Journal of the House of Lords
March 1581

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History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Author

Sir Simonds d'Ewes

Year published

1682

Pages

271-276

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'Journal of the House of Lords: March 1581', The Journals of all the Parliaments during the reign of Queen Elizabeth (1682), pp. 271-276. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43696 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Contents

March 1581

On Wednesday the first day of March, the Bill for the Explanation of the Statute against forging of Evidences was read tertiâ vice: which coming to the Question, and the numbers of the Contents on the one side, and the numbers of the Not-contents on the other side found to be equal and alike with their Proxies, it was Commanded to be laid up in the Desk till the next Parliament.

On Thursday the second day of March a Bill for the increase of Mariners and maintenance of Navigation, was after the second reading, committed to be ingrossed. Five Bills also were sent up to the Lords from the House of Commons; whereof the first was the Subsidy Bill, the other four of no great moment. The Bill also for the Confirmation of a Subsidy granted by the Clergy primâ & secundâ vice lecta, & commissa ad ingrossandum. There were two other Bills each of them read once this Morning; whereof the first being a Bill for the punishment of those who should counterfeit the hands of any of her Majesties Privy-Council, or the Seals of others, was after the third reading rejected. Qued nota, because it is seldom seen that any Bill after it hath passed the third reading should be rejected.

Then was the Parliament continued by the Lord Chancellor unto two of the Clock in the Afternoon; at which time the Lords meeting, there were only two Bills read primâ vice; whereof the first was the Subsidy Bill, and then the Lord Chancellor Adjourned the Parliament unto the day following.

On Friday the third day of March, Six Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; whereof the last was a Bill that Gavelkind Lands within the County of the City of Exeter may be Inheritable as Lands at the Common Law, which was read the third time and concluded.

Nota, That this Custom of Gavelkind (by which all the Sons do Inherit the Lands of their Ancestors equally) is not only in Kent, but hath been also in the City of Exeter in the County of Devon. and as is very probable either is, or hath been in other parts of the Kingdom.

The Lord Chancellor continued the Parliament unto two of the Clock in the Afternoon; about which time the Lords meeting, the Bill for the grant of a Subsidy and two Fifteenths and Tenths by the Temporalty, was read secundâ vice.

On Saturday the 4th day of March, were four Bills of no great moment each of them once read; whereof the first being a Bill for the confirmation of a Subsidy granted by the Clergy, was after the third reading concluded.

Mr Oughtred that was sent for by Order of the Lords, made his appearance, and to him day was given for bringing of his Councel on Tuesday next, and the same day was also appointed for my Lady Marquess of Winchester.

This Forenoon finally, two Bills of no great moment were sent up to the Lords from the House of Commons, and one Bill for the assurance of an yearly rent to the Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield in Fee, was tertiâ vice lecta; and then sent down from the Lords to the said House of Commons.

On Monday the 6th day of March, to which day the Parliament had been last Adjourned, were two Bills of no great moment read; whereof the first was touching Fines and Recoveries.

On Tuesday the 7th day of March, Six Bills were brought up to the Lords from the House of Commons; whereof the last was for keeping of the Queens Majesties Subjects in due obedience: there were two Bills also each of them once read; whereof the last touching Fines and common Recoveries, was after the third reading sent down to the House of Commons.

This day appeared before the Lords, as was appointed, the Lord Marquess with his Councel on the one side, and the Councel of the Lady Marquess on the other side, and Mr Oughtred for himself; The Lord Chancellor with consent of the Lords, after hearing of all the Parties, and upon Conference, thought it best for the better Expedition of the matter, that certain of the Lords, if the Parties consented thereunto, should have the hearing of all the Controversies betwixt them, and of the several accompts of Mr Oughtred; to which the Parties being called again, every one for himself did personally assent, only further Order was taken that the Lady Marquess should deliver her assent the next day by her Councel. The Lords that were named to hear the said Controversies were these, which were chosen by the Parties themselves, the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Treasurer, the Lord Chamberlain, and the Earl of Bedford; and for the Causes between the Lord Marquess and the Lady Marquess, were chosen by the said Parties, the Lord Chancellor, Lord Treasurer, Lord Chamberlain, and the Lord Buckhurst.

