Journal of the House of Lords
February 1563

Sponsor

History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Author

Sir Simonds d'Ewes

Year published

1682

Pages

68-69

Citation Show another format:

'Journal of the House of Lords: February 1563', The Journals of all the Parliaments during the reign of Queen Elizabeth (1682), pp. 68-69. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43665 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


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Contents

February 1563

On Monday the first day of February, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal Assembled, but nothing was done, save only the Parliament continued in usual Form, usq; in diem Mercurii prox. hora nona.

On Wednesday the 3d of February, the Lords also Assembled, but nothing was done, save only the Parliament continued by the Lord Keeper, usq; ad diem Sabbati prox. hora nona.

On Saturday the 6th day of February (to which day the Parliament had been on Wednesday last continued) a Bill against forging of Evidences and Writings, was read the first time.

On Monday the 8th day of February, the Bill against forging of false Deeds and Writings, was read the second time, & commissa ad ingrossand.

On Tuesday the 9th of February, the Bill touching Pewterers, was read the first time.

Dominus Custos magni Sigilli continuavit præsens Parliamentum usq; in diem Jovis prox. hora nona.

On Thursday the 11th day of February, the Bill against forging of false Deeds and writings, was read tertia vice, & conclusa, and sent down to the House of Commons by the Queens Attorney and Sollicitor.

On Monday the 15th day of February (to which day the Parliament had been on Thursday last continued) The Bill touching Fines to be levyed in the County Palatine of Durham, The Bill against carrying over Sea of Sheep Skins and Pelts, not being Staple Ware, And the Bill to revive certain Statutes Repealed for Servants robbing their Masters, the punishment of the Vice of Buggery, against fond and phantastical Prophecies, and for the punishment of Invocation of evil Spirits, Inchantments, Witchcrafts and Sorceries, were brought from the House of Commons, and each of them read prima vice.

Two Bills also had each of them their first and second reading, of which the latter, being the Bill for the Restitution in Blood of Thomas Brooke, William Cromer, and Cutbert Vanghan, and others, commissa suit Domino primario justiciario Com. Placitor.

On Tuesday the 16th day of February, the Bill for Restitution in Blood of Anne Thomas; The Bill for Restitution in Blood of the Heirs of Thomas Isely; And the Bill for Restitution in Blood of Thomas Diggs, were each of them read Primâ, secundâ & tertiâ vice, & conclus. and were, with two others, sent down to the House of Commons, by Serjeant Carus and the Queens Attorney.

Dominus Custos magni Sigilli continuavit præsens Parliamenum usq; in diem Crastinum bora nona.

On Wednesday the 17th day of February, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal Assembled, but nothing was done, save only the Parliament continued by the Lord Keeper in usual Form, usq; in diem crastinum hora nona.

On Thursday the 18th day of February, the Bill touching Fines to be levied within the County Palatine of Durham, and the Bill against carrying of Sheep Skins and Pelts over the Seas, not being Staple Wares, were each of them read tertia vice & conclusæ.

On Saturday the 20th day of February (to which day the Parliament had been on Thursday last continued) Three Bills were brought up to the Lords from the House of Commons, of which the first being the Bill of one Subsidy and two Fifteens and Tenths, granted by the Temporalty, was read the first time.

The Bill for Assurance of certain Lands to Sir Francis Jobson, was read the first time, whereupon the Lords took Order that the Learned Counsel, as well of the said Francis, as of the Bishop of Durham, whom it concerned, should on Saturday then next following be heard, what could on either side be said in furtherance or disallowance of the same.

The Bill also for the Assurance of the Queens Majesties Royal Power, over all States and Subjects within her Dominions, was brought up to the Lords from the House of Commons.

On Monday the 22th day of February, two Bills had each of them one reading; of which the first being the Bill of one Subsidy and two Fisteens and Tenths, granted by the Temporalty, was Secunda vice lect. but no mention is made, that it was either Ordered to be ingrossed, or referr'd to Committees, because it had been formerly sent up to the Lords from the House of Commons.

On Tuesday the 23th day of February, the Bill of one Subsidy and two Fifteens and Tenths, granted by the Temporalty, was read tertiâ vice & communi omnium Procerum assensu conclus. and sent to the House of Commons by Serjeant Carus, and Doctor Huicke.

Nota, That this Bill of Subsidy, after it had passed the Upper House, was not by them altered or amended in any thing, but only sent back again unto the House of Commons, to whom it did most properly belong, and is on the last day of the Parliament, or Session of Parliament, to be brought up by the Speaker of the said House, as it was at this time on Saturday the 10th day of April ensuing, and presented unto her Majesty by Thomas Williams Esq; Prolocutor of the said House, at this present Session, before the gave her Royal Assent to such Acts as passed.

On Thursday the 25th day of February, the Bill for the Assurance of the Queens Majesties Royal Power over all States and Subjects within her Dominions, was read the first time.

On Saturday the 27th day of February, the Bill for Restitution in Blood of the Children of Thomas Cranmer, late Archbishop of Canterbury, and the Bill declaring the Authority of the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and the Lord chancellor, to be one, were each of them read prima vice.

Eight Bills were brought up to the Lords from the House of Commons, of which the first, being the Bill of one Subsidy and two Fifteens and Tenths, granted by the Temporalty, and the second against carrying over Sheep Skins and Pelts over the seas, not being Staple Ware, were each of them returned conclus.

This day, according to the Order formerly taken, Sir Francis Jobson, with his Counsel, came before the Lords, and by them declared .... And no more is set down in the Original Journal-Book of the Upper House; and by the negligence of the Clerk the matter is so left abruptly; but it doth plainly appear, that it was touching the Assurance of certain Lands, which concerned the Bishop of Durham, ut videas, on Saturday the 20th of this Instant February foregoing.