standing in the names of the trustees of the nominal value of £52,000. The endowment funds include a sum of £1,046 6s. 1d. consols given in 1852 by Richard de Beauvoir Benyon for securing the services of a clergyman of the Church of England; £1,317 12s. 9d. Midland Railway 2½ per cent. stock given in 1903 for the endowment of a bed in a female medical ward by Miss Mary Hall Pocock; £821 Great Eastern Railway 4 per cent. stock, bequeathed in 1903 by Miss Martha Penelope Leggatt for the same purpose; £3,185 India 3 per cent. stock, bequeathed in 1891 by will of William Merry; £112 14s. 3d. Reading Corporation 3 per cent. stock, under will of George Pitt in 1902 for sick employees of Messrs. H. & G. Simonds; £1,036 4s. 4d. New South Wales 3 per cent. stock, by will of Mrs. Fuller Julia Lloyd in 1902, for providing special comfort for ladies or gentlemen who might be patients; £490 13s. 2a. Reading Corporation 3 per cent. stock, by will in 1902 of Horace James Gardener, late of the Bull Hotel, Streatley, for ensuring the right of the proprietor of the said hotel of sending one in-patient and two out-patients yearly to the said hospital.

Parish of St. Giles.

—In 1602 Augustine Knapp, by his will proved in the P.C.C., gave 20s. yearly for clothing poor, lame, blind and impotent people. The annuity was redeemed in 1881 by the transfer to the official trustees of £33 12s. 6d. consols, now producing 16s. 8d. yearly, which has for some years been accumulated.

In 1606 Thomas Deane, by his will proved in the P.C.C., gave an annuity of £3 for the poor of Reading in bread.

This charity was augmented in 1623 by will of Richard Aldworth, proved in the P.C.C., who devised a like annuity of £3.

The annuities are paid out of property known as the Billingbear estate, one-third being applicable in this parish and one-third in each of the parishes of St. Mary and St. Lawrence.

In 1661 Thomas Ward by his will devised 10s. yearly to be divided equally among four ancient poor people, payable out of certain lands in Swallowfield, Wiltshire, now transferred to Berkshire.

In 1673 Stephen Atwater by his will gave an annuity of 20s. to be divided equally among four poor men belonging to the clothing trade, charged upon land at Whitley in this parish.

In 1688 Samuel Jemmett, by will proved in the P.C.C., gave 20s. yearly out of his lands in Shinfield to be distributed equally among four poor house-holders.

The payments of the three annuities last mentioned appear to have been discontinued.

In 1814 Catherine Collis by her will bequeathed £100 stock, the dividends, subject to the repair of her father's tomb, to be applied in the distribution of bread on 23 March yearly. The trust funds, with accumulations, are now represented by £105 consols and £62 8s. 8d. London County 3 per cent. stock.

In 1887 Daniel Seller Russell, by his will proved at Oxford, bequeathed £100, the income to be distributed among old and decayed parishioners attending the parish church. The trust funds with accumulations are now represented by £88 11s. 2d. consols and £44 16s. 8d. London County 3 per cent. stock. The income of this charity and that of Catherine Collis's charity, amounting together to £8 3s., are distributed at the same time among the sick and needy.

In 1903 Martha Penelope Leggatt, by her will proved in London, bequeathed £500 for the benefit of the poor. The legacy was invested in £567 7s. 6d. consols, producing £14 3s. 8d. yearly, which in 1909 was applied in the distribution of £5 among the sick and needy and the balance among aged poor.

The charity of Elizabeth Dora Clarke for the curates of the parish church, founded by will dated in 1898, is endowed with a sum of £3,742 1s. 5d. India 3 per cent. stock, producing £112 5s. yearly.

The Southern Hill Home, founded in 1874, was sold in 1906 and the proceeds invested in £1,036 12s. consols, producing £25 18s. 4d. yearly, which, under a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 21 February 1902, is made applicable in aid of the Reading Female Aid Society, or in aid of any other society or institution in England having an evangelical and Protestant religious basis and having as its object the rescue and care of fallen women.

The several sums of stock above mentioned are held by the official trustees.

Church Lands.