Then the Lord Chancellor continued the Parliament unto two of the Clock in the Afternoon, at which hour the Lords meeting, Three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; whereof the last being a Bill touching the Lord Zouch, was read secundâ vice, and then committed to be ingrossed.

On Wednesday the 8th day of March, Three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; whereof the last was Billa for keeping the Queens Majesties Subjects in their due Obedience.

Two Bills also were brought up to the Lords from the House of Commons; whereof the last being a new Bill for the fortifying of the Borders towards Scotland (which they returned with a former Bill passed by the Lords before with great deliberation to the same purpose, and sent down to them so passed with the same title) it gave the Lords much distast, because they thought this course to be both derogatory to the superiority of the place, and contrary to the antient course of both Houses; and as they misliked the disorder, so was it their pleasure that this their misliking should be entred in the Records of Parliament, lest so evil an Example might hereafter be abused, as a precedent. Vide plus de ista materia die 10 Martii sequente.

Then the Lord Chancellor continued the Parliament unto two of the Clock in the Afternoon, at which the Lords meeting, four Bills had each of them one reading; whereof the first being the Bill for the Grant of a Subsidy and two Fifteenths and Tenths by the Temporalty, was read tertiâ vice & communi omnium Procerum assensu conclusa.

On Thursday the 9th day of March, Five Bills had each of them one reading; whereof the first being a Bill for restitution in Blood of Philip Earl of Arundel, was read primâ vice.

On Friday the 10th day of March, were five Bills read; the first three being of no great moment had each of them one reading, the fourth being a Bill for restitution in Blood of two of the Saintlegers, was read secundâ & tertiâ vice, and then was sent down to the House of Commons with another Bill for the Earl of Arundels restitution, which had likewise passed the Lords this Forenoon. The new Bill lastly for the fortifying of the Borders towards Scotland was read primâ vice.

Nota, That though the Lords did take great offence at the House of Commons for sending up this new Bill unto them, and rejecting a former Bill by them passed and sent down to the said House of Commons, which had been framed by them to the same purpose, without acquainting their Lordships first upon what grounds or for what reasons they had rejected the former Bill (as may be seen at large on Wednesday the 8th day of March foregoing;) and though their Lordships did then likewise Order that this Act should be Entred in the Records of the Upper House as a thing derogatory to the dignity thereof, yet it pleased their Lordships not only on this Friday this 10th day of March to give the said new Bill its first reading, but on Tuesday the 14th of March following caused it to be read the second time, and on the next day following being Wednesday having added certain amendments unto it, did finally upon the third reading conclude and pass it. Vide Martii 17 postea.

One Act lastly for the repair of Dover Haven, was sent up to the Lords from the House of Commons, which was read primâ vice.

On Monday the 13th day of March, to which day the Parliament had been last Adjourned, Five Bills were sent up to the Lords from the House of Commons; of which the first being an Act for the true making, melting and working of Wax, with two others were read primâ vice.

Six other Bills also were read this Morning; of which the fifth being a Bill for restitution in Blood of Anthony Mayney, was read secundâ & tertia vice, and so concluded; but the rest had each of them but one reading and no more.

On Tuesday the 14th day of March, Four Bills had each of them one reading; of which the last being a Bill for the fortifying of the Borders towards Scotland was read secundâ vice.

On Wednesday the 15th day of March, Three Bills had each of them one reading apiece; of which the last being the Bill for the fortifying of the Borders towards Scotland was read tertiâ vice, and so concluded:Six Bills also were sent up to the Lords from the House of Commons; of which the last being a Bill touching Iron-Mills near unto the City of London, on the River of Thames, was read primâ vice.

On Thursday the 16th day of March, Two Bills had each of them one reading; whereof the last being a Bill touching deceit in dying of Cloths, was read tertia vice, and then sent down to the House of Commons.

On Friday the 17th day of March, Two Bills were brought up to the Lords from the House of Commons; whereof the first was for the fortifying of the Borders towards Scotland, with request that certain words might be left out for that they were superfluous.

It seemeth the Commons having formerly given the Lords distast about this Bill (as may appear on Wednesday the 8th day of March last past) did now send unto them about some amendments, which their Lordships had added to the said Bill, which before they would alter or once read (for the Bill it self had already passed both Houses) they gave them notice thereof on this instant Friday the 17th day of this instant March, desiring as may easily be collected) that some supefluous words might be put out of the said amendments: whereupon it seemeth the Upper House did yield to this respectful and seasonable request of the Commons (although it be not mentioned in the Original Journal-Book;) for the Bill being altered according to their desires, and sent down again to them this Forenoon, they there presently passed the said amendments, and returned the Bill concluded.

Two other Bills were also sent up to the Lords from the House of Commons; of which the first being a Bill for the repressing of seditious practices against the Queens Majesty, was read primâ & secundâ vice.

On Saturday the 18th day of March, the Bill for the increase of Mariners and maintenance of the Navigation returned from the House of Commons conclusa with certain amendments, and a Proviso added by them which was read primâ, secundâ & tertiâ vice, & communi omnium procerum assensu conclusa est.

Two other Bills also of no great moment; (whereof the last touching Iron-Mills about the City of London, &c. was read tertiâ vice & communi omnium procerum assensu conclusa, with certain amendments, and two Provisoes to be taken out, were sent down to the House of Commons.

Then was Entred the continuance of the Parliament in these words, viz. Dominus Cancellarius continuavit præsens Parliamentum usq; in horam secundam post meridiem.

At which hour the Lords meeting, the two former Bills last above-mentioned, which had been sent down to the House of Commons, were returned from them up to the Lords again concluded.

Not long after the Lords were set, her Majesty came to the Upper House, and the Knights, Citizens and Burgesses of the House of Commons having notice of her Majesty being there, with John Popham their Speaker repaired unto the said House, and as many as could conveniently being let in, the said Speaker standing at the Rail or Bar at the lower end of the Upper House, after his humble reverence made, and some expressions of his zealous affection towards her Majesty, and humble acknowledgment of her many gracious favours towards him, he then proceeded according to the usual course to desire her Majesties Assent to such wholsome Laws as in this Session of Parliament had passed either House; and withal did in the name of the House of Commons humbly offer unto her Majesty the Bill of one Subsidy and two Fifteens and Tenths, as a small testimonial of their unfeigned Loyalty, and thankful acknowledgment of the great happiness they enjoyed under her Majesties most gracious Government.

To which Speech the Lord Chancellor, having received instructions from her Majesty, Answered, that she did graciously accept the said Speakers many dutiful expressions, and did well allow of those wholsome Laws they had made, hoping that all such whose places it might concern, would be careful to put them in Execution: And lastly concluded with her Majesties thankful acceptance of the aforesaid Subsidy, Fifteenths and Tenths, granted unto her by the House of Commons.

Then were the Titles of all the publick and private Acts read in their due Order, and her Majesties Assent thereunto, and then the Bill of Subsidies, to which the Clerk of the Parliament standing up, did read the Queens Answer in manner and form following:

La Roigne remercie ses loiaulx subjects, & accept leur benevolence & ainsi le veult.

The Clerk of the Parliament having read the Queens acceptance and thanks for the Subsidy given as aforesaid, did then upon the reading of the Pardon pronounce in these French words following, the thanks of the Lords and Commons for the same.

Les Prelats Seigneurs & Communes en se present Parlement assembles an nom de touts vous autres Subjects remercient tres humblement vostre Majestie, & prient a dieu que ils vous donne sante bonne, vie & longue.