—It appears from an inquisition of commissioners of charitable uses made at Newbury on 18 April 1599 that there had been given and conveyed to certain persons whose names were then unknown divers messuages, lands and tenements within the borough of Reading, the rents whereof had been employed towards the reparation of the church of St. Giles and other charitable uses, the evidences whereof had been embezzled and taken out of the chest of the vestry room of the church by one Jeffrey Cowper, sometime churchwarden. By a decree made thereupon, dated 18 April 1599, confirmed by Letters Patent of 7 December of the following year, the rents and profits thereof were assured for the repair of the church, the maintenance of the bells and seats and the surplus towards the relief of the poor of the said parish. The trust estate now consists of seven houses in London Street, three cottages in Steeple Place, St. Giles's buildings, consisting of sixteen cottages, four houses and straw stores in Southampton Street, No. 7 Silver Street, property in Hawke Court and in East Street, and the playground of St. Giles's boys' school, also of certain quit-rents. The gross rental amounts to about £514 a year.

Parish of St. Lawrence.

—Consolidated gifts to parish officers of St. Lawrence. By the Parliamentary scheme above mentioned the several sums of £20, £33 6s. 8d. and £27 16s. consols out of the funds of the church almshouse charities, Thomas Lydall's charity, and John Blagrave's charity respectively, making together £81 2s. 8d. consols, were transferred to the official trustees, upon trust to remit the dividends to the vicar of St. Lawrence, who should pay thereout annually 4s. 4d. to the clerk, 3s. 4d. to the bell-ringer, 1s. to the sexton, and 10s. to the churchwardens for the repairs of the church and should retain the residue for his own use.

The charity of John Johnson, founded in 1614 by will proved in the P.C.C., is endowed with a messuage situate in Fisher Row, now known as 21 and 22 Broad Street, purchased with moneys bequeathed by the testator, which is let at £45 yearly. In 1907 the net income was apportioned £9 10s. to the vicar, £9 10s. to the churchwardens for the reparation of the church, £2 towards the sexton's family, and the balance in bread, food and gifts to the poor.

The charities of Elizabeth Elwes and Richard Johnson, founded respectively in 1621 and 1630 by wills proved in the P.C.C., whereby legacies of £100 and £60 respectively were bequeathed for the poor, are now endowed with £744 8s. 3d. consols, and £6,400 2½ per cent. annuities, arising from the sales in 1886 and 1896 of the properties purchased in 1635 with the original legacies. The annual dividends, amounting to £178 12s., were in 1907 applied in the payment of eight pensions of £10 4s. each, a sum of £1 6s. 8d. in bread to a large number of poor persons under a gift by John Newman in 1523, £4 15s. 7d. to the provident club, £5 5s. to the Queen Victoria Nursing Home, £22 11s. in money gifts, and the balance in the distribution of flannel, &c., and relief tickets.

The charities of Thomas Deane and Richard Aldworth, see under parish of St. Giles. The sum of £1 18s. is received and applied yearly in this parish.

The charities of Roger Knight and John Bagley, founded respectively in 1634 and 1638 by wills proved in the P.C.C., are now endowed with £644 12s. 2d. consols, arising from the sale in 1888 of two messuages in Gutter Lane. The annual dividends, amounting to £16 2s. 4d., are in pursuance of the trusts applicable, £1 for a sermon, £1 14s. for the poor, and the balance towards the reparation of the church.

The charity of Elizabeth Thorne, who died in 1772, is endowed with £135 11s. 2d. consols with the official trustees; the annual dividends, amounting to £3 7s. 8d., are applicable in augmentation of Edward Hungerford's charity for celebration of evening service. See under municipal church charities above.

Charity of John Allen—See under the parish of St. Mary.

John Chamberlain, as appeared from the table of benefactions, devised a rent-charge of £1 annually to be given to the poor on Ash Wednesday. The annuity is paid by Merton College, Oxford, in respect of land at Stratton (Wilts.), and applied in gifts of food to the poor.

In 1791 Rachel Veasey, by her will proved in the P.C.C., bequeathed £805 New South Sea stock, subsequently represented by £920 1s. 8d. consols, for certain charitable purposes. In 1904, by an order of the Charity Commissioners, £120 consols, being three twenty-third parts thereof, or £3 a year, was set aside as the share of the Green girls' school, and £40 consols, being one twenty-third part thereof, or £1 a year, for books for the Sunday schools. The income on £760 1s. 8d. consols, the remainder of the stock, amounting to £19 a year, is applied in gifts of £1 each to five poor widows and five poor householders, £2 each to two servants who have lived two years in one family, and in gifts of 10s. each to ten poor persons.