Nota, That here to the Subsidy Bill, because it is the meer gift of the Subject, the Queens Consent is not required for the passing of it, but as it is joined with her thankful acceptance; nor to the Bill of Pardon, because it is Originally her free gift, is other circumstance required than that the thankful acceptance thereof by the Lords and Commons be likewise expressed, it being but once read in either House, before it come thus at last to be expedited.

Then followed the Prorogation of the Parliament, which is Entred in the Original JournalBook in manner and form following.

Dominus Cancellarius ex mandato Dominæ Reginæ tunc præsentis, Prorogavit præsens Parliamentum usq; in vicesimum quartum diem Aprilis proximum futurum.

At which day this said Parliament was again Prorogued, and so was still continued by sixteen other Prorogations, each after other, till it was at last Dissolved upon the 19th day of April in the twenty fifth year of her Majesties Reign; the substance of all which Prorogations, with the manner of the Dissolution, doth next follow.

Nota, The word or term Adjourned is used for Prorogued throughout.

Vicesimo quarto die Aprilis, in quem diem Prorogatum fuerat hoc præsens Parliamentum, Sir Thomas Bromley Knight Lord Chancellor, the Bishop of London, and the Lord Cromwell, Commissioners, &c. did Adjourn the Parliament ad & in 29 diem Maii.

Vicesimo nono die Maii, in quem diem Prorogatum fuerat præsens Parliamentum, The Parliament was by the Lord Chancellor, the Earl of Darby, and the Bishop of Sarisbury, Commissioners, &c. Adjourned ad & in 12 diem Junii.

Duodecimo die Junii, in quem diem Prorogatum fuerat, &c. The Parliament was by the Lord Chancellor, Lord Treasurer, and five other Commissioners, Adjourned ad & in 28 diem jam instantis Junii.

Vicesimo octavo die Junii, Anno 23 Eliz. Reginæ, in quem diem Prorogatum fuerat hoc præsens Parliamentum, The Parliament was by the Lord Chancellor, the Earl of Arundell, and the Lord Dacres, Commissioners, &c. Adjourned ad & in 26 diem Julii prox. futurum.

Vicesimo sexto die Julii, Anno 23 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was by Sir Thomas Bromley Lord Chancellor, and three other Commissioners, Adjourned ad & in 12 diem Augusti, Anno 23 Eliz. Reginæ, prox. futurum.

Vicesimo primo die Augusti, Anno 23 Eliz. Reginæ, in quem diem Prorogatum fuerat, &c. The Parliament was by the Lord Wentworth, and the Bishop of London, Commissioners, &c. Prorogued ad & in quintum diem Octobris prox. fu-turum.

Quinto die Octobris, Anno 23 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was by the Lord Chancellor, and Edward Lord Stafford, Adjourned according to the Queens Majesties Commission in that behalf, &c. ad & in 18 diem Januarii prox. futurum.

Decimo octavo die Januarii, Anno 24 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was Adjourned by the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Treasurer, the Bishop of London, and the Lord Howard of Essingham, by vertue of the Queens Majesties Commission, ad & in duodecimum diem Februarii proximè futurum.

Duodecimo die Februarii, Anno 24 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was Adjourned by the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Treasurer, the Bishop of London, and the Lord Buckhurst, by Vertue of a Commission, ad & in 12 diem Martii prox. futurum. Upon which said 12th day of March in the same twenty fourth year of her Majesties Reign, the Lord Chancellor, and other Lords met, and Prorogued the Parliament unto a further day, which after five other Prorogations was at last Dissolved, all which follow in their several places, viz.

Duodecimo die Martii, Anno 24 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was by the Lord Chancellor, the Bishop of London, and Gregory Lord Dacres, by vertue of a Commission, Adjourned ad & in 26 diem Aprilis prox. futurum.

Vicesimo sexto die Aprilis, Anno 24 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was Adjourned by the LordChancellor, one Earl, one Bishop, and two Lords, by vertue of a Commission, ad & in 26 diem Maii prox. futurum.