In 1802 Mrs. Susannah Veasey, by her will proved in the P.C.C., bequeathed her residuary estate for the poor. The legacy is now represented by £225 consols, the annual dividends of which, amounting to £5 12s. 4d., are duly applied.

In 1840 Mrs. Mary Walsham by her will bequeathed £100 consols, the dividends thereof, amounting to £2 10s., to be distributed in coal among four recipients.

Church Estate.

—By a decree made upon the findings of an inquisition of charitable uses taken at Newbury on 18 April 1599, confirmed by Letters Patent on 17 December, 1602, the rents and profits of certain lands were assured for the repair of the church of St. Lawrence and of the bells and seats, and the overplus to the relief of the poor. The trust estate now consists of a house and shop, No. 39 Friar Street, let at £40 a year, a ground rent of £55 on 110 Friar Street, the ground rents on Nos. 18, 20 and 22 Cross Street, amounting together to £70, and £419 5s. 1d. consols, producing £10 9s. 4d. yearly, which together with certain small quit-rents made in 1910 a total gross income of £175 16s. 5½d. The net income is applied towards the reparation of the parish church.

The several sums of stock above mentioned are held by the official trustees.

Parish of St. Mary.—Apprenticing and Educational Charities.

—In 1732 John Allen, by his will proved in the P.C.C., bequeathed £1,000 to be laid out in land and settled upon the three ministers of St. Mary, St. Giles and St. Lawrence upon trust that nine-tenths of the rents and profits should be applied in apprenticing in the said three parishes, and the residue be retained by the said ministers, subject to the repair of testator's monument.

The endowment consists of a farm known as Little John's Farm in Tilehurst, containing 53 acres or thereabouts, awarded in 1817 on the inclosure in that parish, which is let at £170 a year, and of £1,767 19s. 8d. consols, with the official trustees, arising from accumulations of income. The annual dividends, amounting to £44 4s., are together with the net rent applicable in pursuance of a scheme of 9 February 1909 in premiums of not less than £20 or more than £50 in putting forth boys bona fide residents of the said three parishes as apprentices to some useful trade. A certain amount is received by each of the vicars upon the apprenticeship of a boy selected from his parish.

The official trustees also hold on an investment account a sum of £886 18s. 6d. consols, which is being accumulated until a sum of £1,139 0s. 5d. stock shall have been attained.

Neale's School—The official trustees hold a sum of £470 12s. 8d. consols in trust for this school, representing a legacy of £300 by the will of Joseph Neale, 1705, and a legacy of £100 by will of William Watlington, 1848. The annual dividends, amounting to £11 15s. 4d., are applied for the benefit of a school, comprised in a deed dated 23 December 1876.

The National schools are entitled to share in the municipal educational charities above.

The Consolidated Charities.

—The following charities were by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 7 November 1905 consolidated and placed under one body of trustees, namely the charities of

(1) Richard Jeyes, will proved in the P.C.C. 1649, and John Bacon, will, 1681.

Trust funds, £2,055 1s. consols, arising from the sale of realty formerly belonging to the charities.

(2) John Wells Hounslow, will, proved at Oxford, 1902; trust fund, £110 16s. 4d. consols.

(3) John Blagrave, mentioned in Parliamentary Returns of 1786; trust fund, £137 2s. 4d. consols.

(4) Reginald Butler, will, 1638, being a rent-charge of £1, issuing out of land known as Burghfield.

(5) Charities of Thomas Deane and Richard Aldworth, see under parish of St. Giles. The sum of £1 18s. is applied yearly in the parish of St. Mary.

(6) William Elkins, will, 1638, consisting of an annuity of £1 out of lands in Mapledurham.

(7) John Mills, will, date unknown, trust fund, £51 6s. 9d. consols, representing a sum of £50 received by way of compromise in respect of a charge on a house in Castle Street.

(8) Robert Reeve, deed, 25 February 1620, being an annuity of £2 12s., issuing out of Nos. 7 and 9 Castle Street.

(9) Nicholas Russell, will, 1611, proved in the Court of Arches, consisting of an annuity of 13s. 4d., charged on No. 17 Minster Street and Finch's Buildings, Hosier Street.

The several sums of stock are held by the official trustees, producing in annual dividends £58 17s., which with the sum of £7 3s. 4d. received in respect of the annuities were in 1909 applied in pursuance of the scheme in pensions of 5s. weekly.

The official trustees also hold a sum of £88 11s. 2d. consols, producing £2 4s. yearly, in trust for the charity of Daniel Seller Russell, for old and decayed parishioners attending the parish church, derived under will proved at Oxford 26 April 1887.

Ecclesiastical Charities.—Church Lands.

—The earliest document relating to the church lands was a deed poll under the seal of the Abbot and convent of Reading, dated 10 March, 28 Henry VI, whereby a certain tenement in Olde Street, otherwise Wode Street (subsequently 2 Castle Street), was granted to the procurators of the church of St. Mary. The church was also possessed of four dwelling-houses and yards at St. Mary's Butts. These properties were sold in 1886 and 1902 respectively, and the proceeds thereof are represented by £5,553 6s. 8d. consols with the official trustees, producing £138 16s. 8d. yearly, which with the rent of No. 22 Castle Street, still retained and let at £26 a year, are applied towards the expenses of the church.

In 1624 John Kendrick, by will proved in the P.C.C., gave £250 to purchase lands for the maintenance of morning service at the parish church.

The trust fund now consists of £780 8s. 1d. consols with the official trustees, representing the proceeds of sale in 1873 of property in Tilehurst belonging to the charity. The annual dividends, amounting to £19 10s., are duly applied.

The four charities next mentioned are also for the benefit of the clergy of St. Mary's, namely—

Mrs. Elizabeth Thorne, who died in 1772, by will, left a legacy, now represented by £135 11s. 2d. consols, for the benefit of the vicar.

Isaac Harrison, will proved at Oxford 28 August 1888, trust fund, £925 9s. consols.

Miss Charlotte Kimber, will, 1890, trust fund, £199 4s. Local Loans 3 per cent. stock.

Caroline Young, by a codicil to will proved at London 31 May 1902, bequeathed £500, the interest to be applied in augmentation of the stipend of the incumbent of St. Mary's Chapel. The sum of £450, received after payment of legacy duty, was lent on mortgage of two houses at Caversham at 4 per cent.

The sums of stock above mentioned are held by the official trustees, producing together £32 9s. 8d. yearly, which with the interest on the mortgage, amounting to £18 a year, is duly applied in accordance with the trust of the respective charities.

Mission rooms, comprised in deeds of 22 September 1875 and 2 June 1899, are regulated by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 8 February 1901.

Nonconformist Charities.

—The Broad Street Independent Chapel and trust property, comprised in deed of 30 November 1808, is endowed with two messuages and shops, Nos. 89 and 89a Broad Street, let at £100 a year, of which £60 is for the benefit of the minister and £40 for the chapel; also with a rent-charge of £2 from a farm in the parish of Compton, Berks.

The minister was also entitled to the dividends on £500 consols, £533 2s. 5d. consols, and £100 consols under the charities of Mary Ryder, Elizabeth King and Elizabeth Chinner respectively.

The sums of stock were sold cut in 1892 for effecting improvements to the chapel, subject to replacement by yearly instalments of £24. The sum of £637 12s. 9d. India 3 per cent. stock is held by the official trustees in respect of such investment account, which is being accumulated until a sum of £1,133 2s. 5d. stock shall have been attained.

Parish of St. John the Evangelist.

—In 1887 Daniel Seller Russell, by his will proved at Oxford, bequeathed £100, the interest to be distributed among old and decayed parishioners attending St. John's Church in sums of 5s. each. The legacy, less duty, was invested in £87 18s. 2d. consols, producing £2 3s. 8d. yearly.

In 1897 Leonard Goodhart Sutton gave a sum of £100 consols as a convalescent fund, the dividends to be applied in sending to the seaside poor and deserving inhabitants needing change of air.

The sums of stock are held by the official trustees.

Parish of Christ Church, Whitley.

—The Church Institute, founded by a deed of trust 3 August 1911, is endowed with a sum of £1,079 10s. 3d. India 3½ per cent. stock with the official trustees. The annual dividends, amounting to £37 15s. 8d., are applicable in keeping in repair and improving the said institute.

Footnotes

1 Private Act, 24 & 25 Vict. cap. 23.
2 a L. and P. Hen. VIII, xvii, g. 285 (1).
3 V.C.H. Berks. ii, 245 et seq.
4 Ibid. 282.
5 V.C.H. Berks. ii, 283.
6 £1 is paid out of this charity for a sermon on St. Thomas's Day.
7 See V.C.H. Berks. ii, 283.