Vicesimo sexto dic Maii, Anno 24 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was Adjourned by the Lord Chancellor, and Roger Lord Morley, by vertue of a Commission, &c. ad & in decimum diem Octobris prox. futur.

Decimo die Octobris, Anno 24 Eliz. Reginæ, the Parliament was in usual form Adjourned by the Bishop of London, and Gregory Lord Dacres, by vertue of a Commission, &c. ad & in 29 diem Novembris prox. futurum.

Vicesimo nono die Novembris, Anno 25 Eliz. Reginæ, The Parliament was in usual manner Adjourned by the Bishop of London, and Gregory Lord Dacres, by vertue of a Commission, &c. ad & in 24 diem Januarii prox. futurum. Nota the word Adjourned is used for Prorogued.

Vicesimo quarto die Januarii, Anno 25 Eliz. Reginæ; the Parliament was in usual form Adjourned by the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Treasurer, and the Bishop of London, by vertue of a Commission, &c. ad & in 19 diem Aprilis prox. futurum.

Memorand. quod hodierno die, decimo nono die Aprilis, Anno Regni 25 Elizabethæ Reginæ, in quem diem Prorogatum fuit hoc præsens Parliamentum, convenere Proceres, tam Spirituales quam Temporales, quorum nomina subscribuntur, Thomas Bromley Miles Cancellarius Angliæ, Willielmus Dominus Burleigh, Dominus Thesaurarius Angliæ, Philippus Comes Arundell, Franciscus Comes Bedford, Johannes Episcopus London, Edwardus Dominus Stafford, Fredericus Dominus Windesor, Henricus Dominus Hunsdon, Henricus Dominus Norris; Qui cum convenissent, Thomas Bromley Miles Dominus Cancellarius Angliæ literas Regias Commissarias Anthonio Mason Clerico Parliamenti publice legendas in manus tradidit, virtute quarum Dissolutum est hoc præsens Parliamentum.

Earum autem tenor hic erat.

ELizabetha Dei gratia Angliæ, Franciæ & Hiberniæ Regina, Fidei Defensatrix, &c. prædilecto & fideli Consiliario suo Thomæ Bromley Militi Domino Cancellario Angliæ, reverendissimóq; in Christo Patri Edwino Ebor. Archiepiscopo Angliæ Primati & Metropolitano; ac prædilecto & Consiliario suo Willielmo Domino Burleigh Domino Thesaurario Angliæ, ac etiam charissimis consanguineis & Consiliariis suis, Edwardo Comiti Lincoln. magno Admirallo suo Angliæ, Thomæ Comiti Sussex Domino Camerario suo; Necnon charissimis consanguineis suis Philippo Comiti Arundell, Henrico Comiti Northumbr. Henrico Comiti Darby, Willielmo Comiti Wigorn. ac etiam charissimis consanguineis & Consiliariis suis, Henrico Comiti Huntingdon, Domino Præsidenti Concilii sui in partibus Borealibus, Ambrosio Comiti Warwici Magistro Ordinationum suarum, Francisco Comiti Bedford; Charissimis consanguineisq; suis, Henrico Comiti Pembroke, Edwardo Comiti Hertford; ac Charissimo consanguineo & Consiliario suo Roberto Comiti Leicestr. Magistro Equorum suorum, ac etiam charissimo consanguinco suo Anthonio Vicecomiti Mountague; necnon reverendis in Christo Patribus Johanni Episcopo London. Johanni Episcopo Sarisburien. Johanni Episcopo Roffen. ac etiam prædilectis & fidelibus suis Willielmo Domino Cobham, Domino Gardiano Quinq; Portuum suorum, Peregrino Domino Willoughby, Gregorio Domino Dacre, Edwardo Domino Stafford, Johanni Domino Lumley, Frederico Domino Windesor, Thomæ Domino Wentworth, Lodovico Domino Mordant, Henrico Domino Cromwell, Carolo Domino Howard de Effingham, Rogero Domino North, prædilecto & fideli Consiliario suo Henrico Domino de Hunsdon, Domino Gardiano Marchiarum Orientalium versus Scotiam; ac prædilectis & fidelibus suis Thomæ Domino Buckhurst, Henrico Domino Compton, Henrico Domino Cheyney de Tuddington, & Henrico Domino de Norris de Ricott, salutem. Cum nuper pro quibusdam arduis & urgentibus negotiis, Nos statum & Defensionent Regni nostri Angliæ ac Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ concernentibus, præsens hoc Parliamentum nostrum apud Civitatem nostram Westmonasterii octavo die Maii, Anno regni nostri 14° inchoari & teneri ordinaverimus; à quo die idem Parliamentum nostrum tunc & ibidem tentum & continuatum fuerat usq; tricesimum diem Junii tunc prox. sequentem; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum post diversas Prorogationes, usq; octavum diem Februarii, Anno regni nostri 18° Prorogatum fuerat; ac ibidem tunc tentum & continuatum fuerat usq; 15 diem Martii tunc prox. sequentem; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum post diversas Prorogationes, usq; ad & in 16 diem Januarii, Anno Regni nostri vicesimo tertio, Prorogatum fuerat; ac ibidem tunc tentum & continuatum fuerat usq; 18 diem Martii tunc prox. sequentem; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 24 diem Aprilis tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die Parliamentum nostrum ad & in 29 diem Maii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 12 diem Junii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 28 diem ejusdem Mensis Junii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 26 diem Julii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 21 diem Augusti tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in quintum diem Octobris tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 23 diem Novembris tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in quintum diem Decembris tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 18 diem Januarii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 12 diem Februarii tunc prox. sequentem Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 12 diem Martii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 26 diem Aprilis tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 26 diem Maii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in decimum diem Octobris tunc prox. sequentem Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 29 diem Novembris tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat; Eodemq; die idem Parliamentum nostrum usq; ad & in 24 diem Januarii tunc prox. sequentem, Prorogatum fuerat: Nec non idem Parliamentum nostrum à prædicto 24 die Januarii usq; ad & in instantem 19 diem Aprilis Prorogatum fuerat ibidem tenend. & prosequend. Sciatis tamen certis urgentibus causis & considerationibus nos specialiter moventibus, de fidelitate igitur, prudentia & circumspectione vestris plurimum confidentes, de avisamento & assensu Concilii nostri, assignavimus vos Commissionarios nostros, dantes vobis triginta & quatuor, triginta & tribus, triginta & duobus, triginta & uni, triginta, & novem viginti, & octo viginti, & septem viginti, & sex viginti, & quinq; viginti, & quatuor viginti, & tribus viginti, & duobus viginti, & uni viginti, viginti, novemdecim, octodecim, septemdecim, sexdecim, quindecim, quatuordecim, tredecim, duodecim, undecim, decem, novem, octo, septem, sex, quinq; quatuor vel tribus vestrum, tenore Præsentium, plenam potestatem & authoritatem hoc instante die Veneris, ad præsens Parliamentum nostrum nomine nostro plenarie dissolvendum; Et ideo vobis mandamus, quod circa præmissa diligenter intendatis, ac ea in forma prædicta effectualiter expleatis: Damus autem universis & singulis Archiepiseopis, Marchionibus, Comitibus, Vicecomitibus, Episcopis, Baronibus, Militibus, Civibus & Burgensibus, ac omnibus aliis quorum interest ad dictum Parliamentum nostrum conventuris, tenore Præsentium, firmiter in mandatis, quod vobis in præmissis faciend. agend. & exequend. pareant, obediant, & intendant, prout decet. In cujus rei testimonium has Literas nostras fieri fecimus Patentes. Teste me ipsa apud Westmonasterium decimo nono die Aprilis, Anno Regni nostri vicesimo quinto.

Per ispam Reginam, &c.